League of Women Voters of Fairfax

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging informed and active participation in government. It influences public policy through education and advocacy.

MISSION STATEMENT: Empowering Voters. Defending Democracy.

VISION STATEMENT: We envision a democracy where every person has the desire, the right, the knowledge and the confidence to participate.

VALUE STATEMENT: We believe in the power of women to create a more perfect democracy.

Virginia21

Virginia21 empowers college students and young Virginians to be engaged citizens and advocates for issues important to them and Virginia’s future. Founded and led by young people, VA21 envisions a well-educated, prosperous, and civically-engaged Virginia.

Virginia21’s premier student leadership development program attracts community-minded young people who are ready to begin the rewarding process of defining their identities as leaders. Virginia21 provides quality programming featuring elected officials, business leaders, citizen advocates, as well as access to one of Virginia’s largest nonpartisan political networks.

Our work ensures that the collective voice of our young people is heard in our local communities, campuses, the state capitol, and beyond.

Virginia Council for the Social Studies

Mission:  The Virginia Council for the Social Studies engages and supports Virginia educators in advocating and strengthening social studies.

The goals of the Virginia Council for the Social Studies are to foster professional growth, develop communication among stakeholders in the social studies community, and to promote the teaching of social studies in Virginia, the United States, and the international sphere. The Virginia Council of the Social Studies is an affiliate with the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

Websitevcss.org
Email: Contact Form

OneVirginia2021

OneVirginia2021 is a leader in advocating for fair redistricting in the Commonwealth of Virginia. They are organizing through local, regional, and statewide efforts and rely on residents for support and participation.

OneVirginia2021 partners with individuals and organizations to raise awareness, provide information, and work with legislators to implement meaningful reformEvery decade, with recent results of the census in hand, legislative districts are drawn. Redrawing political lines is a powerful tool that determines who wins an election, controls the legislature, and ultimately which laws pass.

In Virginia, legislators create the criteria and draw their own districts. This is a manipulative process known as gerrymandering, and we must create a system that more fairly draws political lines.

Virginia Public Access Project

The nonprofit Virginia Public Access Project connects Virginians to nonpartisan information about Virginia politics in easily understood ways.

VPAP was founded in 1997 on one simple premise: Because Virginia’s ethics laws rely on disclosure, it is imperative that citizens have easy access to public documents related to money in politics.

VPAP is fiercely nonpartisan. It has no dog in any political fight. Its singular focus is to give Virginians the information they need to make informed decisions.

VPAP’s approach is grounded in facts taken directly from public documents such as campaign finance reports, election returns, conflicts disclosures and lobbyist registrations. VPAP breaks down the silos of government data and weaves in other information such as newspaper articles.

This integrated approach provides the public with unique and valuable insights on politicians and issues that impact their families and communities.

VPAP’s excellence and nonpartisan approach have won awards from numerous organizations, including the Virginia Coalition for Open Government, the Wilder School of Public Policy at VCU and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Virginia Mercury

The Virginia Mercury is an independent, nonprofit online news organization covering state government and policy. From the push to remove Confederate statues to big shifts in health care and energy policy, the Old Dominion is changing. The Mercury aims to bring a fresh perspective to coverage of the state’s biggest issues.

The news outlet, which also features original and guest commentary on a range of topics, is staffed full-time by five veteran Virginia newspaper journalists.

Current top news categories:  Criminal Justice + Policing, Energy + Environment, Government + Politics, Education, General Assembly 2020, and Election 2020.

Blog: Quick hits on the news of the day, odds and ends and commentary. The Bulletin | Blog Link

Mercury Newsletter:  Fair and tough reporting on the politics and policy decisions that affect all Virginians is more important than ever. Sign up for daily delivery of independent, nonpartisan coverage of state government, health care, the environment, criminal justice and more. subscribe

Donate:  Assist in the Virginia Mercury’s mission of taking a fresh look at policy, politics and governance in the Old Dominion with a tax-deductible donation to support our reporting on the issues that matter to millions of Virginians. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law. Go here to donate.

League of Women Voters of Virginia 1League of Women Voters of Fairfax

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging informed and active participation in government. It influences public policy through education and advocacy.

MISSION STATEMENT: Empowering Voters. Defending Democracy.

VISION STATEMENT: We envision a democracy where every person has the desire, the right, the knowledge and the confidence to participate.

VALUE STATEMENT: We believe in the power of women to create a more perfect democracy.

Summary

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging informed and active participation in government. It influences public policy through education and advocacy.

MISSION STATEMENT: Empowering Voters. Defending Democracy.

VISION STATEMENT: We envision a democracy where every person has the desire, the right, the knowledge and the confidence to participate.

VALUE STATEMENT: We believe in the power of women to create a more perfect democracy.

About

Source: Wikipedia

Overview

The League of Women Voters (LWV) is an American civic organization that was formed to help women take a larger role in public affairs after they won the right to vote. It was founded in 1920 to support the new women suffrage rights and was a merger of National Council of Women Voters, founded by Emma Smith DeVoe, and National American Woman Suffrage Association, led by Carrie Chapman Catt, approximately six months before the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution gave women the right to vote. The League of Women Voters began as a “mighty political experiment” aimed to help newly enfranchised women exercise their responsibilities as voters. Originally, only women could join the league; but in 1973 the charter was modified to include men. LWV operates at the local, state, and national level, with over 1,000 local and 50 state leagues, and one territory league in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The League of Women Voters is officially nonpartisan–it neither supports nor opposes candidates or parties. It does, however, support a variety of progressive public policy positions, including campaign finance reform, universal health care, abortion rights, climate change action and environmental regulation, and gun control.

one territory league in the U.S. Virgin Islands.[4]

The League of Women Voters is officially nonpartisan–it neither supports nor opposes candidates or parties. It does, however, support a variety of progressive public policy positions, including campaign finance reformuniversal health careabortion rightsclimate change action and environmental regulation, and gun control.[4][5]

Activities

The LWV sponsored the United States presidential election debates in 1976, 1980 and 1984. On October 2, 1988, the LWV’s 14 trustees voted unanimously to pull out of the debates, and on October 3 they issued a press release condemning the demands of the major candidates’ campaigns. LWV President Nancy Neuman said that the debate format would “perpetrate a fraud on the American voter” and that the organization did not intend to “become an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public.”

In 2012, LWV created National Voter Registration Day, a day when volunteers work to register voters and increase participation.

The League sponsors voter’s guides including Smart Voter and Voter’s Edge, which was launched in collaboration with MapLight.

Policy views

The League lobbied for the establishment of the United Nations, and later became one of the first groups to receive status as a nongovernmental organization with the U.N.

The League has opposed voter ID laws and supported efforts at campaign finance reform in the United States. LWV opposed the decision in Citizens United v. FEC. The League supports increased regulation of political spending.

The League pushed for adoption of the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which requires states to offer voter registration at all driver’s license agencies, at social service agencies, and through the mail.

The League endorsed passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, which banned soft money in federal elections and made other reforms in campaign finance laws.]

LWV supports the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Kyoto Protocol. LWV opposes the proposed Keystone Pipeline project.

In January 2013, the League of Women Voters in Hawaii urged President Obama to take action on climate change under his existing authority, the Clean Air Act of 1990, which the League supported.

The League supports the abolition of the death penalty.

LWV supports universal health care and endorses both Medicaid expansion and the Affordable Care Act.

The League supports a general income tax increase to finance national health care reform for the inclusion of reproductive health care, including abortion, in any health benefits package. The League supports abortion rights and strongly opposed the passage of the Partial-Birth Abortion Act.

The League actively opposed welfare reform legislation proposed in the 104th Congress.

The League opposes school vouchers. In 1999, LWV challenged a Florida law that allowed students who were attending failing public schools to use school vouchers to attend other schools.

The League supports a system for illegal immigrants already in the United States to earn full citizenship. It lobbied for passage of the DREAM Act.

The League advocates gun control policies including regulating firearms and supporting licensing procedures for gun ownership by private citizens to include a waiting period for background checks, personal identity verification, gun safety education and annual license renewal.

Governance

A national board of directors consisting of four officers, eight elected directors, and not more than eight board-appointed directors, most of whom reside in the Metro Washington D.C. area, govern the League subject to the Bylaws of the League of Women Voters of the United States. The national board is elected at the national convention and sets position policy.

Local Leagues and state Leagues are organized in order to promote the purposes of the League and to take action on local and state governmental matters. These Leagues (chapters) have their own directors and officers. The national board may withdraw recognition from any state or local League for failure to fulfill recognition requirements.

Notable members

Contact

Email: Office

Locations

VA office
1011 E. Main Street, Suite 214A
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: (804) 447-8494

Web

Website, Vote 411

Videos

2018 LWV Convention: Creating a More Perfect Democracy

Published on December 29, 2018
By: LeagueofWomenVoters

LWV Fairfax City Candidate Forum

By: cityoffairfaxva

Virginia Officers & Board Members

PresidentSue Lewispresident@lwv-va.org
First Vice PresidentLinda Garvelinkfirstvp@lwv-va.org
Second Vice PresidentLynn Johnstonsecondvp@lwv-va.org
SecretaryMartha Rollinssecretary@lwv-va.org
TreasurerPat Hursttreasurer@lwv-va.org
ArrangementsLynn Johnstonevents@lwv-va.org
CommunicationsCarol Lindstromcommunications@lwv-va.org
Action CoordinatorDeb Wakeactioncoordinator@lwv-va.org
Legislative CoordinatorValarie Fillgrovelegcoordinator@lwv-va.org
Voter EditorCarol Lindstromvotereditor@lwv-va.org
Voter ProtectionVacant – if you are a member who is interested in this position, please contact the nominating committee (email below)voteprotect@lwv-va.org
Voter ServicesMaggi Lucavoterservices@lwv-va.org
MembershipAndrianne Konstasmembership@lwv-va.org
Public RelationsAdarsh Trehanpublicrelations@lwv-va.org
Facebook CoordinatorCarolyn Caywoodfacebookcoord@lwv-va.org
Twitter CoordinatorCarol Lindstromtwittercoord@lwv-va.org
Program DirectorAnne Smithprograms@lwv-va.org
Administrative AssistantLaura Grahamadminassist@lwv-va.org
Nominating CommitteeKathy Matusiaknominating@lwv-va.org

National League of Voters

Websitelwv.org
Address:  1730 M Street NW, Suite 1000,
Washington, DC 20036-4508
Phone: 202-429-1965

Since 1920 we have been an activist, grassroots organization whose leaders believed that voters should play a critical role in democracy.

The League of Women Voters was founded by Carrie Chapman Catt in 1920 during the convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The convention was held just six months before the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote after a 72-year struggle.

The League began as a “mighty political experiment” designed to help 20 million women carry out their new responsibilities as voters. It encouraged them to use their new power to participate in shaping public policy. From the beginning, the League has been an activist, grassroots organization whose leaders believed that citizens should play a critical role in advocacy. It was then, and is now, a nonpartisan organization. League founders believed that maintaining a nonpartisan stance would protect the fledgling organization from becoming mired in the party politics of the day. However, League members were encouraged to be political themselves, by educating citizens about, and lobbying for, government and social reform legislation.

This holds true today. The League is proud to be nonpartisan, neither supporting nor opposing candidates or political parties at any level of government, but always working on vital issues of concern to members and the public. The League has a long, rich history, that continues with each passing year.

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Virginia21Virginia21

Virginia21 empowers college students and young Virginians to be engaged citizens and advocates for issues important to them and Virginia’s future. Founded and led by young people, VA21 envisions a well-educated, prosperous, and civically-engaged Virginia.

Virginia21’s premier student leadership development program attracts community-minded young people who are ready to begin the rewarding process of defining their identities as leaders. Virginia21 provides quality programming featuring elected officials, business leaders, citizen advocates, as well as access to one of Virginia’s largest nonpartisan political networks.

Our work ensures that the collective voice of our young people is heard in our local communities, campuses, the state capitol, and beyond.

Summary

Virginia21 empowers college students and young Virginians to be engaged citizens and advocates for issues important to them and Virginia’s future. Founded and led by young people, VA21 envisions a well-educated, prosperous, and civically-engaged Virginia.

Virginia21’s premier student leadership development program attracts community-minded young people who are ready to begin the rewarding process of defining their identities as leaders. Virginia21 provides quality programming featuring elected officials, business leaders, citizen advocates, as well as access to one of Virginia’s largest nonpartisan political networks.

Our work ensures that the collective voice of our young people is heard in our local communities, campuses, the state capitol, and beyond.

About

Source: Strategic Plan FY20-FY25

Virginia21 was founded in 2002 at the College of William & Mary as a student organization. Over the years its tax status has evolved, but the spirit of the mission has remained largely the same: to engage Virginia’s young adults in state and local politics. For the first decade of existence, Virginia21 largely focused on higher education issues including college affordability, textbook reform, and campus safety. At all times, the organization has focused on young person civic engagement including voter registration, voting access, and leadership development. In recent years, Virginia21 has recognized the need to represent all young adults and as such began expanding programming to more broadly address the needs of young people aged 18-35.

Virginia21 Action, a 501(c)4 affiliate to Virginia21, will work closely with Virginia21 to help implement and advocate for these policies. Based on policies researched and developed by Virginia21, advocacy recommendations will be made to Virginia21 Action. Additionally, Virginia21 and Virginia21 Action will share certain resources and staff time within the terms of the shared services agreement between the two organizations.

In FY18-19, Virginia21 collected feedback via survey response from current students, junior board members, and the Board of Directors. In addition to this, the Board of Directors and staff met several times for brainstorming and planning sessions. The following plan is the result of those efforts. Through the identification of these goals and the implementation plan below, Virginia21 will become the paramount organization representing young adults across the Commonwealth with a clear vision for success.

Twitter

Web

Website, Twitter, Facebook

Current Position

Virginia21 currently serves young Virginians aged 18-35. According to US Census Data, this age group makes up about 33% of Virginia’s population.1 Virginia21’s primary program components are:

1. Student Program
2. Policy Efforts
3. Professional Development Programming

The organization currently has 16 active chapters, of which 11 are public, four are private, and one is a community college. Exact numbers of student members are not currently known. These chapters organize and implement campus-wide programming to promote a culture of civic engagement. These students also participate in a year-round leadership development program provided by the organization that includes skill building in advocacy, communications, organizing, and networking. Attendance at leadership programs has been inconsistent over the years due to internal and external factors including an increase in hyper-partisanship following the 2016 election, increased civic engagement groups on campuses, and staffing changes.

Strategic Plan

Source: Strategic Plan FY20-FY25

Mission
Virginia21 empowers college students and young Virginians to be engaged citizens and advocates for issues important to them and Virginia’s future.

Vision
Virginia21 envisions a well-educated, prosperous, and civically-engaged Virginia.

Strategy
Virginia21 will make young adult Virginians the most civically engaged and politically influential age demographic in the Commonwealth through targeted leadership development and civic engagement programming. An educated and empowered young population will result in positive policy outcomes in the areas of higher education and workforce development, shared economic prosperity, and good government. It will make Virginia21 a stronger, more sustainable organization that will continue working towards the fulfillment of our mission and realization of our vision long into the future. Virginia21 will leverage its position as Virginia’s only statewide young voter advocacy organization to fully realize its potential to impact the Commonwealth.

Lines of Effort

For the purposes of this plan, all the major work that Virginia21 does has been divided into major “lines of effort.” Each goal will be accomplished through one or more of these lines of effort.

— Administrative
Includes all major administrative duties of the organization to ensure that Virginia21 is fiscally sound and legally compliant at all times, including bookkeeping/accounting, budgeting, payroll, bills, database management, and staffing.

— Leadership and Professional Development
Includes all work to develop young Virginians into future leaders and preparing them for successful lives and careers.

— Policy
Includes all the major policy work of Virginia21, such as policy research and development, policy education for organizational constituents, policy communications, and strategic partnerships with policy allies.

— Organizing and Advocacy
Includes student engagement, young professional engagement, mobilization of both groups, and other field work to civically engage young Virginians and empower them to advocate for Virginia21’s policy agenda.

— Development
Includes managing the financial health and proper board function of Virginia21 including all fundraising, development communications, board management, and organizational growth.

Civic Engagement

Virginia21 will strive to create a broad culture of civic engagement, with a focus on the state and local level, among young Virginians. The organization will work across the entire spectrum of R.E.A.L. civic engagement: voter Registration, Education, Activation, and Legislation.

Goal 1:

Virginia21 will develop policies that increase voting access and ensure that there are no undue burdens to registering to vote and casting a ballot and policies that support a culture of civic education and engagement at Virginia’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. Virginia21 will encourage Virginia21 Action to advocate for such policies.

▸ Policy: policy development through research, an analysis of the current political atmosphere, and seeking strategic partners with shared policy goals
▸ Organizing and Advocacy: educate young Virginians about this policy area and amass them to effectively advocate for the policies that we propose
▸ Leadership and Professional Development: develop effective young organizers and advocates for our cause .

The lynchpin of Virginia21’s programming, this process will be ongoing. Success will be defined through the passage of every law that eases the voting process from registration to ballot casting, as well as measurable increases in civic engagement from young Virginians through voter registration, engagement with informational material in the leadup to elections, and events held on college campuses and other locations throughout the state meant to foster civic engagement.

Goal 2

Through its leadership, Virginia21 will see that Virginia has the highest participation rates in the country among young people in every election.
KEY AREAS OF FOCUS
▸ Policy: provide young Virginians with the policy resources to be informed voters

▸ Organizing and Advocacy: field efforts on campuses and elsewhere around the state to disseminate informational resources and encourage/facilitate voter registration and participation
▸ Leadership and Professional Development: develop effective campus and community leaders and organizers to spearhead our civic engagement efforts

Success will be defined by achieving the highest turnout rates in America as measured by exit polling, precinct data, and other available surveys. Virginia21 expects to complete this goal within three to five years

Goal 3

Virginia21 will provide ample opportunities for young people to interact with and hear directly from elected officials, candidates for office, and other government leaders.

▸ Policy: cultivate relationships with important political leaders
▸ Organizing and Advocacy: organize forums, panels, and other events on campuses and in communities around Virginia, with organizers ensuring their peers are made aware and given opportunities to attend
▸ Leadership and Professional Development: give young leaders the opportunity to interact with and learn from important political leaders to grow their own leadership skills As an existing piece of Virginia21’s programming, work on this goal has begun and will be ongoing indefinitely.

Success will be considered on an annual basis and will be considered achieved when each student chapter is either hosting or participating in at least one event with officials present per year.

Goal 4

Virginia21 will provide young Virginians with clear and easily accessible information on candidates, ballot initiatives, issues, and whatever else is needed to ensure that they are well-informed voters.

▸ Policy: provide young Virginians with the resources to be informed voters, seek strategic partnerships to ensure that all materials provided by the organization are information forward, nonpartisan, and thorough
▸ Organizing and Advocacy: field efforts on campuses and around the state to disseminate informational resources ▸ Leadership and Professional Development: develop effective campus leaders and organizers to spearhead our civic engagement efforts This goal will be ongoing, with an annual focus each election season.

Virginia21 will consider this goal achieved based on reach and opportunity, ensuring that young people across Virginia all at least have reasonable access to voter information.

 

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Virginia Council for the Social StudiesVirginia Council for the Social Studies

Mission:  The Virginia Council for the Social Studies engages and supports Virginia educators in advocating and strengthening social studies.

The goals of the Virginia Council for the Social Studies are to foster professional growth, develop communication among stakeholders in the social studies community, and to promote the teaching of social studies in Virginia, the United States, and the international sphere. The Virginia Council of the Social Studies is an affiliate with the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

Websitevcss.org
Email: Contact Form

Summary

The goals of the Virginia Council for the Social Studies are to foster professional growth, develop communication among stakeholders in the social studies community, and to promote the teaching of social studies in Virginia, the United States, and the international sphere. The Virginia Council of the Social Studies is an affiliate with the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

Websitevcss.org
Email: Contact Form

Leadership

President

Katie Blomquist
kjblomquist@fcps.edu

Vice President:
Bill O’Sick
wosick@mail.dps.k12.va.us

Treasurer & Membership Chair:
Matthew Atkinson
VCSSMEMB@gmail.com

Secretary
Amy Tomasulo
amy.tomasulo@vbschools.com

Legislative Liaison, Southside, and New River Valley:
Bill O’Sick
wosick@mail.dps.k12.va.us

Northern Virginia Representatives:
Tanya Siwik
Tanya.Siwik@fcps.edu

Kris Petersen
​kdpeterson@fcps.edu

Central Virginia Representatives:
Sarah McDermott (Independent Council)
sarahmcdermott@trinityes.org

Matt Atkinson
msatkinson@henrico.k12.va.us

Tidewater Representatives:
India Meissel
indiameissel@spsk12.net

Meridith Breen
​mbreen@ycsd.york.va.us
Western Virginia Representatives:
Allen Ruliffson

aruliffson@rockingham.k12.va.us

Past President:

Wesley Hedgepeth

Government and Public Relations:
Celina Pierrottet
crpierrottet@gmail.com

​Jennifer Hitchcock
​jahitchcock@fcps.edu

Michael Hasley
mjhasley@henrico.k12.va.us

Blog

From blog website

Status of Social Studies SOLS

5/30/2018

Currently, as this is being posted, the Virginia General Assembly hasn’t passed a budget which means a final decision on SOLs for secondary Social Studies courses hasn’t been made, yet.

Before the GA ended this year, the final bill (SB 969) impacting SOL tests and authentic assessments would allow for EOC tests to be based off an authentic assessment. Originally, SB 969 specifically prohibited performance assessments, but then at the last minute, it was amended to allow for them.

But then the session ended without a budget.  When the Senate came back in the last few weeks, the budget they were debating referred back to the original wording SB 969.

So in conjunction with the Virginia Social Studies Leaders Consortium, we submitted the following letters to Virginia Senators in support of the amended SB 969 which allows for performance assessments:

As members of the Virginia Social Studies Leaders Consortium (VSSLC) and the Virginia Council on the Social Studies (VCSS), we urge you to amend budget item 130#1s as reflected below.  The proposed language is essentially the current language adopted by the House Education Committee (SB 969) as proposed by the patron, Senator Newman.  It was supported by the Board of Education, the Virginia Association of School Superintendents (VASS), and a number of education stakeholders.   The current language of budget item 130#1s reflects the original language in SB969 prohibiting performance assessments rather than the language ultimately agreed to by the patron and all interested parties.

As a result of the Revised Standards of Accreditation, many school divisions across Virginia are under the impression that verified credit may be earned in the coming school year through locally developed, authentic performance assessments. Local budgets, time, and expertise are currently invested in the development of these assessments and the related professional learning for teachers. While the VSSLC accepts that a state-developed assessment may be a necessary compromise, it is worth noting that many public school teachers and leaders will be both surprised and disappointed by legislation that underestimates the benefits of local authentic performance assessments.

The proposed amendment below supports statewide accountability for social studies education at the high school level.  However, it does so by supporting a more balanced approach which includes performance assessments and doesn’t simply emphasize memorization at the expense of understanding and application.  The shift towards utilizing performance assessments compels school divisions  to more fully measure what students know, as well as what they can do with this information.  We are confident that this change in assessment will improve social studies instruction, deepen student understanding, and sharpen critical thinking skills.

Below is the rest of the letter, which won’t paste into this post nicely, so it’s an image.

Picture

We will post more information as soon as we know more.

52nd VCSSE State Conference

Our next state conference will be held at the Hotel Roanoke on November 2 and 3, 2018.
Planning has begun! If you’re interested in helping us plan, please email us.

The Annual Conference offers sessions for every K-12 teacher – from those beginning their
professional careers to seasoned veterans.

Our agenda is packed with new, exciting, and informative presentations. In order to
“Harmonize the Human Experience”

There will be content specialists offering in-depth sessions in geography, citizenship, history and economics.

This broad theme will explore the following questions:

  • How can we weave the humanities and arts into our social studies instruction?
  • How do we guide students to see history through multiple perspectives?
  • How do we support and enrich learners at all levels with unique strengths and needs?
  • How are we integrating social studies into other content areas?
  • How do we teach both skills and content in a harmonious way?

​Your registration includes access to all general workshop sessions, the exhibition hall and vendor fair, continental breakfast Friday and Saturday, and lunch on Friday. Conference registration also includes membership in the Virginia Council for the Social Studies.”

Pre-service teachers, student teachers, and teachers attending this conference for the first time may attend the conference for a reduced fee. See the fees page for information about our group discount!

Click here to register now!

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OneVirginia2021OneVirginia2021

OneVirginia2021 is a leader in advocating for fair redistricting in the Commonwealth of Virginia. They are organizing through local, regional, and statewide efforts and rely on residents for support and participation.

OneVirginia2021 partners with individuals and organizations to raise awareness, provide information, and work with legislators to implement meaningful reformEvery decade, with recent results of the census in hand, legislative districts are drawn. Redrawing political lines is a powerful tool that determines who wins an election, controls the legislature, and ultimately which laws pass.

In Virginia, legislators create the criteria and draw their own districts. This is a manipulative process known as gerrymandering, and we must create a system that more fairly draws political lines.

Summary

OneVirginia2021 partners with individuals and organizations to raise awareness, provide information, and work with legislators to implement meaningful reformEvery decade, with recent results of the census in hand, legislative districts are drawn. Redrawing political lines is a powerful tool that determines who wins an election, controls the legislature, and ultimately which laws pass.

In Virginia, legislators create the criteria and draw their own districts. This is a manipulative process known as gerrymandering, and we must create a system that more fairly draws political lines.

Information

Website:  onevirginia2021.org   Facebook   Twitter    Tumblr

Phone: 804-240-9933
Email: director@onevirginia2021.org
Address: 409 E Main Street, Suite 203
Richmond, VA 23219

The Problem

From OneVirginia website

  • IN VIRGINIA, AUTHORITY FOR REDISTRICTING RESTS WITH THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, WHOSE LEADERS HAVE PUT PARTY AND INCUMBENT ADVANTAGE BEFORE CONSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPACTNESS AND CONTIGUITY.
  • LEGISLATORS HAVE DRAWN DISTRICT LINES TO FAVOR PARTISAN INTEREST SINCE THE EARLY DAYS OF THE REPUBLIC, BUT POWERFUL COMPUTERIZED MAPPING TOOLS AND DETAILED DEMOGRAPHIC DATA HAVE TURNED THE MAPMAKING INTO A WEAPON.
  • THE OVERWHELMING MAJORITY OF ELECTIONS ARE FOREGONE CONCLUSIONS. THE OUTCOMES ARE RIGGED TO FAVOR INCUMBENTS. YOU HAVE A VOTE — BUT NOT A VOICE.

The Solution

  • TRANSFER MAP-DRAWING FROM THE LEGISLATURE TO AN INDEPENDENT REDISTRICTING COMMISSION USING A TRANSPARENT PROCESS AND CLEAR RULES THAT PROTECT COMMUNITIES.
  • PROHIBIT MAP-DRAWING WITH THE INTENT OF FAVORING A PARTY OR INDIVIDUAL.
  • SPECIFY OTHER CRITERIA: COMPACTNESS; CONTIGUITY; AND RESPECT FOR COUNTY, TOWN, AND OTHER POLITICAL BOUNDARIES AND FOR COMMUNITIES OF INTEREST.
  • TO APPLY REFORMS TO THE 2021 REDISTRICTING THAT WILL FOLLOW THE 2020 CENSUS, THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY MUST PASS AN AMENDMENT IN ITS 2019 AND 2020 SESSIONS, AND VOTERS MUST APPROVE IT IN NOVEMBER 2020.

The Work

  • OUR GOAL IS TO EDUCATE VIRGINIANS ON THE REDISTRICTING PROCESS, WHAT GERRYMANDERING DOES TO OUR COMMUNITIES, AND HOW WE CAN MAKE REASONABLE, TANGIBLE REFORMS TO IMPROVE REPRESENTATION.
  • WE EMPOWER PEOPLE TO CONTACT THEIR STATE REPRESENTATIVES WITH A PETITION FOR REFORM.  WE HAVE AN INTERNAL GOAL OF ACHIEVING 1,000 PETITION SIGNERS PER HOUSE OF DELEGATE DISTRICT.
    • AS OF APRIL 2018, WE HAVE OVER 72,000 SIGNATURES AROUND VIRGINIA.
  • WE SUPPORT LITIGATION EFFORTS ON BOTH RACIAL AND POLITICAL GERRYMANDERING CASES IN VIRGINIA, WISCONSIN, MARYLAND, AND NORTH CAROLINA.

Documentary

 GerryRIGGED: Turning Democracy On Its Head
Published Feb. 15, 2017 by OneVirginia2021

This video examines the historical context and consequences of gerrymandering through a multi-partisan lens that includes Republicans, Democrats, Independents, Libertarians and the Tea Party. The documentary explores the impact on communities and individual lives by including testimonials from strategists, political consultants, and map drawers, and by incorporating interviews with the men and women in politics who have the most to win – and perhaps lose – through reform.

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Virginia Public Access Project 3Virginia Public Access Project

The nonprofit Virginia Public Access Project connects Virginians to nonpartisan information about Virginia politics in easily understood ways.

VPAP was founded in 1997 on one simple premise: Because Virginia’s ethics laws rely on disclosure, it is imperative that citizens have easy access to public documents related to money in politics.

VPAP is fiercely nonpartisan. It has no dog in any political fight. Its singular focus is to give Virginians the information they need to make informed decisions.

VPAP’s approach is grounded in facts taken directly from public documents such as campaign finance reports, election returns, conflicts disclosures and lobbyist registrations. VPAP breaks down the silos of government data and weaves in other information such as newspaper articles.

This integrated approach provides the public with unique and valuable insights on politicians and issues that impact their families and communities.

VPAP’s excellence and nonpartisan approach have won awards from numerous organizations, including the Virginia Coalition for Open Government, the Wilder School of Public Policy at VCU and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Summary

The nonprofit Virginia Public Access Project connects Virginians to nonpartisan information about Virginia politics in easily understood ways.

VPAP was founded in 1997 on one simple premise: Because Virginia’s ethics laws rely on disclosure, it is imperative that citizens have easy access to public documents related to money in politics.

VPAP is fiercely nonpartisan. It has no dog in any political fight. Its singular focus is to give Virginians the information they need to make informed decisions.

VPAP’s approach is grounded in facts taken directly from public documents such as campaign finance reports, election returns, conflicts disclosures and lobbyist registrations. VPAP breaks down the silos of government data and weaves in other information such as newspaper articles.

This integrated approach provides the public with unique and valuable insights on politicians and issues that impact their families and communities.

VPAP’s excellence and nonpartisan approach have won awards from numerous organizations, including the Virginia Coalition for Open Government, the Wilder School of Public Policy at VCU and the Society of Professional Journalists.

About

The Virginia Public Access Project grew out of a joint effort by the state’s five largest newspapers to track campaign contributions.

The effort was vital because Virginia is one of a handful of states with no contribution limits. Anything goes – as long as candidates identify donors who give more than $100. The system was built upon the premise that by making donor information public, candidates will police themselves to avoid the perception that they are beholden to one particular donor or to donors in general. The flaw, of course, was the public had no meaningful access to the information contained in disclosure reports, which at the time were crammed in file cabinets at the State Board of Elections.

In 1997, David Poole took a leave of absence from his job as a political reporter for The Roanoke Times to build a campaign finance database for the newspapers. Poole envisioned transforming the database into a public resource that would provide meaningful public access. Poole recruited a Board of Directors who shared his vision, and VPAP was incorporated in April 1997.

VPAP transformed campaign finance disclosure in Virginia. Over the years, VPAP has expanded its mission to connect Virginians with nonpartisan information about politics.

Strategic Plan

Twitter

Contact

Locations

Office
1209 E. Cary Street, Suite 200 Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: 804.353.4300
Fax:  804.331.0103

Web

Website, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Videos

Voter participation in Virginia

By: VPAP Updates

What if the region’s were resized based on population?

Published on July 31, 2017
By: VPAP Updates

Election information

Source: Webpage

Money in VA Politics

Source: Webpage

Engage in Your Democracy 1

General Assembly

Source: Webpage

VPAP Issues

Lobbying

Source: Webpage

Lobbying in Virginia
Those who are paid more than $500 a year to influence legislative or executive actions, including procurement, are required to register annually with the state. Exceptions

Registrations expire each year on April 30. Each year, lobbyists fill out forms intended to disclose the matters they sought to influence, how much they were paid and how much they spent on things such as entertainment. Details

Who Hires Lobbyists?
Some 1,178 clients retained lobbyists in 2019-20.

A Typical Lobbyist’s Portfolio
There were 2,865 individuals who registered to lobby in 2019-20.

Lobbyist Status

Visuals

Source: Webpage

VA News

Source: Webpage

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Virginia MercuryVirginia Mercury

The Virginia Mercury is an independent, nonprofit online news organization covering state government and policy. From the push to remove Confederate statues to big shifts in health care and energy policy, the Old Dominion is changing. The Mercury aims to bring a fresh perspective to coverage of the state’s biggest issues.

The news outlet, which also features original and guest commentary on a range of topics, is staffed full-time by five veteran Virginia newspaper journalists.

Current top news categories:  Criminal Justice + Policing, Energy + Environment, Government + Politics, Education, General Assembly 2020, and Election 2020.

Blog: Quick hits on the news of the day, odds and ends and commentary. The Bulletin | Blog Link

Mercury Newsletter:  Fair and tough reporting on the politics and policy decisions that affect all Virginians is more important than ever. Sign up for daily delivery of independent, nonpartisan coverage of state government, health care, the environment, criminal justice and more. subscribe

Donate:  Assist in the Virginia Mercury’s mission of taking a fresh look at policy, politics and governance in the Old Dominion with a tax-deductible donation to support our reporting on the issues that matter to millions of Virginians. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law. Go here to donate.

Summary

The Virginia Mercury is an independent, nonprofit online news organization covering state government and policy. From the push to remove Confederate statues to big shifts in health care and energy policy, the Old Dominion is changing. The Mercury aims to bring a fresh perspective to coverage of the state’s biggest issues.

The news outlet, which also features original and guest commentary on a range of topics, is staffed full-time by five veteran Virginia newspaper journalists.

Current top news categories:  Criminal Justice + Policing, Energy + Environment, Government + Politics, Education, General Assembly 2020, and Election 2020.

Blog: Quick hits on the news of the day, odds and ends and commentary. The Bulletin | Blog Link

Mercury Newsletter:  Fair and tough reporting on the politics and policy decisions that affect all Virginians is more important than ever. Sign up for daily delivery of independent, nonpartisan coverage of state government, health care, the environment, criminal justice and more. subscribe

Donate:  Assist in the Virginia Mercury’s mission of taking a fresh look at policy, politics and governance in the Old Dominion with a tax-deductible donation to support our reporting on the issues that matter to millions of Virginians. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law. Go here to donate.

About

Source: Webpage

From the push to remove Confederate statues to big shifts in healthcare and energy policy, the Old Dominion is changing; fair and tough reporting on the policy and politics that affect all of us as Virginians is more important than ever. The Mercury aims to bring a fresh perspective to coverage of the state’s biggest issues.

The Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by grants and a coalition of donors and readers. We retain full editorial independence and are a proud member of the Virginia Press Association.

The Virginia Mercury generally features progressive commentary, though we are open to considering serious submissions on policy issues. We generally do not accept submissions, however, from declared candidates for public office or sitting elected officials. Contact Editor-in-Chief Robert Zullo at commentary@virginiamercury.com with submissions. Please include links and sourcing to expedite fact-checking.

Note: Virginia onAir recognizes that some of Virginia Mercury’s articles and much of their commentary has a progressive  focus. We are mostly interested in their more partisan neutral articles that can be shared in their entirety because they are Creative Commons Non-Commercial. Select the “CC-NC” icon in the footer of each page to learn more.

If you know other Virginia news sources that have partisan neutral and CC-NC content, please contact our Hub curation director at jessler.elvira@onair.cc.

Twitter

Web

Website, Twitter, Facebook

Staff

Robert Zullo, Editor-in-Chief

Robert has spent 13 years as a reporter and editor at weekly and daily newspapers, beginning at Worrall Community Newspapers in Union, N.J., where he was a staff writer and managing editor. He spent five years in south Louisiana covering hurricanes, oil spills and Good Friday crawfish boils as a reporter and city editor for the The Courier and the Daily Comet newspapers in Houma and Thibodaux. He covered Richmond city hall for the Richmond Times-Dispatch from 2012 to 2013 and worked as a general assignment and city hall reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from 2013 to 2016. He returned to Richmond to cover energy, environment and transportation for the Richmond Times-Dispatch. He grew up in Miami, Fla., and central New Jersey. A former armored car guard and a graduate of the College of William and Mary, he has received numerous first-place awards for editorial, feature and column writing as well as breaking news coverage and investigative reporting.

Ned Oliver, Reporter

Ned, a Lexington native, has a decade’s worth of experience in journalism, beginning at The News-Gazette in Lexington, and including stints at the Berkshire Eagle, in Berkshire County, Mass., and the Times-Dispatch and Style Weekly in Richmond. He also has the awards to show for it, including taking a pair of first-place honors at the Virginia Press Association awards earlier this year for investigative reporting and feature writing. He is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock, in Great Barrington, Mass.

Sarah Vogelsong, Reporter

Sarah hails from McLean and has spent over a decade in the fields of journalism and academic publishing. Most recently she covered environmental issues in Central Virginia for Chesapeake Bay Journal; prior to that, she worked at the Progress-Index in Petersburg and the Caroline Progress in Caroline County, as well as writing for multiple regional publications. In 2017, she was honored as one of Gatehouse’s Feature Writers of the Year, and she has been the recipient of numerous awards from the Virginia Press Association. She is a graduate of the College of William & Mary.

Graham Moomaw, Reporter

A veteran Virginia politics reporter, Graham grew up in Hillsville and Lynchburg, graduating from James Madison University and earning a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland. Before joining the Mercury, he spent six years at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, most of that time covering the governor’s office, the General Assembly and state politics. He also covered city hall and politics at The Daily Progress in Charlottesville.

Katie Masters, Reporter

An award-winning reporter, Kate grew up in Northern Virginia before moving to the Midwest, earning her degree in journalism from the University of Missouri. She spent a year covering gun violence and public health for The Trace in Boston before joining The Frederick News-Post in Frederick County, Md. While at the News-Post, she won first place in feature writing and breaking news from the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, and Best in Show for her coverage of the local opioid epidemic. Most recently, she covered state and county politics for the Bethesda Beat in Montgomery County, Md.

Roger Chesley, Columnist

Longtime columnist and editorial writer Roger Chesley worked at the (Newport News) Daily Press and The (Norfolk) Virginian-Pilot from 1997 through 2018.

Bob Lewis, Columnist

Bob Lewis covered Virginia government and politics for 20 years for The Associated Press. Now retired from a public relations career at McGuireWoods, he is a columnist for the Virginia Mercury.

Ivy Main, Columnist

Ivy Main is a lawyer and a longtime volunteer with the Sierra Club’s Virginia chapter. A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency employee, she is currently the Sierra Club’s renewable energy chairperson. Her opinions are her own and do not necessarily reflect those of any organization.

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