Universities

Virginia onAir working with students, faculty, staff, and alumni from the seven major public universities:

George Mason University
James Madison University
University of Virginia
Virginia Commonwealth University
William & Mary
Old Dominion University
Virginia Tech

In each of the university post above, we aggregate the programs and organizations related to Virginia governance and elections that are within or close to each university. Each university post, in most cases, will have information about civic engagement programs, internships, academic programs, research centers, and nearby colleges, high schools.

If you would like to add your program or organization, select the Feedback (currently “Discuss”) icon in each post and contact jessler.elvira@onair.cc.

George Mason University

GMU has placed an emphasis on civic engagement in both its undergraduate and graduate programs and research initiatives.

Student programs include: Civic Learning and Community Engagement, Student Government, Roosevelt Institute, Democracy Squad at GMU, and Mason Leads.

Internships programs are provided for: Schar School undergraduate and graduate students, Global Political Fellows and Political Communication students.

 Kristen Wright is the Director of Civic Engagement within the Office of Undergraduate Education.

James Madison University

At JMU, we define civic engagement as advancing the legacy of James Madison, the Father of the Constitution, by preparing individuals to be active and responsible participants in a representative democracy dedicated to the common good.

Although often viewed as synonymous with community engagement, civic engagement is characterized by an ethic of citizenship and public responsibility. Few Americans better exemplify these traits than our university’s namesake, James Madison, who devoted his life to promoting the concept of liberty buttressed by the twin necessities of active political participation and rigorous, substantial education. In a period in which many Americans have lost confidence in our political institutions and find “politics” to be too controversial, partisan or divisive, embodying this Madisonian commitment seems a more pressing charge than ever before.

The Engagement Advisory Group is a key coordinating team for engagement at JMU. The leader for civic engagement on the group is Dr. Abraham (Abe) Goldberg, Executive Director of the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement and Associate Professor of Political Science.

University of Virginia

Engaged UVA is the front door to community partnerships at UVA, designed to connect faculty, students and communities to mutually beneficial research and teaching programs. The site reflects current and ongoing community based initiatives, and allows users to search for associated faculty, courses, projects, and community partners.

Engaged UVA was launched by the Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Outreach in 2017 in an effort to gather and highlight information on the community engaged programs already underway at the University. Faculty can use this site to find colleagues doing similar work. Students can find new courses and engagement opportunities. Community members can see the array of current and ongoing programs. Questions about the programs should be addressed to program directors.

Website: engageduva.virginia.edu/

Virginia Commonwealth University

The Center for Community Engagement and Impact works with faculty, staff and community partners as a central university hub to facilitate mutually-beneficial partnerships and relationships that enhance student learning and address community-identified needs.

High-quality academic-community partnerships are built using values and principles that guide us in our work. VCU encourages partnerships that strive for:

  • Impact by aligning efforts to meet community-identified needs.
  • Connections that foster new understanding.
  • Mutual benefit and reciprocity for all parties.
  • Communication that honors shared goals and supports continuous improvement.
  • Contributions that recognize the knowledge, skills and experiences that everyone contributes to the pursuit of common goals

Website:  community.vcu.edu/
Executive director:  Heidi A. Crapol

William & Mary

The Office of Community Engagement connects William & Mary and community to support students’ development as active and educated citizens and to promote positive, community-driven social change.
Our vision is that students will prioritize working within and understanding community in a lifelong pursuit of social justice.

What We Do

  • Promote the development of active, educated citizen students at William & Mary, combining intellectual  rigor and community service to generate positive, community-driven social change
  • Connect community organizations with students and faculty to create mutually beneficial partnerships
  • Provide opportunities to tutor and mentor local students through our educational programs
  • Offer ongoing and one-time local service projects  for students and groups through our local community engagement programs
  • Organize opportunities for immersive service through Branch Out Alternative Breaks
  • Introduce new students to diverse social issues and community-building methods  before move-in day through our 7 Generations Pre-Orientation program
  • Provide grant funding for innovative community engagement projects that develop students as active citizens and to support communities in achieving their own goals
  • Engage the minds of students, community partners, faculty and staff with discussions about social issues and community topics
  • Sponsor campus events and forums promoting the development of active citizens, including the annual William & Mary Active Citizens Conference

Websitewm.edu/offices/oce
Director: Melody Porter

Old Dominion University

The ODU Office of Community Engagement’s mission is to develop events and outreach opportunities to fulfill the university’s community outreach mission by promoting service, partnerships, and expertise that connect the University to our communities for community betterment and mutual success.

Its vision is to create a culture and spirit of community and civic-mindedness by building on and promoting existing efforts through strategic outreach to community organizations and integration of academic excellence to enhance ODU’s role in the Hampton Roads community, the Commonwealth and beyond.

Webpageodu.edu/communityengagement

Virginia Tech

VT Engage: The Center for Leadership & Service Learning is Virginia Tech’s center for service learning, leadership education, & civic engagement.

Our vision is to equip civic leaders to create a more just world.

​Our mission is to facilitate leadership, service learning, ​and civic engagement experiences that ​advance community priorities, ​contribute to student development, ​and embody Ut Prosim (That I May Serve)​.

We invite undergraduate and graduate students of any major to join us to #ExperienceUtProsim.

UniversitiesUniversities

Virginia onAir working with students, faculty, staff, and alumni from the seven major public universities:

George Mason University
James Madison University
University of Virginia
Virginia Commonwealth University
William & Mary
Old Dominion University
Virginia Tech

In each of the university post above, we aggregate the programs and organizations related to Virginia governance and elections that are within or close to each university. Each university post, in most cases, will have information about civic engagement programs, internships, academic programs, research centers, and nearby colleges, high schools.

If you would like to add your program or organization, select the Feedback (currently “Discuss”) icon in each post and contact jessler.elvira@onair.cc.

Summary

Virginia onAir working with students, faculty, staff, and alumni from the seven major public universities:

George Mason University
James Madison University
University of Virginia
Virginia Commonwealth University
William & Mary
Old Dominion University
Virginia Tech

In each of the university post above, we aggregate the programs and organizations related to Virginia governance and elections that are within or close to each university. Each university post, in most cases, will have information about civic engagement programs, internships, academic programs, research centers, and nearby colleges, high schools.

If you would like to add your program or organization, select the Feedback (currently “Discuss”) icon in each post and contact jessler.elvira@onair.cc.

X
George Mason statue & JCGeorge Mason University

GMU has placed an emphasis on civic engagement in both its undergraduate and graduate programs and research initiatives.

Student programs include: Civic Learning and Community Engagement, Student Government, Roosevelt Institute, Democracy Squad at GMU, and Mason Leads.

Internships programs are provided for: Schar School undergraduate and graduate students, Global Political Fellows and Political Communication students.

 Kristen Wright is the Director of Civic Engagement within the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Summary

GMU has placed an emphasis on civic engagement in both its undergraduate and graduate programs and research initiatives.

Student programs include: Civic Learning and Community Engagement, Student Government, Roosevelt Institute, Democracy Squad at GMU, and Mason Leads.

Internships programs are provided for: Schar School undergraduate and graduate students, Global Political Fellows and Political Communication students.

 Kristen Wright is the Director of Civic Engagement within the Office of Undergraduate Education.

About

Source: Wikipedia

George Mason University (Mason, GMU, or George Mason) is a public research university in Fairfax County near Fairfax City in Virginia. In 1956, the Commonwealth of Virginia authorized the establishment of a Northern Virginia branch of the University of Virginia and the institution that is now named George Mason University opened in September 1957. It became an independent institution in 1972. It has since grown to become the largest four-year public university in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The university is named after the Founding Father George Mason, a Virginia planter and politician who authored the Virginia Declaration of Rights that later influenced the future Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution. Mason operates five campuses in Virginia (Fairfax, Arlington, Prince William, Loudoun, and Front Royal), as well as a sixth campus in South Korea.

The university is classified among “R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity”. It is particularly well known in the fields of economics. Two Mason economics professors have won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics: James M. Buchanan in 1986 and Vernon L. Smith in 2002.

Twitter

Web

Website, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn

Student Programs

University-wide Community Engagement

Webpageaengage.gmu.edu/

Community Engagement is about partnership between George Mason University and its surrounding communities. These mutually beneficial partnerships impact our teaching and learning, our scholarship, and our outreach efforts that strive to improve the human condition and support the public good at home and abroad.

Our mission is to be an exemplary “engaged university” by “preparing our students to thrive in a global context by infusing global awareness, citizenship values, and learning opportunities across all fields, and we will partner with other organizations in solving global problems where our impact will be highest.”

Mason is committed to “engagement with the world”. It is our hope that students and faculty become engaged citizens “ethically orientated and committed to democratic ideals; respectful of individual differences, rights, and liberties; knowledgeable of important issues affecting the world; focused on the well-being of others; and committed to building a just society”.

Students as Volunteers

Patriot Experience

Volunteer Fairfax

Connect Northern Virginia

Weekends at Mason

Mason Student Organizations

Civic Learning and Community Engagement

University Life webpage

University Life Offices that provide opportunities for Civic Learning and Community Engagement

Student Government

The Student Government (SG) office is in the Student Involvement section of the HUB on the Fairfax Campus. SG divisions include the Executive Branch, the Student Senate (Legislative) Branch, and the Elections and Disputes Commission. The Executive Branch includes Executive Boards such as the Parking Appeals Board, Student Funding Board, and the Student Dining Board.

Students are encouraged to attend meetings and share their views:

  • The Executive Branch meets Thursdays at 7 p.m. For locations and updates, check the calendar.
  • The Student Senate meets Thursday at 4:30 p.m. Find meeting locations in the calendar.
  • The Student Funding Board meets Tuesdays at 3 p.m. in the Student Involvement office.

For more information, call 703-993-2909.

Roosevelt Institute

Roosevelt @ Mason seeks to empower students with the resources and environment to become effectively involved in the policy process at the campus, local, state, and national levels. The Roosevelt Institute engages in policy research, analysis, and writing to increase youth voices at all levels of the policy process. Roosevelt @ Mason promotes communication and coordination with community members, stakeholders, and policymakers in order to create real policy-oriented solutions. The ultimate goal of the organization is to facilitate progressive policy innovation in the local political process.”

Roosevelt @ Mason is George Mason University’s largest and most active nonpartisan student policy organization.

Mason 360 page
Facebook page
Twitter 

 

Democracy Squad at GMU

Democracy Squad is a virtual organizing space for George Mason University students, staff, faculty, and alumni, to promote positive civic engagement on campus. Participants commit to taking actions that reinforce democratic values and institutions in and around Mason nation.

We reinforce democracy by taking action to alleviate sources of democratic weakness. Democracy Squad does this in three main areas: address inequality (income, race healthcare, etc.), promote political representation (strengthen parties, increase voting rights, support reform efforts to expand the citizen-representative tie, etc.), and improve the information environment (promote events that share scientific and high quality information, etc.).

Organized by Professor Jennifer Victor, Democracy Squad participants commit to building a positive campus environment that promotes democracy. Democracy Squad is administered through Magnify, a social networking tool designed to help people solve collective action problems.

See this post for more information

Mason Leads

Source: Website

This is a site where you’ll discover a wide range of leadership programs and initiatives for members of our campus community. Leadership is a common thread that connects the entire Mason community. Our commitment is to engage our students, faculty, staff and alumni in creating a socially conscious, civically engaged, and global campus community through leadership at all levels of our institution. Every day on Mason’s distributed campuses around the world you’ll encounter hundreds of individuals engaged in leadership through formal and informal positions and experiences.

MasonLeads Mission Statement

To inspire the development, emergence, and recognition of leadership throughout the Mason community by:

  • Raising campus-wide awareness of leadership opportunities for our students, faculty, staff, and community
  • Encouraging student, faculty and staff participation in leadership development
  • Forming a cross-disciplinary community of leadership scholars at Mason
  • Focusing on the diverse talents and strengths of all involved in leadership
  • Publicizing and celebrating acts of leadership throughout the Mason community
  • Building a culture at Mason that values leadership at all levels of the institution

George Mason’s MasonLeads formulated a set of leadership assumptions, core values, and competencies for faculty, staff, students, and alumni to consider in their own exploration and practice of leadership.  For example, we believe you do not need to have a formal title to engage in a leadership process or to assume leadership responsibilities.  Through self-reflection and reflective practice, we are confident that members of our campus community will make a difference through their leadership.  We embrace a set of core leadership values and common competencies founded on the ideas that leadership is learned and that leadership development is a lifelong journey.  These leadership assumptions, core values, and competencies are designed to be considered and used as an integrated whole.

Internships

Schar School Undergraduates

Undergraduate Internship Program
Webpage

Schar graduate

Webpage

The Schar School of Policy and Government Internship Program provides an opportunity for students to gain professional experience and skills that will complement their academic program and enhance their career opportunities. The program also is intended to support area organizations by allowing employers to work with graduate students in an effort to increase recruiting success.

The internship program is open to all degree seeking Schar School Master’s students who have completed a minimum of 9 credits of required coursework with a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. Students in the MPP and ODKM programs who do not have at least two years of relevant professional experience are required to complete a three-credit internship.

The Schar School Career Services does not place students in internships but is available to assist students with the search process. Additionally, the Schar School CareersNow contains information on available internships.

Please contact Duane Bradshaw, or Brian Bar to discuss strategies in finding internships and full time positions.

Global Political Fellow

webpage

The internship is a key component of the Global Politics Fellows program.  The coursework is conveniently scheduled to allow students more time for a substantive internship.  Students will intern three days a week, for twenty to twenty-five hours a week.  This schedule increases the number of internships available to our Fellows and usually allows them to take on more responsibility.  This makes Global Politics Fellows more of an asset for their host organization and gives the student enhanced learning opportunities.  Internships are also great networking opportunities to learn more about a potential career field and gain contacts one can use when looking for a summer job and for their future job search after graduation.

Students will obtain their own internship with the help and support of the Fellows program and the Career Center.  Internship host sites will likely include local and federal government offices, foreign embassies, non-profit organizations, non-governmental organizations and think tanks.  Internship duties often focus on advocacy, program support, communications, research and community outreach.  Most internships will be unpaid, but students are also encouraged to pursue internships that offer a small stipend or a paid internship.

Global Politics Fellows will follow all of the current guidelines and requirements for internship credit set for George Mason University’s GLOA 495 and GOVT 496 courses.

Communication Internships

Webpage

The Communication Department at George Mason University encourages and supports students who wish to complete an internship in a range of communication related positions, while earning academic credit. Internships act as a bridge to the workforce by offering students opportunities to gain valuable work experience, and obtain the tools needed to enter a professional environment.

The internship program pairs career management course work with the internship learning experience. Communication majors and minors spend approximately ten hours each week during the semester working with a sponsored on-campus or off-campus organization. Interns perform communication related supervised work. Positions can be paid or unpaid. The course can be taken a second time for academic credit.

The Washington, D.C. region has a wide range of internship opportunities. Students can work with a large corporation, small company or association. Communication internship related fields include: journalism, social media, marketing, public relations, sports, health, science, government, politics, public policy, education, research, human resources, administration, radio and television production.
Past and present internships include: national and local radio and television broadcast facilities, major and local newspapers, magazines, public relations companies, major sports teams, public school systems, George Mason University, industry corporate headquarters, non-profit organizations, national associations, foundations, health organizations, political campaigns, the U.S Congress, military organizations, the White House, and many national and local government organizations.. Mason students are highly regarded by area employers.

Academic Programs

Schar School of Policy & Government

Website:  schar.gmu.edu/

Email:  schar@gmu.edu
Phone
:  703-993-2280
Address:Founders Hall, Fifth Floor
3351 Fairfax Drive, MS 3B1
Arlington, VA 22201

Social Media:  Twitter  Facebook  Instagram   YouTube  LinkedIn

WebWikipedia

Undergraduate Student Services:
Robinson Hall A201, MS 3F4
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
Phone: 703-993-1400
Email: gvip@gmu.edu
Fax: 703-993-1399

George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government prepares undergraduate and graduate students to be leaders and managers who solve problems and advance the public good in all sectors and levels of government—in the United States and throughout the world.

Our graduates apply the knowledge and skills gained in our classrooms at some of the most prestigious companies, consulting firms, nonprofits, multinational organizations, and government agencies in Washington, DC, and beyond. Decision-makers and the public use our faculty’s research to both understand and develop policy in a variety of areas.  In addition, we are committed to public service in our professions and in regional, national, and global communities.

Located where policy happens—just 3 miles from the Pentagon, 4 miles from The White House, and 6 miles from the U.S. Capitol Building—students are connected to jobs, internships, networking, and experiences that can only be found in the Washington, D.C., area.

It’s policy in action. Learning from professors with real-world experience, students gain the applicable skills and the practical knowledge to lead government agencies and nonprofit organizations, develop public policies and programs, create innovate consulting solutions, or provide expert policy analysis. Schar School alumni apply what they learned in the classroom to pursue fulfilling and meaningful careers. Graduates are doing consequential work at leading employers including the U.S. Department of State, USAID, the World Bank, the United Nations, the National Endowment for Democracy, Deloitte, Booz Allen Hamilton, and many others.

 

Social Action & Integrative Learning (SAIL)

website

Social Action & Integrative Learning (SAIL), housed within the School of Integrative Studies, is an evolving community of Mason students, faculty, administrators, alumni, and community partners who are active and passionate collaborators in effecting positive social change. SAIL fosters integrative, innovative, and experiential learning opportunities on campus, regionally, and globally that educate and activate towards a more equitable, just, nonviolent, and sustainable world.

Mason Impact

Websitehttps://provost.gmu.edu/initiatives/mason-impact

The Mason Impact offers a bold and challenging approach to academics, preparing you to tackle global questions and issues. You’ll look at your studies with a different perspective. There are four areas of focus:

  • Research and Creative Activities: You aren’t content to just hit the books; you want to create new knowledge through research, ingenuity, and imagination.
  • Community Engagement and Civic Learning: You’re passionate about working to generate social change, whether in a small community, the nation, or the world.
  • Entrepreneurship: You see a problem as an opportunity to discover a solution, start a business, or create a prototype.
  • Global Activities: Your vision isn’t limited to what you see; you’re ready to leap beyond borders, to expand your knowledge, to become a true citizen of the world.

By completing a Mason Impact Project, you will be tackling a global question and may be eligible to receive funding to do so. We’ll treat you like a professional researcher, because with our help, you’ll be one. If your research topic qualifies, you might get funding for your project. And when you graduate, you’ll get a special notation on your transcript, telling the world about your accomplishments.

Minor in Political Communication

Webpage

The interdisciplinary minor in political communication is offered jointly by the Schar School of Policy and Government and the Department of Communication. This minor is available to all Mason undergraduate students with the exception of communication majors pursuing a concentration in political communication.

Political communication explores the interaction among members of the public, the media, advocacy groups, and politicians in a democratic society. This minor uses a diverse approach to questions of how mass and interpersonal communication influence democratic functioning, including (1) how political actors use strategic messaging to persuade and mobilize the public, (2) how citizens make sense of these messages and their impact on engagement, deliberation, efficacy, knowledge, and participation, and (3) the role of the mass media in facilitating or hindering this relationship. Political communication includes explicitly political activities like voting and political campaigns. It also encompasses any issue of public debate or deliberation, including culture and social movements.

Research Centers & Initiatives

Center for Business Civic Engagement

Webpage

Mission

The mission of the Center for Business Civic Engagement is to study the impact of the application of business theory and principles to government to determine if government can be both more effective and efficient for its stakeholders.

Civic Engagement Principles

Transparency

Government is a result of taxpayers voluntarily giving government money earned. Government has a responsibility, especially in this “tech age,” to be transparent so every citizen can see where every dollar is spent and what results have been achieved with the investment of he or her tax dollars. Transparent government results in both more effective and efficient government.

Accountability

Government plays a significance force in the lives of everyday people. With this use of power, there comes an accountability requirement. Every elected official is accountable to constituents, not just on Election Day, but everyday of the year. Government must work, and it must work in an efficient way.

Stewardship

Government officials must be exceptional stewards of resources, as resources come from hard-working individuals, entrepreneurs, and corporations. Stewardship should not be diminished because of politics.

Metrics Measurement

Constituents expect to see a return on their investment, a quantitative or qualitative way to justify the commitment of resources, money, labor and time. Government programs should have metrics to measure their effectiveness and their efficiency.

Civility

How can business engagement or business models maintain a civility among its diverse and inclusive populations? Can competitive business models help government reduce its level of hyper-partisanship?

Effective Business Advocacy

What tools can make business advocacy more effective in assuring elected officials on the economic impact of laws and regulations? How can businesses ensure their perspective is heard and part of the discussion on the tax and regulatory culture? What are the unintended consequences for the Free Enterprise system when business views are neither communicated or heard?

 

The Center for Leadership and Community Engagement

Webpage

The Center for Leadership and Community Engagement facilitates mutually beneficial partnerships between the Mason community and community organizations.  We support these evolving relationships to ensure they contribute to both community development goals and student learning objectives.

  • Support for faculty integrating community based learning pedagogy into their courses
  • Point of contact for community organizations seeking mutually beneficial partnership with George Mason University faculty and students
  • Opportunities for students to earn course credit through their leadership and engagement in the local community
  • Alternative Break service-learning trips
  • Scholarship on community based learning pedagogy, student leadership development and the intersection of leadership, civic engagement and student learning
  • Co-sponsorship of campus events that promote community engagement and leadership development opportunities for students
  • Minor in Leadership Studies
  • Minor in Nonprofit Studies

We can help you make the connection between student learning goals and the opportunity to make a positive difference in our community.  For more information, visit: clce.gmu.edu.

Almanac of Virginia Politics

Webpage

The Virginia Almanac project at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government provides an informative record of legislative sources, key decision-makers, and the legislative process. The new online edition outlines the basic framework of Virginia politics by providing the raw data for analyzing the record of members of the General Assembly. As a historical tool the Almanac is useful to lobbyists, libraries, civic activists, and researchers. This easily accessible source is an indispensable tool for those who want to know the who, what, when, and how of Virginia politics.

X
JMU Political ScienceJames Madison University

At JMU, we define civic engagement as advancing the legacy of James Madison, the Father of the Constitution, by preparing individuals to be active and responsible participants in a representative democracy dedicated to the common good.

Although often viewed as synonymous with community engagement, civic engagement is characterized by an ethic of citizenship and public responsibility. Few Americans better exemplify these traits than our university’s namesake, James Madison, who devoted his life to promoting the concept of liberty buttressed by the twin necessities of active political participation and rigorous, substantial education. In a period in which many Americans have lost confidence in our political institutions and find “politics” to be too controversial, partisan or divisive, embodying this Madisonian commitment seems a more pressing charge than ever before.

The Engagement Advisory Group is a key coordinating team for engagement at JMU. The leader for civic engagement on the group is Dr. Abraham (Abe) Goldberg, Executive Director of the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement and Associate Professor of Political Science.

Summary

At JMU, we define civic engagement as advancing the legacy of James Madison, the Father of the Constitution, by preparing individuals to be active and responsible participants in a representative democracy dedicated to the common good.

Although often viewed as synonymous with community engagement, civic engagement is characterized by an ethic of citizenship and public responsibility. Few Americans better exemplify these traits than our university’s namesake, James Madison, who devoted his life to promoting the concept of liberty buttressed by the twin necessities of active political participation and rigorous, substantial education. In a period in which many Americans have lost confidence in our political institutions and find “politics” to be too controversial, partisan or divisive, embodying this Madisonian commitment seems a more pressing charge than ever before.

The Engagement Advisory Group is a key coordinating team for engagement at JMU. The leader for civic engagement on the group is Dr. Abraham (Abe) Goldberg, Executive Director of the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement and Associate Professor of Political Science.

About

Source: Wikipedia

James Madison University (also known as JMU, Madison, or James Madison) is a public research university in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Founded in 1908 as the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg, the institution was renamed Madison College in 1938 in honor of President James Madison and then James Madison University in 1977.[5] The university is situated in the Shenandoah Valley, just west of Massanutten Mountain.

Twitter

Web

Website, Twitter, Facebook

Student Programs

Source: Civic Engagement webpage

Below are a few examples of student civic engagement at JMU:

  • Dukes Vote is a student-led initiative, supported and facilitated by the James Madison Center for Civic Engagement at JMU. Dukes Vote works in partnership with academic and student affairs, and with community partners, to enhance JMU’s mission of civic engagement among students by providing opportunities and programming to build capacity, knowledge, skills and values that prepare students for an active and informed role in democracy.
  • In Fall 2018, Dukes Vote sponsored and facilitated the Civic10dencies series of workshops with the goal of building civic and democratic capacity, knowledge, skills, values and dispositions.
  • Various departments and groups at JMU developed and sponsor the “Democracy in Peril?” series which focuses on the state of democracy both in the US and abroad. It provides a forum for presentations and open discussions about current politics.
  • D.E.E.P. (Diversity Education Empowerment Program) Impact is designed to influence meaningful change throughout the JMU campus community through the development of programs and services that heighten awareness, increase knowledge and celebrate the value of diversity in all forms. D.E.E.P Impact also focuses on promoting inclusion, advocacy and respect in order to equip students with the cultural capacity to change and shape the world. D.E.E.P Impact is sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Student Services (CMSS).
  • Madison Vision Series is a lecture series honoring James Madison’s conviction that cultivating an informed and educated citizenry is essential to the health of our republican democracy. The series brings scholars, thinkers and leaders of all kinds to campus for lively explorations of issues facing our society.
  • The Student Government Association (SGA) of James Madison University is an organization dedicated to collaborating with all members of its community to advocate for student opinion, while fostering a proactive, inclusive environment. Follow JMU SGA on Twitter for updates.

Internships

Undergraduate Internship Program

Source: Webpage

Inquiries concerning the department’s undergraduate internships for political science, international affairs, and public policy & administration students (POSC 493, PPA 494, POSC 495, & PPA 496) should be directed to Dr. Rob Alexander, the Undergraduate Internship Coordinator, at alexanrw@jmu.eduYou are on the main webpage for the JMU Department of Political Science’s undergraduate internship program, so please consult these online resources and then contact Dr. Alexander if you have further questions.

Beyond those 4 undergraduate academic internships, you might be interested in other academic internships offered by other programs in housed in our department:

Graduate Internship Program

Questions regarding the department’s graduate internship programs should be communicated to the director of the graduate program of interest:

Academic Programs

Source: Civic Engagement webpage

Below are a few examples of civic engagement programs at JMU:

  • The Health Policy Collaborative (HPC) is a partnership between faculty from multiple disciplines. Faculty from the School of Nursing, in collaboration with the Department of Health Sciences, Social Work, Communication Sciences & Disorders, and the College of Business, has developed the HPC to be a conduit for educating students, faculty and the community about health policy. The HPC will act as an infrastructure for research for practical policy solutions and provide a platform for students to engage in health policy both inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Gen Ed Cluster Four: The American Experience and The Global Experience require students to think critically about their own society and its relationship to the larger global community.  These courses develop responsible and enlightened global citizenship by examining a wide variety of the processes that shape the human experience.
  • The Gandhi Center for Global Nonviolence is a nonviolence-oriented organization classified under the Justice Studies Department at JMU. Embodying the highest values of inquiry, learning and creativity, the Gandhi Center functions as a global hub to advance the understanding of, appreciation for and practice of nonviolence. The Center features a library and reading room for individual research, collaborative endeavors both internal and external, and public participation in service both on and off campus. The Center seeks to pursue justice and service through nonviolent means and ends.

Political Science Department

Source: Website

Engaged in Public Service

We seek to enhance the quality of public policy and civic life at home and abroad by teaching students, conducting research, and collaborating with people inside and outside of the JMU community. Over the breadth of this website, you will see information about ongoing academic programs, career development programming, annual events, & short-term/one-shot events.  You will also see a community of faculty, staff, students, & alumni who are dedicated to JMU’s emphasis on engaged learning, civic engagement, & community engagement.

For guidance in choosing a major in Political Science (POSC), in Public Policy & Administration (PPA), or in International Affairs (INTA), click on the For Prospective Majors link on the Undergraduate

Research Centers & Initiatives

Center for Civic Engagement

Source: Webpage

Our mission is to educate and inspire people to address public issues and cultivate a just and inclusive democracy.

As a nonpartisan entity, JMU Civic emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge to make one a more informed participant in our democracy, skills to make one a more effective participant, and values that embrace pluralism, open-mindedness, empathy, respect, diversity and inclusion.

What JMU Civic Does:

  • We build year-round voter education and engagement initiatives with students, faculty and staff.
  • We integrate civic learning opportunities in courses and academic programs with faculty and departments across campus.
  • We provide resources for students to learn about and discuss public issues in an academic environment, and to develop and implement plans for informed participation in civic life.
  • We collaborate with JMU’s Center for Assessment & Research Students to assess campus-wide civic learning
  • We work alongside community, state and national partners on civic learning initiatives and events.
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Auto Draft 13University of Virginia

Engaged UVA is the front door to community partnerships at UVA, designed to connect faculty, students and communities to mutually beneficial research and teaching programs. The site reflects current and ongoing community based initiatives, and allows users to search for associated faculty, courses, projects, and community partners.

Engaged UVA was launched by the Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Outreach in 2017 in an effort to gather and highlight information on the community engaged programs already underway at the University. Faculty can use this site to find colleagues doing similar work. Students can find new courses and engagement opportunities. Community members can see the array of current and ongoing programs. Questions about the programs should be addressed to program directors.

Website: engageduva.virginia.edu/

Summary

Engaged UVA is the front door to community partnerships at UVA, designed to connect faculty, students and communities to mutually beneficial research and teaching programs. The site reflects current and ongoing community based initiatives, and allows users to search for associated faculty, courses, projects, and community partners.

Engaged UVA was launched by the Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Outreach in 2017 in an effort to gather and highlight information on the community engaged programs already underway at the University. Faculty can use this site to find colleagues doing similar work. Students can find new courses and engagement opportunities. Community members can see the array of current and ongoing programs. Questions about the programs should be addressed to program directors.

Website: engageduva.virginia.edu/

About

Source: Wikipedia

The University of Virginia (U.Va. or UVA) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was founded in 1819 by United States Declaration of Independence author Thomas Jefferson. It is the flagship university of Virginia and home to Jefferson’s Academical Village, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. UVA is known for its historic foundations, student-run honor code and secret societies.

The original governing Board of Visitors included Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. Monroe was the sitting President of the United States at the time of its foundation, and earlier Presidents Jefferson and Madison were UVA’s first two rectors. Jefferson conceived and designed the original courses of study and original architecture. UVA was the first university of the American South elected to the research-driven Association of American Universities in 1904. More than a century later, the journal Science credited UVA faculty with two of the top ten global scientific breakthroughs of 2015.

The University of Virginia offers 121 majors across the eight undergraduate and three professional schools. It is classified among “R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity”.  Its alumni have founded many companies, such as Reddit and CNET, which together produce more than $1.6 trillion in annual revenue and have created 2.3 million jobs. It sits on a historic 1,135-acre (1.8 sq mi; 459.3 ha) central campus partially protected by UNESCO. The university additionally maintains 562 acres north of the campus at UVA Research Park, and 2,913 acres southeast of the city at Morven Farm.  Moreover, it manages the College at Wise in Southwest Virginia and until 1972 managed George Mason University and the University of Mary Washington in Northern Virginia.

Twitter

Web

Website, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube

Student Programs

Source: Webpage

University of Virginia students have varied interests and ideas, many of which are realized through involvement in student organizations and activities. As a unit of the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Engagement is here to provide resources which help you turn your ideas into reality. Our mission is to engage students and the University community in self-governance and promote citizen leadership.

Located on the first floor and lower level of Newcomb Hall in the PAC (suite 164), you will find a team of student staff, student volunteers, and professional staff who can help you find your place at UVA through involvement in a student organization, participating in an event, involving yourself in student legislation, or creating something new. In light of coronavirus, find us via email at studentengagement@virginia.edu and we can chat over email or schedule a ZOOM call. You can also reach out to individual staff members – find our email in the About – Professional Staff section.

Internships

The Master of Public Policy Internship

Source: Webpage

The Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy has a 400-hour internship during the summer between the first and second year is a cornerstone of our Master of Public Policy degree. No matter the policy field or employment sector, this requirement will challenge students to put what they’ve learned into action. Financial aid may be available for students accepting unpaid internships with nonprofit organizations and government entities.

Center for Politics Student Internships Program

Source: Webpage

Funding provided by the Larry J. Sabato Foundation and the Peter and Eaddo Kiernan Foundation was used to launch the newly-created 22nd Century Scholars scholarship program. The University of Virginia Center for Politics in partnership with UVA’s Miller Center, Weldon Cooper Center/Sorensen Institute, and Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy have selected 56 students for the five-week virtual program, running from June 29 to July 31, 2020 .

The talented UVA undergraduate students (rising second, third, and fourth-years) were selected from a pool of 300 student applicants (most from UVA but some from as far as Harvard University) who lost related summer jobs and internships as a result of the pandemic across a wide spectrum of the public sector including: Capitol Hill (with both Democratic and Republican members); within the Executive Branch (the Department of State, Department of Justice, and USAID); the National Institutes of Health; statehouses; local government; as well as domestic and international non-profits and NGOs.

Department of Politics

Third and fourth year students are encouraged to seek out internships. For institutions with unfunded internship programs, grants and scholarships are available to students to offset some personal costs. We encourage alumni employers and organizations to consider offering internships.

Academic Programs

UVA Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics

Source: Website

The Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics supports research and honors teaching that develop a critical understanding of national and international politics. Its distinguished faculty members seek to instill in their students a theoretical and practical appreciation of the ideas, institutions, and history that shape political life. The Department celebrates methodological pluralism: it seeks to promote an awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies so that students can evaluate and select the approaches most suited to exploring the research questions in which they are interested. The faculty and students approach these questions through a rich variety of topics, including democratization; liberalism and its critics; race, gender, and ethnicity; political economy; and the role of human rights international affairs.

The Department comprises five subfields: American PoliticsComparative PoliticsInternational RelationsPolitical Methodology, and Political Theory. In addition, the Department has a formal working group focured on Race, Ethnicity, and Gender, made up of scholars from across the traditional subfields.

Bolstering the Department’s standing as a locus of rigorous empirical and theoretical research is its close affiliation with a number of research centers and institutions, including The Miller Center of Public Affairs, the Center for Politics, the Center for Survey Research, the Center for South Asian Studies, the East Asia CenterThe Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, ​the Department of Women, Gender & Sexuality (WGS), the Department of Media Studies , the Department of Middle-East & South Asian Languages & Cultures, the Department of Latin American Studies, and the Center for Russian and East European Studies (CRESS).

Respect for the Learning Environment

As stated in its official policy, “the University of Virginia is committed to providing a safe and non-discriminatory environment for all members of the University community.”

The Department of Politics is committed to a classroom learning environment that is respectful to all students and open to a full range of viewpoints.  If any student has a concern about the conduct of an instructor within or outside the classroom, they are  / she or he is welcome to raise this concern, with or without a chosen faculty advisor, with any of the following people, as listed on the Department’s Leadership webpage: the Department’s Director of Diversity and Inclusion, its Director of Graduate Studies, its Director of Undergraduate Programs, or the Department Chair.

Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy

Source: Website

Graduate Programs
At Batten, we’re defining a new model of public policy education. Our Master of Public Policy degree offers more than the typical policy research and data analysis education found at other public policy schools. We focus on the result of policy — solving society’s most pressing problems. We stand distinguished by teaching and cultivating effective, value-based leadership so our graduates can make significant strides toward becoming the dynamic leaders the world demands.

MASTER OF PUBLIC POLICY
ACCELERATED MASTER OF PUBLIC POLICY
DUAL DEGREES

Research Centers & Initiatives

Democracy Initiative

Source: Website

One of the primary drivers of the Democracy Initiative is to provide a robust and multi-modal program of public engagement. This includes:

  • practitioner engagement with UVA faculty and students to shape and inform research, solve problems, and propose next steps and solutions;
  • collaboration with other institutions of higher education, including Virginia community colleges, to support curricular initiatives and related work;
  • major conferences, colloquia, and speaker series, as well as new and traditional media—including podcasts, blogs, and video—to learn from, and connect and share with, a broad and diverse public; and
  • deep engagement with policy makers and others in Washington, D.C.—as well as in states, cities, and towns, particularly our hometown, Charlottesville.

The Miller Center of Public Affairs hosted — with the Democracy Initiative as a lead partner — the first biennial summit on May 21-23, 2019. We convened political insiders, top scholars, the public, and students—our future leaders and influencers—for the Presidential Ideas Festival: Democracy in Dialogue. The three-day event in and around Charlottesville featured working sessions about specific aspects of democracy, the presidency, and global leadership.

In addition, the Equity Center is now a part of the Initiative. The Center will tangibly redress racial and socioeconomic inequality in university communities by advancing a transformative approach to the fundamental research mission, which will, in turn, reform institutional values, pedagogy, and operations.

UVA Center for Politics

Source: Website

The Center for Politics thought – provoking and timely political analysis and our pragmatic civic education programs have formed the core of our activities throughout the past decade.

The Center is a part of the National Campaign for Political & Civic Engagement, a consortium of 20 universities and colleges with academic programs in politics. Its priorities, directed towards college students are to establish:

  • A relationship with electoral politics
  • A foundation in civic education
  • A focus on career development

The Center addresses these priorities through activities and programs such as our student Voter Registration Coalition, our internship program, an annual career panel, and the Youth Leadership Initiative.

Mission

The mission of the University of Virginia Center for Politics is to educate and inspire our citizenry about practical politics and civic engagement through programs that are unique, compelling, and open-minded. Everything we do must fulfill our goal of instilling citizens with an appreciation for the core values of American freedom, justice, equality, civility, and service.

Programs

Sabato’s Crystal Ball  is a comprehensive, nonpartisan political analysis and handicapping newsletter run by the University of Virginia Center for Politics. The Crystal Ball keeps tabs on presidential elections, along with every race for the U.S. Senate, House of Representatives, and state governor. More info.

Youth Leadership Initiative, YLI, a program of the University of Virginia Center for Politics, develops FREE education resources designed to assist civics teachers, and encourage students to participate in the political process. Signup to access lesson plans, E Congress, Mock Election and Democracy Corps.  More info.

Global Perspectives on Democracy hosts leadership and civic engagement-related exchanges and public events connected to international relations in partnership with non-governmental organizations and units of the University of Virginia. More info

 

History

The Center for Politics was founded in 1998 by Larry J. Sabato at the University of Virginia to overcome the notion that politics thwarts the proper function of government. We think politics makes public policy more vibrant and makes bureaucracies more responsive. Since our inception we have established annual conferences, publications, programs, and curricula to advance democracy around the world and to equip people to better understand politics and government.

The Annual American Democracy Conference is organized by UVA Center for Politics in partnership with the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy.

Center for Media and Citizenship

Source: Website

The Center for Media and Citizenship is a nonpartisan organization affiliated with the Department of Media Studies and the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. Our mission is to broaden and deepen our understanding of civic engagement and democracy in a rapidly changing media environment. We explore the past, present and future of citizenship — rights, responsibilities, challenges, and opportunities — specifically within the context of ever-evolving media forms and technologies. We are particularly interested in the relationships between a free press, vibrant journalism, civic life, and the ideals of our constitutional democracy. Our work is quite purposefully informed by Thomas Jefferson’s vision for the University of Virginia, and its focus on creating citizen leaders who will have the knowledge, the skills and the inspiration to strengthen the ideals of our democracy.
In the summer of 1820, as construction of the magnificent buildings in his planned Academical Village moved forward, Thomas Jefferson wrote that the University would be “an establishment which I contemplate as the future bulwark of the human mind in this hemisphere.” A bulwark is a defensive wall, a structure for protection and support. That metaphor captures Jefferson’s understanding of the University’s leadership role in American civic life . Those who teach, study, and work at the University of Virginia would participate in a unique and historic mission. A university, he once wrote, should be an “incubator where the future guardians of the rights and liberties of their country may be endowed with science and virtue, to watch and preserve the sacred deposit.
For Jefferson, the University of Virginia was never to be an end in itself, but would always be a kind of tool, a mechanism, by which the ideals of democratic, civic life could be preserved and strengthened. He envisioned a university that did not serve the interests of a king, of any church, or of any one political class. It would instead serve to empower the ideals of democracy, justice, and citizenship. As media scholar Neil Postman has eloquently observed, “Thomas Jefferson. . . knew what schools were for — to ensure that citizens would know when and how to protect their liberty. . . It would not have come easily to the mind of such a man, as it does to political leaders today, that the young should be taught to read exclusively for the purpose of increasing their economic productivity.
To create citizen leaders capable of critical thinking who will contribute to humanity’s potential and push back against any force in society that threatens the principles of democracy, civic life, and human liberty: that is the historic mission of the University of Virginia. And no one perhaps understood more palpably the threat those forces posed than the founder himself: a man who participated in perpetuating human slavery in his own home. Indeed, the very construction of his Academical Village was made possible through the use of enslaved labor. The work of the Center for Media and Citizenship is grounded in a vision that the University of Virginia has an obligation, not only to this nation but to the world: to discover, to learn, to teach, and to inspire all those who would nurture and strengthen the ideals of democracy, citizenship, and justice.
Freedom of the press, of speech, and the work of responsible journalists, scholars and engaged citizens cannot be understated when we consider the success of a self-governing people. “If it were left to me,” Jefferson mused in 1787, “to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. But I should mean that every man should receive those papers and be capable of reading them.” It was not only a press free to investigate and criticize the government that was necessary— willing, as we might say today, to “speak truth to power” — but a literate, educated citizenry was a crucial part of the formula: citizens who had full access to the information, the news, and the views that would inform their self governance. In 1823, as the University prepared to open to students for the first time, Thomas Jefferson wrote, “The only security of all is in a free press.” Understanding the power and the responsibilities of journalism and of the media in a constitutional democracy is therefore a critical component in our study of citizenship.
At the University of Virginia’s Center for Media and Citizenship, we take seriously the very real threats to self governance, and to human and civil rights. We believe that a deeper appreciation and understanding of the relationships between the media, journalism, democracy, and citizenship will provide much-needed insight and perspective. Our offices and media lab are located in Wilson Hall on the historic Grounds of the Academical Village at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. We invite you to follow the links below for more information about the Center, to sign up for our newsletter, to join us at our upcoming public events, and please consider supporting this important work with your donation.
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VCU onAir ChapterVirginia Commonwealth University

The Center for Community Engagement and Impact works with faculty, staff and community partners as a central university hub to facilitate mutually-beneficial partnerships and relationships that enhance student learning and address community-identified needs.

High-quality academic-community partnerships are built using values and principles that guide us in our work. VCU encourages partnerships that strive for:

  • Impact by aligning efforts to meet community-identified needs.
  • Connections that foster new understanding.
  • Mutual benefit and reciprocity for all parties.
  • Communication that honors shared goals and supports continuous improvement.
  • Contributions that recognize the knowledge, skills and experiences that everyone contributes to the pursuit of common goals

Website:  community.vcu.edu/
Executive director:  Heidi A. Crapol

Summary

The Center for Community Engagement and Impact works with faculty, staff and community partners as a central university hub to facilitate mutually-beneficial partnerships and relationships that enhance student learning and address community-identified needs.

High-quality academic-community partnerships are built using values and principles that guide us in our work. VCU encourages partnerships that strive for:

  • Impact by aligning efforts to meet community-identified needs.
  • Connections that foster new understanding.
  • Mutual benefit and reciprocity for all parties.
  • Communication that honors shared goals and supports continuous improvement.
  • Contributions that recognize the knowledge, skills and experiences that everyone contributes to the pursuit of common goals

Website:  community.vcu.edu/
Executive director:  Heidi A. Crapol

About

Source: Wikipedia

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) is a public research university in Richmond, Virginia. VCU was founded in 1838 as the medical department of Hampden–Sydney College, becoming the Medical College of Virginia in 1854. In 1968, the Virginia General Assembly merged MCV with the Richmond Professional Institute, founded in 1917, to create Virginia Commonwealth University. In 2018, more than 31,000 students pursue 217 degree and certificate programs through VCU’s 11 schools and three colleges. The VCU Health System supports the university’s health care education, research, and patient care mission.

VCU had a record $310 million in sponsored research funding in the fiscal year 2019 and is classified among “R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity”. A broad array of university-approved centers and institutes of excellence, involving faculty from multiple disciplines in public policy, biotechnology and health care discoveries, supports the university’s research mission. Twenty-eight graduate and first-professional programs are ranked by U.S. News & World Report as among the best in the country. VCU’s athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are collectively known as the VCU Rams. They are members of the Atlantic 10 Conference. The VCU campus includes historic buildings such as the Ginter House, now used by the school’s provost.

Student Programs

Source: Webpage

Civic Engagement
Your time at VCU is a gateway to finding your life-changing experiences, your best friend or mentor, and getting involved in your community. Check out the endless list of ways to connect with people in our community for the greater good!

Internships

Wilder School

Source: Webpage

The Wilder School encourages students to participate in for-credit, structured and supervised internships with government, nonprofit and business organizations. Internships provide students with experience in a professional setting outside the classroom and enrich the learning process by supplementing theory with practice.

For guidelines, policies, requirements and application details click links below:

Undergraduate Internship Guidelines

Graduate Internship Guidelines

Government and Public Affairs Experience Application

 

Department of Political Science

Source: Webpage

VCU Political Science students can earn up to six credits for internship hours earned during fall, spring and summer semesters: one credit=50 hours working on an internship.

Students may apply for internship credits with a variety of politically-relevant organizations, including, but not limited to, government offices, non-profit groups, political campaigns, law offices, media outlets, lobbying groups, etc.

Students may also apply for POLI credit through the Wilder School’s Virginia Capitol Semester program in the Virginia General Assembly.

Although it is each student’s responsibility to find an internship that best suits their interests and talents, this is a list that keeps a live-updated record of potential internship opportunities.

Internship Requirements

In order to receive VCU Political Science course credit for an internship, students must:

  • be declared a political science major, or be minoring in nonprofits or public management,
  • have completed at least nine upper-level credits (300 level or above) in political science courses and
  • have earned at least a cumulative 2.7 GPA in political science major coursework

In some cases, the Political Science internship director may grant an exception if students do not meet one of the criteria listed above. Students in this situation should speak with their Political Science adviser first, and then contact the internship director with a formal written request for an exception. It is likely the internship director will want to meet with students face-to-face before making any decisions of this nature.

If you are unsure about whether you meet the above requirements, or whether doing an internship for course credit is right for you, please contact your political science adviser at poliadvisor@vcu.edu.

Academic Programs

L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs

Source: Website

At the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, we’re all about taking advantage of everything our city has to offer.

You’ll find our students making a difference in internships across Virginia, from the General Assembly to state agencies and nonprofits. Our faculty is immersed in research — and partner with students on it, too. Our alumni (10,000 strong) open doors to the Wilder School network at Fortune 500 companies, local governments, advocacy groups and public interest firms.

At about 1,000 undergraduates and 400 graduate students strong each year, we’re big enough to offer bold opportunities and small enough for individualized instruction and true faculty mentorship.

The 2020 U.S. News & World Report rankings confirm the Wilder School among the nation’s top 20% of graduate schools of public affairs at No. 45. The school also ranks No. 39 in Public Management & Leadership, marking the first time the Wilder School has ranked in one of the specialty areas!

Our strategically designed programs mean you can really customize your study based on your interests. Mix and match classes in:

VCU Department of Political Science

Source: Website

VCU’s College of Humanities and Sciences offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science, with concentrations available in

Our faculty have expertise in a broad spectrum of subjects, including: international health; Russian politics; the intersections between politics and religion in both historical and contemporary contexts; Anglo-American political thought; feminist political theory; U.S. presidential decision-making for national security and foreign policy; information politics (e.g. government secrecy, mis/disinformation and public ignorance); national security intelligence; governance responses to human migration; global environmental politics; immigration; labor politics; Latin American politics; legislative behavior; partisan gerrymandering; campaign finance; political communication; political behavior; public opinion; international relations; local economic development in the US; public administration; constitutional law; European politics; political theory; comparative political development; African democratization; public administration; and public and nonprofit management.

Graduates of our program have gone on to professional degree programs in law, public policy, business, and medicine, while others have pursued graduate studies in political science, international affairs/international relations, and public administration. In addition to finding employment in the private sector in fields including risk analysis, government relations, lobbying, and consulting, our graduates have also been successful in securing public-sector jobs at the local, state, and federal levels, and with non-governmental organizations in Richmond, Washington, DC, and around the world.

Our Mission

Political science is the systematic study of institutions, behavior and ideas in order to further our understanding and explanation of government and politics at the local, state, national and international levels. The discipline has a rich history that bridges the present with the past and future, is pluralistic in its modes of inquiry and adopts a critical approach that makes use of qualitative and quantitative analytic methods.

VCU Political Science uses its unique position on an urban campus located in the state capital and just a short distance from Washington, D.C. to provide our students with transformative learning experiences that promote active and engaged citizenship, domestically and globally. We integrate our teaching with cutting-edge scholarship that advances the boundaries of the discipline and meaningfully impacts public debate and policy.

The department values diversity of thought and identity, inclusive pedagogy, informal mentorships, active citizenship and the free expression of ideas through innovative scholarship, teaching and community engagement. We are dedicated to developing programs and a curriculum that prepare our graduates to be informed and inquisitive citizens who are positioned to make a difference as professionals and lifelong learners.

Research Centers & Initiatives

Wilder School’s Center for Public Policy

Source: Webpage

The Wilder School’s Center for Public Policy aims to advance research and training that informs public policy and decision-making to improve our communities.

Drawing on the wide-ranging expertise of Wilder School faculty, we provide diverse public-facing services including leadership development and training, economic and policy impact analysis, survey insights and program evaluation to clients in state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, businesses and the general public, across Virginia and beyond.

THE DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND OUTREACH

leads the effort to create effective public policy in Virginia by connecting local and state policymakers to academic experts within VCU through the Translational Research Fellows Program. It also conducts public policy polls multiple times per year to provide policymakers and the public with an up-to-date snapshot of public opinion in Virginia, and engages in community outreach activities with Girl Scouts, homeschool groups, Rotary Clubs, and others.

THE GRACE E. HARRIS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

promotes the development of current and emerging leaders in academic institutions, other public, private, and nonprofit organizations, and communities. Consistent with the mission of VCU, the Institute is committed to identifying and nurturing the next generation of leaders through leadership training and public policy research.

UITY AND DIVERSITY PROJECTS

The Wilder School and the Center for Public Policy have a long history of promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion within our community and across Virginia. Through offerings in research, training, and leadership, we leverage the expertise of Center for Public Policy faculty and researchers as we work with state and local governments, as well as with businesses and nonprofits, to create a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive commonwealth. Click here to learn more about this work.

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William & MaryWilliam & Mary

The Office of Community Engagement connects William & Mary and community to support students’ development as active and educated citizens and to promote positive, community-driven social change.
Our vision is that students will prioritize working within and understanding community in a lifelong pursuit of social justice.

What We Do

  • Promote the development of active, educated citizen students at William & Mary, combining intellectual  rigor and community service to generate positive, community-driven social change
  • Connect community organizations with students and faculty to create mutually beneficial partnerships
  • Provide opportunities to tutor and mentor local students through our educational programs
  • Offer ongoing and one-time local service projects  for students and groups through our local community engagement programs
  • Organize opportunities for immersive service through Branch Out Alternative Breaks
  • Introduce new students to diverse social issues and community-building methods  before move-in day through our 7 Generations Pre-Orientation program
  • Provide grant funding for innovative community engagement projects that develop students as active citizens and to support communities in achieving their own goals
  • Engage the minds of students, community partners, faculty and staff with discussions about social issues and community topics
  • Sponsor campus events and forums promoting the development of active citizens, including the annual William & Mary Active Citizens Conference

Websitewm.edu/offices/oce
Director: Melody Porter

Summary

The Office of Community Engagement connects William & Mary and community to support students’ development as active and educated citizens and to promote positive, community-driven social change.
Our vision is that students will prioritize working within and understanding community in a lifelong pursuit of social justice.

What We Do

  • Promote the development of active, educated citizen students at William & Mary, combining intellectual  rigor and community service to generate positive, community-driven social change
  • Connect community organizations with students and faculty to create mutually beneficial partnerships
  • Provide opportunities to tutor and mentor local students through our educational programs
  • Offer ongoing and one-time local service projects  for students and groups through our local community engagement programs
  • Organize opportunities for immersive service through Branch Out Alternative Breaks
  • Introduce new students to diverse social issues and community-building methods  before move-in day through our 7 Generations Pre-Orientation program
  • Provide grant funding for innovative community engagement projects that develop students as active citizens and to support communities in achieving their own goals
  • Engage the minds of students, community partners, faculty and staff with discussions about social issues and community topics
  • Sponsor campus events and forums promoting the development of active citizens, including the annual William & Mary Active Citizens Conference

Websitewm.edu/offices/oce
Director: Melody Porter

About

Source: Wikipedia

The College of William & Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M, and officially The College of William and Mary in Virginia) is a public research university in Williamsburg, Virginia. Founded in 1693 by letters patent issued by King William III and Queen Mary II, it is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, after Harvard University.

William & Mary educated American presidents Thomas Jefferson (third), James Monroe (fifth), and John Tyler (tenth) as well as other key figures pivotal to the development of the United States, including the first President of the Continental Congress Peyton Randolph of Virginia, the first U.S. Attorney General Edmund Randolph of Virginia, the fourth U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall of Virginia, Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay of Kentucky, sixteen members of the Continental Congress, and four signers of the Declaration of Independence, earning it the nickname “the Alma Mater of the Nation.” A young George Washington also received his surveyor’s license at the college, and he would become the college’s first American chancellor in 1788.

William & Mary is notable for its many firsts in American higher education. The F.H.C. Society, founded in 1750, was the first collegiate fraternity in the United States, and W&M students founded the Phi Beta Kappa academic honor society in 1776, the first Greek-letter fraternity. W&M was also the first school of higher education in the United States to install an honor code of conduct for students, dating back to 1736. The establishment of graduate programs in law and medicine in 1779 makes it one of the first universities in the United States.

In addition to its undergraduate program, W&M is home to several graduate programs and four professional schools. The Marshall–Wythe School of Law is the oldest law school in the United States. In his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America’s Best Public Undergraduate Colleges and Universities, Richard Moll included William & Mary as one of the original eight “Public Ivies”. It is classified among “R2: Doctoral Universities – High Research Activity”.

Student Programs

Source: Webpage

Student Engagement & Leadership

Engagement is a cornerstone for leadership development and positive change. And, engagement has not waned during the pandemic. We will support the forward progress of recognized student organizations, including community engagement, intramurals (where possible), fraternity and sorority life, AMP, wellness and much more.

We have developed specific guidelines for engagement within our recognized student organizations and for campus events. If you have questions, please contact us. 

Learn more about engagement and leadership at W&M.

Learn more about the thematic area of Student Engagement and Leadership.

Internships

American Politics Institute

Source: Webpage

The College of William & Mary American Politics Institute is a six credit academic program composed of an accelerated course and an internship in the DC area. The coursework will be taught by Instructor Jaime Settle and involves intensive instruction from academic experts and political figures to explore the inner workings of political polarization and how it has changed the nature of political groups, parties, media, and office holders. The internship involves undergraduate student fellows witnessing and interacting firsthand with policymakers in the formation of American political practices through internships at Washington, DC think tanks, nongovernmental organizations, and political agencies.

Fellows also are expected to develop a deeper knowledge of a topic in American politics by completing a research paper due at the end of the summer.  In addition, fellows will receive career guidance by the Institute Professor and Washington Office staff, and network exensively with area alumni

Leadership and Community Engagement Institute

Source: Webpage

The Leadership and Community Engagement Institute is a six-credit academic program composed of a two-week course, an internship and internship credits that give W&M students the opportunity to work, live and learn in the DC area for the summer.  This Institute will be taught by Drew Stelljes, the Assistant Vice President for Student Engagement and Leadership and Executive Assistant Professor of Education at W&M.  The two week class will give students the chance to interact with prominent leaders in government, education, non-profits, law and international relations.  Through nearly twenty site visits and guest lectures, Institute fellows will gain insight into the most effective leadership strategies from the nation’s most successful community change makers.  Discussions are lively and thought-provoking, with current issues in leadership examined as class readings and assignments that help fellows develop their own leadership and communication skills.

Dr. Stelljes and W&M Washington Center staff help students obtain internships throughout the DC area that align with the topic.  Community Engagement fellows’ internships from previous summers include the Boys and Girls Club of America, the Jane Goodall Foundation, Civic Enterprises, the Department of Education, the National Conference on Citizenship, the United Nations Foundation, Global Playground and the Pulitzer Center.  Fellows receive an additional three independent study credits based on the academic work affiliated with the internship while completing papers and projects for the good of the organization.  The Institute helps program fellows discover their strengths in leadership, and develop lasting relationships with national leaders and W&M alums.

Academic Programs

The Department of Government

Source: Website

The Department of Government is a remarkable community of students, alumni, faculty, and staff committed to the study of politics and governance. Our interests span the full range of political behavior and institutions, from the beliefs of ordinary citizens to relationships between nations. We also seek to develop awareness of the moral and ethical implications of political action.

Government faculty members are productive scholars devoted to excellent teaching and the well-being of their students. Among other professional fields, alumni of the Department hold leadership positions in government, the corporate world, non-profit organizations, the legal profession, and education.

Online Citizenship Institute

Source: Webpage

This institute on online communities and digital activism examines how new media and distributed networks can help or hinder positive civic change. It considers how the campaigns of social movements, online organizations, hashtag activists, independent journalists, fans, and other kinds of digital citizens organize and disseminate ideas to promote political, civil, or human rights. It analyzes the rhetoric of online civility, free speech, and intellectual property as concerns for the digital public sphere. It also shows why governments might want to regulate online behavior and technology companies.

Aim 4

Source: Webpage

Aim 4 is a civic leadership program for students to learn and practice the skills of engaging with their communities and creating positive social change.

  • Provides opportunities like meeting with civic leaders, taking civic engagement courses, and completing meaningful service projects
  • Develops community among small cohorts of students dedicated to positive social change
  • Offers personal and purposeful advising to support an integrated experience at William & Mary

“At the beginning of the year, I joined Aim 4 because I really enjoyed community service and wanted to help people. This is still true, but I have a more nuanced, advanced perspective now. I am developing the skills and resources needed to combat complex social issues.”

Aim 4 Class Years 

  • Freshman Year: Finding Roots supports students as they consider how they will develop their active citizenship at William & Mary.
  • Sophomore Year: Digging Deeper pushes students to explore how they will deepen their understanding of community.
  • Upperclassmen: Taking Responsibility focuses on how students are responsible for change while at W&M and beyond.

Research Centers & Initiatives

Social Justice Policy Initiative

Source: Webpage

The Social Justice Policy Initiative (SJPI) is a faculty-student collaborative project to engage in policy-oriented and community-based research and advocacy. The SJPI aims to bring sociological and inter-disciplinary research to community-based and advocacy organizations and policy-makers at local, state, national, and global levels. The SJPI is housed in the Sociology Department but also hosts innovative, interdisciplinary collaborations with faculty in Africana Studies, Government, Theatre, and Modern Languages.

Within the Social Justice Policy Initiative, students work with faculty members and external partners, such as community organizations or policymakers, to research pressing social issues and support their programming and policy advocacy. Students and faculty have the opportunity to engage with community organizations, policymakers, schools, and other groups across a wide range of issue-areas, including education, labor markets, housing, immigration, and food justice. The SJPI seeks to break down silos both within and beyond the university to inform pressing social issues.

How to Get Involved

The SJPI engages students in community and policy-engaged research through four streams:Be a

  1. Research Fellow
  2. Be a Research Affiliate
  3. Be an Intern
  4. Social Justice Policy Research Courses
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ODU onAir ChapterOld Dominion University

The ODU Office of Community Engagement’s mission is to develop events and outreach opportunities to fulfill the university’s community outreach mission by promoting service, partnerships, and expertise that connect the University to our communities for community betterment and mutual success.

Its vision is to create a culture and spirit of community and civic-mindedness by building on and promoting existing efforts through strategic outreach to community organizations and integration of academic excellence to enhance ODU’s role in the Hampton Roads community, the Commonwealth and beyond.

Webpageodu.edu/communityengagement

Summary

The ODU Office of Community Engagement’s mission is to develop events and outreach opportunities to fulfill the university’s community outreach mission by promoting service, partnerships, and expertise that connect the University to our communities for community betterment and mutual success.

Its vision is to create a culture and spirit of community and civic-mindedness by building on and promoting existing efforts through strategic outreach to community organizations and integration of academic excellence to enhance ODU’s role in the Hampton Roads community, the Commonwealth and beyond.

Webpageodu.edu/communityengagement

About

Source: Wikipedia

Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public research university in Norfolk, Virginia. It was established in 1930 as the Norfolk Division of the College of William & Mary and is now one of the largest universities in Virginia with an enrollment of 24,176 students for the 2019 academic year. Old Dominion University is also home to over 700 international students from 89 different countries. Its main campus covers over 251 acres (1.02 km2) straddling the city neighborhoods of Larchmont, Highland Park, and Lambert’s Point, approximately five miles (8.0 km) from Downtown Norfolk.

Old Dominion University is classified among “R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity”.[5] According to the National Science Foundation, ODU spent $60.3 million on research and development in 2018.[6] It contributes nearly $2 billion annually in economic impact to the regional economy.

The university offers 168 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to over 24,000 students and is one of the nation’s largest providers of online distance learning courses. Old Dominion University has approximately 124,000 alumni in all 50 states and 67 countries. Old Dominion University derives its name from one of Virginia’s state nicknames, “The Old Dominion”, given to the state by King Charles II of England for remaining loyal to the crown during the English Civil War.

Student Programs

Center for Service & Civic Engagement

Source: Webpage

The Center for Service and Civic Engagement serves as a clearinghouse to match volunteers with community partners and service opportunities both on and off campus. The Center also helps support service-based student organizations and events. Finally, the Center compliments the mission of Old Dominion University by building service and philanthropic partnerships with campus and community organizations.

 

Internships

POLS|GEOG 368 Internship Guidelines

Source: Webpage

The internship program for political science and international studies is designed to offer students first hand experience in domestic and international professional settings. (government offices, non-governmental organizations, businesses, non-profit organizations, etc.). For suggestions for finding internships please contact the internship director, and view our internship listings.

General Assembly Internship

Source: Website

The Governmental Relations office hosts a General Assembly Internship program each year. ODU students have the opportunity to work closely with Virginia state legislators and their staff. Students develop professional skills while strengthening their political knowledge and gain a unique understanding of Virginia’s General Assembly. The full time, paid internship is held from January-March of each year. The group is advised by Annie Morris, Assistant to the President for Local, State and Federal Government Relations and Bo Ram Yi, Assistant to the VP SEES.

For more information, please contact: Bo Ram Yi at byi@odu.edu or 683-5032

Eligibility
Applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student at Old Dominion University to apply for this program. You must be able to reside in Richmond from Monday-Friday during session months. This internship is typically held from early January to early March of each year. Students are encouraged to take online classes during this internship period. Housing is provided at a local Richmond hotel.

Academic Programs

Department of Political Science & Geography

Source: Website

The Department of Political Science and Geography at Old Dominion University is a vibrant community of students, educators, scholars, practitioners, activists and engaged citizens. With a core of 20 full-time faculty, leading at frontiers of research, we offer majors, minors and certificates in geography and political science, unmatched by any other university in the region.

ODU Political Science and Geography are separate programs, equipping ODU students with powerful and respected understanding of the most important forces shaping our planet, country, state and community.

ODU Department of Political Science and Geography equips students to understand and influence this rapidly changing world. Our professors are active in scholarly and public debates on domestic and international affairs, frequently on local and national news media. With our world under stress from globalization to political polarization, climate change to changing human geography, the department has never been more active, or its graduates more in demand.

Research Centers & Initiatives

Social Science Research Center

Source: Website

The Social Science Research Center is a fully-equipped social science research center with staff expertise in various forms of research methods and data collection, including mail surveys, telephone surveys, household interviews, focus groups, and most conventional forms of data analysis.

SSRC staff can assist in all stages of research including instrument design, project management, data collection, data auditing, data management, data analysis, technical report writing, and the development of multi-media report presentations. We work with customers to determine their data collection and research needs and how to best accommodate those needs given time and budget restrictions.

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VT onAir Chapter 1Virginia Tech

VT Engage: The Center for Leadership & Service Learning is Virginia Tech’s center for service learning, leadership education, & civic engagement.

Our vision is to equip civic leaders to create a more just world.

​Our mission is to facilitate leadership, service learning, ​and civic engagement experiences that ​advance community priorities, ​contribute to student development, ​and embody Ut Prosim (That I May Serve)​.

We invite undergraduate and graduate students of any major to join us to #ExperienceUtProsim.

Summary

VT Engage: The Center for Leadership & Service Learning is Virginia Tech’s center for service learning, leadership education, & civic engagement.

Our vision is to equip civic leaders to create a more just world.

​Our mission is to facilitate leadership, service learning, ​and civic engagement experiences that ​advance community priorities, ​contribute to student development, ​and embody Ut Prosim (That I May Serve)​.

We invite undergraduate and graduate students of any major to join us to #ExperienceUtProsim.

About

Source: Wikipedia

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, commonly known as Virginia Tech and by the initials VT and VPI, is a public, land-grant, research university with its main campus in Blacksburg, Virginia. It also has educational facilities in six regions statewide and a study-abroad site in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland. Through its Corps of Cadets ROTC program, Virginia Tech is also designated as one of six senior military colleges in the United States.

Virginia Tech offers 280 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to some 34,400 students and manages a research portfolio of $522 million, placing it 46th among universities in the U.S. for research expenditures and the only Virginia school listed among the top 50. It is classified among “R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity”. Virginia Tech is the state’s second-largest public university by enrollment.

Student Programs

Source: Website

Student Engagement and Campus Life complements the academic experience by building communities, promoting holistic education, and cultivating environments through leadership, innovation, and service.

Our Vision
To be a national leader in cultivating innovative environments and communities in order to provide transformative experiences for all Hokies.

Our Core Values
We believe in teamwork, integrity, development, equity, and being student-centered.

Internships

Department of Political Science

Source: Website

Our faculty publishes leading-edge research in a wide variety of fields.  We prepare students to understand domestic and international affairs. Our areas of focus include national security and foreign policy, legal studies, environmental affairs, world politics and policy, global development, and international business.

Our department offers five majors: political science, international public policy, international relations, international studies and national security and foreign affairs. In the political science major, you can choose from four options: legal studies option, political theory option, national security option or the general option.

Academic Programs

Department of Political Science

Source: Webpage

Our faculty publishes leading-edge research in a wide variety of fields.  We prepare students to understand domestic and international affairs. Our areas of focus include national security and foreign policy, legal studies, environmental affairs, world politics and policy, global development, and international business.

Our department offers five majors: political science, international public policy, international relations, international studies and national security and foreign affairs. In the political science major, you can choose from four options: legal studies option, political theory option, national security option or the general option.

Government and International Affairs (GIA)

Source: Webpage

Address complex global issues through multidisciplinary, problem solving and participatory learning

Today’s most pressing political, economic, environmental, and social challenges are truly global. Traditional frameworks and singularly disciplinary approaches are no longer sufficient for making sense of the complex and changing landscape of global affairs. To be effective, meeting that challenge requires knowledge from the social sciences, humanities, policy studies, arts, and advanced technologies.

Government and International Affairs (GIA) provides researchers and students the skills to leverage their experiences and further their knowledge of contemporary security and economic governance practices. Combining theory and practice, the programs in Government and International Affairs enable students and practitioners to develop critical thinking and learn how to conduct interdisciplinary, innovative, and independent research.

In Washington DC area.

Research Centers & Initiatives

Center for Public Administration and Policy

Source: Website

The mission of the Center for Public Administration & Policy (CPAP) is to promote good governance and the advancement of capable and ethical public service by providing outstanding education, research, and outreach in the theory and practice of public administration, management, and policy.

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