OnAir@GMU ChapterGMU onAir

GMU onAir is the first and model chapter for the US onAir network of 50 state governance and election Hubs. The GMU onAir Chapter is currently leading the curation and management of the United States onAir central Hub at: https://us.onair.cc/.

The GMU onAir chapter is open to all Mason undergrad and graduate students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of Mason although only students can be members of the soon to be Registered Student Organization called “Students onAir”.

Parvin Ghahremani will become the Chapter president for the fall semester and Ani Prakash will be its vice president.

Since its founding in the fall of 2018, many chapter members have taken advantage of the onAir internship opportunities especially the Global Politics Fellows, Migration Policy Fellows, and Schar undergrad interns.

For more information on the Chapter, contact: gmu@onair.cc.
To view posts on many of our current and former members, go here.

i
Speak Up for Impact 1-minute video contest
March 21, 2022

Speak Up for Impact!

US onAir is excited to announce its Spring 2022 Speak Up for Impact! Video Contest. The contest starts on March 21, 2022 and ends April 25, 2022.  Win cash!

Contest Aim

Speak Up contests promote university competitions to have the most impact on local, state, and federal government and elections – via informed, civil discussion among university communities and their elected officials.

decade of studies showed that when constituents and their elected officials used a moderated platform to discuss their views (based on a set of issue-based facts) to find common ground, trust went up and people were more likely to vote – especially for those with whom they interacted.  That’s impact!

US onAir is a non-profit, non-partisan network with a central US Hub and 50 state Hubs designed for citizens to learn, discuss, and impact their democracy.

  • LEARN the facts about issues on posts, curated by student volunteers
  • DISCUSS issues via live-streamed aircasts, moderated by student volunteers.
  • HAVE IMPACT on elected officials, governance, prospective voters, and elections.

What you do

Got a minute?  Want to influence 2022 politics?  In your short video, tell your US Senators and US House Representative what you’d like done about an issue that matters to you, and ask for their feedback. If you want to win up to $150, influence others to ‘Speak Up’ (submit their video) also.

What we do

To amplify your voice, we will spotlight selected videos on the US and state onAir Hubs, on our YouTube channel, and other social media. We will also invite you and the US Representatives you address to discuss your issue on an aircast.

Three Cash Awards

The individual or group that influences the most people to ‘Speak Up’ (submit their own short video) will win.  There will be one Individual and two Team awards (a student organization and a GMU class). Each wins $150.

In this first Speak Up contest, only those with a George Mason University email can join to win. There are 2 more ‘Speak Up’ video contests planned for 2022, 1 for summer and 1 for fall.

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OnAir@GMU May 2022 to April 2023 officers
March 30, 2022

OnAir@GMU chapters members have selected the following officers and managers starting in May of this year. They are:

Parvin Ghahremani, President
Ani Prakash, Vice President
Paul Sullivan, Outreach Manager
Yatharth Pandey, Curation Manager

 

Voter Trust & Apathy - Meredith Cary
Meredith CaryMarch 14, 2022 (01:12)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4qAT-7Mfes&t=4s

This is a Speak Up video with slides that outlines some of the reasons why the OnAir@GMU chapter is promoting the Speak Up contest and especially targeted to faculty.

 

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Jim Lillard joins onAir Networks as a Director
January 20, 2022

Jim Lillard, current Vice President- OnAir@GMU chapter,  will serve as an onAir Networks Director this semester assisting our Arlington Fellows interns.

Fall 2021 GPF Internship Experience

There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things […].”

— Tim O’Shea, Government & International Politics Honors College alumnus

The average American tends to have more knowledge about how they are represented in the federal government than about their representation at the state level. While there are numerous reasons why this is the case, a group of George Mason students and alumni are working to close this informational gap through technology.

Democracy onAir, an online hub started by entrepreneur Scott Joy and now run by students, hopes to be the answer to all the questions people, particularly young adults, may have about who is representing them at the state-level.

GMU Alumnus Tim O'Shea

Executive Director of OnAir and Mason alumnus Tim O’Shea. Photo by Lathan Nathaniel Goumas/George Mason University Strategic Communications

“Our objective is to use technology in a way that makes it easier for people to engage in more civil [and educated] democratic processes,” said Tim O’Shea, an Honors College alumnus who graduated from Mason last May. O’Shea studied Government & International Politics as an undergraduate and is currently a Juris Doctorate candidate at Georgetown University.

On October 25, O’Shea and current Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin hosted a colloquium introducing onAir to a group of first-year Honors College students. Both O’Shea and McLaughlin joined onAir when it was just a startup and have continued to contribute to the interactive information hub. O’Shea is now the Executive Director of onAir while McLaughlin serves as the Content Director.

O’Shea and McLaughlin’s colloquium encouraged students to evaluate how they can be civically engaged on and off campus while informing them of the resources provided by onAir.

“Our hub is completely curated and managed by students,” emphasized McLaughlin, who is double majoring in Communication and Government & International Politics. Students involved with onAir interview representatives, host town hall meetings, and keep the hub’s pages up to date with current politics.

“We want to democratize the production of political information [in order to engage] young people in the process of creating that information,” explained O’Shea. O’Shea believes that “political information is better” when it is “produced and curated by people who actually live in communities that are impacted by [policies].”

The Virginia onAir hub allows users to enter their residential address and easily identify who is representing them at all levels. Users can then click on a representative’s name and read a complete background on that politician’s affiliations, election results, voting records, positions on major issues, and much more.

Students working for onAir use a stock set of questions when interviewing representatives to create an even baseline with which users can evaluate politicians.

“The goal of our hub is to provide that same quality and availability of information that a lot of us have for our federal representatives, but on the state level,” said O’Shea.

“All [policy] affects us. […] That’s really the basis of onAir.”

— Adia McLaughlin, Honors College senior; Communication and Government and International Politics double major; Student Government Vice President

Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin.

Honors College senior and Chapter Director of Mason’s OnAir, Adia McLaughlin, explains her relationship with OnAir. Photo by Joshua McLean.

Currently, Virginia is the first state to have a Democracy onAir hub, and Mason is the first onAir university chapter. McLaughlin is the president of Mason’s onAir group, which connects with more than 20 representatives. However, McLaughlin has a different relationship to the organization than some others.

“I’m from North Carolina, and I vote in North Carolina,” explained McLaughlin. “But by becoming closer to Fairfax representatives, […] I’ve been able to advocate for my fellow GMU students who do have stakes specifically here.”

Democracy onAir intends to spread to more regions of Virginia by reaching out to students at universities across the state in hopes of creating new onAir chapters. The organization also hopes to expand to more states in the future.

“The reason Mason was such a great pick to start is because we have so much civic engagement already on this campus,” said McLaughlin. “It wasn’t hard to find students who were willing to put in the time [and effort] to collect all of this data.”

At the end of the colloquium, O’Shea and McLaughlin encouraged all the students to leave their mark at Mason by creating their own unique paths to achieve their goals. The two hope that onAir shows students that there are always innovative and more effective ways to accomplish something than what may be traditional.

“There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things, and we hope we’re an example of that for people,” said O’Shea of his and McLaughlin’s contributions to onAir.

“All [policy] affects us,” said McLaughlin. “That’s really the basis of onAir.”

To explore the Virginia onAir hub, visit va.onair.cc. To explore GMU’s onAir chapter, see this post.

Pandemic Communication
Climate Change & US Governance

Summary

GMU onAir is the first and model chapter for the US onAir network of 50 state governance and election Hubs. The GMU onAir Chapter is currently leading the curation and management of the United States onAir central Hub at: https://us.onair.cc/.

The GMU onAir chapter is open to all Mason undergrad and graduate students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of Mason although only students can be members of the soon to be Registered Student Organization called “Students onAir”.

Parvin Ghahremani will become the Chapter president for the fall semester and Ani Prakash will be its vice president.

Since its founding in the fall of 2018, many chapter members have taken advantage of the onAir internship opportunities especially the Global Politics Fellows, Migration Policy Fellows, and Schar undergrad interns.

For more information on the Chapter, contact: gmu@onair.cc.
To view posts on many of our current and former members, go here.

News

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Speak Up for Impact 1-minute video contest
March 21, 2022

Speak Up for Impact!

US onAir is excited to announce its Spring 2022 Speak Up for Impact! Video Contest. The contest starts on March 21, 2022 and ends April 25, 2022.  Win cash!

Contest Aim

Speak Up contests promote university competitions to have the most impact on local, state, and federal government and elections – via informed, civil discussion among university communities and their elected officials.

decade of studies showed that when constituents and their elected officials used a moderated platform to discuss their views (based on a set of issue-based facts) to find common ground, trust went up and people were more likely to vote – especially for those with whom they interacted.  That’s impact!

US onAir is a non-profit, non-partisan network with a central US Hub and 50 state Hubs designed for citizens to learn, discuss, and impact their democracy.

  • LEARN the facts about issues on posts, curated by student volunteers
  • DISCUSS issues via live-streamed aircasts, moderated by student volunteers.
  • HAVE IMPACT on elected officials, governance, prospective voters, and elections.

What you do

Got a minute?  Want to influence 2022 politics?  In your short video, tell your US Senators and US House Representative what you’d like done about an issue that matters to you, and ask for their feedback. If you want to win up to $150, influence others to ‘Speak Up’ (submit their video) also.

What we do

To amplify your voice, we will spotlight selected videos on the US and state onAir Hubs, on our YouTube channel, and other social media. We will also invite you and the US Representatives you address to discuss your issue on an aircast.

Three Cash Awards

The individual or group that influences the most people to ‘Speak Up’ (submit their own short video) will win.  There will be one Individual and two Team awards (a student organization and a GMU class). Each wins $150.

In this first Speak Up contest, only those with a George Mason University email can join to win. There are 2 more ‘Speak Up’ video contests planned for 2022, 1 for summer and 1 for fall.

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OnAir@GMU May 2022 to April 2023 officers
March 30, 2022

OnAir@GMU chapters members have selected the following officers and managers starting in May of this year. They are:

Parvin Ghahremani, President
Ani Prakash, Vice President
Paul Sullivan, Outreach Manager
Yatharth Pandey, Curation Manager

 

Voter Trust & Apathy – Meredith Cary
Meredith CaryMarch 14, 2022 (01:12)

This is a Speak Up video with slides that outlines some of the reasons why the OnAir@GMU chapter is promoting the Speak Up contest and especially targeted to faculty.

 

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Jim Lillard joins onAir Networks as a Director
January 20, 2022

Jim Lillard, current Vice President- OnAir@GMU chapter,  will serve as an onAir Networks Director this semester assisting our Arlington Fellows interns.

Fall 2021 GPF Internship Experience

There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things […].”

— Tim O’Shea, Government & International Politics Honors College alumnus

The average American tends to have more knowledge about how they are represented in the federal government than about their representation at the state level. While there are numerous reasons why this is the case, a group of George Mason students and alumni are working to close this informational gap through technology.

Democracy onAir, an online hub started by entrepreneur Scott Joy and now run by students, hopes to be the answer to all the questions people, particularly young adults, may have about who is representing them at the state-level.

GMU Alumnus Tim O'Shea

Executive Director of OnAir and Mason alumnus Tim O’Shea. Photo by Lathan Nathaniel Goumas/George Mason University Strategic Communications

“Our objective is to use technology in a way that makes it easier for people to engage in more civil [and educated] democratic processes,” said Tim O’Shea, an Honors College alumnus who graduated from Mason last May. O’Shea studied Government & International Politics as an undergraduate and is currently a Juris Doctorate candidate at Georgetown University.

On October 25, O’Shea and current Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin hosted a colloquium introducing onAir to a group of first-year Honors College students. Both O’Shea and McLaughlin joined onAir when it was just a startup and have continued to contribute to the interactive information hub. O’Shea is now the Executive Director of onAir while McLaughlin serves as the Content Director.

O’Shea and McLaughlin’s colloquium encouraged students to evaluate how they can be civically engaged on and off campus while informing them of the resources provided by onAir.

“Our hub is completely curated and managed by students,” emphasized McLaughlin, who is double majoring in Communication and Government & International Politics. Students involved with onAir interview representatives, host town hall meetings, and keep the hub’s pages up to date with current politics.

“We want to democratize the production of political information [in order to engage] young people in the process of creating that information,” explained O’Shea. O’Shea believes that “political information is better” when it is “produced and curated by people who actually live in communities that are impacted by [policies].”

The Virginia onAir hub allows users to enter their residential address and easily identify who is representing them at all levels. Users can then click on a representative’s name and read a complete background on that politician’s affiliations, election results, voting records, positions on major issues, and much more.

Students working for onAir use a stock set of questions when interviewing representatives to create an even baseline with which users can evaluate politicians.

“The goal of our hub is to provide that same quality and availability of information that a lot of us have for our federal representatives, but on the state level,” said O’Shea.

“All [policy] affects us. […] That’s really the basis of onAir.”

— Adia McLaughlin, Honors College senior; Communication and Government and International Politics double major; Student Government Vice President

Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin.

Honors College senior and Chapter Director of Mason’s OnAir, Adia McLaughlin, explains her relationship with OnAir. Photo by Joshua McLean.

Currently, Virginia is the first state to have a Democracy onAir hub, and Mason is the first onAir university chapter. McLaughlin is the president of Mason’s onAir group, which connects with more than 20 representatives. However, McLaughlin has a different relationship to the organization than some others.

“I’m from North Carolina, and I vote in North Carolina,” explained McLaughlin. “But by becoming closer to Fairfax representatives, […] I’ve been able to advocate for my fellow GMU students who do have stakes specifically here.”

Democracy onAir intends to spread to more regions of Virginia by reaching out to students at universities across the state in hopes of creating new onAir chapters. The organization also hopes to expand to more states in the future.

“The reason Mason was such a great pick to start is because we have so much civic engagement already on this campus,” said McLaughlin. “It wasn’t hard to find students who were willing to put in the time [and effort] to collect all of this data.”

At the end of the colloquium, O’Shea and McLaughlin encouraged all the students to leave their mark at Mason by creating their own unique paths to achieve their goals. The two hope that onAir shows students that there are always innovative and more effective ways to accomplish something than what may be traditional.

“There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things, and we hope we’re an example of that for people,” said O’Shea of his and McLaughlin’s contributions to onAir.

“All [policy] affects us,” said McLaughlin. “That’s really the basis of onAir.”

To explore the Virginia onAir hub, visit va.onair.cc. To explore GMU’s onAir chapter, see this post.

Pandemic Communication
Climate Change & US Governance

About

For the past 3 and 1/2 years, numerous Mason students, faculty, staff, and alumni have led the way in developing the US onAir network.
Some of the key contributors include:

Todd Gillette, GMU PhD  in Neuroscience 2015, Chair – Democracy onAir and lead developer of the onAir software;
Tim O’Shea, GMU BA Government and International Politics 2019 and Georgetown Law 2022, first US onAir Executive Director and Director – Democracy onAir;
Shuaib Ahmed, GMU BS IT 2019 and GMUMasters student in Cyber, former Director and manager- Democracy onAir;
Jim McLean, GMU BA CVPA 2001 and GMU instructional technologist, imaging and aircasting advisor;
Gary Kreps, GMU professor and former chair of communication, communication advisor;
Lourdes Fernandez, GMU English profess and PhD 2019, two significant focus groups with her classes;
Aram Zucker-Scharff, GMU BA English 2011 and BS IT 2011, lead developer and CTO  for onAir networks;
Meredith Cary, GMU adult education student, lead inspiration and sponsor for the Speak Up 1-minute videos and contest

 

OnAir@GMU Charter

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Twitter

Contact

Email: Parvin Ghahremai

Locations

Fairfax Campus
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030

Web

Virginia onAir, United States onAir, Ukraine onAir, Costa Rica onAir, Cyber onAir, Twitter

Videos

Livestreamed Events

David Bulova Town Hall

By: Virginia onAir

When:    Saturday February 2nd at 9:00 to 11:00 am
Where:   Fairfax City Hall Council Chambers at 10455 Armstrong Street (parking in rear of City Hall offices)
Web:       Recorded by Nic Barta for Virginia onAir edited by Ny-jhee Jones.

Summary of the event – Go to this post.

Activities

Students and other people in the Mason community who are not part an onAir internship program, can contribute to the chapter  in many ways including:

Most of the above ways to to contribute require less than an hour per week depending on the nature and extent of engagement.

For more information on how to participate in onAir activities, contact: gmu@onair.cc.

 

 

Benefits

Beyond helping to reinvigorate a more civil and vibrant democracy in their state, chapter members will:

  • Have the same benefits as people and organizations that purchase premium memberships including a full member profile post and the ability to author or co-author issue related posts
  • Be able to network Virginia elected officials and political organizations
  • Acquire and develop their political communication and media skills
  • Gain experience and credibility to pursue job opportunities including with Democracy onAir and other democracy promoting organizations

Internships

Democracy onAir welcomes any US citizen to apply for an internship. We require a minimum commitment of 6 hours per week.

We have a special interest in working with undergraduate and graduate students majoring in government, communications, media, or a related field with a passion to improve democracy in the US.  Students (and other US citizens) who want to intern with Democracy onAir this year can submit their resume along with an introductory email articulating why you are interested in being a Democracy onAir intern and include a link, if appropriate, to your relevant academic program (internship, capstone project, research project etc.) to: internships@onair.cc. 

See this post for more information on our internships.

Current GMU interns include:
Global Politics Fellows
Paul Sullivan, Yatharth Pandey, Parvin Ghahremani, Connor Oatman, and Ben Murphy

Migration Policy Fellows
Eve Armstrong, Joe Kubicki, and Ani Prakash

The above Arlington Fellows programs are 6 credit programs requiring approximately 20 hours per week of engagement.

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Speak Up - GMUSpeak Up – GMU

What YOU Do

Record 1-minute videos.
Participate in Zoom aircasts.
Tell your representatives about an issue that matters to you, what you’d like done about it, and  ask for their feedback.

What WE Do  

Amplify your voice.
Facilitate civil conversations.
We invite the politicians you address to discuss your issue … and spotlight the aircasts in onAir Hubs & social media.

WHY

To find common ground.
Promote participatory democracy.
Connect students, faculty, & the public to their representatives & candidates to have greater impact on elections and legislation.

Speak Up for Impact Contest

The GMU onAir Chapter is sponsoring the first Speak Up for Impact contest.  Anyone can submit a 1-minute video either using their own or another person’s GMU email address. A minimum cash prize of $150 will be awarded to the student who has the most videos submitted in their name. In addition, a minimum cash prize of $150 will be awarded to the Club and to the Class with the most submitted videos in their names. Check the News section of this post for higher cash awards provided by additional sponsors throughout the semester.

The contest starts August 22, 2022 and ends December 9, 2022. 

Summary

What YOU Do

Record 1-minute videos.
Participate in Zoom aircasts.
Tell your representatives about an issue that matters to you, what you’d like done about it, and  ask for their feedback.

What WE Do  

Amplify your voice.
Facilitate civil conversations.
We invite the politicians you address to discuss your issue … and spotlight the aircasts in onAir Hubs & social media.

WHY

To find common ground.
Promote participatory democracy.
Connect students, faculty, & the public to their representatives & candidates to have greater impact on elections and legislation.

Speak Up for Impact Contest

The GMU onAir Chapter is sponsoring the first Speak Up for Impact contest.  Anyone can submit a 1-minute video either using their own or another person’s GMU email address. A minimum cash prize of $150 will be awarded to the student who has the most videos submitted in their name. In addition, a minimum cash prize of $150 will be awarded to the Club and to the Class with the most submitted videos in their names. Check the News section of this post for higher cash awards provided by additional sponsors throughout the semester.

The contest starts August 22, 2022 and ends December 9, 2022. 

About

Contest Aim

Speak Up contests promote university competitions to have the most impact on local, state, and federal government and elections – via informed, civil discussion among university communities and their elected officials.

A decade of studies showed that when constituents and their elected officials used a moderated platform to discuss their views (based on a set of issue-based facts) to find common ground, trust went up and people were more likely to vote – especially for those with whom they interacted.  That’s impact!

US onAir is a non-profit, non-partisan network with a central US Hub and 50 state Hubs designed for citizens to learn, discuss, and impact their democracy.

  • LEARN the facts about issues on posts, curated by student volunteers
  • DISCUSS issues via live-streamed aircasts, moderated by student volunteers.
  • HAVE IMPACT on elected officials, governance, prospective voters, and elections.

Submission Form

Contest Overview

Eligibility:

Any individual (at least 18 years old) can enter as long as they submit their own and a student’s email address. No purchase of any sort is necessary and there is no entry fee.

Submission Steps:

  1. Create your video as an mp4.
  2. Upload the mp4 when you officially join the contest by fully completing this ENTRY form.

Selection of Winner(s):

Those who inspire the most to ‘Speak Up’ win. The top three will win $150 each:

  • The educator (or the class designee), for the most videos submitted on behalf of a GMU class
  • The student organization, for the most videos submitted on behalf of a student organization
  • The individual (faculty, student, affiliate, staff, alumni) who submits their video and influences the most individuals (in person or by social media) to join and ‘Speak Up’.

Contest Details

Agreement to Rules

Each Entrant must comply with all the terms and conditions of the official rules (the “Rules”) contained herein. By participating in the Contest, each Entrant fully and unconditionally agrees to be bound by and accepts the terms and conditions of these Rules and the decisions of US onAir and its Judges (including, without limitation, the selection of finalists and winners, and the awarding of prizes), which are final and binding in all respects.

  • You represent and warrant that you meet the requirements and qualifications for this Contest and that you have read these Rules and are fully familiar with them.
  • You represent and warrant that you will be severally liable for any failure to comply with these Rules.
  • You represent that you are at least 18 years of age.
  • Runtime: Videos are no longer than 75 seconds, including any credits. Any video longer than 75 seconds will be disqualified.
  • Message: The video must:
    • Address your US Senators and US House member. Find out who they are here.
    • Tell them what you want done about an issue that most matters to you … or … Ask them what they plan to do about that issue.
    • Ask for their response to you.
  • Style: The title must include the issue and the entrant’s name (e.g., ‘Everyone Vote!’ – John Doe). Use any style of expression (e.g., speak, sing, dance, animation, slides, personal story, etc.).
  • Exclusivity: Submissions must be posted online during the dates of the contest and must not be entered in, or associated with, any other contest or campaign. Previously posted submissions from publicized contests will be disqualified.
  • Terms of Service: Entrants must comply with the terms of service — including any community guidelines and copyright policies for YouTube. If your video is removed from the host platform for violation of its terms of service, you will be disqualified from the contest.
  • Music: If the video contains music, the use of copyrighted music in the video is not allowed, but non-copyright music is optional. To avoid violating copyright law, entrants are strongly encouraged to use either an original song; music available in the YouTube Audio Library; or royalty-free licensed music (e.g., music purchased — or downloaded for free —  from a stock music website).
  • Permission: Entrants are responsible for securing all necessary rights, licenses, clearances, releases, consents and/or permissions from any other people who appear in the video entry.
  • Originality: You represent and warrant that your entry is original and in full compliance with the terms of service of YouTube.
  • Ownership: You retain ownership of your video. However, by entering the Contest, you grant to the US onAir a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free, sublicensable and transferable license to use that video (including to reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works, display and perform it) in connection with the Contest and US onAir’s (and its successors’ and Affiliates’) business, including for the purpose of promoting the Contest.

Appropriateness

Video submissions must be consistent with use of:

Video submissions must NOT:

  • Promote any product or brand.
  • Violate the terms of service of the host platform.
  • Identify other individuals by name (other than an elected official), without written permission.
  • Contain any of the following:  profanity; content depicting or promoting sexual activity; content depicting or promoting illegal activity; content that depicts or promotes violence or harm; or any other offensive, obscene, or inappropriate content, which will be determined by US onAir and the Contest Judges.

Indemnity

  • To the extent permitted by applicable law, you agree to defend, indemnify and hold harmless US onAir, its Affiliates, officers, directors, employees and agents, from and against any and all claims, damages, obligations, losses, liabilities, costs or debt, and expenses (including attorney’s fees) arising from: (i) your participation in the Contest; (ii) your violation of any term of this Agreement; (iii) your violation of any third party right, including without limitation any copyright, property, or privacy right; or (iv) any claim that your video caused damage to a third party. This defense and indemnification obligation will survive this Agreement and the Contest.

Permissions

  • By submitting an entry, you grant to US onAir and its affiliated companies the right, except where prohibited by law, to use your name, likeness, picture, voice, biographical information, submission/entry and written or oral statements, for advertising and promotional purposes in promoting or publicizing the Contest, US onAir and its mission and services, without compensation unless required by law. You shall have no right of approval, no claim to compensation, and no claim (including, without limitation, claims based on invasion of privacy, defamation, rights of integrity or attribution, or right of publicity) arising out of any use, alteration, or use in composite form of your name, picture, likeness, address (city and state only), biographical information, or entry.

Rights

  • The rights granted herein shall extend to US onAir and its affiliated companies and agents with respect to all entrants in the Contest, including the entrant who is selected as the prize winner(s) and those entrants who are not selected. US onAir is under no obligation to use the winning entries or any other entry for any purpose.

Governing Law

  • All claims arising out of or relating to these Rules will be governed by VA law and will be litigated exclusively in the federal or state courts of Fairfax County, VA.

Speak Up – GMU Flyer

Download (PDF, Unknown)

X
Parvin Ghahremani 1Parvin Ghahremani

My name is Parvin Ghahremani. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

Why I am interning with Democracy onAir…

I decided to pursue an internship at Democracy on Air after learning about their mission to get students involved in politics at the state and federal levels. As a Government and International Politics major, I am constantly learning about issues that pertain to our government which is why I am eager to intern at Democracy onAir and spread awareness on the importance of protecting our democracy.

test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-OQsjk3CO8

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How would I improve U.S. Democracy
i
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Parvin GhahremaniJanuary 28, 2022

Democracy gives citizens a voice in legislation. In a democracy, citizens are allowed to freely express their opinions and beliefs through elected representatives. Without a democracy, citizens would not have a say in how they are governed and by who they are governed.

The ability to have a voice in legislation through elected representatives is a privilege that we should not take for granted. As a dual citizen of the U.S and Mexico, I have been able to see the difference in how both countries deal with democracy.

As a Mexican citizen, I have witnessed the effects of having government officials in office who are not there to represent the people’s interests but their own. As an American citizen, I have had the privilege to witness change through representatives that are in office by the people and for the people. Democracy matters to me because it has allowed me to have a voice in legislation that affects my everyday life.

Summary

My name is Parvin Ghahremani. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

Why I am interning with Democracy onAir…

I decided to pursue an internship at Democracy on Air after learning about their mission to get students involved in politics at the state and federal levels. As a Government and International Politics major, I am constantly learning about issues that pertain to our government which is why I am eager to intern at Democracy onAir and spread awareness on the importance of protecting our democracy.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy
i
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Parvin GhahremaniJanuary 28, 2022

Democracy gives citizens a voice in legislation. In a democracy, citizens are allowed to freely express their opinions and beliefs through elected representatives. Without a democracy, citizens would not have a say in how they are governed and by who they are governed.

The ability to have a voice in legislation through elected representatives is a privilege that we should not take for granted. As a dual citizen of the U.S and Mexico, I have been able to see the difference in how both countries deal with democracy.

As a Mexican citizen, I have witnessed the effects of having government officials in office who are not there to represent the people’s interests but their own. As an American citizen, I have had the privilege to witness change through representatives that are in office by the people and for the people. Democracy matters to me because it has allowed me to have a voice in legislation that affects my everyday life.

About

Education

George Mason University- Schar School of Policy and Government

BA: Government and International Politics with a concentration in International Relations

Expected December 2022

Experience

My Major

My Professional Goals

OnAir activities

I am currently the Director for Virginia onAir as a part of my internship with Democracy onAir.

Papers and Projects

My Major

….

My Professional Goals

Internship

Interview

X
Ani PrakashAni Prakash

My name is Ani Prakash. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Global Affairs. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because as someone who is keen on studying world affairs and who has developed an interest in domestic politics and foreign policy at a younger age, I have always expressed a passion towards improving the frameworks of our country’s democracy as well as electoral systems that are vital towards preserving the democratic freedoms our nation’s founders have developed.

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Parvin GhahremaniJanuary 31, 2022 (01:30)
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Ani PrakashJanuary 19, 2022

Former US President Abraham Lincoln once quoted that “a democracy is of the people by the people, and for the people ”. I remember firsthand witnessing our democracy being under siege when I watched the Capitol building being looted on January 6th by a coalition of insurrectionists and supremacist organizations, in an attempt to subvert the certification process over Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 election. Both my parents and I held feelings of distraught, after witnessing what was noted to be one of the worst attacks against our country’s regional security and national institutions since September 11th. My parents were appalled by some of the demonstrations and internally encountered a series of questions that each illustrated, “Is this what our democracy consists of? or Is this how we represent our traditions of democracy on the world stage”.

Democracy is truly the most important government system that establishes a strong connection not only towards our family values but also to our personal lives. When my parents first immigrated to this country in 1997, they knew for sure that aspects surrounding the United States being acknowledged as a “city on a hill” were the reasons behind their decision to settle in this country. Their decisions to engage in political participation as well as electing politicians of their choice enabled them to earn their first taste of true democracy, a symbol of equality, freedom and inclusiveness. Democracy, as an emblem of our republic, is what matters to me heavily because personally, this system not only changed my parent’s lives but its key tenets of equality and transparency are impactful towards myself and the lives of many.

How I would improve US democracy
Ani PrakashFebruary 2, 2022

Democracy is the linchpin behind our country’s government since its key elements of freedom, transparency, and inclusiveness are what our Founding Fathers considered as the ideal makeup of our nation’s republic. Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed that, “a democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely”. Our nation’s representative democracy symbolized the United States for centuries, yet issues regarding insurrections on federal institutions and misinformation attacks towards election results have clearly placed our democracy in peril and under siege. For our democracy to be preserved and safeguarded over future disturbances intending to rupture our government, it is time that we take a stand towards reforming our nation’s electoral systems. 

To improve our frameworks of democracy, we must consider the For the People Act of 2021, a House Resolution underscoring an intention to expand voting rights and implement structural reforms towards our nation’s democratic systems. The need for election integrity regulations and adequate strategies to protect US democratic institutions are vital solutions that are essential not just for the prevention of hyper-partisan gerrymandering but for preserving our nation’s frameworks of democracy. Democracy is a basic necessity for our country’s survival and without any form of enforcement to defend this model of governance, our democratic systems as well as our nation entirely would cease to exist. As John Adams once quoted, “a democracy never lasts too long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and even worse can murder itself”.  

Summary

My name is Ani Prakash. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Global Affairs. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because as someone who is keen on studying world affairs and who has developed an interest in domestic politics and foreign policy at a younger age, I have always expressed a passion towards improving the frameworks of our country’s democracy as well as electoral systems that are vital towards preserving the democratic freedoms our nation’s founders have developed.

News

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Parvin GhahremaniJanuary 31, 2022 (01:30)
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Ani PrakashJanuary 19, 2022

Former US President Abraham Lincoln once quoted that “a democracy is of the people by the people, and for the people ”. I remember firsthand witnessing our democracy being under siege when I watched the Capitol building being looted on January 6th by a coalition of insurrectionists and supremacist organizations, in an attempt to subvert the certification process over Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 election. Both my parents and I held feelings of distraught, after witnessing what was noted to be one of the worst attacks against our country’s regional security and national institutions since September 11th. My parents were appalled by some of the demonstrations and internally encountered a series of questions that each illustrated, “Is this what our democracy consists of? or Is this how we represent our traditions of democracy on the world stage”.

Democracy is truly the most important government system that establishes a strong connection not only towards our family values but also to our personal lives. When my parents first immigrated to this country in 1997, they knew for sure that aspects surrounding the United States being acknowledged as a “city on a hill” were the reasons behind their decision to settle in this country. Their decisions to engage in political participation as well as electing politicians of their choice enabled them to earn their first taste of true democracy, a symbol of equality, freedom and inclusiveness. Democracy, as an emblem of our republic, is what matters to me heavily because personally, this system not only changed my parent’s lives but its key tenets of equality and transparency are impactful towards myself and the lives of many.

How I would improve US democracy
Ani PrakashFebruary 2, 2022

Democracy is the linchpin behind our country’s government since its key elements of freedom, transparency, and inclusiveness are what our Founding Fathers considered as the ideal makeup of our nation’s republic. Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed that, “a democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely”. Our nation’s representative democracy symbolized the United States for centuries, yet issues regarding insurrections on federal institutions and misinformation attacks towards election results have clearly placed our democracy in peril and under siege. For our democracy to be preserved and safeguarded over future disturbances intending to rupture our government, it is time that we take a stand towards reforming our nation’s electoral systems. 

To improve our frameworks of democracy, we must consider the For the People Act of 2021, a House Resolution underscoring an intention to expand voting rights and implement structural reforms towards our nation’s democratic systems. The need for election integrity regulations and adequate strategies to protect US democratic institutions are vital solutions that are essential not just for the prevention of hyper-partisan gerrymandering but for preserving our nation’s frameworks of democracy. Democracy is a basic necessity for our country’s survival and without any form of enforcement to defend this model of governance, our democratic systems as well as our nation entirely would cease to exist. As John Adams once quoted, “a democracy never lasts too long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and even worse can murder itself”.  

About

Education

Education

George Mason University                                                                    August 2020-May 2024

Bachelor of Arts: Global Affairs

Cumulative GPA: 3.98

 

Bridgewater-Raritan High School, Bridgewater, NJ                           September 2016-June 2020

High School Diploma

 

Experience

Vice President

Company Name

VerDay Inc

Dates EmployedMar 2019 – Present

Employment Duration2 yrs 11 mos

LocationBridgewater, New Jersey

Summer Trainee

Company Name

Washington International Diplomatic Academy

Dates EmployedJul 2021

Employment Duration1 mo

Principal

Company Name

BR-Morgan Stanley Mock Venture Capital Firm

Dates EmployedJan 2019 – Jun 2020

Employment Duration1 yr 6 mos

Treasurer@Google CS First

Company Name

Google

Dates EmployedJan 2019 – Jun 2020

Employment Duration1 yr 6 mos

Communications Director at TILE^Bridgewater-Raritan

Company Name

TILE.org

Dates EmployedDec 2018 – Jun 2020

Employment Duration1 yr 7 mos

Skills

Languages:

English(native/bilingual)

Russian(limited-working proficiency)

Spanish(limited-working proficiency)

Proficiency over Microsoft Suite applications(Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and Outlook)

 

My Major

My decision to pursue Global Affairs as a major for my undergraduate studies dates back to my interests in World History that I’ve developed back in elementary school. During those times, I was always passionate in learning about historical events and the development of early civilizations that shaped our modern world, from Egypt and Mesopotamia to India, China, and Ancient Greece. My passions towards studying global historical events and civilizations that dominated our world in its early times were some of the key determinants behind my decision to consider International Relations as a degree to pursue for my college education. Towards the end of my sophomore year in high school, I was a bit clueless over the fields I should consider studying and the career opportunities I may be granted with regards to the discipline I select. I was beating myself around the bush, expressing my doubts over whether to choose computer science, business, chemical engineering, or accounting as a degree to pursue in college. However, I was able to recall some of my interests I reveled both in elementary and middle school, which were history and politics.

I started to conduct some extensive research online to try and figure out the fields/disciplines that best match the interests I generated. I came across two studies that I felt were the most intriguing, which were political science and international relations. Out of those two, the one that grabbed my attention the most was international relations so I did a little bit of research just to grasp details behind what this field entail as well as some of the facets illustrated behind this discipline. Since this field had something to do with politics, law, economics, and security but broadened under a global perspective, this was palatable to my desires so by the start of my high school junior year, I was clear to both my parents, counselors, and friends that I wanted to pursue international relations(global affairs) as a major for my undergraduate college education.

My Professional Goals

After graduating from Mason, one of my long-term professional goals I intend on pursuing is working at the US Foreign Service under the State Department. I hope to serve as a US Diplomat(Foreign Service Officer), working at an embassy abroad or at a permanent mission of a multilateral organization. I hope to represent my country as an Ambassador and present myself in the frontline of US diplomatic statecraft, whether its negotiating trade agreements or other diplomatic conventions with host nations, brokering ceasefires for regional conflicts, mobilizing humanitarian assistance or emergency response  coordinators to regions inflicted with humanitarian disasters, and fostering multilateral relations with two or more countries, either through cultural diplomacy or facilitation of joint-military exercises between the United States and the host nation I would serve under.

Along with the Foreign Service, another one of my professional goals include working as an analyst or intelligence officer under the US Intelligence Community. I intend on serving as either a political or military affairs analyst of the CIA, Foreign or Security Policy Analyst of the Defense Intelligence Agency(DIA), or an Intelligence Analyst at the National Security Agency(NSA). I hope to represent my country as a senior intelligence official working to preserve US national security and safeguard our interests abroad, whether it’s through clandestine operations launched or assessments and analytical briefs I would draft that would each entail some of the indicators our nation should be aware of with regards to the future of our national security.

Web

LinkedIn

OnAir Activities

I am producing aircasts on US OnAir as part of my GPF internship with Democracy OnAir.

I am also directing Wisconsin OnAir.

Posts curating:

  • Issues: Climate Change/US Governance and Ukraine/Russia
  • Committee: Intelligence
  • Subcommittee: Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation
  • VA Representative: Abigail Spanberger
  • University: University of Wisconsin-Madison

Papers and Projects

US-Russia Relations 2021-2024: Risks, Challenges, and Possibilities

Download (PDF, Unknown)

X
Eve ArmstrongEve Armstrong

My name is Eve Armstrong. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Sociology. I am currently a member of the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellowship at GMU and am completing this spring an internship with US onAir.

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy
Eve ArmstrongFebruary 2, 2022
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Paul SullivanJanuary 28, 2022 (00:47)
i
Why Democracy Matters to Me

Consider the French Revolution. The French monarchy embodied a world order marked by violations against the basic rights of its citizens. One person had the unquestionable power to destroy the lives of those they govern. The enactors of revolution showcased the way a society erupts when leadership does not represent the population. This is why democracy is crucial for a society to function. It is a fundamental right of the governed to participate in the politics of the nation. Through our votes, we can decide who represents us and we can hold those leaders responsible for the way they represent us. History has proven that while other systems of government have merits, the democratic system is the one that most greatly upholds the social order and protects human rights and liberties.

Summary

My name is Eve Armstrong. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Sociology. I am currently a member of the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellowship at GMU and am completing this spring an internship with US onAir.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy
Eve ArmstrongFebruary 2, 2022
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Paul SullivanJanuary 28, 2022 (00:47)
i
Why Democracy Matters to Me

Consider the French Revolution. The French monarchy embodied a world order marked by violations against the basic rights of its citizens. One person had the unquestionable power to destroy the lives of those they govern. The enactors of revolution showcased the way a society erupts when leadership does not represent the population. This is why democracy is crucial for a society to function. It is a fundamental right of the governed to participate in the politics of the nation. Through our votes, we can decide who represents us and we can hold those leaders responsible for the way they represent us. History has proven that while other systems of government have merits, the democratic system is the one that most greatly upholds the social order and protects human rights and liberties.

About

Skills
·   Training and mentoring

·   Opening and closing procedures

·   Conversational Spanish
·   MS Office

·   Customer service

·   Issue resolution

Work Experience
Shift Manager
12/2021 – Current
Mattie and Eddie’s | Arlington, VA

·   Directed employees through daily routines.

·   Handled customer complaints, questions and inquiries.

·   Managed cash positions and made bank deposits.

Bartender
03/2021 – Current
Mattie and Eddie’s | Arlington, VA

·   Managed bar area, cocktail design and menu and handled inventory, regulation compliance and customer relationships.

Server
05/2018 – 11/2021
Kaliwa | Washington, DC

·   Ensure that guests have an enjoyable dining experience at a fast-paced pan-Asian Michelin Guide restaurant on Washington, D.C.’s Southwest Waterfront.

·   Responsibilities include taking orders, serving food and drinks, opening and closing, and handling a cash register.

Education

Bishop Ireton High School | Alexandria, VA
·   Class of 2017

·   Magna Cum Laude
University of Vermont | Burlington, VT

·   Completed 85 Credits toward a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology
Griffith University | Gold Coast, Australia

·   Semester Abroad

·   Completed 16 Credits toward Bachelor of Arts

George Mason University | Fairfax, VA

·   Expected graduation December 2022

·   Major in Sociology

Work Experience

Floor Manager
12/2021 – Current
Mattie and Eddie’s | Arlington, VA

·   Directed employees through daily routines.

·   Handled customer complaints, questions and inquiries.

·   Managed cash positions and made bank deposits.

Bartender
03/2021 – Current
Mattie and Eddie’s | Arlington, VA

·   Managed bar area, cocktail design and menu and handled inventory, regulation compliance and customer relationships.

Server
05/2018 – 11/2021
Kaliwa | Washington, DC

·   Ensure that guests have an enjoyable dining experience at a fast-paced pan-Asian Michelin Guide restaurant on Washington, D.C.’s Southwest Waterfront.

·   Responsibilities include taking orders, serving food and drinks, opening and closing, and handling a cash register.

My Major

My Professional Goals

OnAir Activites

I am acting as the Assistant Director for US onAir as part of my internship for the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellowship at GMU.

I am also directing New Hampshire onAir.

Papers & Projects

Internship

Poster

Interviews

Reflective Paper

X
Paul Sullivan 1Paul Sullivan

My name is Paul Sullivan. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a minor in Intelligence Studies. I am currently a Global Politics Fellow, and I am completing an internship with Democracy onAir for the Spring 2022 period.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because I want to develop my interests in politics and international relations into the media space. Further, I would like to support others in broadening their understanding of U.S. Federal, State, and Local institutions so as to make the public into better citizens and improve the health of democracy globally.

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy
Other, Paul SullivanFebruary 3, 2022

I think voting is and ought to be a crucial part of the American experience. For being one of our most powerful American rights, most of the people I know don’t truly consider it a right. Food, water, shelter – those are rights. Voting? Well, that’s ‘special’. It’s a civic duty! It’s so important you only need to participate ‘some of the time’. What if a politician told you that your body only needs food ‘some’ of the time? You’d be outraged! And what of the ‘body politic’?

A year ago, I was with the homeless in McPherson Square – a dozen or so blocks from the US Capitol. Now those are people whose rights were forgotten about. I heard the same sentiment echoed over-and-over: “Muriel Bowser ‘ain’t doin’ nothin’ about us.” These people can’t vote. They hardly know where their next meal is coming from. I remember a bit of wisdom of them told me:

“Do you want to know who the most popular candidate is?: Nobody. If nobody was a candidate you could vote for by not showing up, nobody would win every election.”

And what of us? With election day on a Tuesday, how can some of our poorest vote? You can’t just tell people living paycheck-to-paycheck that $40 dollars isn’t important. And that’s the problem. We ourselves – the American people – can hardly vote, most of us aren’t truly given the capacity. Once we start thinking about ‘voting’ as a fundamental right – like water – then everything else will follow: ranked choice voting, electoral college, education, workweek holiday, etc. Then we have a democracy.

i
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Other, Paul SullivanJanuary 31, 2022

I remember several months ago sitting outside an elementary school on a cold November morning. I saw a large group of people huddled together in line wanting to do one thing: make their voices heard. I was serving as an election official that morning  in my fluorescent election vest also waiting in the cold, like all those people in line. I was waiting for a car to pull up to the designated parking spot to help the disabled and elderly vote in the same election as those people in line.

I know that standing outside in below freezing temperatures at a polling location isn’t going to be the joy of everyone’s day. I know the disappointment of finding out a candidate you voted for lost in their election, but what I saw that morning shocked me: I saw peace. I saw political canvassers from across the isle – trading snacks and talking about their work yesterday. There were shipbuilders in line talking about football, and there was a mother explaining to her kids the importance of respecting people’s opinions.

It is easy to forget that even with all of democracy’s failings – peace is the norm. We think of events that of January 6th as abhorrent and rare – not the norm. My mother immigrated from the Philippines and she sometimes tells me stories about the political life she was raised in. She lived under Ferdinand Marcos from the mid-60s until the mid-80s when democratic values were fleeting. She told of Communist guerilla fighting, of Islamic insurrectionists in Mindanao, and of Marcos’ martial law. She came to the United States because she wanted peace, and for that same reason democracy matters to me.

Summary

My name is Paul Sullivan. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a minor in Intelligence Studies. I am currently a Global Politics Fellow, and I am completing an internship with Democracy onAir for the Spring 2022 period.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because I want to develop my interests in politics and international relations into the media space. Further, I would like to support others in broadening their understanding of U.S. Federal, State, and Local institutions so as to make the public into better citizens and improve the health of democracy globally.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy
Other, Paul SullivanFebruary 3, 2022

I think voting is and ought to be a crucial part of the American experience. For being one of our most powerful American rights, most of the people I know don’t truly consider it a right. Food, water, shelter – those are rights. Voting? Well, that’s ‘special’. It’s a civic duty! It’s so important you only need to participate ‘some of the time’. What if a politician told you that your body only needs food ‘some’ of the time? You’d be outraged! And what of the ‘body politic’?

A year ago, I was with the homeless in McPherson Square – a dozen or so blocks from the US Capitol. Now those are people whose rights were forgotten about. I heard the same sentiment echoed over-and-over: “Muriel Bowser ‘ain’t doin’ nothin’ about us.” These people can’t vote. They hardly know where their next meal is coming from. I remember a bit of wisdom of them told me:

“Do you want to know who the most popular candidate is?: Nobody. If nobody was a candidate you could vote for by not showing up, nobody would win every election.”

And what of us? With election day on a Tuesday, how can some of our poorest vote? You can’t just tell people living paycheck-to-paycheck that $40 dollars isn’t important. And that’s the problem. We ourselves – the American people – can hardly vote, most of us aren’t truly given the capacity. Once we start thinking about ‘voting’ as a fundamental right – like water – then everything else will follow: ranked choice voting, electoral college, education, workweek holiday, etc. Then we have a democracy.

i
Why Democracy Matters to Me
Other, Paul SullivanJanuary 31, 2022

I remember several months ago sitting outside an elementary school on a cold November morning. I saw a large group of people huddled together in line wanting to do one thing: make their voices heard. I was serving as an election official that morning  in my fluorescent election vest also waiting in the cold, like all those people in line. I was waiting for a car to pull up to the designated parking spot to help the disabled and elderly vote in the same election as those people in line.

I know that standing outside in below freezing temperatures at a polling location isn’t going to be the joy of everyone’s day. I know the disappointment of finding out a candidate you voted for lost in their election, but what I saw that morning shocked me: I saw peace. I saw political canvassers from across the isle – trading snacks and talking about their work yesterday. There were shipbuilders in line talking about football, and there was a mother explaining to her kids the importance of respecting people’s opinions.

It is easy to forget that even with all of democracy’s failings – peace is the norm. We think of events that of January 6th as abhorrent and rare – not the norm. My mother immigrated from the Philippines and she sometimes tells me stories about the political life she was raised in. She lived under Ferdinand Marcos from the mid-60s until the mid-80s when democratic values were fleeting. She told of Communist guerilla fighting, of Islamic insurrectionists in Mindanao, and of Marcos’ martial law. She came to the United States because she wanted peace, and for that same reason democracy matters to me.

About

Education

George Mason University: Fairfax, VA

BA: Government and International Politics Major with a concentration in IR

Intelligence Studies Minor

Expected May 2023

Skills

  • MS Office Suite Proficiency
  • Adobe Premiere & Photoshop Proficiency
  • Language Background in Latin & Mandarin
  • Work experience with R Studio

Career Experience

Election Official for the City of Virginia Beach’s 44th Electoral Precinct

  • Fall 2018 – Present

Undergraduate Research Assistant (URAP) at George Mason University

  • Spring 2021

 

Work Experience

Skate Guard, Fairfax Ice Arena

  • Sep 2021 – Present

Maintenance, Chilled Ponds

  • Jul 2021 – Aug 2021

Papers & Projects

Download (PDF, Unknown)

OnAir Activities

I am directing Outreach Efforts for US OnAir as part of my GPF internship with Democracy OnAir.

I am also directing Ohio OnAir.

Posts curating:

Issues: China & Economy
Committee: Foreign Affairs (House) & Armed Services (Senate)
VA Representative: Tim Kaine & Elaine Luria
Focus University: Ohio State University

X
Joe KubickiJoe Kubicki

My name is Joe Kubicki. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics. I am currently involved with the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

 

I am interning at Democracy onAir because it is a perfect intersection of my interest in politics and my skills in journalism. Getting the word out to the people about what is going on in the world and why they should pay attention is something that is very important to me. So, I want to use my time at Democracy onAir to help spread awareness for issues that more often go unnoticed because people don’t know that these things are even happening.

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy

How would I improve our democracy? Well, I would start with changing the way political campaigns are funded. At the moment with the Citizens United court decision, has allowed millions of dollars of dark money to be funneled towards campaigns.

What is dark money? It is money that is donated through Super PACs that have no restrictions on how much you can donate and allows it to be done anonymously. If we want to have fair campaigns and elections we either need to publicly fund campaigns so we know how much money is spent or allow the unlimited donations to continue but not anonymously.

Overall though, the sooner the problem is fixed, the better because democracy is meant to make all of our inputs equal, but the way some are able to affect the political system shows just how unequal we really are when it comes to who is in charge.

i
Why Democracy Matters To Me
Recorded by Yatharth Pandey

Democracy matters to me because democracy is an answer to a question; how is power distributed throughout society? And if that answer happens to be a democracy, well then this society you live in has distributed power in a manner so as to try and provide for those who do not have enough for themselves. Because of this, a belief in a functioning democracy is foundational to the other beliefs I hold. When my paternal grandparents and maternal great-grandparents respectively came to America they had nothing except contacts of family friends. My parents were both able to pursue college degrees. My dad got a master’s degree and my mom got a doctorate. Coming to a country that is a democracy allowed both sides of my family to prosper in a multitude of ways. While the spread of democracy is not directly linked to the spread of freedom it is something that often comes with it because the reasoning for starting a democracy is very heavily associated with that of maintaining the most freedom possible for every individual in the society.

Summary

My name is Joe Kubicki. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics. I am currently involved with the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

 

I am interning at Democracy onAir because it is a perfect intersection of my interest in politics and my skills in journalism. Getting the word out to the people about what is going on in the world and why they should pay attention is something that is very important to me. So, I want to use my time at Democracy onAir to help spread awareness for issues that more often go unnoticed because people don’t know that these things are even happening.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy

How would I improve our democracy? Well, I would start with changing the way political campaigns are funded. At the moment with the Citizens United court decision, has allowed millions of dollars of dark money to be funneled towards campaigns.

What is dark money? It is money that is donated through Super PACs that have no restrictions on how much you can donate and allows it to be done anonymously. If we want to have fair campaigns and elections we either need to publicly fund campaigns so we know how much money is spent or allow the unlimited donations to continue but not anonymously.

Overall though, the sooner the problem is fixed, the better because democracy is meant to make all of our inputs equal, but the way some are able to affect the political system shows just how unequal we really are when it comes to who is in charge.

i
Why Democracy Matters To Me
Recorded by Yatharth Pandey

Democracy matters to me because democracy is an answer to a question; how is power distributed throughout society? And if that answer happens to be a democracy, well then this society you live in has distributed power in a manner so as to try and provide for those who do not have enough for themselves. Because of this, a belief in a functioning democracy is foundational to the other beliefs I hold. When my paternal grandparents and maternal great-grandparents respectively came to America they had nothing except contacts of family friends. My parents were both able to pursue college degrees. My dad got a master’s degree and my mom got a doctorate. Coming to a country that is a democracy allowed both sides of my family to prosper in a multitude of ways. While the spread of democracy is not directly linked to the spread of freedom it is something that often comes with it because the reasoning for starting a democracy is very heavily associated with that of maintaining the most freedom possible for every individual in the society.

About

My Major

I’m majoring in Government and International Politics because I think too many people and problems have been ignored by our politicians, our institutions, and our governments. Whether it’s the water in Flint, Michigan, the Dakota Access Pipeline, homeless freezing on the streets. Instead of helping these people, which might actually cost money and take some effort, they just find ways to hide the problems, waiting until another issue is plastered on news headlines and they don’t have to do anything, making public benches impossible for homeless people to sleep on and you can’t see that we have people freezing on the streets at night.

I’m majoring in government because my family got help when they needed it, and they even got it from this country, and I can’t stand idly by while other families that could just as easily have been my family are ignored, turned away, or even outright attacked.

I’ve been lucky enough to live a life where I can believe in the promises America is supposed to make to the people who live here or come here. I just want other people to be that lucky too.

My Professional Goals

After I graduate I want to work in politics or the world that orbits politics at the least. Whether that is an NGO, lobbying group, a non-profit or charity, or even just working for a politician or in the government.

If I can, I want the work I do to be policy-focused that way it is generally going to be a broad effect that it has on the world which would help the most people as possible. From my days in the yearbook, I have a bit of a soft spot for journalism so if the ideal opportunity comes up to be a political reporter I think I would have to take that chance if it came up. Otherwise, I just want to be close to the process of making the world better and I want to leave my fingerprints on it by pushing us towards an even better world.

Education

George Mason, Schar School of Policy and Government

Bachelor of Arts Majoring In Government and International Politics                     Graduation Expected May 2024

Overall GPA: 3.29

Work Experience

Sept. 2018 – June 2019

Team Leader, Colonial Forge High School Yearbook

I managed a team of people on the yearbook staff ensuring they stayed on schedule and met all yearbook deadlines. I also helped them create their spreads which included planning, photography, editing, interviewing, and as a leader, I had to ensure they were confident in their abilities, stayed on schedule, got any assistance from the editors or teacher that was needed, and any problems they had I either needed to solve or report to the editors and teacher as necessary or take responsibility for any unfinished or low-quality work. The main function of a team leader besides consolidating a group was being entrusted with the fact that any work that had been delegated to your group that was unfinished by a certain point you were expected to complete.
June 2019 – May 2020

Editor, Colonial Forge High School Yearbook

Including all the roles of the team leader, which became extended to the entire yearbook staff that you were the first expected to complete work, you had several additional responsibilities. As an editor I was responsible for the artistic direction of the yearbook, I created the style that the entire yearbook used. I had the challenge of making the vision of the other editors and teacher a reality, pretty much by myself, and I had to teach myself the advanced photoshop that I used. As well, I helped guide the next year’s team leaders and editors, helped them gain more skills, and become more prepared for stepping into a leadership role.
Dec. 3 – 5, 2021

Judge, GMU Patriot Games

I had to judge for numerous different debates where students competed either on their own or in small teams to debate a pre-selected topic which they had to be able both in favor of and against the selected topic. I had to manage the debate, ensuring the competitors stayed on time, that we followed the proper format, and that we finished in time, and while doing so I had to analyze the arguments being made from both sides and determine who was doing better as well as why. I judged all the way up to the finals of the Public Forum debate and stayed

Skills

  • Microsoft Office
  • Adobe Suite
  • Graphic Design
  • Photoshop
  • Research Skills

OnAir Activities

I am acting as a curator for US onAir as part of my internship for the Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellowship at GMU.

I also am the Director for Georgia onAir.

I curate posts for the US Presidency, US House of Representatives, Rob Wittman, and House Armed Services Seapower and Projection Forces.

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Yatharth PandeyYatharth Pandey

My name is Yatharth Pandey. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in government and international politics with a minor in International Security. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

Interning with Democracy OnAir allows me to explore my interests of Foreign and public policy while also strengthening democracy in our society and country at large. Empowering our democratic institutions is key to forging a stronger democracy.

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How would I improve U.S. Democracy

The United States is often referred to as one of the strongest democracies, but as of late there have been glaring cracks in the system that many have seen, culminating in the horrendous events of January 6th, 2021, which threatened our very institutions. From this, there are steps that the United States government could take to strengthen our democratic processes. One such idea are stronger election and voting laws, which protect voters and their rights on election day. In many states, state legislatures can provide an unfair advantage to certain districts by providing more polling stations to those who are more likely to vote for them than districts that skew against, thus threatening democratic integrity. These laws would need to be repealed ensuring stronger voting rights for groups so more of the population is represented, and thus more can take part in democratic process

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Joseph KubickiJanuary 13, 2022 (01:04)
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Why Democracy Matters to Me

The institutions that guard the United States’ strong government have held American society together for over two centuries, and the most important institution that has been taken for granted as of late is democracy. Democracy as a concept has endured for ages against many challenges to it. From the global impacts it has through the lives it empowers across the globe, democracy is one of the most valuable political and philosophical cornerstones of government abroad as well as the United States.

Democracy is unique in the sense where the public holds the power in national decision making. This makes it invaluable to a government’s stability as power is concentrated in the public. This is key to having a functional state, as through a dictatorship resentment could grow rapidly amongst a population. In giving the public the power to vote, change in public policy is possible in a nation. Therefore, citizens can use democracy to make their society beneficial for everyone involved.

Democracy is not without its flaws as a system, and we can all learn more from its core principles, but it is an invaluable tool of governance to me and I will continue to uphold its principles as an American citizen.

Summary

My name is Yatharth Pandey. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in government and international politics with a minor in International Security. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

Interning with Democracy OnAir allows me to explore my interests of Foreign and public policy while also strengthening democracy in our society and country at large. Empowering our democratic institutions is key to forging a stronger democracy.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy

The United States is often referred to as one of the strongest democracies, but as of late there have been glaring cracks in the system that many have seen, culminating in the horrendous events of January 6th, 2021, which threatened our very institutions. From this, there are steps that the United States government could take to strengthen our democratic processes. One such idea are stronger election and voting laws, which protect voters and their rights on election day. In many states, state legislatures can provide an unfair advantage to certain districts by providing more polling stations to those who are more likely to vote for them than districts that skew against, thus threatening democratic integrity. These laws would need to be repealed ensuring stronger voting rights for groups so more of the population is represented, and thus more can take part in democratic process

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Joseph KubickiJanuary 13, 2022 (01:04)
i
Why Democracy Matters to Me

The institutions that guard the United States’ strong government have held American society together for over two centuries, and the most important institution that has been taken for granted as of late is democracy. Democracy as a concept has endured for ages against many challenges to it. From the global impacts it has through the lives it empowers across the globe, democracy is one of the most valuable political and philosophical cornerstones of government abroad as well as the United States.

Democracy is unique in the sense where the public holds the power in national decision making. This makes it invaluable to a government’s stability as power is concentrated in the public. This is key to having a functional state, as through a dictatorship resentment could grow rapidly amongst a population. In giving the public the power to vote, change in public policy is possible in a nation. Therefore, citizens can use democracy to make their society beneficial for everyone involved.

Democracy is not without its flaws as a system, and we can all learn more from its core principles, but it is an invaluable tool of governance to me and I will continue to uphold its principles as an American citizen.

About

Education

 George Mason University: Fairfax, VA

BA: International Government and Politics Major

International Security Minor

Expected December 2022

Experience

International Relations Task Force (IRTF) at George Mason University
August 2021- Ongoing

URAP (Undergraduate Research Project) Assistant at George Mason University

Spring 2021- Summer 2021

Team Leader: Schar School Virtual learning community at George Mason University

2020-2020

Library Assistant and Volunteer at Princeton Public Library

2018-2018

 

Web

Linkedin

My Major

I major in government and international politics because I have always been interested in foreign affairs and how our world governing systems function. In understanding these topics, we can help create good policies on bettering our planet and creating a safe world to forge ahead against challenges like climate change.

My Professional Goals

My goals for the future are to work as an foreign policy analyst in the State Department or any Think Tank institutes that focus on foreign policy and international relations. I want to do this because of the many opportunities it grants and it expands my interest in public policy and international relations. I also would get the opportunity to meet a diverse group of individuals from all parts of the globe.

onAir Activities

Curator and Aircaster for US OnAir

I am also directing Pennsylvania OnAir. as part of my Global Politics Fellowship internship program at George Mason University.

Posts Curating

  • Issues: Homeland Security, NATO/Europe
  • Committee: Homeland Security
  • Subcomittee: Climate Security
  • VA Representative: Don McEachin
  • University: Pennsylvania State University

Papers and Projects

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Pandey and Wallace URAP Celebration

Democracy onAir Internship

Poster

Interviews

Reflective Paper

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Connor Oatman 1Connor Oatman

My name is Connor Oatman. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in international politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because my interest in government and international politics is tied intrinsically to my experience growing up within the functioning albeit complicated democracy of the United States, and it is my desire to improve our own democracy as well see the advancement of democracy and democratic institutions globally.

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How Would I improve U.S. Democracy
Other, Connor OatmanFebruary 4, 2022

What Would I Do to Improve Democracy?

The key to democracy is choice. Choosing your leaders, making decisions on the laws that affect your life, democracy as a governing system is giving people the right to choose. However, this right of choice is not always what it should be within a democratic system, the United State’s government being a prime example of that.

In our current system people have the ability to choose, between two options. For most people, particularly those among my generation this is not a choice we feel comfortable with as the current two-party system is often not reflective of our views in a comprehensive manner, and has led to nearly constant legislative gridlock for the majority of my life that I can remember. In order to improve democracy, I believe we need to open our government up to a multi-party system like every other democracy in the world.

This can be achieved through numerous methods such as ranked choice voting, changes made to campaign finance laws and requirements, and changes made to the requirements for a candidate being placed on a ballot. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said it best, “If this were any other country Joe Biden and I would not be in the same party,” so why should we force them to be? The two have radically different views on policy yet fall under the same democratic umbrella. The key to improving democracy in the US is to give a true choice to voters through a multi-party system, not a false or forced choice through a two-party system

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded By Ben MurphyJanuary 28, 2022 (00:54)
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Why Democracy Matters for Me
Connor Oatman

Why Democracy Matters for Me

Democracy is one of the cornerstones of the United States. Politically, philosophically, and culturally no greater influence can be seen on American society than our adherence and admiration for the principles of democracy upon which our founding fathers built our constitution.

Democracy is the only form of government in which the people governed have a say in their own governance, and the importance of this fact cannot be stressed enough. People, regardless of their wealth, their freedom of movement, or any other freedoms they may be granted by their government, are not truly free so long as they have no say in their government, in the decisions made at the highest levels that will affect their lives.

It is for these reasons that I value democracy both at home and abroad, and I will continue to uphold these principles and values of a democratic system of government so long as I am able.

Summary

My name is Connor Oatman. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in international politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because my interest in government and international politics is tied intrinsically to my experience growing up within the functioning albeit complicated democracy of the United States, and it is my desire to improve our own democracy as well see the advancement of democracy and democratic institutions globally.

News

i
How Would I improve U.S. Democracy
Other, Connor OatmanFebruary 4, 2022

What Would I Do to Improve Democracy?

The key to democracy is choice. Choosing your leaders, making decisions on the laws that affect your life, democracy as a governing system is giving people the right to choose. However, this right of choice is not always what it should be within a democratic system, the United State’s government being a prime example of that.

In our current system people have the ability to choose, between two options. For most people, particularly those among my generation this is not a choice we feel comfortable with as the current two-party system is often not reflective of our views in a comprehensive manner, and has led to nearly constant legislative gridlock for the majority of my life that I can remember. In order to improve democracy, I believe we need to open our government up to a multi-party system like every other democracy in the world.

This can be achieved through numerous methods such as ranked choice voting, changes made to campaign finance laws and requirements, and changes made to the requirements for a candidate being placed on a ballot. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said it best, “If this were any other country Joe Biden and I would not be in the same party,” so why should we force them to be? The two have radically different views on policy yet fall under the same democratic umbrella. The key to improving democracy in the US is to give a true choice to voters through a multi-party system, not a false or forced choice through a two-party system

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded By Ben MurphyJanuary 28, 2022 (00:54)
i
Why Democracy Matters for Me
Connor Oatman

Why Democracy Matters for Me

Democracy is one of the cornerstones of the United States. Politically, philosophically, and culturally no greater influence can be seen on American society than our adherence and admiration for the principles of democracy upon which our founding fathers built our constitution.

Democracy is the only form of government in which the people governed have a say in their own governance, and the importance of this fact cannot be stressed enough. People, regardless of their wealth, their freedom of movement, or any other freedoms they may be granted by their government, are not truly free so long as they have no say in their government, in the decisions made at the highest levels that will affect their lives.

It is for these reasons that I value democracy both at home and abroad, and I will continue to uphold these principles and values of a democratic system of government so long as I am able.

About

Work Experience

Shift Leader, Rita’s of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, NC

[July 17, 2017-April, 2020]

COLD PRESSER AND JUICERISTA, CLEAN JUICE, SOUTHERN PINES, NC

[Jan 2020-present] Not working while living at GMU

Education

ASSOCIATES OF ARTS, SANDHILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, PINEHURST NC, MAY 12, 2020

3.5 unweighted GPA. Deans list every year in institution. Graduated Cum Laude. Distinction by professor in Communication, Foreign Language, and International Relations.

BACHELORS OF ARTS IN GOVERNMENT AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CONCENTRATION, GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY, FAIRFAX VA, ONGOING

3.46 current cumulative GPA. Global Politics Fellows honors program

Skills

Punctuality: I am very accustomed to meeting deadlines and arriving to events at a specific time due to the different times I have had to work in my part-time job, as well as the organization and meeting of events with KSA while also balancing schoolwork deadlines

Experience communicating and working with other people: My work on the GMU KSA board has given me large amounts of hands-on experience working within a team and communicating effectively to manage projects, events, and the effective running of large student organizations that must coordinate with their faculty advisors and schools.

Professionalism and Leadership: As a shift leader, and KSA board member, I have been afforded numerous opportunities to acquire hands-on leadership experience that I have been able to use effectively in my academic work as well as in life and in organizations I am a part of. As a leader in these organizations, it was my job to mediate conflicts, manage those below me and monitor projects, communicate with faculty advisors and higher-ranking officials, and serve as an inspiration for others within the organizations.

 

Phone and Online Communication Expertise: Throughout my time as a shift-leader during employment and as a KSA board member at GMU during the height of Covid I was often responsible for managing store calls as well as schedule and manage events for KSA through phone call or online meeting services such as Zoom.

 

Foreign Language Experience: I am fluent in English and can comfortably converse in Spanish at intermediate conversational fluency. I am also currently learning Korean and have reached the intermediate level in my education in the language.

Professional Achievments

Extracurricular Activities and Clubs

GMU Korean-American Student Association (KSA) Board and Intern (Undergraduate Education)

Employment

Ice Maker at Rita’s Italian Ice

Promotion from general employee to shift leader at Rita’s Italian Ice

Cold Presser and Juicerista at Clean Juice, Southern Pines

My Major

I am majoring in Government and International Politics because of my intense love for understanding the world, it’s nations and political institutions, and how and why they operate the way they do…

My Professional Goals

OnAir Activities

I am hosting aircasts on US OnAir as part of my GPF internship with Democracy OnAir. I am also directing North Carolina OnAir.

Papers and Projects

Generational Perspectives on Sino-Japanese and Korean-Japanese Relations

Download (PDF, Unknown)

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Ben Murphy 3Ben Murphy

My name is Ben Murphy. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in international politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because I want to get the experience of working for a non-profit involved in the government. I also believe Democracy onAir is an exciting opportunity because it allows me to work on many different tasks to see what I enjoy and may end up doing in the future.

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How would I improve U.S. Democracy

I think the best way to improve our democracy is to start getting people to understand what is in their best interest. I believe for a democracy to function properly It is essential that the voting population have a good understanding on what is important to them and what their interest are.

My hope is that we can one day have a government that the people can have faith in, that fully represents the peoples will. If we can accomplish that goal, I think we will end up with a more representative and better functioning democracy for all.

i
Why Democracy matter to me

Democracy matters to me because I believe the fundamental premise that allows for the most people to be happy is self-determination. The most important thing for me is the freedom to make decisions regarding my future, how I express myself, or even who I associate with.

Democracy allows us the people to take control of our lives starting from the local level all they way up to the federal level to make decisions that can not only help ourselves but likewise help other people in the country. I think that while no form of government is perfect democracy offers us the most equalizing of platforms that puts everyone on similar standing so that we can express our beliefs and lobby for what we believe in on equal ground.

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Connor OatmanJanuary 31, 2022 (00:44)

Summary

My name is Ben Murphy. I am a current undergraduate student at George Mason University majoring in international politics with a concentration in International Relations. I am currently involved with the Global Politics Fellows Program and am completing this spring an internship with Democracy onAir.

I am interning with Democracy onAir because I want to get the experience of working for a non-profit involved in the government. I also believe Democracy onAir is an exciting opportunity because it allows me to work on many different tasks to see what I enjoy and may end up doing in the future.

News

i
How would I improve U.S. Democracy

I think the best way to improve our democracy is to start getting people to understand what is in their best interest. I believe for a democracy to function properly It is essential that the voting population have a good understanding on what is important to them and what their interest are.

My hope is that we can one day have a government that the people can have faith in, that fully represents the peoples will. If we can accomplish that goal, I think we will end up with a more representative and better functioning democracy for all.

i
Why Democracy matter to me

Democracy matters to me because I believe the fundamental premise that allows for the most people to be happy is self-determination. The most important thing for me is the freedom to make decisions regarding my future, how I express myself, or even who I associate with.

Democracy allows us the people to take control of our lives starting from the local level all they way up to the federal level to make decisions that can not only help ourselves but likewise help other people in the country. I think that while no form of government is perfect democracy offers us the most equalizing of platforms that puts everyone on similar standing so that we can express our beliefs and lobby for what we believe in on equal ground.

Why Democracy Matters to Me
Recorded by Connor OatmanJanuary 31, 2022 (00:44)

About

Education

George Mason, Schar School of Policy and Government

Bachelor of Arts Majoring In: Government and International Politics                     Graduation Expected May 2022

Overall GPA: 3.92

Work Experience 

Panera Bread – Burke, VA (September, 2017- February, 2018)

Associate

  • Created a welcoming environment for customers
  • Practiced efficient cleaning and closing techniques
  • Worked alongside co-workers to efficiently handle customer complaints

Domino’s Pizza- Burke, VA (November, 2016- July, 2017)              

Customer Service Representative

  • Handled cash register transactions upwards of $2,000 a day
  • Identified and resolved customer complaints
  • Demonstrated effective safety expertise throughout the store

 Extracurricular Activities

GMU Debate Team, Member (January, 2020-August, 2020)              

  • Leant initial debate techniques including speech patterns
  • Worked on proper research methods to solidify debate positions

GMU Undergraduate Research Assistant Program, Researcher (January, 2021- May, 2021)

  • Recoding of Data from PDF forms to searchable Excel documents
  • Experience in Data collection from .gov websites
  • Recoding data from databases to searchable excel documents
  • Experience researching relevant databases for future use

Skills

  • Proficient in Spanish
  • Comprehensive Internet research skills
  • Extensive knowledge of Microsoft Excel
  • Experience with STATA
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office

My Major

I am majoring in Government and International Politics because influencing change has always been something I have been interested in, and I figured the best way to work in or around the government was completing this degree. I have found through my time in school the portion of government I am most interested in is the legal framework and to a lesser degree the political theory behind many of our institutions.

My Professional Goals

After I graduate I am interested in attending law school and going to work in the legal field, I also have interests in government and the sectors around it like non-profits, think tanks, or the government itself. On a less serious note I think going to culinary school would be really cool, I don’t have any aspirations of becoming a chef or anything but I think the knowledge would be valuable regardless.

Papers and Projects

International Relation Theories

Download (PDF, Unknown)

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Todd GilletteTodd Gillette

I am Board Chair of Democracy OnAir, providing guidance on the vision and planning of the US onAir network.

My day job is a software engineer at Northrop Grumman. I have a PhD in Neuroscience from George Mason University.

Summary

I am Board Chair of Democracy OnAir, providing guidance on the vision and planning of the US onAir network.

My day job is a software engineer at Northrop Grumman. I have a PhD in Neuroscience from George Mason University.

About

Todd Gillette 1

I studied Engineering and Computer Science at Swarthmore College, graduating in 2003, after which I moved to Virginia to work in IT (specifically knowledge managements systems) with Vivakos Inc until 2006. I then entered the Neuroscience PhD Program at George Mason University with a 2-year fellowship from Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study. After the fellowship was over, I became a Graduate Research Assistant under Dr. Giorgio Ascoli at Krasnow’s Center for Neural Informatics, Neural Structures, and Neural Plasticity (CN3) of Giorgio Ascoli. I spent a semester working with Dr. Ted Dumas and helping publish a paper on gene therapy in addressing stress.

In the CN3 as a Graduate Research Assistant under Dr. Ascoli, I used my extensive experience in software development, data management, statistics, data visualization, and bioinformatics. My dissertation research involved bioinformatic pattern searching applied to neuronal morphology, with further interests regarding neuronal networks and their specific information processing roles and capabilities, as well as science policy and educational outreach.

Research

My work centered on neuronal morphology, with a focus in data mining and pattern analysis to determine distinct topological features (i.e. branching patterns) of various neuronal types. Some of my non open access articles can be requested and automatically delivered via my lab’s publications page.

Experience

Education

  • PhD Neuroscience
    George Mason University
    2015
  • BS Engineering and Computer Science
    Swarthmore College
    1999 to 2003

Work Experience

  • Board Chair
    Democracy onAir
    2019 to present
  • Software Engineer
    OnAir Networks
    2014 to 2018
  • Sr. Principal Software Engineer
    Northrop Grumman Corporation
    2019 to present
  • Principal Systems Engineer / Future Technical Leader
    Northrop Grumman Corporation
    2016 to 2019

Web

Websites

Twitter, LinkedIn

Personal Information

Organizations

  • International Council on Systems Engineering (2017 – present)
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (2019 – present)
  • Society for Neuroscience (2007 – 2017)
  • GMU Graduate and Professional Student Association (GAPSA) delegate for Neuroscience (2009 – 2012)
  • Neuroscience Graduate Student Organization – president (2010 – 2011)

onAir Activities

Posts

Hub Posts

Members

Papers

Publications

Topological characterization of neuronal arbor morphology via sequence representation: I – Motif analysis
By: Gillette TA, Ascoli GA
BMC Bioinformatics, 16

Topological characterization of neuronal arbor morphology via sequence representation: II – Global alignment.
By: Gillette TA, Hosseini P, Ascoli GA
BMC Bioinformatics, 16

Statistical analysis and data mining of digital reconstructions of dendritic morphologies
By: Polavaram S, Gillette TA, Parekh R, Ascoli GA
Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, 8(138):138

The DIADEM Metric: Comparing multiple reconstructions of the same neuron
By: Gillette TA, Brown KM, Ascoli GA.
Neuroinformatics

Measuring and Modeling Morphology: How Dendrites Take Shape
By: Gillette TA, Ascoli GA
In Le Novere N. (Ed.), “Computational Systems Neurobiology”, pp. 387-428, Springer

Anti-glucocorticoid gene therapy reverses the impairing effects of elevated corticosterone on spatial memory, hippocampal neuronal excitability, and synaptic plasticity,
By: Theodore C Dumas, Todd A Gillette, Deveroux Ferguson et al.
1712-1720. In Journal of Neuroscience 30 (5)

On Comparing Neuronal Morphologies with the Constrained Tree-edit-distance
By: Todd A Gillette, John J Grefenstette
In Neuroinformatics 7 (3).

Quantifying neuronal size: summing up trees and splitting the branch difference
By: Kerry M Brown, Todd A Gillette, Giorgio A Ascoli
485-493. In Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 19 (6)

Projects

  • Assisted technically in the art sculpture project Mental Floss, producing a virtual model and assisting with the projects underlying data
  • Researched at University of Central Florida’s Center for Research in Computer Vision (in 2002 as part of an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates)
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James LillardJames Lillard

I am currently a Director for the US onAir Network.  I am planning on graduating this spring from George Mason University with a major in Global Affairs and a Global Governance concentration.

Last fall I was a Global Politics Fellows at the Schar School of Policy and Government. I completed a six credit  internship with Democracy onAir as part of the GPF program.

I am a member of Democracy onAir because I believe strongly in the necessity of comprehensive and accurate information being readily available to voters, especially concerning elections and aspects of governance that may not be adequately covered in traditional media.

Summary

I am currently a Director for the US onAir Network.  I am planning on graduating this spring from George Mason University with a major in Global Affairs and a Global Governance concentration.

Last fall I was a Global Politics Fellows at the Schar School of Policy and Government. I completed a six credit  internship with Democracy onAir as part of the GPF program.

I am a member of Democracy onAir because I believe strongly in the necessity of comprehensive and accurate information being readily available to voters, especially concerning elections and aspects of governance that may not be adequately covered in traditional media.

About

Education

  • Bachelor of Arts in Global Affairs
    George Mason University
    2020 to 2021Currently pursuing my Bachelor of Arts in Global Affairs at George Mason University.
  • Associate of Arts
    Northern Virginia Community College
    2019
  • High School Diploma
    Gonzaga College High School
    1999 to 2003

Work Experience

  • Senior Veterinary Assistant
    Nova Mobile Vet
    2013 to 2020– Responsible for primary assistance in outpatient appointments, anesthetic procedures (surgery and dentistry), and diagnostics (radiography and ultrasound).
    – Additional responsibilities included travel logistics and maintenance of the mobile unit.
  • Veterinary Assistant
    McLean Animal Hospital
    2005 to 2013– Responsible for the primary care of hospitalized patients, assisting with out-patient appointments and procedures, running in-clinic lab work and diagnostics (blood work, radiography), medication of animals in boarding facility.

Resume

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Internship

Poster

Download (PDF, Unknown)

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Tim O'Shea 3Tim O’Shea

I am on the Board of Directors for Democracy onAir.  Democracy onAir is a nonprofit, nonpartisan social enterprise that manages the US onAir Network and is the founding sponsor of the US onAir Coalition.

Summary

I am on the Board of Directors for Democracy onAir.  Democracy onAir is a nonprofit, nonpartisan social enterprise that manages the US onAir Network and is the founding sponsor of the US onAir Coalition.

About

Tim O’Shea graduated summa cum laude from George Mason University where he studied Government and International Politics, Data Analysis, and Economics. He previously worked as the Database and Intelligence Manager at Rise To Peace, where he developed and launched multiple open-source intelligence databases on international terrorism. He also worked as a Market Research Associate for the Virginia Small Business Development Center, where he helped Virginia businesses and organizations with expanding internationally. He has presented at research conferences at James Madison University and Georgetown University, and his work has been published in the Chicago Journal of Foreign Policy and the Immigrant Research Library.

Experience

Education

Work Experience

  • Executive Director
    Democracy onAir
    2019 to 2020

    – Development of recruitment, workflow, fundraising, and communication protocols and resources
    Building an advisory board for the organization

    – Public interfacing and representation of Democracy onAir at relevant conferences

    – Management of other directors

  • Market Research Associate
    Virginia SBDC
    2018 to 2019

    – Gathers and synthesizes open source market intelligence and research for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) seeking to expand to international markets

    – Provides clients with reports including market trends and factors, comparative regulatory profiles, expansion targets, data visualization, government resources, and recommended next steps

    – Develops government relations material for organizations seeking legislative or executive branch support for initiatives and programs

  • Student Assistant, Robinson Professor Office
    George Mason University

    – Provided administrative support for group of elite, multidisciplinary professors and professors emeriti, including managing student meetings, technical support, and course registration

    – Coordinated and arranged for hundreds of donations of books and manuscripts to multiple college campuses and special collections

    – Planned, promoted and ran academic events such as debates and lectures including well-known economists, pollsters, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists

    – Acted as a technical and teaching assistant for professor’s classes on criminal justice and economic policy

    – Maintains and updates website on professor’s achievements and appearances in the media

    – Interfaced with other departments and campus groups in order to support office, promote sponsored events, and host visitors

  • Database & Intelligence Manager
    Rise to Peace

    – Conceptualized, designed, and built the Active Intelligence Database and Undercovered Attacks Database, compiling news reports on terrorist activity into public access databases with instant archives and other organizational features

    – Trained and managed a small team of interns to write articles on terrorism data and research, maintain databases, and increase social media presence with focused content on terrorism and extremism

    – Provided strategic planning, coordination, and on site support for community and academic events to generate support and awareness of the organization as well as serve mission of the organization

  • Joseph Schumpeter Fellow
    Mercatus Center at George Mason University
    2016 to 2019

    – Received and renewed membership five times for selective, paid fellowship for applied economic study at the Mercatus Center

    – Participated in discussions with Mercatus Center Fellows and George Mason Economics faculty on modern economic public policy issues, including economic education, technology policy, disaster relief, and foreign aid and Immigration

  • Immigration and Cross-Border Policy Intern
    Bipartisan Policy Center

    – Assembled, crystallized and sent daily press briefings for members of the Immigration Team

    – Wrote timely articles on U.S. immigration policy issues, including family separation and denaturalization efforts

    – Generated data analysis, modeling, and visualization on contemporary immigration policy challenges, including immigrant detention, court backlogs, and border deterrence

    – Created impact statements on BPC articles for use in development outreach, including reach to key voter populations

    – Contributed to short and long term reports on relevant research literature, recent polling data, and federal grant evaluation

    – Winner of the Robert F. Bennett Award for demonstrating a commitment to public service and a desire to make a difference

  • Research Assistant
    George Mason University – Schar School of Policy and Government

    – Served as part of an international team analyzing the erosion of U.S. soft power in Central Asia as part of the Minerva Research Initiative

    – Analyzed characteristics and trends of Central Asian terrorism, including research on their radicalization, attack profiles, and specific case studies in Turkey, Sweden, Russia, and the United States

  • Immigration Law Clerk
    The HMA Law Firm PLLC
    2017 to 2017

    – Conceptualized, designed, and built multi-layered database on violence and persecution around the world, compiling qualitative and quantitative information from government and NGO reports and news sources.

    – Built tools for legal data analysis, including comparative displays for affirmative and defensive asylum districts and decision matrix on immigration options for use by attorneys, and designed training for future interns on using tools.

    – Completed country conditions and asylum case research for clients from countries including El Salvador, Guatemala, Venezuela, Syria, and Cameroon, and others.

  • Research Intern, Center for Political-Military Analysis
    Hudson Institute
  • Public Forum Debate Coach
    Poly Prep Country Day School
    2015 to 2017

    – Provided guidance and advice on argument creation for high school debate team.

    – Completed extensive research on current events and public policy issues for use in positions and cohesive arguments.

    – Assisted conflict mediation and team cohesion among team members.

    – Coached teams to 1st and 3rd place rankings out of 700+ nationally competitive teams, as well as to record the 2 highest national win counts across a debate season, and one of the first “total sweeps” of a national debate tournament in history.

    – Coached debaters interviewed by Fortune Magazine for comment on the Presidential debates

Contact

Email: Democracy OnAir

Locations

Zipcode
22209

Videos

2018 Midterm Election Coverage

November 6, 2018
By: MasonCableNetwork

Web

Websites

LinkedIn, Twitter

Twitter

Papers

Articles

Students Bring Their Agenda to the Capitol
By: By: Abigail Adcox
Fourth Estate – February 4, 2019

“In terms of per-student spending, Mason lags behind in how much money we get from the state,” said Tim O’Shea, the executive secretary for government and community relations for Student Government.

In addition, this year over 80 percent of students attending were members of another student organization besides Student Government, according to O’Shea. This was in part an effort to target students who were active on campus outside of Student Government, and who might be able to personally relate how student funding affects them.

“The biggest reason for me, and this comes from conversations with the State Relations office, is that you consistently hear that state legislators and their [staffs] have a very strong opinion of Mason students as civically engaged and very adept students, and part of that is because of things like Mason Lobbies, where they get to see Mason students in action,” O’Shea explained.

What the Hell does Student Government Do?
By: Tim O’Shea
Fourth Estate – January 28, 2018

I joined Mason’s Student Government (SG) familiar with the dismal aspects of its reputation. I knew that many students see SG as an ineffective body comprised of playacting, would-be politicians passing empty bills and soaking up student funding. Mason students on social media are either unaware of Student Government’s role in our community or convinced that nothing happens.

I believe that these takes miss the important changes at Mason due to SG’s efforts that have either gone unnoticed or been merely forgotten. Student Government pressure on the school administration was the impetus behind the creation of the Gunston Go-Bus, which brings Mason students to local shopping areas that include Fair Oaks and Fairfax Corner. SG’s annual trip to meet with state legislators, Mason Lobbies, is often cited by state lawmakers as an important component of their positive impression of Mason students.

Publications

What Makes a Terrorist Attack Notable? Attack Characteristics as Determinants of United States Media Coverage
By: Liam Timmons and Tim O’Shea
Chicago Journal of Foreign Policy – January 9, 2019

This report analyzed the theoretical basis for determinants of U.S. media coverage of international terrorist attacks, as well as the statistical distribution of attack characteristics across attacks both covered and uncovered by major U.S. media sources.

mmigrants and Public Benefits: What Does the Research Say?
By: Tim O’Shea and Cristobal Ramón
Bipartisan Policy Center – December 5, 2018

Literature review of the usage of public benefits programs by immigrants, including analysis of factors including research methodology, state and federal laws, and both static and dynamic analysis.

Why are families being separated at the border? An Explainer
By: Tim O’Shea and Theresa Cardinal Brown
Bipartisan Policy Center – June 13, 2018

Central Asian Export of ‘Lone Wolf’ Terrorism: Case Studies, Comparisons, and Lessons
By: Tim O’Shea
Rise To Peace – May 16, 2018

Honors College

Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin and alumnus Tim O’Shea lead online hub that encourages civic engagement through technology

Source: Zaria Talley, Honors College

“There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things […].”

— Tim O’Shea, Government & International Politics Honors College alumnus

The average American tends to have more knowledge about how they are represented in the federal government than about their representation at the state level. While there are numerous reasons why this is the case, a group of George Mason students and alumni are working to close this informational gap through technology.

Democracy onAir, an online hub started by entrepreneur Scott Joy and now run by students, hopes to be the answer to all the questions people, particularly young adults, may have about who is representing them at the state-level.

GMU Alumnus Tim O'Shea

Executive Director of OnAir and Mason alumnus Tim O’Shea. Photo by Lathan Nathaniel Goumas/George Mason University Strategic Communications

“Our objective is to use technology in a way that makes it easier for people to engage in more civil [and educated] democratic processes,” said Tim O’Shea, an Honors College alumnus who graduated from Mason last May. O’Shea studied Government & International Politics as an undergraduate and is currently a Juris Doctorate candidate at Georgetown University.

On October 25, O’Shea and current Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin hosted a colloquium introducing onAir to a group of first-year Honors College students. Both O’Shea and McLaughlin joined onAir when it was just a startup and have continued to contribute to the interactive information hub. O’Shea is now the Executive Director of onAir while McLaughlin serves as the Content Director.

O’Shea and McLaughlin’s colloquium encouraged students to evaluate how they can be civically engaged on and off campus while informing them of the resources provided by onAir.

“Our hub is completely curated and managed by students,” emphasized McLaughlin, who is double majoring in Communication and Government & International Politics. Students involved with onAir interview representatives, host town hall meetings, and keep the hub’s pages up to date with current politics.

“We want to democratize the production of political information [in order to engage] young people in the process of creating that information,” explained O’Shea. O’Shea believes that “political information is better” when it is “produced and curated by people who actually live in communities that are impacted by [policies].”

The Virginia onAir hub allows users to enter their residential address and easily identify who is representing them at all levels. Users can then click on a representative’s name and read a complete background on that politician’s affiliations, election results, voting records, positions on major issues, and much more.

Students working for onAir use a stock set of questions when interviewing representatives to create an even baseline with which users can evaluate politicians.

“The goal of our hub is to provide that same quality and availability of information that a lot of us have for our federal representatives, but on the state level,” said O’Shea.

“All [policy] affects us. […] That’s really the basis of onAir.”

— Adia McLaughlin, Honors College senior; Communication and Government and International Politics double major; Student Government Vice President

Honors College senior Adia McLaughlin.

Honors College senior and Chapter Director of Mason’s OnAir, Adia McLaughlin, explains her relationship with OnAir. Photo by Joshua McLean.

Currently, Virginia is the first state to have a Democracy onAir hub, and Mason is the first onAir university chapter. McLaughlin is the president of Mason’s onAir group, which connects with more than 20 representatives. However, McLaughlin has a different relationship to the organization than some others.

“I’m from North Carolina, and I vote in North Carolina,” explained McLaughlin. “But by becoming closer to Fairfax representatives, […] I’ve been able to advocate for my fellow GMU students who do have stakes specifically here.”

Democracy onAir intends to spread to more regions of Virginia by reaching out to students at universities across the state in hopes of creating new onAir chapters. The organization also hopes to expand to more states in the future.

“The reason Mason was such a great pick to start is because we have so much civic engagement already on this campus,” said McLaughlin. “It wasn’t hard to find students who were willing to put in the time [and effort] to collect all of this data.”

At the end of the colloquium, O’Shea and McLaughlin encouraged all the students to leave their mark at Mason by creating their own unique paths to achieve their goals. The two hope that onAir shows students that there are always innovative and more effective ways to accomplish something than what may be traditional.

“There’s a lot of really great ways that you can use technology to engage with the world and change things, and we hope we’re an example of that for people,” said O’Shea of his and McLaughlin’s contributions to onAir.

“All [policy] affects us,” said McLaughlin. “That’s really the basis of onAir.”

To explore the Virginia onAir hub, visit va.onair.cc.

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Fatima IftikharFatima Iftikhar

My name is Fatima Iftikhar and I am a senior at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a minor in International Security and a concentration in International Relations. This fall I a member of the Global Politics Fellowship Program and am interning with Democracy OnAir.

I decided to become a member of Democracy onAir because of their initiatives and fields of work. This non-profit works to inform the public on current politics and government in the United States and I want to help be a part of this mission. Local governance and electoral politics are vital topics in Government which I want to learn more about, and this is a perfect opportunity to do so.

Summary

My name is Fatima Iftikhar and I am a senior at George Mason University majoring in Government and International Politics with a minor in International Security and a concentration in International Relations. This fall I a member of the Global Politics Fellowship Program and am interning with Democracy OnAir.

I decided to become a member of Democracy onAir because of their initiatives and fields of work. This non-profit works to inform the public on current politics and government in the United States and I want to help be a part of this mission. Local governance and electoral politics are vital topics in Government which I want to learn more about, and this is a perfect opportunity to do so.

About

Education

  • Bachelor’s of Arts in Government and International Politics
    George Mason University
    2020 to 2021Expect to graduate in Spring 2022

Work Experience

  • Instructional Assistant Substitute Teacher
    Fairfax County
    2018 to 2020Curated dozens of concepts to meet curriculum objectives
    Demonstrated strong planning skills by facilitating group outings and leading daily activities for 12 children from diverse backgrounds
    Collaborated with 2 staff members to manage student workload
  • Sales Advisor
    Macy’s
    2018 to 2020Gained marketing and sales experience by advertising promotions, explaining company policies, closing sales and adapting to client needs
    Provided administrative support by handling inbound calls and completing data entry functions while maintaining complex databases in a fast-paced environment
    Demonstrated client service skills by interacting with 300+ daily guests to advertise promotions and answer inquires

Volunteer Experience

Front Desk Receptionist SAI Mortgage

Determined needs of visitors by connecting them with the appropriate professional
Facilitated 50+ calls a day resulting in 20% increase in clientele
Exhibited organizational skills and discretion by handling confidential information such as client records and legal documentation

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Christopher Nicholson 1CJ Nicholson

My name is CJ Nicholson and I am a Global Affairs major at George Mason University, concentrating in global governance with a minor in Spanish. I am also a part of the Fall 2021 Global Politics Fellows cohort, and I am completing an internship with Democracy onAir this fall as well.

I became a member of Democracy onAir to help dispel much of the misinformation occurring in current politics in the United States. Democracy onAir’s goal to bring truthful, unbiased information resonated strongly with me and I wanted to assist to the best of my abilities in reaching that goal.

Summary

My name is CJ Nicholson and I am a Global Affairs major at George Mason University, concentrating in global governance with a minor in Spanish. I am also a part of the Fall 2021 Global Politics Fellows cohort, and I am completing an internship with Democracy onAir this fall as well.

I became a member of Democracy onAir to help dispel much of the misinformation occurring in current politics in the United States. Democracy onAir’s goal to bring truthful, unbiased information resonated strongly with me and I wanted to assist to the best of my abilities in reaching that goal.

About

Christopher Nicholson 2As someone who comes from a rural area of Virginia, with many community members, friends, and family often misunderstanding elections, voting, candidates, etc. the goal of Democracy onAir is both very important and personal to me.

My freshman year, I studied abroad in Spain, which really began my first dive into the politics of another country. I had previously studied and kept myself updated with politics here in the United States, but being in Spain really opened new doors to me. I came back with a growing interest in what was happening around the world, and quickly went from being undecided to declaring a Global Affairs major. Being a Global Affairs major, I learn and study much about the relations between countries and their complex intricacies. However, it is just as important to have a complete understanding of local and regional politics as well, as these can often shape what direction international events play out on. Furthermore, just as in the United States, misinformation and more and more extreme politics have begun to become more prevalent abroad as well. Domestic and global events over the past couple years have only strengthened my want to help improve the state of politics as best as I can.

Education

Education

  • Bachelor of the Arts in Global Affairs, Minor in Spanish
    George Mason University
    2018 to 2021• Global Politics Fellows
    • GPA: 3.98
    • Dean’s List: Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021
  • Study Abroad
    Universidad de Carlos III de Madrid
    2019 to 2019• Overcame language and cultural barriers.
    • Tested out a new study abroad program for Freshman.

Work Experience

  • Intern
    Federation of Social Organizations (Costa Rica)
    2020 to 2020• Developed impact assessments with member organizations.
    • Surveyed member organizations to gather data on the Federation’s effectiveness.

Volunteer Experience

  • Recruitment and Retention Chair, Fellowship Vice President
    Alpha Phi Omega
    2020 to 2021• Planned and executed recruitment events in Fall 2020 and Fall 2021
    • Scheduled and held thriving virtual and in person events for the chapter.
    • Participated in multiple donation drives.
    • Volunteered in multiple service events to benefit the community.
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Dima KassemDima Kassem

I am currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree at George Mason University in Government and International Politics with a minor in International Security. After graduation I am debating between going to law school or pursuing a master’s degree in International Relations.

I decided to do my internship at Democracy on Air because I wanted to be able to participate in forums and discussions about our representatives and candidates and I value the importance of that.

Summary

I am currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree at George Mason University in Government and International Politics with a minor in International Security. After graduation I am debating between going to law school or pursuing a master’s degree in International Relations.

I decided to do my internship at Democracy on Air because I wanted to be able to participate in forums and discussions about our representatives and candidates and I value the importance of that.

About

Dima Kassem 1As someone who was raised in the Middle East, I am extremely privy to how important it is to have a democracy, more specifically how crucial it is for the public to be well informed about the democratic process and elections. Growing up in the Middle East, I did not understand the impact of having an informed public. I moved to the United States from in August of 2016 around the time when one of the most crucial presidential races was happening. It was the first time I ever got the chance to vote in an election where I knew my voice mattered and I was able to see first-hand how important it is to be able to talk about those who are running for office especially those wanting to run the country.

Education

  • Bachelor’s of Arts in Government and International Politics
    George Mason University
    2020 to presentExpected Graduation date is May 2022

Work Experience

  • Campus Intern
    TGI Greek
    2021 to present• Current campus intern for TGI Greek.
    • Responsibilities include contacting Greek and non-Greek organizations on campus to promote custom apparel for certain events, setting up meetings between on-campus organization representatives and company account manager, and closely work with sales and marketing team to create t-shirt designs and promote our brand.
  • Server
    Ornery Beer Company
    2020 to present• Working in a high-speed environment while ensuring positive guest experience in a friendly and efficient manner.
    • Maintained compliance with company policies and procedures for food safety, sanitation, and quality.
    • Resolved problems promptly and escalated larger concerns to management.
    • Sustained a teamwork mind frame, assisting other staff by helping run food and drinks, and maintain communication.

Volunteer Experience

  • Director New Member Experience
    Virginia Iota Chapter of Pi Beta Phi
    2020 to 2021
  • Team Lead Volunteer
    El Oum Betlem (The Mother Gathers)
    2013 to 2016• Youngest volunteer with non-governmental organization specializing in helping families of martyrs sustain their own businesses by helping them in perfecting a craft that becomes the basis of their business.
    • Served in a team leader role leading a team of 10+ volunteers. During this time, developed additional leadership and conflict resolution skills while working with diverse group of people.

Organizations

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