Terry McAullife

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

Mark Warner

i

Latest news about Senator Mark Warner can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

i

Latest Senator Mark Warner press releases can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

Sen. Mark Warner, the self-described “only so-called Democratic moderate” on the Senate Budget Committee, described how he will work with Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders to craft a spending bill that could be passed by reconciliation along with a bipartisan infrastructure bill.

“I think I’m the only so-called Democratic moderate on the Budget Committee,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Monday. “I’m prepared to work with Senator Sanders and others to start down the path on a budget reconciliation process.”

Warner said he would be happy for the reconciliation package to include tax increases.

Mark Warner emerges as moderates' dealmaker-in-chief
Axios, Jonathan SwanJune 27, 2021 (Short)

As Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain navigate the legislative minefield of the next few months, they’ll often turn to a moderate Democrat who gets far less ink than Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) or Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.).

The big picture: Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) has become a pivotal player in the multi-trillion-dollar negotiations that will shape the Democrats’ electoral prospects, Joe Biden’s presidency and the future of the country.

Behind the scenes: Centrist Democrats and Republicans involved in the negotiations tell Axios that Warner is well-positioned for this dealmaking role.

i
How You'll Benefit From the American Rescue Plan
Mark Warner emailMarch 10, 2021

Dear Friend,

On Saturday, nearly one year since the first COVID-19 case was reported in Virginia, I voted to pass the American Rescue Plan – a bold piece of legislation that will create 7 million jobs and ensure that our nation is able to get vaccines into arms, kids into schools, Americans to work, and lifelines to our hard-hit communities. Earlier today, I was glad to see the House of Representatives put its final stamp of approval on this bill, which now heads to the White House, where President Joe Biden is expected to sign it into law.

Among other priorities, I was especially proud to work with President Biden to secure $17 billion in funding for broadband in this bill, because as too many folks across the Commonwealth know, broadband is a necessity in the 21st century – not a luxury. But in Virginia, there are still 700,000 people who lack access to high-speed internet during the pandemic. This funding will expand broadband access and affordability, and is the largest-ever federal investment of its kind.

In addition to broadband, the American Rescue Plan extends emergency unemployment insurance programs through September 6, 2021. This will help ensure that Americans who lost their jobs through no fault of their own are able to make ends meet while the economy rebuilds.

The American Rescue Plan also funds a number of critical priorities that will help Virginians get through the health and economic crisis:

  • Relief checks: The bill includes an additional round of $1,400 economic impact payments for individuals making less than $75,000 and joint filers making less than $150,000 – plus an additional $1,400 per dependent
  • Vaccine procurement & testing: The legislation includes $160 billion for national vaccination and other health efforts, including testing, tracing, genomic sequencing, public health staffing, and supplies to slow the spread of COVID-19
  • Keeping small businesses open: The American Rescue Plan has billions to help small businesses keep their doors open, including:

$7.25 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

$15 billion for the Targeted Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Advance Program

$28.6 billion for a new Restaurant Revitalization Fund to provide grants to help small local restaurants, bars, and craft breweries stay in business and keep their workers employed

$1.25 billion for the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant (SVOG) Program to support live entertainment venues, and a critical fix to ensure venue operators can access both PPP and SVOGs

$10 billion in new funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative to help small businesses grow and create jobs

  • Reopening schools: The bill includes $170 billion for K-12 schools and higher learning institutions so they have the resources they need to reopen safely
  • Keeping Americans in their homes: The legislation includes more than $21 billion in emergency rental assistance to help renters and small landlords make ends meet as well as $9.9 billion to aid homeowners struggling to afford their mortgage payments, utility bills, and other housing costs
  • Help for the hungry: The legislation extends a 15 percent increase in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits through September 30, 2021, which will help the nearly 50 million Americans who have struggled with hunger during the pandemic
  • Maintaining government services & preventing layoffs: The bill provides $350 billion in aid for state, local, and tribal governments so they can continue to provide critical community services, limit long-term harm caused by the pandemic, and address longstanding inequities exacerbated by COVID-19
  • Child care & help for families: The bill cuts taxes for working families by expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. An estimated 1.5 million children across Virginia will benefit from this expanded tax credit, and it will lift 249,000 children in the Commonwealth out of poverty and deep poverty. Researchers have said the move will cut the child poverty rate in half nationwide this year. The bill also includes $39 billion in dedicated relief for child care, to make sure that child care providers can continue supporting working families

As we work to rebuild and recover from COVID-19, please know that I will continue to work with the Biden administration and leaders in Virginia to ensure that funding is distributed appropriately, programs are implemented quickly, and Virginians get the help they deserve.

If you want to share your thoughts about an issue that’s important to you, you can send me an email any time using the form on my Senate website. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Mark Warner

New Senate intel chief wants to reimagine 'decimated' spy agency
Martin MatishakFebruary 4, 2021 (Medium)

Virginia Democrat Mark Warner says the focus should be on strengthening the intelligence community after years of blistering attacks.

Some Democrats may be eager to use their newfound power in Washington to investigate the misdeeds of the Trump era. But Mark Warner isn’t interested in performing an autopsy of the last four years in the U.S. intelligence community.

The Virginia Democrat and newly installed chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee doesn’t believe he would best serve the country by launching probes into the political pressure spy agencies faced under former President Donald Trump, who labeled elements within the intelligence community part of the “deep state” and clashed with them over issues like Russian election interference. Instead, Warner would rather focus on depoliticizing and rebuilding the clandestine organizations.

Congress has dropped the ball on election security
Martin MatishakSeptember 9, 2020 (Short)

Warner also pointed to the Trump administration’s warnings that other nations have taken the Russian playbook from 2016 and are working on improving it.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) took Congress to task Wednesday for not passing any substantive election security legislation since Russia’s digital assault on the 2016 presidential race, warning that Moscow could launch a new offensive in the weeks before Election Day.

“While our systems have partially improved, we as the Congress have not legislated any guardrails,” Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said at the 11th annual Billington Cybersecurity Summit. “I think that leaves us vulnerable.”

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has sickened hundreds of thousands of people around the world, including many cases here in Virginia. Since the outbreak began, my top priority has been to provide our nation and our Commonwealth with the tools we need to fight this pandemic and help workers and small businesses make it through these tough times.

Below you will find a complete list of my actions to date on the coronavirus, along with resources for Virginians, the latest statistics on COVID-19 cases in Virginia, and guidance from public health officials.

Also in this message from Senator Warner Covid-19 related legislation.

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006; Venture Capital from 1989 – 2001

Committees: Select Committee on Intelligence (Chairman), Finance, Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs, Budget, Rules & Administration

Web:  Government Page, Campaign Site, TwitterYouTubeFacebook, Instagram

Quotes:

Senator Warner is committed to strengthening our national security both at home and abroad, and he believes a strong and engaged United States is fundamental to securing our national interests around the world.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

Featured Video:

What is the Cybersecurity Caucus?

Source: Government page

Tim Kaine

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

Web:   Campaign Site  Government Page  Twitter  YouTube  Facebook

Committees:  Armed Services   Budget Committee   Foreign Relations   Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Quotes:
“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

Featured Video:
Sen. Tim Kaine: On election night Virginia showed its ‘values’

Terry McAuliffeTerry McAullife

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

Summary

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

About

Terry McAullife

Source: Wikipedia

Terry McAuliffe (born February 9, 1957) is an American politician and former entrepreneur who served as the 72nd Governor of Virginia from 2014 to 2018. He was chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 2001 to 2005, was co-chairman of President Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign, and was chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign.

McAuliffe was previously an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2009 gubernatorial election. In the 2013 gubernatorial election, he ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. He defeated Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Libertarian Robert Sarvis in the general election, collecting 47.8% of the vote; Cuccinelli garnered 45.2% and Sarvis received 6.5%. McAuliffe assumed office on January 11, 2014, and his term ended on January 13, 2018.

Family and education

McAuliffe was born and raised in Syracuse, New York, the son of Mildred Katherine Lonergan and Jack McAuliffe. His father was a real estate agent and local Democratic politician. The family is of Irish descent.

He graduated from Bishop Ludden Junior/Senior High School in 1975. In 1979, he earned a bachelor’s degree from The Catholic University of America, where he served as a resident adviser.After graduating, McAuliffe worked for President Jimmy Carter’s reelection campaign, becoming the national finance director at twenty-two. Following the campaign, McAuliffe attended theGeorgetown University Law Center, where he obtained his Juris Doctor degree in 1984.

Business career

At age of 14, McAuliffe started his first business,McAuliffe Driveway Maintenance, sealing driveways and parking lots. According toThe Washington Post, McAuliffe has “earned millions as a banker, real estate developer, home builder, hotel owner, and internet venture capitalist.”

In 1985, McAuliffe helped found the Federal City National Bank, a Washington, D.C.-based local bank. In January 1988, when McAuliffe was thirty years old, the bank’s board elected McAuliffe as chairman, making him the youngest chairman in the United States Federal Reserve Bank’s charter association. In 1991, McAuliffe negotiated a merger with Credit International Bank, which he called his “greatest business experience.”  McAuliffe became the vice-chairman of the newly merged bank. Shareholders questioned whether he was given special treatment; Chairman Richard V. Allen denied the allegation.

In 1979, McAuliffe had met Richard Swann, a lawyer who was in charge of fundraising for Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign inFlorida. In 1988, McAuliffe married Swann’s daughter, Dorothy. McAuliffe invested $800,000 in Swann’s American Pioneer Savings Bank, which was taken over In 1990 by federal regulators, causing Swann to file for bankruptcy. The Resolution Trust Corporation, a federal agency, took over American Pioneer’s assets and liabilities.[13] Under Swann’s guidance, McAuliffe purchased some of American Pioneer’s real estate from the Resolution Trust Corporation. McAuliffe’s equal partner in the deal was a pension fund controlled by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). They purchased real estate valued at $50 million for $38.7 million; McAuliffe received a 50% equity stake.  The deal was arranged by Jack Moore, a NECA trustee and acquaintance of McAuliffe.[13][15] Next, McAuliffe acquired a distressed house-building company, American Heritage Homes, which had been buying real estate formerly owned by American Pioneer.[13] McAuliffe served as chairman of American Heritage along with CEO Carl H. Linder. The Florida-based company came out of distress under a plan in which it built 800 homes a year.

In 1997, McAuliffe invested $100,000 in Global Crossing, a Bermuda-registered telecommunications company. Global Crossing went public in 1998. In 1999, McAuliffe sold the majority of his holding for $8.1 million.

In 2009, McAuliffe founded GreenTech Automotive, a holding company, which purchased Chinese electric car company EU Auto MyCar for $20 million in May 2010. Later that year, McAuliffe relocated GreenTech’s headquarters to McLean, Virginia. GreenTech subsequently announced plans to manufacture vehicles in Mississippi. In December 2012, McAuliffe was questioned about the factory’s location in Mississippi instead of Virginia. McAuliffe said he wanted to bring the factory to Virginia, but the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the commonwealth’s recruitment agency, chose not to bid on it. Documents showed the VEDP was awaiting more information at the time it was announced the factory was being built in Mississippi. In April 2013, McAuliffe announced his resignation from GreenTech to focus on his run for governor of Virginia. He no longer holds an ownership stake in the company.

Fundraising career and relationship with the Clintons

McAuliffe had a prolific fundraising career within the Democratic Party and a personal and political relationship with Bill and Hillary Clinton. McAuliffe and his staff raised $275 million, then an unprecedented sum, for Clinton’s causes while president. After Bill Clinton’s tenure ended, McAuliffe guaranteed the Clintons’ $1.35 million mortgage for their home in Chappaqua, New York. The deal raised ethical questions. In 2000, McAuliffe chaired a fundraiser with the Clintons, setting a fundraising record of $26.3 million.

McAuliffe told The New York Times in 1999, “I’ve met all of my business contacts through politics. It’s all interrelated.” When he meets a new business contact, he continued, “Then I raise money from them.” He acknowledged that success of his business dealings stemmed partly from his relationship with Bill Clinton, saying, “No question, that’s a piece of it.” He also credited his ties to former congressmen Dick Gephardt and Tony Coelho, his Rolodex of 5,000-plus names, and his ability to personally relate to people. In 2004, he was one of the five-member board of directors of the Clinton Foundation. He told New York Times reporter Mark Leibovich in 2012 that his Rolodex held 18,632 names.

Chairman of the Democratic National Committee

In June 2000, as organizers of the 2000 Democratic National Convention were scrambling to raise $7 million, convention chairmanRoy Romer resigned to become superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. McAuliffe immediately accepted appointment as Romer’s replacement when asked on a phone call by presumptive presidential nominee Al Gore. Already in the news for a record $26 million fundraiser with Bill Clinton the month prior, McAuliffe promised that money would be a “non-issue” for the convention, and that the outstanding $7 million would be raised “very quickly”. The selection of McAuliffe was praised by many in the party, and was widely seen to represent the growth in his influence, with James Carville telling the New York Times that “his stock is trading at an all-time high”.

In February 2001, McAuliffe was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and served until February 2005.McAuliffe tried and failed to persuade his top rival, Maynard Jackson, to drop out of the race for chairman but was still the heavy favorite. During his tenure, the DNC raised $578 million and emerged from debt for the first time in its history.

In the period between the 2002 elections and the 2004 Democratic convention, the DNC rebuilt operations and intra-party alliances. McAuliffe worked to restructure the Democratic primary schedule, allowing Arizona, New Mexico, North Carolina and South Carolinato vote earlier; the move provided African-American and Hispanic communities greater power in presidential primaries. According toThe Washington Post, the move bolstered United States Senator John Kerry’s fundraising efforts. The DNC rebuilt its headquarters and created a computer database of more than 170 million potential voters known as “Demzilla.” Five-time presidential candidateRalph Nader alleged that during the 2004 presidential election McAuliffe offered him cash to withdraw from certain pivotal states.McAuliffe’s staff admitted to conversations with Nader about his campaign but denied offering him money.

In January 2005, a few weeks before his term ended, McAuliffe earmarked $5 million of the party’s cash to assist Tim Kaine and other Virginia Democrats in their upcoming elections. This donation was the largest nonpresidential disbursement in DNC history, and was part of McAuliffe’s attempt to prove Democratic viability in Southern states in the wake of the 2004 presidential election. Kaine was successful in his bid, and served as the Governor of Virginia from 2006 to 2010.

Post-DNC chairmanship

McAuliffe was co-chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign and one of her superdelegates at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

In 2012, he was a visiting fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. In addition to several faculty and student lectures, McAuliffe hosted a segment entitled “The Making of a Candidate: From Running Campaigns to Running on my Own.”

McAuliffe was an adviser at ZeniMax Media.

Web

Government Page, Facebook, Government Page, Government Page

Issues

Abortion

In 2013, McAuliffe said he supports “keeping existing Virginia laws on when abortions are legal.” He opposes new state health and safety regulations on abortion clinics

Impeachment

In August 2018, McAuliffe stated “that’s something we ought to look at”, referring to the impeachment of president Trump. He argued that if “President Obama had gone to Helsinki and done what President Trump had done, you would already have impeachment hearings going on”.

X
Mark Warner 7Mark Warner

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006; Venture Capital from 1989 – 2001

Committees: Select Committee on Intelligence (Chairman), Finance, Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs, Budget, Rules & Administration

Web:  Government Page, Campaign Site, TwitterYouTubeFacebook, Instagram

Quotes:

Senator Warner is committed to strengthening our national security both at home and abroad, and he believes a strong and engaged United States is fundamental to securing our national interests around the world.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

Featured Video:

What is the Cybersecurity Caucus?

Source: Government page

i

Latest news about Senator Mark Warner can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

i

Latest Senator Mark Warner press releases can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

Sen. Mark Warner, the self-described “only so-called Democratic moderate” on the Senate Budget Committee, described how he will work with Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders to craft a spending bill that could be passed by reconciliation along with a bipartisan infrastructure bill.

“I think I’m the only so-called Democratic moderate on the Budget Committee,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Monday. “I’m prepared to work with Senator Sanders and others to start down the path on a budget reconciliation process.”

Warner said he would be happy for the reconciliation package to include tax increases.

Mark Warner emerges as moderates' dealmaker-in-chief
Axios, Jonathan SwanJune 27, 2021 (Short)

As Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain navigate the legislative minefield of the next few months, they’ll often turn to a moderate Democrat who gets far less ink than Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) or Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.).

The big picture: Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) has become a pivotal player in the multi-trillion-dollar negotiations that will shape the Democrats’ electoral prospects, Joe Biden’s presidency and the future of the country.

Behind the scenes: Centrist Democrats and Republicans involved in the negotiations tell Axios that Warner is well-positioned for this dealmaking role.

i
How You'll Benefit From the American Rescue Plan
Mark Warner emailMarch 10, 2021

Dear Friend,

On Saturday, nearly one year since the first COVID-19 case was reported in Virginia, I voted to pass the American Rescue Plan – a bold piece of legislation that will create 7 million jobs and ensure that our nation is able to get vaccines into arms, kids into schools, Americans to work, and lifelines to our hard-hit communities. Earlier today, I was glad to see the House of Representatives put its final stamp of approval on this bill, which now heads to the White House, where President Joe Biden is expected to sign it into law.

Among other priorities, I was especially proud to work with President Biden to secure $17 billion in funding for broadband in this bill, because as too many folks across the Commonwealth know, broadband is a necessity in the 21st century – not a luxury. But in Virginia, there are still 700,000 people who lack access to high-speed internet during the pandemic. This funding will expand broadband access and affordability, and is the largest-ever federal investment of its kind.

In addition to broadband, the American Rescue Plan extends emergency unemployment insurance programs through September 6, 2021. This will help ensure that Americans who lost their jobs through no fault of their own are able to make ends meet while the economy rebuilds.

The American Rescue Plan also funds a number of critical priorities that will help Virginians get through the health and economic crisis:

  • Relief checks: The bill includes an additional round of $1,400 economic impact payments for individuals making less than $75,000 and joint filers making less than $150,000 – plus an additional $1,400 per dependent
  • Vaccine procurement & testing: The legislation includes $160 billion for national vaccination and other health efforts, including testing, tracing, genomic sequencing, public health staffing, and supplies to slow the spread of COVID-19
  • Keeping small businesses open: The American Rescue Plan has billions to help small businesses keep their doors open, including:

$7.25 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

$15 billion for the Targeted Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Advance Program

$28.6 billion for a new Restaurant Revitalization Fund to provide grants to help small local restaurants, bars, and craft breweries stay in business and keep their workers employed

$1.25 billion for the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant (SVOG) Program to support live entertainment venues, and a critical fix to ensure venue operators can access both PPP and SVOGs

$10 billion in new funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative to help small businesses grow and create jobs

  • Reopening schools: The bill includes $170 billion for K-12 schools and higher learning institutions so they have the resources they need to reopen safely
  • Keeping Americans in their homes: The legislation includes more than $21 billion in emergency rental assistance to help renters and small landlords make ends meet as well as $9.9 billion to aid homeowners struggling to afford their mortgage payments, utility bills, and other housing costs
  • Help for the hungry: The legislation extends a 15 percent increase in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits through September 30, 2021, which will help the nearly 50 million Americans who have struggled with hunger during the pandemic
  • Maintaining government services & preventing layoffs: The bill provides $350 billion in aid for state, local, and tribal governments so they can continue to provide critical community services, limit long-term harm caused by the pandemic, and address longstanding inequities exacerbated by COVID-19
  • Child care & help for families: The bill cuts taxes for working families by expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. An estimated 1.5 million children across Virginia will benefit from this expanded tax credit, and it will lift 249,000 children in the Commonwealth out of poverty and deep poverty. Researchers have said the move will cut the child poverty rate in half nationwide this year. The bill also includes $39 billion in dedicated relief for child care, to make sure that child care providers can continue supporting working families

As we work to rebuild and recover from COVID-19, please know that I will continue to work with the Biden administration and leaders in Virginia to ensure that funding is distributed appropriately, programs are implemented quickly, and Virginians get the help they deserve.

If you want to share your thoughts about an issue that’s important to you, you can send me an email any time using the form on my Senate website. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Mark Warner

New Senate intel chief wants to reimagine 'decimated' spy agency
Martin MatishakFebruary 4, 2021 (Medium)

Virginia Democrat Mark Warner says the focus should be on strengthening the intelligence community after years of blistering attacks.

Some Democrats may be eager to use their newfound power in Washington to investigate the misdeeds of the Trump era. But Mark Warner isn’t interested in performing an autopsy of the last four years in the U.S. intelligence community.

The Virginia Democrat and newly installed chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee doesn’t believe he would best serve the country by launching probes into the political pressure spy agencies faced under former President Donald Trump, who labeled elements within the intelligence community part of the “deep state” and clashed with them over issues like Russian election interference. Instead, Warner would rather focus on depoliticizing and rebuilding the clandestine organizations.

Congress has dropped the ball on election security
Martin MatishakSeptember 9, 2020 (Short)

Warner also pointed to the Trump administration’s warnings that other nations have taken the Russian playbook from 2016 and are working on improving it.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) took Congress to task Wednesday for not passing any substantive election security legislation since Russia’s digital assault on the 2016 presidential race, warning that Moscow could launch a new offensive in the weeks before Election Day.

“While our systems have partially improved, we as the Congress have not legislated any guardrails,” Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said at the 11th annual Billington Cybersecurity Summit. “I think that leaves us vulnerable.”

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has sickened hundreds of thousands of people around the world, including many cases here in Virginia. Since the outbreak began, my top priority has been to provide our nation and our Commonwealth with the tools we need to fight this pandemic and help workers and small businesses make it through these tough times.

Below you will find a complete list of my actions to date on the coronavirus, along with resources for Virginians, the latest statistics on COVID-19 cases in Virginia, and guidance from public health officials.

Also in this message from Senator Warner Covid-19 related legislation.

Top News

i

Latest news about Senator Mark Warner can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

i

Latest Senator Mark Warner press releases can be found here on the Senator’s webpage.

Sen. Mark Warner, the self-described “only so-called Democratic moderate” on the Senate Budget Committee, described how he will work with Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders to craft a spending bill that could be passed by reconciliation along with a bipartisan infrastructure bill.

“I think I’m the only so-called Democratic moderate on the Budget Committee,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Monday. “I’m prepared to work with Senator Sanders and others to start down the path on a budget reconciliation process.”

Warner said he would be happy for the reconciliation package to include tax increases.

Mark Warner emerges as moderates’ dealmaker-in-chief
Axios, Jonathan SwanJune 27, 2021 (Short)

As Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain navigate the legislative minefield of the next few months, they’ll often turn to a moderate Democrat who gets far less ink than Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) or Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.).

The big picture: Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) has become a pivotal player in the multi-trillion-dollar negotiations that will shape the Democrats’ electoral prospects, Joe Biden’s presidency and the future of the country.

Behind the scenes: Centrist Democrats and Republicans involved in the negotiations tell Axios that Warner is well-positioned for this dealmaking role.

i
How You’ll Benefit From the American Rescue Plan
Mark Warner emailMarch 10, 2021

Dear Friend,

On Saturday, nearly one year since the first COVID-19 case was reported in Virginia, I voted to pass the American Rescue Plan – a bold piece of legislation that will create 7 million jobs and ensure that our nation is able to get vaccines into arms, kids into schools, Americans to work, and lifelines to our hard-hit communities. Earlier today, I was glad to see the House of Representatives put its final stamp of approval on this bill, which now heads to the White House, where President Joe Biden is expected to sign it into law.

Among other priorities, I was especially proud to work with President Biden to secure $17 billion in funding for broadband in this bill, because as too many folks across the Commonwealth know, broadband is a necessity in the 21st century – not a luxury. But in Virginia, there are still 700,000 people who lack access to high-speed internet during the pandemic. This funding will expand broadband access and affordability, and is the largest-ever federal investment of its kind.

In addition to broadband, the American Rescue Plan extends emergency unemployment insurance programs through September 6, 2021. This will help ensure that Americans who lost their jobs through no fault of their own are able to make ends meet while the economy rebuilds.

The American Rescue Plan also funds a number of critical priorities that will help Virginians get through the health and economic crisis:

  • Relief checks: The bill includes an additional round of $1,400 economic impact payments for individuals making less than $75,000 and joint filers making less than $150,000 – plus an additional $1,400 per dependent
  • Vaccine procurement & testing: The legislation includes $160 billion for national vaccination and other health efforts, including testing, tracing, genomic sequencing, public health staffing, and supplies to slow the spread of COVID-19
  • Keeping small businesses open: The American Rescue Plan has billions to help small businesses keep their doors open, including:

$7.25 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

$15 billion for the Targeted Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Advance Program

$28.6 billion for a new Restaurant Revitalization Fund to provide grants to help small local restaurants, bars, and craft breweries stay in business and keep their workers employed

$1.25 billion for the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant (SVOG) Program to support live entertainment venues, and a critical fix to ensure venue operators can access both PPP and SVOGs

$10 billion in new funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative to help small businesses grow and create jobs

  • Reopening schools: The bill includes $170 billion for K-12 schools and higher learning institutions so they have the resources they need to reopen safely
  • Keeping Americans in their homes: The legislation includes more than $21 billion in emergency rental assistance to help renters and small landlords make ends meet as well as $9.9 billion to aid homeowners struggling to afford their mortgage payments, utility bills, and other housing costs
  • Help for the hungry: The legislation extends a 15 percent increase in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits through September 30, 2021, which will help the nearly 50 million Americans who have struggled with hunger during the pandemic
  • Maintaining government services & preventing layoffs: The bill provides $350 billion in aid for state, local, and tribal governments so they can continue to provide critical community services, limit long-term harm caused by the pandemic, and address longstanding inequities exacerbated by COVID-19
  • Child care & help for families: The bill cuts taxes for working families by expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. An estimated 1.5 million children across Virginia will benefit from this expanded tax credit, and it will lift 249,000 children in the Commonwealth out of poverty and deep poverty. Researchers have said the move will cut the child poverty rate in half nationwide this year. The bill also includes $39 billion in dedicated relief for child care, to make sure that child care providers can continue supporting working families

As we work to rebuild and recover from COVID-19, please know that I will continue to work with the Biden administration and leaders in Virginia to ensure that funding is distributed appropriately, programs are implemented quickly, and Virginians get the help they deserve.

If you want to share your thoughts about an issue that’s important to you, you can send me an email any time using the form on my Senate website. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Mark Warner

Virginia Democrat Mark Warner says the focus should be on strengthening the intelligence community after years of blistering attacks.

Some Democrats may be eager to use their newfound power in Washington to investigate the misdeeds of the Trump era. But Mark Warner isn’t interested in performing an autopsy of the last four years in the U.S. intelligence community.

The Virginia Democrat and newly installed chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee doesn’t believe he would best serve the country by launching probes into the political pressure spy agencies faced under former President Donald Trump, who labeled elements within the intelligence community part of the “deep state” and clashed with them over issues like Russian election interference. Instead, Warner would rather focus on depoliticizing and rebuilding the clandestine organizations.

Congress has dropped the ball on election security
Martin MatishakSeptember 9, 2020 (Short)

Warner also pointed to the Trump administration’s warnings that other nations have taken the Russian playbook from 2016 and are working on improving it.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) took Congress to task Wednesday for not passing any substantive election security legislation since Russia’s digital assault on the 2016 presidential race, warning that Moscow could launch a new offensive in the weeks before Election Day.

“While our systems have partially improved, we as the Congress have not legislated any guardrails,” Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said at the 11th annual Billington Cybersecurity Summit. “I think that leaves us vulnerable.”

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has sickened hundreds of thousands of people around the world, including many cases here in Virginia. Since the outbreak began, my top priority has been to provide our nation and our Commonwealth with the tools we need to fight this pandemic and help workers and small businesses make it through these tough times.

Below you will find a complete list of my actions to date on the coronavirus, along with resources for Virginians, the latest statistics on COVID-19 cases in Virginia, and guidance from public health officials.

Also in this message from Senator Warner Covid-19 related legislation.

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2002 – 2006; Venture Capital from 1989 – 2001

Committees: Select Committee on Intelligence (Chairman), Finance, Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs, Budget, Rules & Administration

Web:  Government Page, Campaign Site, TwitterYouTubeFacebook, Instagram

Quotes:

Senator Warner is committed to strengthening our national security both at home and abroad, and he believes a strong and engaged United States is fundamental to securing our national interests around the world.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

Featured Video:

What is the Cybersecurity Caucus?

Source: Government page

About

Mark Warner 6

Source: Government page

Senator Warner was elected to the U.S. Senate in November 2008 and reelected to a third term in November 2020. He serves on the Senate Finance, Banking, Budget, and Rules Committees as well as the Select Committee on Intelligence, where he is the Chairman. During his time in the Senate, Senator Warner has established himself as a bipartisan leader who has worked with Republicans and Democrats alike to cut red tape, increase government performance and accountability, and promote private sector innovation and job creation. Senator Warner has been recognized as a national leader in fighting for our military men and women and veterans, and in working to find bipartisan, balanced solutions to address our country’s debt and deficit.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

The first in his family to graduate from college, Mark Warner spent 20 years as a successful technology and business leader in Virginia before entering public office. An early investor in the cellular telephone business, he co-founded the company that became Nextel and invested in hundreds of start-up technology companies that created tens of thousands of jobs.

Senator Warner and his wife Lisa Collis live in Alexandria, Virginia. They have three daughters.

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C.
703 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-2023

Abingdon
180 West Main Street
Abingdon, VA 24210
Phone: 276-628-8158

Norfolk
101 W. Main Street
Suite 7771
Norfolk, VA 23510
Phone: 757-441-3079

Richmond
919 E. Main Street
Suite 630
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: 804-775-2314

Vienna
8000 Towers Crescent Drive
Suite 200
Vienna, Virginia 22182
Phone: 703-442-0670

Twitter

Politics

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Wikipedia

Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American businessman and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Virginia, first elected in 2008. He is a member of the Democratic Party, vice chair of the Senate Democratic Caucus and chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Before his Senate career, Warner was the 69th governor of Virginia, holding the office from 2002 to 2006. He is the honorary chairman of the Forward Together PAC. Warner delivered the keynote address at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Apart from politics, Warner is also known for his involvement in telecommunications-related venture capital during the 1980s; he founded the firm Columbia Capital.

In 2006, Warner was widely expected to pursue the Democratic nomination in the 2008 U.S. presidential election, but he announced in October 2006 that he would not run, citing a desire not to disrupt his family life. Warner was considered to be a potential vice presidential candidate until he took himself out of consideration after winning the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate.[1]

Running against his gubernatorial predecessor, Jim Gilmore, Warner won his first election to the Senate in 2008 with 65% of the vote. He was reelected in 2014, narrowly defeating Ed Gillespie,[2] and in 2020, defeating Republican nominee Daniel Gade by twelve percentage points.

Early life, education, and business career

Warner was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, the son of Marjorie (née Johnston) and Robert F. Warner. He has a younger sister, Lisa. He grew up in Illinois, and later in Vernon, Connecticut, where he graduated from Rockville High School,[citation needed] a public secondary school. He has credited his interest in politics to his eighth grade social studies teacher, Jim Tyler, who “inspired him to work for social and political change during the tumultuous year of 1968.”[3] He was class president for three years at Rockville High School[citation needed] and hosted a weekly pick-up basketball game at his house, “a tradition that continues today.”[3]

Warner graduated from George Washington University (GWU), earning his Bachelor of Arts in political science in 1977 and graduating with a perfect 4.0 GPA and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. He was valedictorian of his class at GWU and the first in his family to graduate from college.[3] GWU later initiated Warner into Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society, as an alumni member in 1995. While at GWU, he worked on Capitol Hill to pay for his tuition, riding his bike early mornings to the office of U.S. Senator Abraham Ribicoff (D-CT).[3] His sophomore year, Warner took time off from school to serve as the youth coordinator on Ella Grasso‘s successful gubernatorial bid in Connecticut.[4] Upon returning to Washington, Warner took a part-time job in the office of then-Representative Chris Dodd. He would go on to serve as Dodd’s senatorial campaign manager during his freshman year of law school.[5] When his parents visited him at college, he got two tickets for them to tour the White House; when his father asked him why he didn’t get a ticket for himself, he replied, “I’ll see the White House when I’m president.”[3]

Warner then graduated from Harvard Law School with a Juris Doctor in 1980 and coached the law school’s first intramural women’s basketball team. Warner then took a job raising money for the Democratic Party based in Atlanta from 1980 to 1982.[6] Warner has never practiced law.[3]

Warner attempted to found two unsuccessful businesses before becoming a general contractor for cellular businesses and investors. As founder and managing director of Columbia Capital, a venture capital firm, he helped found or was an early investor in a number of technology companies, including Nextel. He co-founded Capital Cellular Corporation, and built up an estimated net worth of more than $200 million.[7][8] As of 2012, he was the wealthiest U.S. Senator.[9]

State activism

Warner involved himself in public efforts related to health care, transportation, telecommunications, information technology and education. He managed Douglas Wilder’s successful 1989 gubernatorial campaign and served as chairman of the state Democratic Party from 1993 to 1995. Warner also served, in the early 1990s, on the Virginia Commonwealth Transportation Board and sat in on monthly committee meetings of the Rail and Public Transportation Division (headed by Robert G. Corder).

1996 U.S. Senate election

He unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 1996 against incumbent Republican John Warner (no relation) in a “Warner versus Warner” election. Mark Warner performed strongly in the state’s rural areas, making the contest much closer than many pundits expected.[10] He lost to the incumbent, 52%-47%, losing most parts of the state including the north.[11]

Governor of Virginia

2001 election

In 2001 Warner campaigned for governor as a moderate Democrat after years of slowly building up a power base in rural Virginia, particularly Southwest Virginia. His opponents were Republican Mark Earley, the state’s attorney general, and the Libertarian candidate William B. Redpath. Warner won with 52.16 percent of the votes, 96,943 votes ahead of the next opponent.[12] Warner had a significant funding advantage, spending $20 million compared with Earley’s $10 million.[13]

Warner also benefited from dissension in Republican ranks after a heated battle for the nomination between Earley, backed by religious conservatives, and then-lieutenant governor John H. Hager, some of whose supporters later openly backed Warner. In the same election, Republican Jerry Kilgore was elected attorney general, and Democrat Tim Kaine was elected lieutenant governor. In his campaign for governor in 2001, Warner said that he would not raise taxes.[citation needed]

Tenure

After he was elected in 2002, Warner drew upon a $900 million “rainy day fund” left by his predecessor, James S. Gilmore, III.[14] Warner campaigned in favor of two regional sales tax increases (Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads) to fund transportation. Virginians rejected both regional referendums to raise the sales tax.

In 2004, Warner worked with Democratic and moderate Republican legislators and the business community to reform the tax code, lowering food and some income taxes while increasing the sales and cigarette taxes. His tax package effected a net tax increase of approximately $1.5 billion annually. Warner credited the additional revenues with saving the state’s AAA bond rating, held at the time by only five other states, and allowing the single largest investment in K-12 education in Virginia history. Warner also entered into an agreement with Democrats and moderate Republicans in the Virginia Senate to cap state car tax reimbursements to local governments.

During his tenure as governor, Warner influenced the world of college athletics. “Warner used his power as Virginia’s governor in 2003 to pressure the Atlantic Coast Conference into revoking an invitation it had already extended to Syracuse University. Warner wanted the conference, which already included the University of Virginia, to add Virginia Tech instead — and he got his way.”[15]

Warner speaking in Philadelphia, May 2006

Warner’s popularity may have helped Democrats gain seats in the Virginia House of Delegates in 2003 and again in 2005, reducing the majorities built up by Republicans in the 1990s. Warner chaired the National Governors Association in 2004-05 and led a national high school reform movement. He chaired the Southern Governors’ Association and was a member of the Democratic Governors Association. In January 2005, a two-year study,[16] the Government Performance Project, in conjunction with Governing magazine and the Pew Charitable Trust graded each state in four management categories: money, people, infrastructure and information. Virginia and Utah received the highest ratings average with both states receiving an A- rating overall, prompting Warner to dub Virginia “the best managed state in the nation.”[citation needed]

Warner with Virginia House of Delegates minority leader Ward Armstrong (left) and then-U.S. Senator Jim Webb (right), November 4, 2007

Kaine and Kilgore both sought to succeed Warner as governor of Virginia. (The Virginia Constitution forbids any governor from serving consecutive terms; so Warner could not have run for a second term in 2005.) On November 8, 2005, Kaine, the former mayor of Richmond, won with 52% of the vote. Kilgore, who had resigned as attorney general in February 2005 to campaign full-time and who had previously served as Virginia secretary of public safety, received 46% of the vote. Russ Potts, a Republican state senator, also ran for governor as an independent, receiving 2% of the vote. Warner had supported and campaigned for Kaine, and many national pundits considered Kaine’s victory to be further evidence of Warner’s political clout in Virginia.[citation needed]

On November 29, 2005, Warner commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. Lovitt was convicted of murdering Clayton Dicks at an Arlington pool hall in 1999. After his trial in 2001, Lovitt’s lawyers stated that a court clerk illegally destroyed evidence that was used against Lovitt during his trial, but that could have possibly exonerated him upon further DNA testing.[17] Lovitt’s death sentence would have been the 1,000th carried out in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment as permissible under the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution in 1976. In a statement, Warner said, “The actions of an agent of the commonwealth, in a manner contrary to the express direction of the law, comes at the expense of a defendant facing society’s most severe and final sanction.” Warner denied clemency in 11 other death penalty cases that came before him as governor.[18]

Warner also arranged for DNA tests of evidence left from the case of Roger Keith Coleman, who was put to death by the state in 1992. Coleman was convicted in the 1981 rape and stabbing death of his 19-year-old sister-in-law, Wanda McCoy. Coleman drew national attention, even making the cover of Time, by repeatedly claiming innocence and protesting the unfairness of the death penalty. DNA results announced on January 12, 2006 confirmed Coleman’s guilt.[19]

In July 2005, his approval ratings were at 74%[20] and in some polls reached 80%.[21] Warner left office with a 71% approval rating in one poll.[22]

U.S. Senate

Elections

2008

Warner accepts the nomination as the Democratic candidate for the Senate

Warner was believed to be preparing to run for the Democratic nomination for president in 2008, and had “done everything but announce his candidacy” before suddenly stating in October 2006 he would not run for president, citing family reasons.[23] Warner declared on September 13, 2007 that he would run for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by the retiring John Warner (no relation) in 2008. John Warner endorsed him, which was seen as a factor of his win by over 30 points.[24]

Warner delivers the keynote address during the second day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.

Warner immediately gained the endorsement of most national Democrats. He held a wide lead over his Republican opponent, fellow former Virginia governor Jim Gilmore (and Warner’s predecessor), for virtually the entire campaign.[25] Warner delivered the keynote address at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.[26]

In a Washington Post/ABC News Poll dated September 24, 2008, Warner held a 30-point lead over Gilmore.[27]

In the November election, Warner defeated Gilmore, taking 65 percent of the vote to Gilmore’s 34 percent. Warner carried all but four counties in the state—Rockingham, Augusta, Powhatan and Hanover. In many cases, he ran up huge margins in areas of the state that have traditionally voted Republican.[28] This was the most lopsided margin for a contested Senate race in Virginia since Chuck Robb took 72 percent of the vote in 1988. As a result of Warner’s victory, Virginia had two Democratic U.S. Senators for the first time since Harry Byrd, Jr. left the Democrats to become an independent (while still caucusing with the Democrats) in 1970.[citation needed]

2014

In 2014, Warner faced Ed Gillespie, who had previously served as Counselor to the President under George W. Bush and chairman of the Republican National Committee. Warner’s margin of victory—only 17,000 votes—was much narrower than expected.[29]

2020

In 2020, Warner faced college professor and U.S. Army veteran Daniel Gade.[30] During the general election, he defeated Gade, taking 55 percent of the vote to Gade’s 43 percent.[31]

Tenure

Upon arriving in the U.S. Senate in 2009, Warner was appointed to the Senate’s Banking, Budget, and Commerce committees. Warner was later named to the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2011.[32]

In 2009, Warner voted for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the stimulus bill. As a member of the Budget Committee, he submitted an amendment designed to help the government track how the stimulus dollars were being spent.[33]

When offered the chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in preparation for the 2012 election cycle, Warner declined because he wanted to keep a distance from the partisanship of the role.[34]

In the fall of 2012, Warner was approached by supporters about possibly leaving the Senate to seek a second four-year term as Virginia’s governor. After considering the prospect, Warner announced shortly after the November 2012 elections that he had chosen to remain in the Senate because he was “all in” on finding a bipartisan solution to the country’s fiscal challenges.[35]

President Barack Obama and Tim Kaine listen to Senator Warner, aboard Air Force One, July 13, 2012

Warner became the senior senator on January 3, 2013 when Jim Webb left the Senate and was replaced by Tim Kaine, who was lieutenant governor while Warner was governor.[citation needed]

Warner has been identified as a radical centrist,[36] working to foster compromise in the Senate.[37] Warner was ranked the 10th most bipartisan member of the U.S. Senate during the 114th United States Congress in the Bipartisan Index, created by The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy to assess congressional bipartisanship.[38] According to the same methodology, Senator Warner was the second most bipartisan Democrat in the 115th United States Congress.

Abortion

Warner is pro-choice and supports Roe v. Wade, though he also supports some restrictions on abortion such as a ban on partial birth abortion and a 24-hour waiting period.[39]

Health care

Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) meets with constituents in 2017

On a video in his senate office, Warner promised Virginians, “I would not vote for a health-care plan that doesn’t let you keep health insurance you like.”[40]

He voted for the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA, commonly called Obamacare), helping the Senate reach the required sixty votes to prevent it from going to a filibuster. (As there were exactly 60 Democratic Senators at the time, each Democrat can be said to have cast the deciding vote.)[41] He and 11 Senate freshmen discussed adding an amendment package aimed at addressing health care costs by expanding health IT and wellness prevention.[42]

In January 2019, Warner was one of six Democratic senators to introduce the American Miners Act of 2019, a bill that would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to swap funds in excess of the amounts needed to meet existing obligations under the Abandoned Mine Land fund to the 1974 Pension Plan as part of an effort to prevent its insolvency as a result of coal company bankruptcies and the 2008 financial crisis. It also increased the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund tax and ensured that miners affected by the 2018 coal company bankruptcies would not lose their health care.[43]

In September 2019, amid discussions to prevent a government shutdown, Warner was one of six Democratic senators to sign a letter to congressional leadership advocating for the passage of legislation that would permanently fund health care and pension benefits for retired coal miners as “families in Virginia, West Virginia, Wyoming, Alabama, Colorado, North Dakota and New Mexico” would start to receive notifications of health care termination by the end of the following month.[44]

Finance

From the start of his Senate term, Warner attempted to replicate in Washington, D.C. the bipartisan partnerships that he used effectively during his tenure as Virginia governor. In 2010, Warner worked with a Republican colleague on the Banking Committee, Bob Corker, to write a key portion of the Dodd-Frank Act that seeks to end taxpayer bailouts of failing Wall Street financial firms by requiring “advance funeral plans” for large financial firms.[45]

In 2013, the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress gave Warner and Corker its Publius Award for their bipartisan work on financial reform legislation.[46]

In 2018, Warner became one of the few Democrats in the Senate supporting a bill that would relax “key banking regulations”. As part of at least 11 other Democrats, Warner argued that the bill would “right-size post-crisis rules imposed on small and regional lenders and help make it easier for them to provide credit”. Chuck Schumer and Elizabeth Warren have stated their opposition to the legislation.[47]

Campaign finance

In June 2019, Warner and Amy Klobuchar introduced the Preventing Adversaries Internationally from Disbursing Advertising Dollars (PAID AD) Act, a bill that would modify U.S. federal campaign finance laws to outlaw the purchasing of ads that name a political candidate and appear on platforms by foreign nationals in the midst of an election year.[48]

Defense

Mark Warner’s freshman portrait

In 2011, Warner voted for the four-year extension of the USA PATRIOT Act.
In 2011, he engaged Northern Virginia’s high-tech community in a pro-bono effort to correct burial mistakes and other U.S. Army management deficiencies at Arlington National Cemetery.[49] In 2012, he successfully pushed the Navy to improve the substandard military housing in Hampton Roads.[50]

Also in 2012, he pushed the Office of Personnel Management to address chronic backlogs in processing retirement benefits for federal workers, many of whom live in Washington’s northern Virginia suburbs.[51] Warner was successful in pushing the Department of Veterans Affairs to expand access to PTSD treatment for female military veterans returning from service in Iraq and Afghanistan.[52]

In August 2013, Warner was one of twenty-three Democratic senators to sign a letter to the Defense Department warning of some payday lenders “offering predatory loan products to service members at exorbitant triple digit effective interest rates and loan products that do not include the additional protections envisioned by the law” and asserting that service members along with their families “deserve the strongest possible protections and swift action to ensure that all forms of credit offered to members of our armed forces are safe and sound.”[53]

Warner was awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal by U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, the Navy’s highest honor for a civilian, for his consistent support of Virginia’s military families and veterans.[54]

Economy

Between 2010 and 2013, Warner invested considerable time and effort in leading the Senate’s Gang of Six, along with Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA).[55] Together, Chambliss and Warner sought to craft a bipartisan plan along the lines of the Simpson-Bowles Commission to address U.S. deficits and debt.[56]

Although the Gang of Six ultimately failed to produce a legislative “grand bargain”, they did agree on the broad outlines of a plan that included spending cuts, tax reforms that produced more revenue, and reforms to entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security—entitlement reforms that are opposed by most Democrats.[57] Although President Obama showed interest in the plan, leaders in Congress from both parties kept a deal from being made.[58] In 2011, the bipartisan Concord Coalition awarded Warner and Chambliss its Economic Patriots Award for their work with the Gang of Six.[59]

Gun laws

On April 17, 2013, Warner voted to expand background checks for gun purchases as part of the Manchin-Toomey Amendment.[60][61] Warner also voted against the 2013 Assault Weapons Ban, but changed his position in a 2018 op-ed and has co-sponsored similar efforts since then.[62][63][64]

In 2017, he called himself a strong supporter of second amendment rights and vowed to advocate for responsible gun ownership for hunting, recreation, and self-defense.[65]

In January 2019, Warner was one of forty senators to introduce the Background Check Expansion Act, a bill that would require background checks for either the sale or transfer of all firearms including all unlicensed sellers. Exceptions to the bill’s background check requirement included transfers between members of law enforcement, loaning firearms for either hunting or sporting events on a temporary basis, providing firearms as gifts to members of one’s immediate family, firearms being transferred as part of an inheritance, or giving a firearm to another person temporarily for immediate self-defense.[66]

LGBT issues

Warner supports same-sex marriage, announcing his support for same-sex marriage in a statement on his Facebook page in March 2013. His announcement came shortly after Senator Claire McCaskill from Missouri announced her support for the institution.[67] In July 2015, Warner and his Senate counterpart Tim Kaine cosponsored the Equality Act along with 38 other Senators and 158 members of the House of Representatives, with Kaine stating “it’s critical that we prohibit discrimination in housing, education and the workplace.”[68]

Transparency

On the Senate Budget Committee, Warner was appointed chairman of a bipartisan task force on government performance in 2009.[69] Warner was a lead sponsor of the 2010 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), which imposed specific program performance goals across all federal agencies and set up a more transparent agency performance review process.[70]

On May 21, 2013, Warner introduced the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (S. 994; 113th Congress), DATA. “The legislation requires standardized reporting of federal spending to be posted to a single website, allowing citizens to track spending in their communities and agencies to more easily identify improper payments, waste and fraud.”[71][72] On November 6, 2013, the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs committee unanimously passed DATA.[73]

On January 27, 2014, a version of the White House Office of Management and Budget‘s (OMB) marked up version of the bill was leaked. This White House version “move[s] away from standards and toward open data structures to publish information” and “requir[es] OMB in consultation with Treasury to review and, if necessary, revise standards to ensure accuracy and consistency through methods such as establishing linkages between data in agency financial systems…”[74] Senator Warner’s responded with the following statement: “The Obama administration talks a lot about transparency, but these comments reflect a clear attempt to gut the DATA Act. DATA reflects years of bipartisan, bicameral work, and to propose substantial, unproductive changes this late in the game is unacceptable. We look forward to passing the DATA Act, which had near universal support in its House passage and passed unanimously out of its Senate committee. I will not back down from a bill that holds the government accountable and provides taxpayers the transparency they deserve.”[75][76]

On April 10, 2014, the Senate voted by unanimous consent to pass the bill, which was then passed by the House in a voice vote on April 28, 2014.[77]

Minimum wage

In April 2014, the United States Senate debated the Minimum Wage Fairness Act (S. 1737; 113th Congress). The bill would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA) to increase the federal minimum wage for employees to $10.10 per hour over the course of a two-year period.[78] The bill was strongly supported by President Barack Obama and many Democratic Senators, but strongly opposed by Republicans in the Senate and House.[79][80][81] Warner expressed a willingness to negotiate with Republicans about some of the provisions of the bill, such as the timeline for the phase-in.[80] Warner said that any increase needs to be done “in a responsible way.”[82]

Other issues

Senator Warner before greeting the new King Salman of Saudi Arabia, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, January 27, 2015

Senator Mark Warner speaks at the September 2020 Hospitality Roundtable

Warner was the original Democratic sponsor of the Startup Act legislation and has partnered with the bill’s original author Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS) to introduce three iterations of the bill: Startup Act in 2011, Startup Act 2.0 in 2012 and Startup Act 3.0 in early 2013. Warner describes the legislation as the ‘logical next step’ following enactment of the bipartisan JOBS Act.[83]

In 2015, Warner criticized the Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen, saying: “I’m concerned in particular with some of the indiscriminate bombing in Yemen … [Gulf states] need to step up and they need to step up with more focus than the kind of indiscriminate bombing.”[84]

In September 2016, in advance of a UN Security Council resolution 2334 condemning Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories, Warner signed an AIPAC-sponsored letter urging President Obama to veto “one-sided” resolutions against Israel.[85]

In June 2017, Warner voted to support Trump’s $350 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia.[86]

In July 2017, Warner voted in favor of the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act that grouped together sanctions against Iran, Russia and North Korea.[87]

In December 2017, Warner criticized Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, saying that it “comes at the wrong time and unnecessarily inflames the region.”[88]

In May 2018, Warner voted for Gina Haspel to be the next CIA director.[89]

In 2016, American foreign policy scholar Stefan Halper served as an FBI operative and contacted members of the 2016 Donald Trump Presidential campaign.[89][90][91] In May 2018, Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, warned Republican lawmakers that it would be “potentially illegal” to reveal the identity of Stefan Halper.[92]

In December 2018, Warner called Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei a threat to U.S. national security.[93]

In February 2019, Warner was one of eleven senators to sign a letter to Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen urging them “to work with all federal, state and local regulators, as well as the hundreds of independent power producers and electricity distributors nation-wide to ensure our systems are protected” and affirming that they were “ready and willing to provide any assistance you need to secure our critical electricity infrastructure.”[94]

In April 2019, Warner was one of thirty-four senators to sign a letter to President Trump encouraging him “to listen to members of your own Administration and reverse a decision that will damage our national security and aggravate conditions inside Central America“, asserting that Trump had “consistently expressed a flawed understanding of U.S. foreign assistance” since becoming president and that he was “personally undermining efforts to promote U.S. national security and economic prosperity” through preventing the use of Fiscal Year 2018 national security funding. The senators argued that foreign assistance to Central American countries created less migration to the U.S., citing the funding’s helping to improve conditions in those countries.[95]

Warner welcomed the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who had exposed American war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan, saying that Julian Assange is “a dedicated accomplice in efforts to undermine American security.”[96]

In July 2019, Warner was a cosponsor of the Defending America’s 5G Future Act, a bill that would prevent Huawei from being removed from the “entity list” of the Commerce Department without an act of Congress and authorize Congress to block administration waivers for U.S. companies to do business with Huawei. The bill would also codify President Trump’s executive order from the previous May that empowered his administration to block foreign tech companies deemed a national security threat from conducting business in the United States.[97]

On May 13, 2020, Warner and Senator Joe Manchin were the two Democratic senators to vote against the Lee-Leahy FISA amendment, which strengthened oversight of counterintelligence.[98]

Controversies

In October 2014, Warner was implicated in a federal investigation of the 2014 resignation of Virginia State Senator Phillip Puckett, a Democrat. He is alleged to have “discussed the possibility of several jobs, including a federal judgeship, for the senator’s daughter in an effort to dissuade him from quitting the evenly divided state Senate.”[99] A Warner spokesman acknowledged that the conversation occurred, but said Warner made no “explicit” job offer[100] and that he and Puckett were simply “brainstorming”.[101]

In January 2015, the Republican Party of Virginia filed a formal complaint against Warner with the United States Senate Select Committee on Ethics, alleging Warner’s interactions with Puckett violated the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act.[102]

Campaign contributions

From 2008 to 2014, some of his top ten campaign contributors were JP Morgan Chase, the Blackstone Group and Columbia Capital.[103] BlackRock had never contributed until Warner bought shares in the BlackRock Equity Dividend Fund in 2011.[103]

Committee assignments

Electoral history

United States Senate election in Virginia, 1996[104]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican John Warner (Incumbent) 1,235,744 52.48% -28.43%
DemocraticMark Warner1,115,98247.39%
Write-ins2,9890.13%
Majority119,7625.09%-57.67%
Turnout2,354,715
Republican holdSwing
Virginia gubernatorial election, 2001[105]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Mark Warner 984,177 52.16% +9.60%
RepublicanMark Earley887,23447.03%-8.79%
LibertarianBill Redpath14,4970.77%
Write-ins8130.04%
Majority96,9435.14%-8.11%
Turnout1,886,721
Democratic gain from RepublicanSwing
United States Senate election in Virginia, 2008[106]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Mark Warner 2,369,327 65.03% +65.03%
RepublicanJim Gilmore1,228,83033.72%-48.85%
Independent GreensGlenda Parker21,6900.60%
LibertarianBill Redpath20,2690.56%
Write-ins3,1780.09%
Majority1,140,49731.30%-41.53%
Turnout3,643,294
Democratic gain from RepublicanSwing
United States Senate election in Virginia, 2014[107]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Mark Warner (Incumbent) 1,073,667 49.15% -15.88%
RepublicanEd Gillespie1,055,94048.34%+14.62%
LibertarianRobert Sarvis53,1022.43%+1.87%
OtherWrite-ins1,7640.08%-0.01%
Plurality17,7270.81%-30.49%
Turnout2,184,473
Democratic holdSwing
United States Senate election in Virginia, 2020[108]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Mark Warner (Incumbent) 2,466,500 55.99% +6.84%
RepublicanDaniel Gade1,934,19943.91%-4.43%
OtherWrite-ins4,3880.10%+0.02%
Majority532,30112.08%+11.27%
Turnout4,405,087
Democratic holdSwing

Personal life

Warner is married to Lisa Collis.[3][failed verification] While on their honeymoon in 1989 in Egypt and Greece, Warner became ill; when he returned home, doctors discovered he had suffered a near-fatal burst appendix. Warner spent two months in the hospital recovering from the illness.[3] During her husband’s tenure as governor, Collis was the first Virginia first lady to use her birth name. Warner and Collis have three daughters.

Warner is involved in farming and winemaking at his Rappahannock Bend farm. There, he grows 15 acres (61,000 m2) of grapes for Ingleside Vineyards; Ingleside bottles a private label that Warner offers at charity auctions.[109]

Warner has an estimated net worth of $257 million as of 2014.[110]

He is not related to John Warner, his predecessor in the Senate.

Honorary degrees

Mark Warner has been awarded several honorary degrees, these include:

Honorary degrees
LocationDateSchoolDegree
 Virginia2002College of William and MaryDoctor of Laws (LL.D) [111]
 District of Columbia2003George Washington UniversityDoctor of Public Service (DPS) [112]
 North CarolinaMay 15, 2006Wake Forest UniversityDoctor of Laws (LL.D) [113]
 Virginia2007Lord Fairfax Community CollegeAssociate of Humane Letters
 VirginiaMay 20, 2007Eastern Virginia Medical SchoolDoctorate [114]
 VirginiaMay 25, 2013George Mason UniversityDoctorate [115]
 VirginiaMay 19, 2018Virginia State UniversityDoctorate [116]

See also

References

  1. ^ Lewis, Bob (June 14, 2008). “Warner takes self out of VP mix”. The San Francisco Chronicle. Associated Press. Archived from the original on June 18, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  2. ^ Vozzella, Laura; Portnoy, Jenna; Weiner, Rachel (November 4, 2019). “Warner claims victory over Gillespie in Virginia Senate race”. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Shaffrey, Mary M.; Hook, Carol S. (November 5, 2008). “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mark Warner”. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  4. ^ Fiske, Warren. “Mark Warner – a hard-driver pushing for his goals”. pilotonline.com.
  5. ^ Guldin, Bob. “Virginia’s Man of the Moment”. GW Magazine. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  6. ^ “Q&A Mark Warner”. C-Span. October 31, 2005. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  7. ^ Evans, Steve (September 7, 2007). “Former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner Advises Darden Students”. UVA Today. University of Virginia. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  8. ^ Warren, Jay (October 29, 2008). “WSLS profiles Mark Warner”. WSLS 10. Archived from the original on June 16, 2014. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  9. ^ “Mark Warner (D-Va), 2012”. Opensecrets.org. Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  10. ^ Biodata Document Number: K1650003526, Resource Center Online. Gale, 2003; reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Gale, 2008; retrieved September 25, 2008.
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  18. ^ “Conservatives Urge Virginia Governor to Grant Clemency Request as 1,000th Execution Nears”. deathpenaltyinfo.org. Death Penalty Information Center. November 22, 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2014.
  19. ^ Glod, Maria; D. Shear, Michael (January 13, 2006). “DNA Tests Confirm Guilt of Executed Man”. The Washington Post. Retrieved October 2, 2006.
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  42. ^ Broder, David S. (December 11, 2009). “Freshmen senators offer sensible health care cuts”. Houston Chronicle. Retrieved October 11, 2020.
  43. ^ Holdren, Wendy (January 4, 2019). “Legislation introduced to secure miners pensions and health care”. The Register-Herald.
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  49. ^ Davenport, Christian (August 7, 2010). “High-tech companies volunteer to digitize Arlington National Cemetery’s records”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  50. ^ Simmons, Laurie (December 14, 2011). “Navy makes big changes after families complain about mold problems”. WTKR. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  51. ^ Kopp, Emily (February 2, 2012). “Senators take OPM to task over long wait for pensions”. Federal News Network. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  52. ^ “Sen. releases VA report on female vets”. WWLP. January 10, 2011. Archived from the original on July 29, 2013. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
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  54. ^ Connors, Mike (March 14, 2013). “Navy gives Sen. Warner highest civilian honor”. The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  55. ^ Shear, Michael D. (December 21, 2010). “Two Senators Seek Middle Ground on Debt”. The New York Times. Retrieved October 11, 2020.
  56. ^ Keller, Bill (April 29, 2011). “What if Sanity Prevails In Washington?”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  57. ^ Killian, Linda (December 1, 2010). “Democratic Sen. Mark Warner Defies Party to Engage GOP on a Deficit deal”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  58. ^ Calmes, Jackie; Steinhauer, Jennifer (July 19, 2011). “Bipartisan Plan for Budget Deal Buoys President”. The New York Times. New York, NY. Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  59. ^ “Concord Coalition honors Sens. Warner & Chambliss”. warner.senate.gov. Office of Senator Mark Warner. December 18, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
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  62. ^ Willis, Derek. “Rejects Feinstein Proposal to… – S.649: A bill to ensure that all individuals who…” ProPublica. Retrieved July 2, 2021.
  63. ^ “Warner: I voted against an assault weapons ban. Here’s why I changed my mind”. Mark R. Warner. Retrieved July 2, 2021.
  64. ^ Feinstein, Dianne (March 14, 2018). “Cosponsors – S.2095 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): Assault Weapons Ban of 2017”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved July 2, 2021.
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  66. ^ “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Helps Introduce Background Check Expansion Act To Reduce Gun Violence”. Urban Milwaukee. January 9, 2019. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  67. ^ Blake, Aaron (March 25, 2013). “Sen. Mark Warner backs gay marriage”. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  68. ^ “Warner, Kaine Introduce Comprehensive LGBT Nondiscrimination Bill”. warner.senate.gov. Office of Senator Mark Warner. July 23, 2015. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  69. ^ “Performance Task Force – Senate Budget Committee”. Budget.senate.gov. July 30, 2013. Archived from the original on February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  70. ^ “Roanoke Times: Blue Ridge Caucus”. The Roanoke Times. Retrieved August 9, 2014.
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  73. ^ “Senate Committee Unanimously Passes Sen. Warner’s Bipartisan DATA Act”. warner.senate.gov. Office of Senator Mark Warner. November 6, 2013. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  74. ^ Miller, Jason (January 27, 2014). “White House calls for major changes to DATA Act”. Federal News Radio. Retrieved February 7, 2014.
  75. ^ Hollister, Hudson (January 28, 2014). “Sen. Warner Rejects OMB Revisions to DATA Act”. datacoalition.org. Data Transparency Coalition. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  76. ^ Ferenstein, Gregory (February 4, 2014). “White House Conspicuously Silent As It Attacks A Bill To Make Spending Transparent”. TechCrunch. Retrieved February 7, 2014.
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  79. ^ Sink, Justin (April 2, 2014). “Obama: Congress has ‘clear choice’ on minimum wage”. The Hill. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
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  81. ^ Bolton, Alexander (April 4, 2014). “Centrist Republicans cool to minimum wage hike compromise”. The Hill. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  82. ^ Bolton, Alexander (April 1, 2014). “Reid: Minimum wage vote may slip”. The Hill. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  83. ^ Hall, Kevin. “Sens. Warner, Moran, Rubio & Coons Introduce Startup Jobs Proposal”. warner.senate.gov. Officer of Senator Mark Warner. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
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  92. ^ Sanchez, Luis (May 19, 2018). “Schumer: GOP efforts to identify FBI informant ‘close to crossing a legal line”. The Hill. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  93. ^ Russell, Andrew (December 7, 2018). Basically kidnapping’: China’s state media lashes out at Canada over arrest of Huawei executive”. Global News. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  94. ^ Thomsen, Jacqueline (February 25, 2019). “Key senators say administration should ban Huawei tech in US electric grid”. The Hill. Retrieved October 15, 2020.
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  101. ^ “Today’s Top Opinion: Puckettgate implicates both parties”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved November 11, 2016.
  102. ^ Republican Party of Virginia letter; accessed November 11, 2016.
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  108. ^ “November 2020 General Official Results”. Virginia Department of Elections. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  109. ^ Bedard, Paul (November 20, 2005). “A Modern-Day Thomas Jefferson?”. U.S. News and World Report. Archived from the original on January 21, 2011. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  110. ^ “Report: Mark Warner 2nd richest member of Congress”. The Virginian-Pilot. January 11, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  111. ^ Zagursky, Erin (May 12, 2018). Don’t check out’: Warner encourages W&M grads to be active citizens”. wm.edu. College of William and Mary. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  112. ^ “Honorary Degree Recipients”. provost.gwu.edu. George Washington University. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  113. ^ “2006: Honorary degrees”. Commencement News. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  114. ^ Brown Garrow, Hattie (May 20, 2007). “Mark Warner tells EVMS grads their degrees are ‘tickets’ to success”. The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  115. ^ “George Mason University Commencement Address”. C-SPAN. May 18, 2013. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  116. ^ Kidd, Thomas; Hobbs, Leah (May 19, 2018). “Lt. Gov. Justin E. Fairfax and U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner encourage VSU graduates at dual commencement ceremonies”. Richmond Free Press. Retrieved March 15, 2019.

Further reading

Archival records

External links

Party political offices
Preceded by
Paul Goldman
Chair of the Virginia Democratic Party
1993–1995
Succeeded by
Suzie Wrenn
Vacant

Title last held by

Edythe Harrison

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Virginia
(Class 2)

1996
Vacant

Title next held by

Himself

Preceded by
Don Beyer
Democratic nominee for Governor of Virginia
2001
Succeeded by
Tim Kaine
Preceded by
Barack Obama
Keynote Speaker of the Democratic National Convention
2008
Succeeded by
Julian Castro
Vacant

Title last held by

Himself

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Virginia
(Class 2)

2008, 2014, 2020
Most recent
Preceded by
Chuck Schumer
Vice Chair of the Senate Democratic Conference
2017–present
Served alongside: Elizabeth Warren
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Jim Gilmore
Governor of Virginia
2002–2006
Succeeded by
Tim Kaine
Preceded by
Dirk Kempthorne
Chair of the National Governors Association
2004–2005
Succeeded by
Mike Huckabee
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
John Warner
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Virginia
2009–present
Served alongside: Jim Webb, Tim Kaine
Incumbent
Preceded by
Dianne Feinstein
Vice Chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee
2017–2021
Succeeded by
Marco Rubio
Preceded by
Marco Rubio
Acting
Chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee
2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Jeanne Shaheen
United States senators by seniority
33rd
Succeeded by
Jim Risch


Issues

Below are Senator Warner’s positions on a number of issues. Warner’s sponsored legislation can be found at his Congress.gov pages.

Gig Economy

Senator Warner Addresses the Opportunities and Challenges of the ‘Sharing Economy’

Senator Warner is committed to exploring the 21st century generational and technological changes and how they’ve led to perhaps the most dramatic transformation in the American economy in decades.  Whether by  economic  necessity  or by choice, as  many as  one-third  of  American  workers now find  themselves working in the “on-demand,” “sharing” or “gig” economy.

Today, online platforms such as Airbnb, Uber, TaskRabbit and Etsy can provide granularity in matching supply and demand for things many people may never have thought about monetizing before: A spare room. A ride in a family car. Free time.

The changing employee-employer dynamic of the “gig economy” poses both opportunities and challenges for the American worker, allowing freedom and flexibility of hours. But many of these on-demand jobs do not provide traditional safety net protections for workers: unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation for injuries, or pension and retirement planning.

Senator Warner is committed to putting forward practical solutions to keep up with this fundamental shift in the economy and to make the on-demand economy work better for more people.

Related News

Cybersecurity

As an early investor in the cellular telephone business, Senator Warner co-founded the company that became Nextel and invested in hundreds of start-up technology companies. Leaning on this background, Senator Warner has used his position in the Senate to promote policies that encourage innovation and entrepreneurship in the cyber domain. Recognizing that no individual body in the United States Senate was uniquely focused on addressing the growing cyber threats faced by consumers, government and private entities, Senator Warner co-founded the bipartisan Senate Cybersecurity Caucus in 2016.

With over 20 billion interconnected devices expected online by 2020, the challenge of securing our home and business networks will be made even more difficult in the years to come. Senator Warner understands that this explosion of devices with expanded capability and connectivity—known as the “Internet of Things”—makes us both more intertwined and more vulnerable. And in the wake of hacks affecting a broad range of private and public entities like the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Target, Anthem, and Yahoo, Senator Warner has been a leader in calling for the protection of consumers’ personal information and timely disclosure of data breaches. He has advocated for resources within the federal government that will put our federal and local governments on a more secure cyber footing. Virginia has the largest cybersecurity workforce in the country and is home to many of the most sophisticated cybersecurity missions in the federal government. Senator Warner has worked to implement policies that will help Virginia and the rest of the country meet the need for a well-trained cyber workforce.

Related News

Education & Worker Training

Senator Warner remains committed to ensuring that every Virginian has access to the quality education and training needed to succeed in our global economy without the burden of crippling student debt. Having paid for his own undergraduate education with student loans, Senator Warner knows first-hand the financial challenges facing those who seek higher education. Senator Warner will continue to fight for commonsense solutions to make college more affordable and to help those who are already struggling with student debt. Senator Warner believes that if left unaddressed, student debt will be the next financial crisis facing our country. Senator Warner also knows that college isn’t the only path to success. He believes that we must increase our focus on industry certifications and lifelong learning and retraining in order to create more opportunities for good paying jobs for Virginians.

Related News

Energy & Environment

Senator Warner firmly believes that we need to reduce our dependence on foreign oil while investing in new technologies that reduce harmful emissions that contribute to climate change. He favors an “all of the above,” portfolio approach that employs solar, wind, bio-fuels, nuclear energy, next generation battery technologies, and investment in research that focuses on using carbon capture technology so we can continue to use our domestic resources, such as coal, more responsibly. The science surrounding climate change unequivocally supports the need for dramatic changes in policy, and Senator Warner believes any comprehensive legislation to address this issue must be balanced with the need to keep all sectors of our economy viable.

Similarly, the Commonwealth’s 3,300 miles of coastal resources provide significant economic contributions to tourism, recreation, commercial and sport fisheries, and wildlife enjoyment within our state. However, pollution, habitat loss, and other factors have taken their toll. Senator Warner believes that our federal and Bay state partners need to continue to work together to seek appropriate resources to preserve the Bay and he opposes any reductions in funding that threaten to erase progress made to restore the Bay’s oyster population and support local commercial fisheries.

Related News

Government Performance & Fiscal Responsibility

Senator Warner has been a leader in Congress in working for improved government efficiency and fiscal accountability. As a member of the Budget Committee, Senator Warner created and chaired the Government Performance Task Force. Senator Warner helped lead the Government Performance and Results Act Modernization in 2010, which among other things required OMB to identify outdated or duplicative reports wasting agency resources and ready for elimination. In his work to eliminate government waste, he also worked on legislation with Senator Paul to reward federal employees who identify and report wasteful end of year spending. He also was the lead Senate architect of the DATA Act, legislation enacted into law in 2014 which makes federal spending information more transparent and accessible. In 2011, Senator Warner co-founded the Senate’s bipartisan Gang of Six, which met for close to a year in an effort to begin solving the nation’s debt and deficit challenges. In Senator Warner’s view, government performance and fiscal responsibility are not Democratic or Republican issues: they represent opportunities to take a data-driven approach to best serve taxpayers.

Related News

Health Care

Senator Warner is committed to providing access to quality, affordable care for Virginians. Warner has consistently said that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not perfect, but our previous system was unsustainable and would eventually bankrupt our economy. Senator Warner knows that we cannot go back to a time when insurers denied coverage because of pre-existing health conditions, charged women more than men, or dropped someone’s coverage when they got sick. Instead of repealing the ACA, Democrats and Republicans should work together to improve the law, and he has been at the forefront of providing bipartisan, commonsense solutions to fix the ACA. He will continue to work with his colleagues on targeted improvements to help Virginians secure affordable health care coverage – and fight efforts to take us backwards.

Related News

Immigration

Senator Warner supports a comprehensive approach to immigration reform. He voted in favor of bipartisan, commonsense immigration reform that would strengthen border security, and offer a tough but fair path to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants who are already living, working and paying taxes in the United States. He has also introduced proposals that would reform our immigration system to meet the needs of an innovation-driven 21st century economy by making it easier for entrepreneurial and highly skilled immigrants educated at U.S. colleges and universities to stay here and create jobs after graduation.

Related News

Gig Economy

Senator Warner Addresses the Opportunities and Challenges of the ‘Sharing Economy’

Senator Warner is committed to exploring the 21st century generational and technological changes and how they’ve led to perhaps the most dramatic transformation in the American economy in decades.  Whether by  economic  necessity  or by choice, as  many as  one-third  of  American  workers now find  themselves working in the “on-demand,” “sharing” or “gig” economy.

Today, online platforms such as Airbnb, Uber, TaskRabbit and Etsy can provide granularity in matching supply and demand for things many people may never have thought about monetizing before: A spare room. A ride in a family car. Free time.

The changing employee-employer dynamic of the “gig economy” poses both opportunities and challenges for the American worker, allowing freedom and flexibility of hours. But many of these on-demand jobs do not provide traditional safety net protections for workers: unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation for injuries, or pension and retirement planning.

Senator Warner is committed to putting forward practical solutions to keep up with this fundamental shift in the economy and to make the on-demand economy work better for more people.

Related News

Infrastructure

Senator Warner believes that we must renew and revitalize our nation’s infrastructure if we want to compete globally in the 21st century. Investing in our outdated roads, bridges, ports, energy grid and broadband networks would create jobs, reduce traffic, and grow the economy.

Senator Warner has introduced bipartisan legislation to create an innovative Infrastructure Financing Authority, which would supplement federal transportation investment programs by assisting communities in leveraging private sector investments to fund worthwhile infrastructure projects. Senator Warner has also been a leader in encouraging innovation in the burgeoning unmanned systems industry, and pushing for collaborating and experimentation in order to safety integrate unmanned maritime, ground and aerial systems into existing infrastructure networks.

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Jobs & Entrepreneurship

As a successful entrepreneur and former business leader, Senator Warner understands the challenges of launching and running a business and meeting a payroll. As Virginia’s governor and now as a senator, he has worked to expand access to start-up capital and credit for America’s new, existing and small businesses. He has focused on updating our country’s approach to workforce training and technology deployment to expand 21st Century economic opportunity in rural and suburban regions. Senator Warner is a leading voice in Washington for updating the social contract for contingent and freelance workers, many of whom lack insurance and other protections typically provided through full-time employment. He also has called on American business leaders to shift away from their recent preoccupation with short-term profits at the expense of longer-term investments in people and the communities where they operate.

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National Security

Senator Warner is committed to strengthening our national security both at home and abroad, and he believes a strong and engaged United States is fundamental to securing our national interests around the world. As the Vice Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Senator Warner is responsible for providing oversight of all U.S. intelligence agencies, and he deeply appreciates the work our intelligence professionals do quietly every day to keep our country safe.

Virginia is also synonymous with defense. It is home to the seat of defense leadership—the Pentagon—to the largest naval station in the world—Naval Station Norfolk—and to our nation’s only aircraft carrier builder. The Commonwealth also has military bases for every military service—Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps and has the largest concentration of active and reserve Coast Guard personnel and the largest defense civilian population in the country. The armed forces of the United States are the strongest and most capable in the history of the world, and Senator Warner represents a state unrivaled in its contribution to the military mission. He is committed to ensuring that our military has the tools and support it needs to defend our country against 21st century threats.

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Veterans

Ensuring that our veterans and their families receive the benefits they have earned and deserve remains one of Senator Warner’s top priorities. Virginia is home to nearly 800,000 veterans—one of the highest per-capita populations in the country—and that number is growing at four times the national average.

Senator Warner is committed to honoring their service and taking active steps to guarantee the federal government honors its promises to our nation’s veterans. He has fought to reduce the disability claim backlog at the Department of Veterans Affairs (V-A), improve access to care and reduce wait times at V-A medical centers, ensure resources for the V-A to provide healthcare for veterans, simplify the benefits and appeals processes, improve mental health services for soldiers returning home, and improve women veterans’ access to healthcare.

Senator Warner is also personally committed to supporting veterans. He prioritizes the employment of veterans, including in his own office in Washington, D.C., and in his Virginia offices.

For Senator Warner, this is not a partisan issue. Taking care of our nation’s veterans is simply a matter of doing what’s right. If you, a family member, or a friend is a veteran, and are in need of assistance, you may contact Sen. Warner’s office here.

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Russia Investigation

On January 6, 2017, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) issued a report by directors of America’s leading intelligence agencies examining Russian activities in the 2016 election. One of their key conclusions was that Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an influence campaign with the goals of undermining public faith in the U.S. democratic process, harming the candidacy and weakening the potential presidency of Hillary Clinton, and boosting the candidacy of his preferred candidate Donald Trump.

Interference in America’s democracy and our electoral process by any outside power is unacceptable. Following the election, many Americans still have questions about the extent of Russian interference, including whether any individuals connected with the Trump campaign may have been involved with Russian efforts to sway the election.

As Vice Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on intelligence, Senator Warner is leading, along with Committee Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina,  the Senate’s bipartisan investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. He has said repeatedly that this is the most serious undertaking of his public life.

The dismissal of FBI Director Jim Comey, who was leading an active investigation into these matters, on May 9 makes it all the more imperative that Congress conduct an expeditious, thorough and bipartisan investigation into possible links between the Trump campaign and the Russians.

This isn’t about re-litigating the results of the 2016 election. It’s about defending the United States from a foreign threat, holding the perpetrators responsible, and fighting back so that something like this never happens again.

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Coronavirus Updates

A MESSAGE FROM SEN. WARNER ON CORONAVIRUS
Updated: March 23, 2021

Since this outbreak began, my top priority has been to provide our nation and our Commonwealth with the tools we need to fight this pandemic and help workers and small businesses make it through these tough times. After one of the hardest years in modern American history, we are seeing a light at the end of the tunnel with new vaccines that have proven effective against this dangerous virus. I was proud to work in Congress to secure the funding that helped safely accelerate the development of these vaccines, and am now focused on ensuring that shots are distributed quickly and equitably so we can get our nation back on track.

That’s why, on March 6, I voted to pass the American Rescue Plan – bold legislation that will save lives and livelihoods, and create 7 million jobs. Among other things, this legislation will ensure that our nation is able to get vaccines into arms, kids into schools, and lifelines to our hard-hit communities. For more information on the American Rescue Plan, and for a summary of the other major relief bills that Congress has passed thus far, click here or scroll down.

Below, you will also find complete list of my actions to date in response to the COVID-19 crisis, along with useful resources for Virginians, the latest statistics on COVID-19 in Virginia, guidance from public health officials, and current vaccine eligibility and sign-up information.

As always, I continue to monitor the situation on the ground, including by maintaining regular contact with officials and health care providers in Virginia. I also stand ready to assist Virginians with other COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 federal issues. If you or a loved one is currently experiencing an issue with a federal agency, please click here to contact my office.

Source

X
Tim KaineTim Kaine

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

Web:   Campaign Site  Government Page  Twitter  YouTube  Facebook

Committees:  Armed Services   Budget Committee   Foreign Relations   Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Quotes:
“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

Featured Video:
Sen. Tim Kaine: On election night Virginia showed its ‘values’

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Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Governor from 2006 – 2010; Lt. Governor from 2002 – 2006; Mayor from 1998 – 2001

Web:   Campaign Site  Government Page  Twitter  YouTube  Facebook

Committees:  Armed Services   Budget Committee   Foreign Relations   Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Quotes:
“Tim has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. Tim believes that health care is a right … and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care.”

Featured Video:
Sen. Tim Kaine: On election night Virginia showed its ‘values’

About

Tim Kaine 6

Source: Government page

Tim Kaine has helped people throughout his life as a missionary, civil rights lawyer, teacher and elected official. He is one of 30 people in American history to have served as a Mayor, Governor and United States Senator.

Early Commitment to Public Service

Tim grew up working in his father’s ironworking shop in Kansas City. His parents taught him the value of hard work and showed him how small businesses and technical skills strengthen this country every day. After graduating from the University of Missouri, Tim started his public service career by running a technical school founded by Jesuit missionaries in Honduras. He trained teenagers to become carpenters and welders, equipping them with skills to lift up themselves and their communities. As Tim says, his work in Honduras was “a North Star” that led to his commitment to advance job opportunities for everyone. His time there reinforced three core values that are still a central part of his life today: “Fè, familia, y trabajo” – “Faith, family, and work.”

Family Life

Tim met Virginian Anne Holton at Harvard Law School and they married in 1984 in the same church in Richmond they attend to this day. They have three adult children. Anne, a former legal aid lawyer and juvenile court judge, served as Virginia Secretary of Education from 2014 until 2016. Before that, Anne ran Great Expectations, a program that offers tutoring, career coaching, and other services to help young adults aging out of foster care and attending Virginia community colleges transition to successful, independent adulthood. She now teaches education policy and government at George Mason University – Tim calls her the best public servant he knows. Anne’s father Linwood Holton, a former Republican Governor of Virginia, was critical to integrating Virginia’s public schools, putting the Commonwealth on the path to progress we see today.

Early Career

After law school, Tim practiced law in Richmond for 17 years, specializing in the representation of people who had been denied housing due to their race, disability, or family status. In 1998, Tim helped win one of the largest civil rights jury verdicts ever in a case involving discrimination against minority neighborhoods by an insurance company. He also began teaching law part-time at the University of Richmond in 1987.

Elected Office

Tim was first elected to office in 1994, serving as a city council member and four years later, Mayor of Richmond. When he was first elected to City Council in Richmond, the city had one of the highest homicide rates in America, and he worked with law enforcement and the community to find solutions that brought down the rate of violent crime. He became Lieutenant Governor of Virginia in 2002 and was inaugurated as Virginia’s 70th Governor in 2006. While serving as Governor, Tim improved the education and health care systems, and by the end of his term, leading publications ranked Virginia the best state to raise a child and the best state for business. He visited a school in every county and city in the Commonwealth and helped Virginia make it through the worst recession since the Great Depression. He also responded to the tragic shooting at Virginia Tech by strengthening Virginia’s background check system and pushing his legislature to do more to make communities safer.

In the Senate

Tim was elected to the Senate in 2012 as a can-do optimist skilled in bringing people together across old lines of party, race, or region. Tim has spent his time in the Senate focused on improving the lives of Virginians. He has made boosting job opportunities for everyone a top priority. As co-chair of the bipartisan Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, Tim focuses on expanding access to job-training programs to ensure that students of all ages are prepared with the skills they need for the jobs of the modern economy. Tim has helped lead efforts in the Senate to reduce unemployment for military families and veterans. As a member of the Armed Services Committee, a Senator from one of the states most closely connected to the military, and the father of a Marine, Tim is focused on crafting smart defense strategy and reducing the risk of unnecessary war. He works to ensure that the military has the resources it needs to keep the country safe and that servicemembers and veterans receive the benefits and care they have earned. He has also been the leading voice against Presidents starting wars without a vote by Congress. Tim believes that health care is a right, not something reserved just for those who can afford it, and has consistently pushed for reforms to expand access to quality care. This includes legislation to give Americans more options for affordable health insurance and to combat the opioid abuse epidemic. Tim serves on Senate Committees where he is able to work on those priorities every day for Virginians: the Armed Services; Budget; Foreign Relations; and Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committees. He is Ranking Member of the Armed Services Readiness Subcommittee and the Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Near East, South Asia, Central Asia, and Counterterrorism.

For more information: Wikipedia  Open Secrets   Balletopia

Experience

Education

  • JD
    Harvard Law School
    1983

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C. Office
231 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: (202) 224-4024
Fax: (202) 228-6363

Manassas, Virginia office
9408 Grant Avenue, Suite 202
Manassas, VA 20110
Phone: (703) 361-3192
Fax: (703) 361-3198 G

Virginia Beach, Virginia office
222 Central Park Avenue Suite 120
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Phone: (757) 518-1674
Fax: (757) 518-1679

Twitter

Politics

Source: Government

Open Secrets

Vote Smart     

Wikipedia

Timothy Michael Kaine (/kn/; born February 26, 1958) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the junior United States senator from Virginia since 2013. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 38th lieutenant governor of Virginia from 2002 to 2006 and 70th governor of Virginia from 2006 to 2010. Kaine was the Democratic nominee for vice president of the United States in the 2016 election as Hillary Clinton‘s running mate.

Born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, Kaine grew up in Overland Park, Kansas, graduated from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri, and earned a Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School before entering private practice and becoming a lecturer at the University of Richmond School of Law. He was first elected to public office in 1994, when he won a seat on the Richmond City Council. He was elected mayor of Richmond in 1998 and held that position until being elected lieutenant governor of Virginia in 2001. Kaine was elected governor of Virginia in 2005 and held that office from 2006 to 2010. He chaired the Democratic National Committee from 2009 to 2011.

On July 22, 2016, Hillary Clinton introduced Kaine as her vice-presidential running mate. The 2016 Democratic National Convention nominated him on July 27. Despite winning a plurality of the national popular vote, the Clinton–Kaine ticket lost the Electoral College, and thus the election, to the Republican ticket of Donald Trump and Mike Pence on November 8, 2016. Kaine was reelected to a second Senate term in 2018, defeating Republican Corey Stewart.

Early life and education

Apartment building where the Kaine family lived when he was born

Kaine was born at Saint Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the eldest of three sons[1][2] born to Mary Kathleen (née Burns), a home economics teacher, and Albert Alexander Kaine, Jr., a welder and the owner of a small iron-working shop.[2][3][4] He was raised Catholic.[2] One of Kaine’s great-grandparents was Scottish and the other seven were Irish.[3][5][6][7] Kaine’s family moved to Overland Park, Kansas, when Kaine was two years old, and he grew up in the Kansas City area.[8] In 1976, he graduated from Rockhurst High School, a Jesuit all-boys preparatory school in Kansas City, Missouri.[1][9] At Rockhurst, Kaine joined the debate team and was elected student body president.[2]

Kaine received his Bachelor of Arts in economics from the University of Missouri in 1979, completing his degree in three years and graduating Omicron Delta Kappa and summa cum laude.[1][2] He was a Coro Foundation fellow in Kansas City in 1978.[10] He entered Harvard Law School in 1979, interrupting his law studies after his first year to work in Honduras[11][12][a] for nine months from 1980 to 1981, helping Jesuit missionaries who ran a Catholic school in El Progreso.[8][15] While running a vocational center that taught carpentry and welding, he also helped increase the school’s enrollment by recruiting local villagers.[2] Kaine is fluent in Spanish as a result of his time in Honduras.[15]

After returning from Honduras, Kaine met his future wife, first-year Harvard Law student Anne Holton.[2] He graduated from Harvard Law School with a J.D. degree in 1983.[16] Kaine and Holton moved to Holton’s hometown of Richmond, Virginia, after graduation,[2] and Kaine was admitted to the Virginia bar in 1984.[9]

Legal career and Richmond City Council

After graduating from law school, Kaine was a law clerk for Judge R. Lanier Anderson III of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, in Macon, Georgia.[9] He then joined the Richmond law firm of Little, Parsley & Cluverius, P.C.[9] In 1987, Kaine became a director of the law firm of Mezzullo & McCandlish, P.C.[9] He practiced law in Richmond for 17 years, specializing in fair housing law and representing clients discriminated against on the basis of race or disability.[17] He was a board member of the Virginia chapter of Housing Opportunities Made Equal, which he represented in a landmark redlining discrimination lawsuit against Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. arising from the company’s practices in Richmond.[18][19] Kaine won a $100.5 million verdict in the case; the judgment was overturned on appeal, and Kaine and his colleagues negotiated a $17.5 million settlement.[19]

Kaine did regular pro bono work.[18] In 1988, he started teaching legal ethics as an adjunct professor at the University of Richmond School of Law.[9][17] Kaine taught at the University of Richmond for six years; his students included future Virginia attorney general Mark Herring.[17][20] He was a founding member of the Virginia Coalition to End Homelessness.[18]

Kaine had a largely apolitical childhood, but became interested in politics in part due to the influence of his wife’s family and his experience attending Richmond city council meetings.[8] In 1994, he was elected the 2nd district member of the city council of the independent city of Richmond, defeating incumbent city councilor Benjamin P.A. Warthen by less than 100 votes.[21] He took his seat on July 1 and retained the position until September 10, 2001, when he resigned and William J. Pantele was appointed to succeed him.[22][23][24] He defeated the incumbent city councilman Benjamin P. A. Warthen by 97 votes.[25] Kaine spent four terms on the city council, the latter two as mayor of Richmond.[17][26]

Mayor of Richmond (1998–2001)

On July 1, 1998, Kaine was elected mayor of Richmond, succeeding Larry Chavis.[27][28] He was chosen by an 8 to 1 vote[25] on the majority-black Richmond City Council,[b] becoming the city’s first white mayor in more than ten years,[23][26] which was viewed as a surprise.[27] Rudy McCollum, an African American city councilor also interested in the mayoralty, decided to back Kaine after a private meeting between the two, clearing the way for Kaine to win the election.[25] Previous mayors had treated the role as primarily ceremonial,[29] with the city manager effectively operating the city; Kaine treated it as a full-time job, taking a more hands-on role.[27]

As mayor, Kaine used a sale-leaseback arrangement to obtain funds to renovate the historic Maggie L. Walker High School and reopen it in 2000 as a magnet governor’s school, the Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School for Government and International Studies, which “now serves the top students in Central Virginia”.[30] Three elementary schools and one middle school were also built in Richmond under Kaine.[31] Along with Commonwealth’s attorney David Hicks, U.S. attorney James Comey, and police chief Jerry Oliver, Kaine was a supporter of Project Exile, an initiative that shifted gun crimes to federal court, where defendants faced harsher sentences.[27] Though controversial, the effort was effective and achieved widespread support; the city’s homicide rate fell by 55% during Kaine’s mayoralty.[27][32] Kaine touted Project Exile during his 2001 campaign for lieutenant governor.[31][32]

On several occasions, Kaine voted against tax increases, and supported a tax abatement program for renovated buildings, which was credited for a housing renovation boom in the city.[27] Forbes magazine named Richmond one of “the 10 best cities in America to do business” during Kaine’s term.[33]

According to John Moeser, a professor emeritus of urban studies and planning at Virginia Commonwealth University and later a visiting fellow at the University of Richmond‘s Center for Civic Engagement, Mayor Kaine “was energetic, charismatic and, most important, spoke openly about his commitment to racial reconciliation in Richmond.”[27] The New York Times wrote that Kaine “was by all accounts instrumental in bridging the city’s racial divide.”[19] In the early part of his term, Kaine issued an apology for the city’s role in slavery;[31][34] the apology was generally well received as “a genuine, heartfelt expression”.[31] In the latter part of his term, a contentious debate took place over the inclusion of a portrait of Confederate general Robert E. Lee in a set of historic murals to be placed on city floodwalls.[25][28] Many African Americans were outraged that Lee would appear on city walls, while Southern heritage groups demanded that the picture remain.[25] Kaine proposed a compromise in which Lee would appear as part of a series of murals that also included figures like Abraham Lincoln and Powhatan Beaty.[25] His stance drew criticism from the NAACP; Kaine argued that placing Lee on the floodwall made sense in context, and that “Much of our history is not pleasant; you can’t whitewash it.”[19][28] Kaine’s proposal passed the council on a 6–3 vote.[25]

During his mayoralty, Kaine drew criticism for spending $6,000 in public funds on buses to the Million Mom March, an anti-gun-violence rally in Washington, D.C.; after a backlash, he raised the money privately and reimbursed the city.[35]

Lieutenant governor of Virginia (2002–2006)

Kaine in an F-14 Tomcat while touring a naval base in 2003

Kaine ran for lieutenant governor of Virginia in 2001. He joined the race after state senator Emily Couric dropped out due to pancreatic cancer and endorsed Kaine as her replacement.[36] In the Democratic primary election, Kaine ran against state delegate Alan A. Diamonstein of Newport News, and state delegate Jerrauld C. Jones of Norfolk.[37] Kaine won the nomination, with 39.7% of the vote to Diamonstein’s 31.4% and Jones’s 28.9%.[38]

In the general election, Kaine won with 925,974 votes (50.35%), edging out his Republican opponent, state delegate Jay Katzen, who received 883,886 (48.06%).[39] Libertarian Gary Reams received 28,783 votes (1.57%).[39]

Kaine was inaugurated on January 12, 2002, and was sworn in by his wife Anne Holton, a state judge.[40]

2005 gubernatorial election

Kaine at the Covington
Labor Day Parade in Virginia, September 4, 2006

In 2005, Kaine ran for governor of Virginia against Republican candidate Jerry W. Kilgore, a former state attorney general. Kaine was considered an underdog for most of the race,[41] trailing in polls for most of the campaign.[42] Two September polls showed Kaine trailing Kilgore—by four percentage points in a Washington Post poll and by one point in a Mason-Dixon/Roanoke Times poll.[43][44] The final polls of the race before the election showed Kaine slightly edging ahead of Kilgore.[42][45]

Kaine ultimately prevailed, winning 1,025,942 votes (51.7%) to Kilgore’s 912,327 (46.0%).[46] A third candidate, independent state Senator H. Russell Potts Jr., ran as an “independent Republican[47][48] and received 43,953 votes (2.2%).[46]

Kaine emphasized fiscal responsibility and a centrist message.[44][47] He expressed support for controlling sprawl and tackling longstanding traffic issues, an issue that resonated in the northern Virginia exurbs.[49] He benefited from his association with the popular outgoing Democratic governor, Mark Warner, who had performed well in traditionally Republican areas of the state.[43] On the campaign trail, Kaine referred to the “Warner-Kaine administration” in speeches and received Warner’s strong backing.[47][50] Kilgore later attributed his defeat to Warner’s high popularity and President George W. Bush‘s sharply declining popularity; Bush held a rally with Kilgore on the campaign’s final day.[45]

The campaign turned sharply negative in its final weeks, with Kilgore running television attack ads that falsely claimed that Kaine believed that “Hitler doesn’t qualify for the death penalty.”[51] The ads also attacked Kaine for his service ten years earlier as a court-appointed attorney for a death-row inmate.[52] The editorial boards of the Washington Post and a number of Virginia newspapers denounced the ads as a “smear” and “dishonest.”[51][52][53] Kaine responded with an ad “in which he told voters that he opposes capital punishment but would take an oath and enforce the death penalty. In later polls, voters said they believed Kaine’s response and were angered by Kilgore’s negative ads.”[54]

In the election, Kaine won by large margins in the Democratic strongholds such as Richmond and northern Virginia’s inner suburbs (such as Alexandria and Arlington), as well as in the Democratic-trending Fairfax County.[55][56] Kaine also won Republican-leaning areas in Northern Virginia’s outer suburbs, including Prince William County and Loudoun County, where George W. Bush had beat John Kerry in the previous year’s presidential election,[55] and performed “surprisingly well in Republican strongholds like Virginia Beach and Chesapeake.”[56] Kaine also defeated Kilgore in the burgeoning Richmond suburbs.[55] Kilgore led in southwest Virginia and in the Shenandoah Valley.[55]

Governor of Virginia (2006–2010)

Kaine was sworn in as governor at the colonial Capitol at Williamsburg, on January 14, 2006, the first governor since Thomas Jefferson to be inaugurated there.[17]

Kaine was chairman of the Southern Governors’ Association from 2008 to 2009.[57]

Democratic response to State of the Union address

On January 31, 2006, Kaine gave the Democratic response to President George W. Bush‘s 2006 State of the Union address. In it, he criticized the Bush administration’s No Child Left Behind Act for “wreaking havoc on local school districts”; criticized congressional Republicans for cutting student loan programs; and condemned as “reckless” Bush’s spending increases and tax cuts.[58] Kaine praised bipartisan initiatives in Virginia “to make record investments in education” and to improve veterans’ access to veterans’ benefits.[58] He criticized the Bush administration’s conduct of the Iraq War and treatment of U.S. soldiers, saying that “the American people were given inaccurate information about reasons for invading Iraq”; “our troops in Iraq were not given the best body armor or the best intelligence”; and “the administration wants to further reduce military and veterans’ benefits.”[58]

Energy, the environment, and conservation

As governor, Kaine protected 400,000 acres (1,600 km2) of Virginia land from development, fulfilling a promise he made in 2005.[59][60] His conservation efforts focused on conservation easements (voluntary easements that preserve the private ownership of a piece of land while also permanently protecting it from development); a substantial Virginia land preservation tax credit encouraged easements.[61] From 2004 to 2009, the Virginia Outdoors Foundation (a quasi-governmental entity set up in 1966 to preserve open land in the state) protected more land than it had in the previous 40 years, a fact Kaine touted as his term drew to a close.[61]

As governor, Kaine established the Climate Change Commission, a bipartisan panel to study climate change issues.[62] The panel was shuttered under Kaine’s Republican successor, Governor Robert F. McDonnell, but revived (as the Governor’s Climate Change and Resiliency Update Commission) under McDonnell’s successor, Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe.[62][63]

In 2008, Kaine supported a coal-fired power plant project in Wise County, clashing with environmentalists who opposed the project.[64][65]

In 2009, Kaine expressed support for tighter restrictions on mountaintop removal coal mining imposed by the Obama administration.[66]

Healthcare and public health

In October 2006, Kaine signed an executive order banning smoking in all government buildings and state-owned cars as of January 1, 2007.[67] He signed legislation banning smoking in restaurants and bars, with some exceptions, in March 2009, making Virginia the first Southern state to do so.[dubious ][68]

In 2007, the Republican-controlled Virginia General Assembly passed legislation, with “overwhelming bipartisan support”, to require girls to receive the HPV vaccine (which immunizes recipients against a virus that causes cervical cancer) before entering high school.[69][70] Kaine expressed “some qualms” about the legislation and pushed for a strong opt-out provision,[69] ultimately signing a bill that included a provision allowing parents to opt out of the requirement without citing a reason.[70]

In 2007, Kaine secured increases in state funding for nursing in the Virginia General Assembly and announced a 10% salary increase for nursing faculty above the normal salary increase for state employees, plus additional funds for scholarships for nursing master’s programs. The initiatives were aimed at addressing a shortage of practicing nurses.[71]

Virginia Tech shooting

After the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, in which Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people, Kaine appointed an eight-member Virginia Tech Review Panel,[72] chaired by retired Virginia State Police superintendent W. Gerald Massengill, to probe the event.[73][74] The commission members included specialists in psychology, law, forensics and higher education as well as former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge.[73] The commission first met in May 2007,[73] and issued its findings and recommendations in August 2007.[72] Among other recommendations, the panel proposed many mental health reforms. Based on the panel’s recommendations, Kaine proposed $42 million of investment in mental health programs and reforms, included “boosting access to outpatient and emergency mental health services, increasing the number of case managers and improving monitoring of community-based providers.”[75] In April 2007, Kaine signed an executive order instructing state agencies to step up efforts to block gun sales to people involuntarily committed to inpatient and outpatient mental health treatment centers.[76] Kaine, who had been in Japan on a trade mission at the time of the shootings, received widespread praise for his quick return to the state and his handling of the issue.[77]

Budget and economy

Among Kaine’s greatest challenges as governor came during the 2008–09 economic crisis; the Washington Post wrote that “perhaps his greatest success was keeping the state running despite [the crisis].”[77] Amid the Great Recession, unemployment in Virginia remained lower than the national average.[78] During Kaine’s tenure as governor, the unemployment rate in Virginia rose from 3.2% to 7.4%, a smaller increase than the national rate, which rose from 4.7% to 9.9% during the same period.[78]

As governor, Kaine approved about $3.31 billion in general fund spending cuts, and after his term in office, the Virginia General Assembly adopted about $1.33 billion in additional budget cuts that Kaine had recommended, for a total of $4.64 billion in cuts.[79] The Washington Post wrote, “Unable to raise taxes and required by law to balance the budget, he was forced to make unpopular cuts that led to such things as shuttered highway rest stops and higher public university tuition.”[77] Virginia was one of three states to earn the highest grade in terms of management in a report by the nonpartisan Pew Center on the States.[80] Virginia took first place each year from 2006 to 2009 in Forbes magazine’s “Best States For Business” rankings.[80]

Infrastructure and transportation

Governor Kaine with U.S. senators
John Warner and George Allen

In July 2007, during the debate on the Silver Line of the Washington Metro through Tysons Corner, Kaine supported an elevated track solution rather than a tunnel, citing costs and potential delays that would put federal funding at risk.[81]

In 2006, Kaine pressed the general assembly to support a legislative package to ease severe traffic congestion by spending about $1 billion annually for highway construction, repairs to aging roads, mass transit, and other transportation projects. The money would be raised through increases in taxes and fees that would have raised an estimated $4 billion in revenue over four years.[82][83][84] The Democratic-controlled Senate supported the plan, but the Republican-controlled House was unwilling to approve the taxes necessary to carry out the project, and the effort failed even after a special session of the legislature was called over the stalemate.[85][86][87]

In 2007, Republicans in the General Assembly passed their own transportation-funding bill. Rather than a statewide tax increase to finance the transportation improvements, as Kaine and most legislative Democrats favored, the Republican bill called for transportation funding “to come from borrowing $2.5 billion and paying the debt costs out of the general fund”; authorized local tax increase in Northern Virginia; increased fees and taxes on rental cars, commercial real estate, and hotels; and increased traffic infraction fines and driver’s licenses fees.[88][89]

Kaine and most legislative Democrats opposed the Republican legislation, calling it inadequate to address traffic congestion and arguing that the withdrawal of funds from the general fund would affect core services such as health care, law enforcement, and education.[89][90] Kaine ultimately signed a bill with amendments reflecting “concerns by local government officials and a bipartisan group of lawmakers who were concerned that the plan took too much money from the state’s general fund.”[91]

Education

Under Kaine, participation in Virginia in early childhood education increased by 40.2% due to his expansion of the Virginia Preschool Initiative, which makes pre-kindergarten more accessible to four-year-olds from households close to the poverty line.[92] Kaine sought increases to the budget for preschool programs every year during his term as governor.[92] Virginia was rated as the best state to raise a child in a 2007 report by Education Week and the Pew Center on the States.[80]

Cabinet and appointments

Kaine made the following appointments to his Virginia Governor’s Cabinet:[93]

As governor, Kaine made a number of appointments to the Virginia state courts. He made two appointments[c] to the Supreme Court of Virginia,[95] naming Chesapeake circuit judge S. Bernard Goodwyn to the Court in 2007[97] and Virginia Court of Appeals Judge LeRoy F. Millette Jr. in 2008.[94][d]

On September 27, 2007, just weeks after appointing Esam Omeish to the 20-member Virginia Commission on Immigration, Kaine learned that Omeish had made videos accusing Israel of genocide and calling for President Bush’s impeachment.[98] He immediately requested and received Omeish’s resignation and said that background checks would be more thorough in the future.[99]

2008 vice presidential speculation

Kaine announced his support for Barack Obama’s presidential bid in February 2007. It was maintained that Kaine’s endorsement was the first from a statewide elected official outside of Illinois.[100] Because Kaine was a relatively popular governor of a Southern state, there was media speculation that he was a potential nominee for vice president.[101] Obama had supported Kaine in his campaign for governor, saying, “Tim Kaine has a message of fiscal responsibility and generosity of spirit. That kind of message can sell anywhere.”[102] On July 28, 2008, Politico reported that Kaine was “very, very high” on Obama’s shortlist for vice president,[103] a list that also included Senator Hillary Clinton of New York, Governor Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas, Senator Evan Bayh of Indiana, and Senator Joe Biden of Delaware.[104] Obama ultimately selected Biden.[105] It was later reported that Obama told Kaine, in breaking the news to him, “You are the pick of my heart, but Joe [Biden] is the pick of my head”.[106] Obama later wrote that he had ultimately narrowed down the choice for his running mate to Kaine and Biden. He said, “At the time, I was much closer to Tim”,[107] but Obama and his advisers David Axelrod and David Plouffe wondered whether voters would accept a ticket of “two relatively young, inexperienced, and liberal civil rights attorneys” and Obama felt the contrast between him and Biden was a strength, and that Biden’s age and experience would reassure voters concerned that Obama was too young to be president.[108]

Democratic National Committee chair (2009–2011)

In January 2009, Kaine became chair of the Democratic National Committee.[109][e] He had turned down the position the first time it was offered to him, expressing misgivings about accepting a partisan position,[26] but took the job at Obama’s request.[110] He took on the position as chair part-time as he continued his term as governor of Virginia.[111] Kaine’s main goals as DNC chair “were protecting the party’s seats in Congress during the 2010 midterms and integrating the president’s campaign apparatus, Organizing for America, and its technological acumen into the party machinery.”[112] In the 2010 midterms, the DNC under Kaine’s leadership outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) by $30 million,[112] but Democrats lost control of the House and lost seats in the Senate amidst a Tea Party backlash. Kaine was not generally blamed for the losses.[112]

Kaine kept a low profile in the position in comparison to his counterpart, RNC chairman Michael Steele.[111][113] He focused more on fundraising and maintaining party unity than on attacking political opponents.[113]

In February 2011, after Kaine spoke to union leaders in Madison, Organizing for America got involved in Wisconsin’s budget battle and opposed Republican-sponsored anti-union legislation. It made phone calls, sent emails, and distributed messages via Facebook and Twitter to build crowds for rallies.[114]

After completing his term as governor in January 2010, Kaine taught part-time at the University of Richmond, teaching a course in spring 2010 at the Jepson School of Leadership Studies and another in fall 2010 at the University of Richmond School of Law.[115][116] He explained that he had chosen to teach at a private university rather than a public university “because it would not have been right for a sitting governor to be seeking employment at an institution when he writes the budget and appoints the board of the institution.”[117]

United States Senate

2012 election

Tim Kaine and supporters, October 20, 2012

After Senator Jim Webb‘s decision not to seek reelection, Kaine announced on April 5, 2011, that he would run for Webb’s seat. He was initially reluctant to return to public office, but Webb, Senator Mark Warner, and other Virginia Democrats saw Kaine as the strongest potential Democratic candidate and convinced him to run.[36] Kaine named Lawrence Roberts as his campaign chairman.[118] Mike Henry was chosen as his campaign manager.[119] Kaine filmed announcement videos in English and Spanish[120][121] and was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[122] He defeated former senator and governor George Allen in the general election.[123][124]

Tenure

Kaine was sworn in on January 3, 2013, reuniting him with Mark Warner, the senior senator. Kaine was lieutenant governor when Warner was governor of Virginia.

On June 11, 2013, Kaine delivered a speech on the Senate floor in support of the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” immigration bill. The speech was entirely in Spanish, marking the first time a senator had ever made a speech on the Senate floor in a language other than English.[125]

Kaine speaking in 2016

As a member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, Kaine pushed for a new Congressional authorization of military force for the American operations against Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).[126] Kaine supported the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action with Iran, though he also helped Republican senator Bob Corker hold a vote on a resolution of disapproval of the deal.[126] Kaine has taken several trips throughout the Middle East, meeting with the leaders of states such as Turkey and Israel.[126]

While in the Senate, Kaine has continued to teach part-time at the University of Richmond, receiving a salary of $16,000 per year.[127]

Kaine has voted with his party more than 90% of the time.[128][129] According to the Washington Post, Kaine has “crafted a largely progressive record as a senator.”[130] He reportedly has good relations with both Democratic and Republican senators.[131][132][133][134]

During the 2016 vice-presidential campaign, Kaine frequently criticized Donald Trump, saying that Trump “as commander-in-chief scares me to death” and had a “bizarre fascination with strongmen and authoritarian leaders”.[135] In 2017, after Trump took office, Kaine continued to criticize his “authoritarian tendencies”, citing his attacks on media, judges, and peaceful protesters.[135] At an event at George Mason University, Kaine said that with Trump in office, Americans “are in a ‘living experiment’ to see whether or not the Constitution still works to check executive power.”[136]

In February 2017, Kaine met with Pope Francis at a general audience at the Vatican. Kaine also met with the Jesuit Refugee Service to discuss refugees and met with Vatican officials to discuss Latin American issues.[137][138] The same month, Kaine delivered an address, “The Truman Doctrine at 70″, at London’s Chatham House.[138][139]

Committee assignments and caucuses

In the 113th Congress (2013–15), Kaine was on the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on the Budget, and the Committee on Foreign Relations.[140] In the 114th Congress, Kaine was on those three committees and the Special Committee on Aging.[141][142] In July 2013, Kaine was named chair of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Near East, South Asia, Central Asia and Counterterrorism.[143]

Within the Senate Armed Services Committee, Kaine is a member of the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities, the Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support (of which he is the ranking member), and the Subcommittee on Seapower.[144]

Within the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee, Kaine is a member of the Subcommittee on State Department and USAID Management, International Operations, and Bilateral International Development (of which he is the ranking member), the Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation, the Subcommittee on Near East, South Asia, Central Asia, and Counterterrorism, and the Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, Transnational Crime, Civilian Security, Democracy, Human Rights and Global Women’s Issues.[145]

In January 2014, Kaine and Senator Rob Portman established the bipartisan Senate Career and Technical Education Caucus (CTE Caucus), which focuses on vocational education and technical education.[146] Kaine and Portman co-chair the caucus.[147][148] In 2014, Kaine and Portman introduced the CTE Excellence and Equity Act to the Senate; the legislation would provide $500 million in federal funding, distributed by competitive grants, to high schools to further CTE programs.[149] The legislation, introduced as an amendment to the omnibus Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, would promote apprenticeships and similar initiatives.[149] Kaine and Portman introduced similar legislation, the Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Act, in 2017.[150]

2016 vice-presidential campaign

Clinton/Kaine logo

Kaine at a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 2016.

Kaine speaking at a campaign event in Phoenix, Arizona in November 2016.

Kaine endorsed Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and campaigned actively for her in seven states during the primaries. He had been the subject of considerable speculation as a possible running mate for Clinton, with several news reports indicating that he was at or near the top of Clinton’s list of people under consideration alongside figures such as Elizabeth Warren and Julian Castro.[151][152]

The New York Times reported that Clinton’s husband, former president Bill Clinton, supported Kaine as his wife’s vice-presidential selection, noting his domestic and national security résumé.[153] On July 22, 2016, she announced Kaine would be her running mate in the election.[154] Clinton introduced Kaine as her choice in a joint appearance at a rally at Florida International University in Miami the next day.[155] The 2016 Democratic National Convention nominated him for vice president on July 27, 2016.[156]

Kaine was the first Virginian since Woodrow Wilson to be on a major-party ticket,[157] and was the first Virginian to run for vice president on a major-party ticket since John Tyler in 1840; he was also the first senator or former senator from Virginia to be on a major-party ticket since Tyler.[158]

In accordance with longstanding political custom in the U.S., upon being nominated for vice president Kaine publicly released his full tax returns for the previous ten years.[159][160] He also publicly released medical records; his physician, Brian P. Monahan, the Attending Physician of the United States Congress, wrote that Kaine was “in overall excellent health.”[161][162] In September Kaine published a campaign book co-authored with Clinton, Stronger Together.[163]

In Kaine’s preparations for the vice presidential debate in October 2016, lawyer Robert Barnett played the role of Republican vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence.[164] (During Pence’s own debate preparations, Wisconsin governor Scott Walker played the role of Kaine.)[165] Pence was criticized after the debate for not defending Trump’s comments,[166] while Kaine was criticized for being too aggressive and interrupting.[167] According to ABC News, Kaine interrupted 70 times during the debate, while Pence interrupted 40 times.[168]

Despite winning a plurality of the national popular vote, the Clinton-Kaine ticket lost the Electoral College, and thus the election, to the Trump-Pence ticket on November 8, 2016.[169] This is the only election Kaine has ever lost. Clinton-Kaine did win Virginia, the only Southern state to vote for the Democratic ticket, a victory attributed in part to Kaine.[170]

2018 election

After the 2016 election, Kaine said he would run for reelection to the Senate in 2018. He expressed his desire to emulate John Warner, who represented Virginia in the Senate for 30 years.[171] He added that he would not run for president or vice president in the future.[171]

In his 2018 Senate campaign against Republican nominee and Trump ally Corey Stewart, Kaine had the endorsement of The Richmond Times-Dispatch, marking the first time in decades the paper had endorsed a Democrat.[172]

After taking an early lead in his race against Stewart, Kaine worked to support other Democrats who, in seven districts, were challenging incumbent Republicans for House seats.[173] Kaine defeated Stewart by more than 15 points.[174]

Personality and leadership style

About 145,000 emails from Kaine and his staff during his term as governor are publicly accessible at the Library of Virginia. Politico conducted an analysis of the correspondence and wrote that the messages show Kaine to be a “media-savvy” and detail-oriented “micro-manager” who is also a policy “wonk“.[175]

According to The New York Times, Kaine “is widely described by people in his political orbit as a likable if less than charismatic figure…guided by moral convictions that flow from his deep Christian faith.”[19] On Meet the Press, Kaine called himself “boring.”[19][176]

Political positions

In terms of political ideology, FiveThirtyEight gives Kaine an average score of −37 (−100 is the most liberal, and 100 is the most conservative).[177] FiveThirtyEight characterizes him as a “mainstream Democrat” and notes that his ideology score is very similar to that of Joe Biden.[177] Three conservative groups—the American Conservative Union, the Club for Growth, and Heritage Action—gave Kaine 0% ratings in the few years before 2016,[178] while the liberal group Americans for Democratic Action gave Kaine a 90% rating in 2014.[179] The New York Times wrote that “in hyperpartisan Washington, he is often seen as a centrist” while also describing him as an “old-fashioned liberal…driven by Jesuit ideals.”[19]

Abortion, birth control, and sex education

Kaine, a Roman Catholic, personally opposes abortion,[180][181] but is “largely inclined to keep the law out of women’s reproductive decisions.”[180] He has said, “I’m a strong supporter of Roe v. Wade and women being able to make these decisions. In government, we have enough things to worry about. We don’t need to make people’s reproductive decisions for them.”[182] Kaine supports some legal restrictions on abortion, such as requiring parental consent for minors (with a judicial bypass procedure) and banning late-term abortions in cases where the woman’s life is not at risk.[183]

In 2009, Kaine signed a bill to create a “Choose Life” license plate, among the more than 200 Virginia specialty plates already offered, the proceeds of which would partly go to Heartbeat International, a Christian organization that operates anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers.[184] Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America expressed disappointment in Kaine’s decision.[184] Kaine considered such license plate messages a matter of free speech and added that the move was “in keeping with the commonwealth’s longtime practice of approving specialty plates with all manner of political and social messages.”[184]

Kaine previously criticized the Obama administration for “not providing a ‘broad enough religious employer exemption'” in the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act, but praised a 2012 amendment to the regulations that required insurers to provide birth control to employees when an employer was an objecting religious organization.[185]

In 2005, when running for governor, Kaine said he favored reducing abortions by “Enforcing the current Virginia restrictions on abortion and passing an enforceable ban on partial birth abortion that protects the life and health of the mother”; “Fighting teen pregnancy through abstinence-focused education”; “Ensuring women’s access to health care (including legal contraception) and economic opportunity”; and “Promoting adoption as an alternative for women facing unwanted pregnancies.”[186]

In 2007, as governor, Kaine cut off state funding for abstinence-only sex education programs, citing studies that showed such programs were ineffective, while comprehensive sex education programs were more effective.[187] Kaine believes that both abstinence and contraceptives must be taught, and that education should be evidence-based.[187]

As a senator, Kaine has received perfect scores from Planned Parenthood and the abortion-rights advocacy group NARAL.[128][188] He has received a score of zero from the anti-abortion National Right to Life Committee.[188]

Campaign finance

Kaine “strongly disagrees” with Citizens United v. FEC (2010).[189] In 2015, Kaine joined a group of Senate Democrats in a letter to Securities and Exchange Commission Chairwoman Mary Jo White that said the ruling “reversed long-standing precedent and has moved our country in a different and disturbing direction when it comes to corporate influence in politics.” They urged the SEC to require publicly traded companies to disclose political spending to their shareholders to “increase transparency in the U.S. political process”.[189]

Capital punishment

Kaine personally opposes capital punishment, but presided over 11 executions while governor.[190] He said, “I really struggled with [capital punishment] as governor. I have a moral position against the death penalty. But I took an oath of office to uphold it. Following an oath of office is also a moral obligation.”[36] During his time in office he commuted one death sentence in June 2008, that of Percy Levar Walton, to life imprisonment without parole on grounds of mental incompetence, writing that “one cannot reasonably conclude that Walton is fully aware of the punishment he is about to suffer and why he is to suffer it” and thus that executing him would be unconstitutional.[191] Kaine vetoed a number of bills to expand the death sentence to more crimes, saying: “I do not believe that further expansion of the death penalty is necessary to protect human life or provide for public safety needs.”[192][193] Some of the vetoes were overridden.[194][f]

On July 31, 2019, after Attorney General William Barr announced that the United States federal government would resume the use of the death penalty for the first time in over 20 years, Kaine co-sponsored a bill banning the death penalty.[195]

Environment, energy, and climate change

Kaine acknowledges the scientific consensus on climate change, and in a 2014 Senate speech criticized climate change deniers, as well as those who “may not deny the climate science, but … deny that the U.S. can or should be a leader in taking any steps” to address the issue.[196]

Kaine has expressed concern about sea level rise (a major consequence of climate change),[148] and in particular its effect on coastal Virginia.[196] In 2014, he partnered with two Virginia Republicans—U.S. Representatives Rob Wittman and Scott Rigell—to hold a conference on sea-level rise and “local adaptation efforts to protect military installations in the Hampton Roads area.”[148]

Kaine endorses making coal energy production cleaner, saying that it is imperative “to convert coal to electricity with less pollution than we do today.”[196] He has criticized those who “frame the debate as a conflict between an economy and the environment”, saying that “protecting the environment is good for the economy.”[196] Kaine co-sponsored the Advanced Clean Coal Technology Investment in Our Nation (ACCTION) Act, legislation to increase investment in clean coal technologies.[197] He voted against legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline.[198] Kaine supports the use of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to harvest natural gas from shale formations. He believes this will reduce carbon pollution.[197] Kaine voted against an amendment introduced by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand that would have repealed a provision in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that exempts fracking from the underground injection control provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act. As a result, regulation of fracking remains in the hands of state agencies; the EPA cannot regulate it or require a federal permit.[199][200] Kaine supports exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG) to other countries.[201]

Like his fellow senator from Virginia, Mark Warner, Kaine applauded the U.S. Forest Service‘s plan to close most, but not all, of the George Washington National Forest to fracking and other horizontal drilling activities.[202]

In 2013, Kaine supported oil and gas exploration off the coast of Virginia, saying, “I have long believed that the moratorium on offshore drilling, based on a cost-benefit calculation performed decades ago, should be reexamined.”[203][204] In April 2015, Kaine reiterated his opposition to the moratorium on offshore drilling.[205] In March 2016, Kaine signaled that his position was softening, saying he was “particularly struck by the material objections of the Department of Defense to the incompatibility of drilling with naval operations off Virginia’s coast… I have participated in this debate for over a decade as a governor and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The DOD has been relatively quiet during this public debate and has never shared their objections with me before.”[205] By August 2016, Kaine stated his support for a ban on offshore drilling, bringing his position in line with Hillary Clinton’s and the Obama administration’s.[205]

Kaine supports the development of solar energy and offshore wind turbines.[197] Based on his votes on environmental issues in the Senate, the League of Conservation Voters has given Kaine a 95% score for 2018, and a 94% lifetime score.[200] (At the time of his vice-presidential campaign, Kaine had an 88% score for 2015, and a 91% lifetime score.)[148]

In March 2019, Kaine was one of 11 senators to sponsor the Climate Security Act of 2019, legislation forming a new group within the State Department that would be responsible for developing strategies to integrate climate science and data into operations of national security as well as restoring the post of special envoy for the Arctic, which Trump had dismantled in 2017. The proposed envoy would advise the president and the administration on the potential effects of climate on national security and be responsible for facilitating all interagency communication between federal science and security agencies.[206]

In April 2019, Kaine was one of 12 senators to sign a bipartisan letter to top senators on the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development advocating that the Energy Department be granted maximum funding for carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), arguing that American job growth could be stimulated by investment in viable options to capture carbon emissions released into the atmosphere and expressing disagreement with the Trump’s 2020 budget request to combine the two federal programs that include carbon capture research.[207]

Financial regulation

Kaine strongly supports financial regulation and the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.[178] In July 2016, he signed a bipartisan letter that “urged the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to ‘carefully tailor its rulemaking’ [under Dodd-Frank] regarding community banks and credit unions so as not to ‘unduly burden’ these institutions with regulations aimed at commercial banks.”[178] The letter prompted criticism from progressives who viewed it as anti-regulation.[178][208] Democracy for America executive director Charles Chamberlain called the letter “a lobbyist-driven effort to help banks dodge consumer protection standards and regulations designed to prevent banks from destroying our economy.” Kaine responded, “it’s important you don’t treat every financial institution the same. It wasn’t credit unions that tanked the economy, it wasn’t local community banks that tanked the economy, generally wasn’t regional banks that did things that tanked the economy.”[178] He also signed a letter urging that a requirement that regional banks report liquidity levels on a daily basis be loosened.[209]

Foreign and defense policy

In the Senate, Kaine has supported the normalization of U.S.–Cuban relations and the international nuclear agreement with Iran.[210]

Kaine expressed support for Israel‘s right to defend itself during the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict.[211] In September 2016, in advance of a UN Security Council resolution 2334 condemning Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories, he signed an AIPAC-sponsored letter urging Obama to veto “one-sided” resolutions against Israel.[212]

In 2015, Kaine expressed support for the Saudi-led coalition’s airstrikes in Yemen against Houthi forces fighting the government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi,[213] but in 2018, he was one of seven senators to sign a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo saying that they found it “difficult to reconcile known facts with at least two” of the Trump administration’s certifications that Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were attempting to protect Yemeni civilians and were in compliance with U.S. laws on arms sales, citing an inconsistency with a memo from Pompeo to Congress expressly stating that on some occasions the Saudi and Emirates governments had failed to adopt measures to reduce civilian casualties.[214] Kaine also condemned the Trump administration for its “eagerness to give the Saudis anything they want” after the administration approved the transfer of nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia after the murder of Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi.[215][216]

In July 2017, Kaine voted for the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act that placed sanctions on Iran, Russia, and North Korea.[217][218]

In 2019, Kaine was one of 34 Senate Democrats to sign a letter to Trump urging him to reconsider cuts to U.S. foreign aid to the Northern Triangle countries of Central America in the Fiscal Year 2018 national security appropriations bill. The letter said that Trump had “consistently expressed a flawed understanding of U.S. foreign assistance”, viewing it as a gift or charity to foreign governments rather than a tool to promote American interests and collective security. The senators wrote that U.S. foreign assistance to Central American countries, by improving stability and alleviating poverty in the region, reduced Central American migration flows to the U.S.[219]

In 2019, Kaine co-sponsored the South China Sea and East China Sea Sanctions Act, a bipartisan bill reintroduced by Marco Rubio and Ben Cardin that was intended to disrupt China’s consolidation or expansion of its claims of jurisdiction over both the sea and airspace in disputed zones in the South China Sea.[220]

Grand strategy and democracy promotion

After the 2016 presidential campaign, Kaine wrote an extensive essay in Foreign Affairs outlining his underlying foreign policy philosophy.[221] According to Kaine, American foreign policy has suffered a lack of direction since the 1990s because the end of the Cold War rendered irrelevant America’s previous grand strategy, which he identifies as the Truman Doctrine. This lack of grand strategy makes American actions seem random, complicating the policy-making process and hindering American leaders’ efforts to convince the public that American foreign policy is worthwhile. To remedy this, Kaine proposed a new grand strategy based mainly on democracy promotion. His grand strategy is informed by a tri-polar balance of international power, with one pole being democratic states including the U.S. and its allies, the second autocratic powers led by Russia and China, and the third nonstate actors (multinational corporations, NGOs, gangs, etc.).

First, Kaine believes that the United States should work to support democracy in already democratic countries, as democracy globally has been declining for many years.[222] To maintain democracy in democratic countries, Kaine proposes the creation of an intergovernmental organization consisting of all the world’s democracies in which states can cooperate on solutions to problems such as corruption and voter inclusion. He compares this hypothetical group to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, in which advanced industrialized countries collaborate on economic policy. Kaine believes that this new organization will help democracies remain democratic, as well as promote democracy in other countries by giving them viable democratic examples to emulate. In this way, Kaine says that the U.S. should no longer see itself as the indispensable nation, but rather the “exemplary democracy”.

Second, Kaine proposes that democracies should coordinate to best interact with authoritarian states. Depending on the circumstances, democracies should either “confront”, “compete”, or “cooperate” with autocracies. For example, Kaine observes that the U.S. competes with its authoritarian adversaries by strengthening military and commercial alliances, and confronts them by decrying their human rights records.[221]

Finally, Kaine believes that democracies and autocracies should cooperate when they have the same interests, such as combating climate change.

In July 2017, Kaine expanded on the grand strategy proposed in this essay in an interview at the Brookings Institution with international relations scholar Robert Kagan.[223]

Afghanistan

Kaine’s website states, “The main mission in Afghanistan—destroying Al Qaeda—is nearly complete and we should bring our troops home as quickly as we can, consistent with the need to make sure that Afghanistan poses no danger in the broader region.”[224]

Latin America

Kaine believes that American foreign policy has neglected relations with Latin America and argues for an increased focus on the Americas, saying, “We have seldom paid enough attention to the Americas, in particular, and when we have—whether through the Monroe Doctrine or by battling communist movements during the Cold War—we have focused more on blocking outsiders from building influence in the Western Hemisphere than we have on the nations already there.”[221]

War powers

Kaine is known for “expertise on the constitutional powers of the presidency”[170] and has said that “war powers questions” are a “personal obsession” of his.[225][226] He has stressed that under the Constitution, “Congress has the power to declare war—and only Congress.”[227] Kaine called the 2018 U.S. missile strikes Trump ordered against the Syrian government illegal because they were undertaken without congressional approval.[227]

Kaine and Senator John McCain introduced the War Powers Consultation Act of 2014,[228] which would replace the War Powers Act of 1973, bringing Congress back into decisions on the deployment of U.S. military forces.[228] The bill would establish a Congressional Consultation Committee, with which the president would be required to consult regularly regarding significant foreign policy matters before ordering the deployment of the armed forces into a significant armed conflict and at least every two months for the duration of any significant armed conflict.[228][229] Kaine argued for the bill by citing his “frustration” over the sloppiness of “process and communication over decisions of war”, noting that “presidents tend to overreach and Congress sometimes willingly ducks tough votes and decisions. We all have to do better.”[228]

In February 2018, Kaine was one of 18 senators to sign a letter to Trump arguing that striking North Korea with “a preventative or preemptive U.S. military strike would lack either a constitutional basis or legal authority” without congressional approval.[230]

In January 2020, Kaine introduced a new war powers resolution that would prohibit the U.S. from entering hostilities against Iran within 30 days unless it was responding to an imminent threat.[231] The next month, the measure passed the Senate 55–45, securing the votes of eight Republicans along with the Democrats.[232] Trump vetoed the measure,[233] and the Senate failed to override the veto.[234]

Syria, Iraq, and ISIL

In 2014, Kaine argued that the U.S. military intervention against Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) undertaken by Obama was unconstitutional without a new congressional authorization for the use of military force against ISIL.[235] In November 2014, at the Halifax International Security Forum, Kaine and McCain emphasized the necessity of such a congressional authorization, saying: “You just can’t have a war without Congress. You can’t ask people to risk their lives, risk getting killed, seeing other folks getting killed or injured if Congress isn’t willing to do the job to put their thumbprint on this and say, this is a national mission and worth it.”[236] After the April 2017 Shayrat missile strike in Syria, ordered by Trump, Kaine said, “There is no legal justification for this. He should not have done this without coming to Congress.”[237] On Meet the Press, Kaine said, “I’m a strong supporter that the U.S. should take action to protect humanitarian causes, like the ban on chemical weapons. Where I differ from this administration, and I took the same position with respect to President Obama, we are a nation that’s not supposed to take military action, start war, without a plan that’s presented to and approved by Congress.”[238]

On December 11, 2014, after a five-month campaign by Kaine, the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved by 10–8 (along party lines) a measure authorizing military force against ISIL but barring the use of ground troops.[239][240] In October 2015, Kaine criticized Obama’s approach to the Syrian Civil War, saying that the establishment of humanitarian no-fly zones would have alleviated the humanitarian crisis in Syria.[241][242]

In April 2018, Kaine criticized Trump for authorizing the launch of a precision military strike on Syria without consulting Congress, calling the strike an “illegal military act”.[243]

On February 26, 2021, Kaine demanded answers from President Biden after he ordered airstrikes on Syria against Iran-backed militias without giving “legal justification” to members of Congress beforehand.[244]

Firearms

Kaine is a firearms owner.[210] He has supported expanded background checks for weapons purchases as well as “restrictions on the sale of combat-style weapons and high-capacity magazines.”[210][245] As governor, Kaine oversaw the closing of loopholes in Virginia law that allowed some who had failed background checks to purchase guns.[210] In the Senate, he has supported legislation that would require background checks for weapons sold via gun shows and via the internet.[210] He also supports legislation to bar weapons sales to suspected terrorists on the No Fly List.[210]

In November 2017, Kaine was a cosponsor of the Military Domestic Violence Reporting Enhancement Act, a bill that would form a charge of domestic violence under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and stipulate that convictions be reported to federal databases with the authority to keep abusers from purchasing firearms within three days in an attempt to close a loophole in the UCMJ through which convicted abusers retained the ability to purchase firearms.[246]

In March 2018, Kaine was one of ten senators to sign a letter to Chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Lamar Alexander and ranking Democrat Patty Murray requesting they schedule a hearing on the causes and remedies of mass shootings in the wake of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.[247]

In June 2019, Kaine was one of four senators to cosponsor the Help Empower Americans to Respond (HEAR) Act, legislation that would ban suppressors being imported, sold, made, sent elsewhere or possessed and grant a silencer buyback program as well as include certain exceptions for current and former law enforcement personnel and others. The bill was intended to respond to the Virginia Beach shooting, in which the perpetrator used a .45-caliber handgun with multiple extended magazines and a suppressor.[248]

Kaine has a 100% rating from the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence[249] and an “F” rating from the NRA.[250]

Health care

Kaine supports the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 (Obamacare), saying in 2012, “I was a supporter and remain a supporter of the Affordable Care Act. I felt like it was a statement that we were going to put some things in the rearview mirror.”[251] In 2013, he said that he agreed that changes to the ACA should be debated, but criticized Republicans for “wrapping them up with the threat” of a federal government shutdown.[252]

In 2018, Kaine and Senator Michael Bennet proposed the creation of “Medicare X”—a public health insurance option modeled after Medicare that would be available on ACA health insurance marketplaces along with private options. The proposal is a more incrementalist alternative to Bernie Sanders‘s push for “Medicare for All” (single-payer health care).[253]

In December 2018, Kaine was one of 42 senators to sign a letter to Trump administration officials Alex Azar, Seema Verma, and Steve Mnuchin arguing that the administration was improperly using Section 1332 of the ACA to authorize states to “increase health care costs for millions of consumers while weakening protections for individuals with pre-existing conditions.” The senators requested the administration withdraw the policy and “re-engage with stakeholders, states, and Congress.”[254]

In January 2019, Kaine was one of six Democratic senators to introduce the American Miners Act of 2019, a bill that would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to swap funds in excess of the amounts needed to meet existing obligations under the Abandoned Mine Land fund to the 1974 Pension Plan as part of an effort to prevent its insolvency as a result of coal company bankruptcies and the 2008 financial crisis. It also increased the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund tax and ensured that miners affected by the 2018 coal company bankruptcies would not lose their health care.[255]

In December 2016, Kaine was one of 17 senators to sign a letter to Trump asking him to fulfill a campaign pledge to bring down the cost of prescription drugs.[256] In February 2017, he and 30 other senators signed a letter to Kaléo Pharmaceuticals in response to the opioid-overdose-reversing device Evzio rising in price from $690 in 2014 to $4,500 and requested the company provide the detailed price structure for Evzio, the number of devices Kaléo Pharmaceuticals set aside for donation, and the totality of federal reimbursements Evzio received in the previous year.[257] In February 2019, Kaine was one of 11 senators to sign a letter to insulin manufacturers Eli Lilly and Company, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi about increased insulin prices and charging that the price increases caused patients to lack “access to the life-saving medications they need.”[258]

In August 2019, Kaine was one of 19 Democratic senators to sign a letter to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar requesting data from the Trump administration on the consequences for healthcare if Texas prevailed in its lawsuit seeking to gut the Affordable Care Act. The senators wrote, “Upending the current health care system will create an enormous hole in the pocketbooks of the people we serve as well as wreck state budgets; therefore, we ask for data to help states and Congress better understand the potential consequences of the position the Administration is taking in court.”[259]

In September 2019, amid discussions to prevent a government shutdown, Kaine was one of six Democratic senators to sign a letter to congressional leadership advocating legislation that would permanently fund health care and pension benefits for retired coal miners as “families in Virginia, West Virginia, Wyoming, Alabama, Colorado, North Dakota and New Mexico” would start to receive notifications of health care termination by the end of the following month.[260]

Immigration

Kaine supports the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) programs,[261] which allow up to five million undocumented immigrants to gain deferral of deportation and authorization to legally work in the United States.[210] Alongside Senator Mark Warner and many other members of Congress, he signed on to an amicus brief in support of the program in the Supreme Court case United States v. Texas.[262][263]

Kaine also supports comprehensive immigration reform, which would allow persons illegally present in the U.S. to earn legal status by paying a fine and taxes.[210]

In July 2019, following reports that the Trump administration intended to end protections of spouses, parents and children of active-duty service members from deportation, Kaine was one of 22 senators to sign a letter led by Tammy Duckworth arguing that the program allowed service members the ability “to fight for the United States overseas and not worry that their spouse, children, or parents will be deported while they are away” and that the its termination would cause personal hardship for service members in combat.[264]

In July 2019, Kaine and 15 other Senate Democrats introduced the Protecting Sensitive Locations Act, a bill to mandate that ICE agents get approval from a supervisor before undertaking an immigration raid or other enforcement actions at “sensitive locations” (schools, hospitals, places of worship, and courthouses) except in special circumstances. The bill would also require agents to receive annual training and require ICE to submit an annual report on enforcement actions in those locations.[265]

LGBT rights

In 2006, Kaine campaigned against an amendment to the Virginia State Constitution to ban same-sex marriage,[266] and in March 2013, he announced his support of same-sex marriage.[267][268]

In the Senate, Kaine co-sponsored the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would bar employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.[269]

In 2005, Kaine said, “No couples in Virginia can adopt other than a married couple. That’s the right policy.”[270] In 2011, he shifted his position.[271] In 2012, he said, “there should be a license that would entitle a committed couple to the same rights as a married couple.”[272]

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Kaine noted that his position on same-sex marriage was “at odds with the current doctrine of the church that I still attend.” He predicted that the Roman Catholic Church would someday adopt his view.[273] In response, two bishops heading the doctrine and marriage committees of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said that the church’s position “cannot change” and reaffirmed their opposition to same-sex marriage.[274]

In October 2018, Kaine was one of 20 senators to sign a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urging him to reverse the State Department’s policy of denying visas to same-sex partners of LGBTQ diplomats who had unions that were not recognized by their home countries, writing that the Trump administration’s refusal to allow LGBTQ diplomats to bring their partners to the U.S. was tantamount to upholding the “discriminatory policies of many countries around the world.”[275] In June 2019, Kaine was one of 18 senators to sign a letter to Pompeo requesting an explanation of the State Department’s decision not to issue an official statement that year commemorating Pride Month or issue the annual cable outlining activities for embassies commemorating Pride Month. The signatories to the letter also asked why the LGBTI special envoy position had remained vacant. The authors said that the State Department’s moves had sent “signals to the international community that the United States is abandoning the advancement of LGBTI rights as a foreign policy priority.”[276]

Taxes

Kaine supports allowing the Bush tax cuts to expire for those with incomes above $500,000.[277]

In 2012, Kaine supported raising the cap on income subject for the FICA (Social Security) payroll tax “so that it covers a similar percentage of income as it did in the 1980s under President Reagan, which would greatly extend the solvency of the (Social Security) program.”[278]

In the Senate, Kaine has supported the Marketplace Fairness Act, which would allow states to require online retailers to collect sales taxes in the same manner as traditional brick-and-mortar retailers.[279][280][281]

Trade

Kaine supported granting Obama Trade Promotion Authority (TPA or “fast track”) to allow him to negotiate free trade agreements.[282] He said the goal should be to “negotiate deals that protect workers’ rights, environmental standards and intellectual property, while knocking down tariffs and other barriers that some countries erect to keep American products out.”[282]

In July 2016, Kaine said the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement was “an improvement of the status quo” and an “upgrade of labor standards… environmental standards… intellectual property protections”, but maintained that he had not yet decided how to vote on final approval of the agreement, citing “significant concerns” over TPP’s dispute resolution mechanism.[283] Later that July, Kaine said that he could not support the TPP in its current form.[284]

Kaine has been a proponent of NAFTA.[285]

Transportation, growth, and housing

Kaine supports some smart growth-style policies (which he calls “a balanced approach to growth”) to control sprawl and improve transportation.[286] He favors a transportation policy that includes public transit, bicycles, and pedestrians.[287] As governor, Kaine pushed through a $100 million open-space acquisition initiative.[287] Under Kaine, Amtrak service in Virginia was expanded.[288][289][290] He also participated in a White House round-table discussion on high-speed rail in 2009.[288]

In April 2019, Kaine was one of 41 senators to sign a bipartisan letter in support of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Section 4 Capacity Building program, a program authorizing HUD to partner with nonprofit community development groups to provide support to community development corporations. The letter said that the longstanding program had successfully promoted economic and community development, opposed the proposed elimination of the plan in Trump’s budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2020, and urged the Senate to support continued funding for Section 4 in Fiscal Year 2020.[291]

Workers’ rights and gender equality

Kaine is “generally pro-union” and has received a 96% lifetime Senate voting rating from the AFL-CIO,[148] which praised his selection as Clinton’s running mate.[292] But Kaine supports Virginia’s longstanding “right-to-work” law, which “frees union nonmembers from any legal obligation to pay fees to a union that bargains collectively on their behalf”.[148]

Kaine supports the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which expands the cases in which worker can sue against gender pay discrimination.[293] After Clinton selected him as her running mate in 2016, Kaine was praised by the National Organization for Women.[292][294]

Kaine favors an increase in the minimum wage.[148]

Electoral history

2001 lieutenant gubernatorial election
Virginia Lieutenant gubernatorial Democratic primary, 2001[295]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tim Kaine 64,008 39.66
DemocraticAlan Diamonstein50,75331.45
DemocraticJ. C. Jones46,64028.90
Majority13,2558.21
Total votes161,401
Virginia Lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2001[296][297]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Tim Kaine 925,974 50.35 +5.30%
RepublicanJay K. Katzen883,88648.06-2.10%
LibertarianG. A. Reams28,7831.57N/A
Write-inOthers4900.03N/A
Majority42,0882.29-2.29%
Total votes1,839,133
Swing to Democratic from RepublicanSwing5.30
2005 gubernatorial election
Virginia gubernatorial election, 2005[298]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Tim Kaine 1,025,942 51.72% -0.44%
RepublicanJerry Kilgore912,32745.99%-1.04%
IndependentRuss Potts43,9532.22%
NoneWrite-Ins1,5560.08%
Majority113,6155.73%+0.60%
Turnout1,983,77844.96%-1.4%
Democratic holdSwing
2012 U.S. Senate election
United States Senate election in Virginia, 2012[299]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Tim Kaine 2,010,067 52.83% +3.24%
RepublicanGeorge Allen1,785,54246.92%-2.28%
n/aWrite-ins9,4100.25%+0.15%
Total votes3,805,019′ 100.0%’ N/A
Democratic hold
2016 vice presidential election
2016 United States vice presidential election
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanMike Pence62,984,828 (popular votes)
305 electors
(30 states + ME−02)
46.1% (popular vote)
56.7% (electoral vote)
DemocraticTim Kaine65,853,514 (popular votes)
227 electors
(20 states + DC)
48.2% (popular vote)
42.2% (electoral vote)
2018 U.S. Senate election
United States Senate election in Virginia, 2018[300]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Tim Kaine (incumbent) 1,910,370 57.00% +4.17%
RepublicanCorey Stewart1,374,31341.01%-5.91%
LibertarianMatt Waters61,5651.84%+1.84%
Write-in5,1250.15%N/A
Total votes3,351,373′ 100%’ N/A
Democratic hold

Personal life

Kaine with his wife Anne at the 2012 Democratic National Convention

In November 1984, Kaine married Anne Bright Holton, the daughter of A. Linwood Holton Jr., a Republican who served as the 61st governor of Virginia from 1970 to 1974.[4][301] The couple met while they were both students at Harvard Law School.[16] Holton has been a judge for the Virginia Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court in Richmond.[302] After serving as first lady of Virginia during her husband’s term, she was appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe in January 2014 to be Virginia’s secretary of education,[302][303] and held that position until July 2016, when she stepped down after her husband was named as the Democratic vice-presidential nominee.[304] The couple has three children, one of whom is a United States Marine.[17][9][305][19][306] As of 2016, Kaine and his wife had been congregants of the St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Richmond, a mostly black congregation, for 30 years.[306][307]

Kaine plays the harmonica[308][309] and often travels with several.[19]

Kaine is fluent in Spanish as a result of his nine months in Honduras.[15] During the 2016 campaign, he became the first member of a presidential ticket to deliver a speech in Spanish.[170]

On May 28, 2020, Kaine announced that he and his wife had tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies.[310]

Awards and honors

Kaine has received the Humanitarian Award from the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities, then the Virginia Region of the National Conference for Community and Justice (2000),[311] the Virginia Council of Churches’ Faith in Action Award (2009),[312] the University of Richmond School of Law‘s William Green Award for Professional Excellence (2012),[313] the Award for Public Service in the Americas from the Inter-American Dialogue (2014),[314] the Appalachian Trail Conservancy‘s Congressional Award (2015),[315] and the Center for the National Interest‘s Distinguished Service Award (2016).[316] He was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic in 2017.[317]

Notes

  1. ^ Many news reports say that Kaine worked in Honduras as part of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps,[11][13] a U.S.-based organization that did not sponsor overseas programs until 1984.[14] By his own account, while a high school student in 1974 Kaine visited a Jesuit mission in Honduras that had ties to his Jesuit high school. In 1980, after completing his first year of law school and without the support of any organization, he contacted that mission and arranged to work at its vocational training school as a volunteer teacher.[12]
  2. ^ Until 2004, the mayor of Richmond was chosen by the city council from among its membership; under the present system, the mayor is chosen by popular vote.[23]
  3. ^ The Virginia Constitution gives the Virginia General Assembly the power to appoint state judges, but gives the governor of Virginia to power to make judicial appointments when the General Assembly is out of session.[94][95] Once the General Assembly convenes, it has thirty days to confirm the appointments; if it does not, the seats become vacant.[96] The General Assembly typically confirms the governor’s choices, as it did with both of Kaine’s appointments.[94][95]
  4. ^ Millette was formerly a Prince William County Circuit Judge whom Kaine had previously elevated to the Court of Appeals of Virginia via an interim appointment. Nine months later, Kaine elevated Millette to the Supreme Court via an interim appointment.[94][95]
  5. ^ Introducing Kaine, President Obama refers repeatedly to the “chairman” (not “chair”), of the Democratic National Committee.
  6. ^ Virginia remains second only to Texas in the number of executions since capital punishment was reinstated in 1976.[36]

References

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  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Nuckols, Christina (October 16, 2005). “Profile: Who is Timothy M. Kaine?”. The Virginian-Pilot.
  3. ^ a b O’Dowd, Niall (April 8, 2016). “Five Irish Americans who could be Hillary Clinton’s running mate”. IrishCentral. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  4. ^ a b “From the RTD archives: Wedding announcement of Tim Kaine and Anne Holton”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. July 21, 2016; reprinting of announcement originally published on November 25, 1984.
  5. ^ Deignan, Tom. “Kaine’s Strong Irish Roots”. Irish America (August September 2016). Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  6. ^ Roche, Barry (August 18, 2016). “Genealogist finds Tim Kaine also has Irish roots in Cork”. Retrieved August 24, 2016.
  7. ^ Smolenyak, Megan. “Tim Kaine’s Irish Roots”. Irish America (October November 2016). Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  8. ^ a b c Dwyer, Timothy (November 3, 2005). “For Kaine, a Faith in Service”. The Washington Post.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g “Timeline: Sen. Tim Kaine’s life and career”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. July 22, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2016.
  10. ^ “Notable Coro Alumni”. Coro Foundation. Retrieved July 23, 2016.
  11. ^ a b Winters, Michael Sean (April 5, 2011). “Tim Kaine Running for Senate”. National Catholic Reporter. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  12. ^ a b Kaine, Tim (June 7, 2016). “Life and Career of Senator Tim Kaine”. American Profile series (Interview). Interviewed by Steve Scully. C-SPAN. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  13. ^ Lovegrove, Jamie (July 22, 2016). “15 things you need to know about Clinton’s running mate, Tim Kaine”. Dallas Morning News. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  14. ^ Langlois, Ed (June 30, 2006). “Jesuit Volunteer Corps – 50 years of nitty-gritty service”. Catholic Sentinel. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  15. ^ a b c Peralta, Eyder (June 12, 2013). “With a Speech in Spanish, Tim Kaine Makes Senate History”. NPR.
  16. ^ a b Danielle Burton, 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Tim Kaine, U.S. News & World Report (July 18, 2008).
  17. ^ a b c d e f Virginia: Past Governors’ Bios: Tim Kaine, National Governors Association (accessed July 21, 2016).
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  20. ^ Trevor Baratko, For a professor and his pupil, politics align, Loudoun Times-Mirror (October 19, 2012).
  21. ^ “Timeline: Sen. Tim Kaine’s life and career”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. July 22, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2021.
  22. ^ “Praising Kaine”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. June 1, 1994. p. A-10.
  23. ^ a b c Amy Biegelsen, What’s a Nice Guy Like Tim Kaine Doing in a Job Like This?, (Richmond, Va.) Style Weekly (February 25, 2009).
  24. ^ “HISTORY OF THE CITY OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA” (PDF). The Office of the City Clerk of Richmond, Virginia. February 10, 2009. Retrieved April 10, 2021.
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  26. ^ a b c Paul Schwartzman, What’s a nice guy like Sen. Tim Kaine doing in a campaign like this?, The Washington Post (July 14, 2016).
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  28. ^ a b c Hickey, Gordon; Johnson, Carrie (July 27, 1999). “Council Supports Mural of Lee: El-Amin’s Proposal Rejected on 8–1 Vote After Heated Hearing”. Richmond Times-Dispatch.
  29. ^ “Mayor Kaine”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. July 3, 1998. p. A-16 – via nl.newsbank.com.
  30. ^ Allen, George; Goldman, Paul (October 12, 2009). “Little Restored Schoolhouse”. The New York Times.
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  32. ^ a b Peter Whoriskey, Kaine Edges Out Katzen For State’s No. 2 Office, The Washington Post (November 7, 2001).
  33. ^ “Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine to Address University Of Virginia’s Class of 2006 at Final Exercises on Sunday, May 21”. UVA Today. May 16, 2006.
  34. ^ Gibson, Bob (January 16, 2007). “Slavery apology measure ignites legislative debate”. The Daily Progress.
  35. ^ Halloran, Liz (May 17, 2012). “Tale of the Tape: Ex-Governors Duke It Out In Va”. NPR.
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  37. ^ Hank Shaw, Difference Few among Democrats, Free Lance-Star (May 21, 2001).
  38. ^ Elections Database: 2001 Lieutenant Governor Democratic Primary, Virginia Department of Elections.
  39. ^ a b Elections Database: 2001 Lieutenant Governor General Election, Virginia Department of Elections.
  40. ^ Tim Kaine and Anne Holton (Associated Press photo by Steve Helber) (January 12, 2002).
  41. ^ Haddock, Vicki (November 5, 2006). “Democrats Get Religion: Left-leaning politicians have a come-to-Jesus moment, bringing their faith out of the closet to challenge conservatives’ claimed moral hegemony”. San Francisco Chronicle. One of the few marquee Democratic victors in 2005 was Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine, an underdog….
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  43. ^ a b Sluss, Michael (September 17, 2005). “Kaine, Kilgore in a dead heat”. Roanoke Times.
  44. ^ a b Shear, Michael D.; Deane, Claudia (September 11, 2005). “Poll Shows Kilgore Ahead of Kaine in Va”. The Washington Post.
  45. ^ a b Warren Fiske, Life after the campaign for Jerry Kilgore, The Virginian-Pilot (April 30, 2006).
  46. ^ a b Elections Database: 2005 Governor General Election, Virginia Department of Elections.
  47. ^ a b c Chris L. Jenkins, Kaine Launches Va. Campaign on a Centrist Path: Democrat Pitches Fiscal Responsibility in Gubernatorial Bid, The Washington Post (March 17, 2005), B01.
  48. ^ Helderman, Rosalind S.; Jenkins, Chris L. (February 26, 2005). “Independent Republican’ Potts Joins Race in Va”. The Washington Post.
  49. ^ Shear, Michael D. (October 18, 2005). “AR Kaine Sounds Slow-Growth Note in Exurbs”. The Washington Post.
  50. ^ Michael D. Shear, Democrat Kaine Wins in Virginia, The Washington Post (November 9, 2005) (“From the beginning, Kaine’s strategy was to target voters who like Warner. He repeatedly took credit for the accomplishments of the ‘Warner-Kaine administration,’ and he appeared frequently with the governor.”).
  51. ^ a b No Death Penalty For Hitler? GOP Ad Goes Too Far Archived August 16, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FactCheck.org, Annenberg Public Policy Center (October 19, 2005).
  52. ^ a b Editorial: Death Penalty Smear, The Washington Post (October 12, 2005).
  53. ^ Editorial: “Death penalty demagoguery,” The Roanoke Times (October 13, 2005).
  54. ^ Michael D. Shear, Democrat Kaine Wins in Virginia, The Washington Post (November 9, 2005); see also GOP Wake-Up Call, The Wall Street Journal (November 10, 2005) (“Mr. Kilgore’s nonstop death-penalty demagoguery might have backfired with social conservatives who saw a man being attacked for his religious beliefs”), James Dao, Democrat Wins Race for Governor in Virginia, The New York Times (November 9, 2005) (“Mr. Kilgore may have hurt himself by running negative advertisements attacking Mr. Kaine’s positions on the death penalty, taxes and illegal immigration. According to some political analysts and polls, those advertisements alienated many independent voters.”).
  55. ^ a b c d Michael D. Shear, Democrat Kaine Wins in Virginia, The Washington Post (November 9, 2005).
  56. ^ a b James Dao, Democrat Wins Race for Governor in Virginia, The New York Times (November 9, 2005).
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  59. ^ Gorman, Sean (June 1, 2015). “Macker-Meter: Preserve 400,000 acres of open space”. PolitiFact. It’s becoming a tradition for winning gubernatorial candidates to make campaign promises to preserve 400,000 acres from development. Tim Kaine did it in 2005 and state figures show he met his pledge.
  60. ^ Virginia Conservation Lands Database, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (accessed July 22, 2016) (“DCR was also responsible for tracking the progress of Former Governor Tim Kaine’s 4-year, 400,000 acre Land Conservation Goal”).
  61. ^ a b Kaine Announces Near Record Land Conservation, WHSV-TV, January 19, 2009
  62. ^ a b Lydia Wheeler, McAuliffe reconvenes climate commission Tim Kaine formed the group in 2008 when he was governor, The Virginian-Pilot (July 3, 2014).
  63. ^ Jenna Portnoy, McAuliffe sets solar energy goal for Va. government, The Washington Post (December 21, 2015).
  64. ^ Craig, Tim (March 30, 2008). “Kaine Says Coal-Burning Power Plant Is Necessary”. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  65. ^ “Wise County VA residents speak out against coal plant”. Appalachian Voices (Press release). December 13, 2009.
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  72. ^ a b Mass Shootings at April 16, 2007: Report of the Review Panel Presented to Governor Kaine, Commonwealth of Virginia (August 2007).
  73. ^ a b c Tim Craig, Thorough Review Set Of Va. Tech, The Washington Post (May 2, 2007).
  74. ^ Transcript of Gov. Tim Kaine’s Convocation remarks, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (April 17, 2007).
  75. ^ Kaine Announces Mental Health Changes, Associated Press (December 14, 2007).
  76. ^ Tim Craig (May 1, 2007). “Ban on Sale Of Guns to Mentally Ill Is Expanded”. The Washington Post. Retrieved June 25, 2007.
  77. ^ a b c Vozzella, Laura (November 2, 2012). “A look at the Virginia Senate candidates’ records as governor”. The Washington Post. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  78. ^ a b John W. Schoen, Possible Hillary VP pick Tim Kaine brings solid economic record, CNBC (July 22, 2016).
  79. ^ Warren Fiske, Tim Kaine says he cut $5 billion in spending as governor, PolitiFact (October 24, 2012).
  80. ^ a b c Jacob Geiger (April 7, 2011). “Tim Kaine says Virginia named best managed state, best for business while he was governor”. PolitiFact.
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  83. ^ Robert Farley (August 5, 2016). “Kaine vs. Pence on Unemployment”. FactCheck.org. Annenberg Public Policy Center. Not long after taking office, Kaine proposed higher taxes on auto insurance and purchases, as well as higher fees for car registration and stiffer fines for driving offenses. The Washington Post estimated the higher taxes and fees would raise revenue of $1 billion a year, or $4 billion total over the four years of Kaine’s term. The extra money would have been earmarked to ease the state’s transportation woes — going to mass transit, highway construction and road projects.
  84. ^ Michael D. Shear & Rosalind S. Helderman, Va. Leaders Push Increase In Taxes, Fees To Aid Roads, Washington Post (January 21, 2006): “Kaine … and a bipartisan group of state senators offered competing proposals Friday to raise taxes and fees, with each plan generating close to $4 billion by 2010, to relieve the state’s congested transportation network. … Kaine is seeking higher taxes on auto insurance and the purchase of a car as well as stiffer fees for car registration and driving offenses. With nearly $1 billion more to spend each year, the new governor said, he can double the state’s support for mass transit, increase highway construction by 90 percent and revive stalled road projects. The money would help build a connected network of carpool or express toll lanes on all of Northern Virginia’s major highways, buy rail cars for Virginia Railway Express and Metro, widen Interstates 95 and 66, and fix traffic bottlenecks.”
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  86. ^ Corey Dade, Kaine’s Versatile Appeal Gives Him a Shot to Run With Obama, The Wall Street Journal (August 1, 2008).
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  90. ^ Michael D. Shear, Kaine Warns Lawmakers About Transit Bill, The Washington Post (February 23, 2007).
  91. ^ Final Endorsement of Road Funding, Albeit With Tepid Praise and Regret, The Washington Post (April 5, 2007).
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