2021 Virginia House District 15 RaceVA House 15 – 2021

The 2021 Virginia House of Delegates District 15 race will be held on November 2nd, 2021. Incumbent Republican candidate Todd Gilbert will be competing against the Democratic candidate Emily Scott for the office. Todd Gilbert, the current Minority Leader of the Virginia House of Delegates, has held the office since 2006. Emily Scott previously ran for local office in Shenandoah County in 2013, which composes part of District 15. Both candidates advanced to the candidacy for the 2021 election after the primary elections were canceled.

Emily Scott running to unseat Gilbert for 15th District seat
The Northern Virginia Daily, Charles PaullinSeptember 12, 2021 (Short)

WOODSTOCK — Doing things differently to address basic needs of constituents is what Emily Scott, the Democratic candidate for the House of Delegates in the 15th District, is looking to accomplish if she is elected this November.

The district includes Shenandoah and Page counties and parts of Warren County. She’ll face incumbent House Minority Leader Todd Gilbert, R-Mount Jackson, who has held the seat for 15 years, in the Nov. 2 election.

“I just feel that there’s opportunities to do things in a different way than we’ve been doing them the past 15 years,” Scott said, questioning what has been brought to the district through its past state representation.

Summary

The 2021 Virginia House of Delegates District 15 race will be held on November 2nd, 2021. Incumbent Republican candidate Todd Gilbert will be competing against the Democratic candidate Emily Scott for the office. Todd Gilbert, the current Minority Leader of the Virginia House of Delegates, has held the office since 2006. Emily Scott previously ran for local office in Shenandoah County in 2013, which composes part of District 15. Both candidates advanced to the candidacy for the 2021 election after the primary elections were canceled.

News

Emily Scott running to unseat Gilbert for 15th District seat
The Northern Virginia Daily, Charles PaullinSeptember 12, 2021 (Short)

WOODSTOCK — Doing things differently to address basic needs of constituents is what Emily Scott, the Democratic candidate for the House of Delegates in the 15th District, is looking to accomplish if she is elected this November.

The district includes Shenandoah and Page counties and parts of Warren County. She’ll face incumbent House Minority Leader Todd Gilbert, R-Mount Jackson, who has held the seat for 15 years, in the Nov. 2 election.

“I just feel that there’s opportunities to do things in a different way than we’ve been doing them the past 15 years,” Scott said, questioning what has been brought to the district through its past state representation.

Todd Gilbert

Current Position: Virginia House Minority leader

Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: Virginia House of Delegates District 15

Former Positions: Prosecutor from 1997 – 2006

Delegate Gilbert is a member of the Courts of Justice Committee, the Rules Committee, and serves as the Vice-Chairman of the House General Laws Committee. He also serves on the Virginia State Crime Commission, which helps to study and direct polices on public safety throughout Virginia and he is the Chairman of the House Criminal Law Subcommittee.

Prior to his election to the House of Delegates, Delegate Gilbert began his career as a full-time prosecutor. His first job was with the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for the City of Lynchburg, where he was a member of the Violent Crime Prosecution Team.

For more information, see this post on Todd Gilbert.

 

Emily Scott

Current Position: Employee at the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen in Front Royal

Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: Virginia House of Delegates District 15

Former Positions: Former Employee in the Tech Industry, Former Employee for two Virginia newspapers

A Shenandoah Valley native who knows well the stresses and challenges facing our region and commonwealth. Emily Scott will bring care, smarts, and grit to the House of Delegates.

For more information, see this post on Emily Scott.

X
Emily Scott

Current Position: Candidate for 15th District of the Virginia House of Delegates
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Virginia House Delegate for the 15th District

Candidate for Delegate
in the 15th District.

Source: Campaign page

Summary

Current Position: Candidate for 15th District of the Virginia House of Delegates
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Virginia House Delegate for the 15th District

Candidate for Delegate
in the 15th District.

Source: Campaign page

Twitter

About

Emily Scott

Source: Campaign page

Emily Scott grew up in Woodstock and graduated from Central High School and Randolph Macon Women’s College. Just out of college, Emily worked for the Recreation Department in Shenandoah County and two Virginia newspapers. In the late 90’s, Emily moved to Michigan and was employed in the tech industry. She returned to Woodstock and is currently employed by the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen in Front Royal. Emily is a member of the Edinburg Lions Club, as a member of Emmanuel Episcopal Church serves on the Finance Committee and  is a member of  the Board of the Woodstock Museum.

Why I am running.

For 15 years, the 15th District has had a delegate in Richmond who has neglected the basic needs affecting folks in Shenandoah, Warren, Page, and Rockingham Counties. Now is the time for the 15th District to have a Delegate who addresses our region’s challenges with care, smarts, and grit.

Contact

Email:

Web

Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Recent Elections

2013 Shenandoah County Board of Supervisors

Cindy Anne Baily ()90246.6%
Steven Paul Shaffer (R)69135.7%
Emily Garnett Scott (D)33617.4%
Write In (Write-in)70.4%
TOTAL1,936

Source: Department of Elections

Issues

Source: Campaign page

Emily’s Priorities

Highway Safety-I-81

Broadband

Health Care and Mental Health

Infrastructure, including expanded public water and sewer.

Education

Agriculture Revitalization

Growing Tourism Industry

Social Security & Medicare Sustainability

Good Jobs raise minimum wage

Repeal Right-to-Work

X
Todd Gilbert 1Todd Gilbert

Current Position: State Delegate for District 15 since 2006
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Prosecutor from 1997 – 2006

Delegate Gilbert is a member of the Courts of Justice Committee, the Rules Committee, and serves as the Vice-Chairman of the House General Laws Committee. He also serves on the Virginia State Crime Commission, which helps to study and direct polices on public safety throughout Virginia and he is the Chairman of the House Criminal Law Subcommittee.

Prior to his election to the House of Delegates, Delegate Gilbert began his career as a full-time prosecutor. His first job was with the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for the City of Lynchburg, where he was a member of the Violent Crime Prosecution Team.

House of Delegates approves spending plan for American Rescue Plan Act funds
The Northern Virginia Daily, Charles PaullinAugust 4, 2021 (Short)

The plan to spend the about $4.3 billion dollars in American Rescue Plan Act funds provided to Virginia in the federal government’s second stimulus package, passed the House of Delegates on Wednesday afternoon, but local representatives are unhappy with how it was done.

The 100-member House is split 55-45 with Democrats in the majority, but the plan passed with a bipartisan 71-25 vote. The state Senate was expected to vote on a plan later Wednesday.

House Minority leader Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah, and Republican delegates Bill Wiley and Michael Webert, who both represent parts of Warren County, voted against the plan, with Gilbert and Wiley saying they felt shut out of the process.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate for District 15 since 2006
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Prosecutor from 1997 – 2006

Delegate Gilbert is a member of the Courts of Justice Committee, the Rules Committee, and serves as the Vice-Chairman of the House General Laws Committee. He also serves on the Virginia State Crime Commission, which helps to study and direct polices on public safety throughout Virginia and he is the Chairman of the House Criminal Law Subcommittee.

Prior to his election to the House of Delegates, Delegate Gilbert began his career as a full-time prosecutor. His first job was with the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for the City of Lynchburg, where he was a member of the Violent Crime Prosecution Team.

News

House of Delegates approves spending plan for American Rescue Plan Act funds
The Northern Virginia Daily, Charles PaullinAugust 4, 2021 (Short)

The plan to spend the about $4.3 billion dollars in American Rescue Plan Act funds provided to Virginia in the federal government’s second stimulus package, passed the House of Delegates on Wednesday afternoon, but local representatives are unhappy with how it was done.

The 100-member House is split 55-45 with Democrats in the majority, but the plan passed with a bipartisan 71-25 vote. The state Senate was expected to vote on a plan later Wednesday.

House Minority leader Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah, and Republican delegates Bill Wiley and Michael Webert, who both represent parts of Warren County, voted against the plan, with Gilbert and Wiley saying they felt shut out of the process.

Twitter

About

Todd Gilbert

Source: Campaign page

Delegate Todd Gilbert represents the 15th district in the Virginia House of Delegates; it includes all of Page and Shenandoah Counties and portions of Warren and Rockingham Counties. He was first elected to the House in 2005. In 2018, Delegate Gilbert was elected Majority Leader of the House of Delegates. Delegate Gilbert is a member of the Courts of Justice Committee, the Rules Committee, and serves as the Vice-Chairman of the House General Laws Committee. He also serves on the Virginia State Crime Commission, which helps to study and direct polices on public safety throughout Virginia and he is the Chairman of the House Criminal Law Subcommittee.

Delegate Gilbert has received numerous awards and distinctions during his tenure in the House of Delegates including the Virginia YMCA’s “Service to Youth Award” for his annual work with their Model General Assembly in Richmond. In 2013, he was named the Family Foundation’s “Legislator of the Year” for his work in promoting family values and religious freedom in Virginia. The Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys also awarded Gilbert their inaugural “Champion of Justice Award” for his extensive work in public safety policy. Both the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police and the Virginia State Police Association have honored Gilbert with their “Legislator of the Year” Award. The American Conservative Union also named him a “Defender of Liberty” for his 100% conservative voting record during the legislative session. Finally, in 2017, Gilbert was named a “Legislator of the Year” by the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for his years of work as a pro-business leader.

Prior to his election to the House of Delegates, Delegate Gilbert began his career as a full-time prosecutor. His first job was with the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for the City of Lynchburg, where he was a member of the Violent Crime Prosecution Team. In 1999, he was fortunate to be able to return home and work in the Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney for Shenandoah County for six years where he was lead prosecutor in a number of major cases. After his election to the House, Gilbert worked for several years as a prosecutor in both the Warren County and Frederick County Commonwealth’s Attorneys Offices. He has taught the art of trial advocacy to fellow prosecutors at the Commonwealth’s Attorneys’ annual trial advocacy school. Taking advantage of his experience in Virginia’s criminal justice system, Gilbert’s primary legislative focus is public safety.

Gilbert is a 1989 graduate of Central High School of Woodstock, where he served as student body president and played three varsity sports. He attended the University of Virginia, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in Government in 1993. While at UVA, he was a legislative intern in the Capitol Hill office of then U.S. Representative George Allen. Upon graduation, he attended the Southern Methodist University School of Law, where he earned his law degree in 1996 and also led the student body as president of the Student Bar Association. While at SMU Law, Gilbert won the school’s annual mock trial competition and participated on the school’s competitive mock trial team.

When not in Richmond for the legislative session, Delegate Gilbert now works in a private law practice. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Woodstock.

Todd is married to the lovely and talented Jennifer Wishon Gilbert, and in 2017 they were blessed with a son.  Jennifer is a broadcast journalist who is currently the White House Correspondent for CBN News. Jennifer covers the President and national politics in Washington, D.C. The Gilberts live on a small farm outside of Mount Jackson, Virginia.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Attorney

Education

  • JD
    Southern Methodist University School of Law
    1996
  • BA
    University of Virginia
    1993

Awards

Family Foundation, Legislator of the Year
Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys, Champion of Justice Award
Virginia State Police, Legislator of the Year
Circuit Court Clerks Association, Legislator of the Year
Virginia Retail Merchants Association, Legislator of the Year
Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police, Legislator of the Year

Personal

  • Birth Year: 1970
  • Place of Birth: Newton, TX
  • Gender: Male
  • Race(s): Caucasian
  • Religion: Southern Baptist
  • Spouse: Jennifer Wishon
  • Children: Christopher Grant

Membership & Affiliation

First Baptist Church of Woodstock
Shenandoah County Bar Association
Virginia State Bar
Virginia YMCA (board of directors)
Virginia YMCA Model General Assembly Committee

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Jeffrey Walters
Administrative Assistant During Session: Lorraine Taylor

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1015

District Office
P.O. Box 309
Woodstock, VA 22664
Phone: (540) 459-7550

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Virginia House of Delegates

Elections

He was first elected to represent the 15th district in the Virginia House of Delegates in 2005.

Tenure

In 2010, Gilbert was appointed to be Deputy Majority Leader of the House of Delegates.

Gilbert will become the Virginia House of Delegates Majority Leader on January 10, 2018, so long as Republicans maintain their majority following the next elections. He was chosen by the House Republican Caucus following their decision to promote current House Majority Leader Kirk Cox to Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates.

Committee assignments

  • House General Laws Committee (Chairman)
  • Militia Police and Public Safety Committee
  • Courts of Justice Committee

Other assignments

  • Virginia State Crime Commission
  • Board of Directors of the Virginia YMCA.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Todd Gilbert (R)18,91474.36%
Beverly Harrison (D)6,49325.53%
Write In (Write-in)300.12%
TOTAL25,437

2017 State Delegate

Todd Gilbert (R)19,28494.3%
Write In (Write-in)1,1715.7%
TOTAL20,455

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Finances

GILBERT, CHRISTOPHER TODD (TODD) has run in 8 races for public office, winning 7 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $1,656,150.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Delegation

Majority Leader (2018-)

Committees

Vice Chair: General Laws
Rules
Courts of Justice

Subcommittees

Chair: Courts of Justice – Subcommittee #1
Chair: Courts of Justice – Subcommittee #4
Courts of Justice – Ethics Subcommittee
General Laws – Subcommittee #3
Rules – Joint Rules

Appointments

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Civil Rights

Protecting the 2nd Amendment

Delegate Gilbert is a recognized leader in protecting our individual right to keep and bear arms and has an “A+” career rating from the National Rifle Association.  The National Rifle Association awarded Delegate Gilbert the “Defender of Freedom Award” at the 146th National Rifle Association annual meeting in Atlanta in April 2017.  The Defender of Freedom Award is awarded to individuals who have distinguished themselves in preserving and protecting our Second Amendment rights.  He has sponsored a number of initiatives aimed at expanding the right to carry a concealed firearm for personal protection.  He sponsored a bill, now the law, to ensure that law-abiding citizens who posses a concealed handgun permit no longer have to be disarmed in Virginia’s restaurants when they go out to dinner with their family.  In 2012, he was the chief co-sponsor of the bill that repealed Virginia’s “one gun a month” handgun rationing law.  Delegate Gilbert does not believe that law-abiding citizens should have to get the permission of their government to carry a concealed firearm.  He believes that the only outcome achieved by more gun laws and restrictions, including so-called “gun-free zones”, is to disarm good, law-abiding people while ensuring they are at the mercy of armed predators who will never follow the law.

Economy

In his twelve years in the House of Delegates, Todd has worked to make Virginia one of the top states in America to do business.  By keeping his promise never to raise taxes and working against burdensome regulations, Delegate Gilbert has helped Virginia withstand the economic downturn better than most states.  He strongly believes in Virginia’s right-to-work laws and voted to make them part of our state constitution because he knows they contribute to job creation in Virginia.  Todd believes that those seeking a good paying job should not be forced to join a labor union and has been awarded the Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s “Champion of Free Enterprise Award” for having a 100% pro-business voting record and holds an “A” rating from the Chamber for his votes to protect economic liberty.  In 2013, he has also helped to strengthen Virginia’s job market by passing legislation to help reduce frivolous lawsuits, and was awarded the “Advocate in Legal Reform Award” by the Chamber of Commerce for his efforts.

Environment

Energy Independence

Delegate Gilbert believes that America’s dependence on foreign sources of energy are an imminent threat to our economy and national security.  America continues to compete with foreign rivals for access to oil sold to us by countries who don’t have America’s interests at heart.  Meanwhile, America has untold reserves of oil, natural gas, and coal that remain untapped, even right here in Virginia.  Todd believes that cheaper energy means economic security and that we should continue to develop these resources along with new clean-coal burning and nuclear plants.  He has co-sponsored legislation to allow oil and natural gas drilling off Virginia’s coast and voted against a number of so-called “green” initiatives which are only helping to make the cost of energy skyrocket for most citizens.

Health Care

Fighting for Healthcare Freedom

Delegate Gilbert fought against the implementation of Obamacare in Virginia.  As a limited government conservative, he believes that the passage and implementation of Obamacare has crippled America’s health care system and paved the way for socialized medicine in the United States.  Health care rationing will ultimately ensure that all Americans, whose health decisions should be between them and their doctor, are at the mercy of their government with respect to their medical treatment.  Todd has co-sponsored legislation to exempt Virginians from the provisions of Obamacare and in a recent session was one of only a handful of representatives to vote against laying the groundwork for the expensive expansion of Medicaid under the mandates of Obamacare.

Safety

As a former career prosecutor of nearly fifteen years, Delegate Gilbert has a unique understanding of the nature of crime and criminals.  He has served on the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission and the Commission on VASAP which oversees DUI offenders in the Commonwealth.  He currently serves on the Virginia Crime Commission which helps to shape public safety policy in Virginia.  Todd has sponsored and supported countless new laws aimed at protecting our children from sexual predators, including mandatory life sentences for those convicted of raping a child.  For his efforts, Delegate Gilbert has been named “Legislator of the Year” by the Virginia State Police Association and the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police.  He also won accolades from Virginia’s prosecutors, having earned the Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys’ inaugural “Champion of Justice Award” for his work on behalf of public safety.

X
VA House Race 38 -2021 1VA House Race 38 -2021

The 2021 Virginia House of Delegates District 38 race will be held on November 2nd, 2021. Incumbent Democratic candidate Kaye Kory will be competing against the Republican candidate Tom Pafford for the office. Kaye Kory, has held the office since 2010. Tom Pafford previously ran for the Fairfax County School Board in 2019, as a nonpartisan candidate. Both candidates advanced to the candidacy for the 2021 election after Kaye Kory won her primary election, and Tom Pafford received the candidacy after the cancellation of the Republican Primary.

Early Voting Started Sept. 17 in Alexandria, Fairfax County
Alexandria LivingSeptember 17, 2021 (Short)

Sept. 17 was the first day that voters in Virginia could cast ballots for the multiple races in this fall’s election cycle.

Here’s how to vote and who’s running. Stay tuned for more information about these races as we get closer to election day on Nov. 2.

Summary

The 2021 Virginia House of Delegates District 38 race will be held on November 2nd, 2021. Incumbent Democratic candidate Kaye Kory will be competing against the Republican candidate Tom Pafford for the office. Kaye Kory, has held the office since 2010. Tom Pafford previously ran for the Fairfax County School Board in 2019, as a nonpartisan candidate. Both candidates advanced to the candidacy for the 2021 election after Kaye Kory won her primary election, and Tom Pafford received the candidacy after the cancellation of the Republican Primary.

News

Early Voting Started Sept. 17 in Alexandria, Fairfax County
Alexandria LivingSeptember 17, 2021 (Short)

Sept. 17 was the first day that voters in Virginia could cast ballots for the multiple races in this fall’s election cycle.

Here’s how to vote and who’s running. Stay tuned for more information about these races as we get closer to election day on Nov. 2.

Wikipedia

The 2021 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021. Incumbent lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax was eligible to run for a second term, but instead ran for governor.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Withdrawn

Declined

Endorsements

Hala Ayala
Governor
State delegates
Organizations
Andria McClellan
Federal officials
State senators
Individuals
Organizations
Sean Perryman
State delegates
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Xavier Warren
Organizations
Elizabeth Guzman (withdrawn)
State delegates
Organizations

Polling

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Hala AyalaElizabeth GuzmanMark LevineAndria McClellanSean PerrymanSam RasoulXavier WarrenOtherUndecided
Roanoke CollegeMay 24 – June 1, 2021637 (LV)± 3.9%16%3%7%7%3%11%2%45%
Christopher Newport UniversityApril 11–20, 2021806 (LV)± 3.9%2%4%2%2%1%12%2%1%64%

Results

Results by county and independent city:

Ayala
  •   Ayala—60–70%
  •   Ayala—50–60%
  •   Ayala—40–50%
  •   Ayala—30–40%
Rasoul
  •   Rasoul—<30%
  •   Rasoul—30–40%
  •   Rasoul—40–50%
  •   Rasoul—50–60%
  •   Rasoul—60–70%
  •   Rasoul—70–80%
  •   Rasoul—80–90%
Levine
  •   Levine—30–40%
Warren
  •   Warren—30–40%
  •   Warren—40–50%
Democratic primary results[42]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Hala Ayala 181,168 37.64%
DemocraticSam Rasoul116,81624.27%
DemocraticMark Levine53,73511.16%
DemocraticAndria McClellan51,01510.60%
DemocraticSean Perryman38,9258.09%
DemocraticXavier Warren19,9094.13%
DemocraticElizabeth Guzmán (withdrawn)19,8034.11%
Total votes481,365 100.00%

Republican convention

After months of uncertainty, the Republican Party of Virginia State Central Committee decided to hold an “unassembled convention” to select their nominees for governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, as opposed to holding a state run primary. The convention was held May 8 using ranked choice voting.[43]

Candidates

Nominated at convention

Defeated at convention

  • Puneet Ahluwalia, business consultant[45]
  • Lance Allen, security company executive[2]
  • Glenn Davis, member of the Virginia House of Delegates and candidate for lieutenant governor in 2017[2]
  • Tim Hugo, former member of the Virginia House of Delegates (2003–2020)[2]
  • Maeve Rigler, business executive[46]

Endorsements

Tim Hugo
State delegates

Results

Round-by-round result visualization of the Ranked Choice Voting election

Virginia GOP Convention, Lieutenant Governor Nominee [48]
CandidateRound 1Round 2Round 3Round 4Round 5
Votes%Votes%Votes%Votes%Votes%
Winsome Sears4,075.6832.5%4,300.1134.3%4,626.7036.9%5,425.9143.2%6,827.8954.4%
Tim Hugo2,824.1722.5%2,987.2023.8%3,184.7625.4%3,816.1130.4%5,726.1145.6%
Glenn Davis2,536.7720.2%2,675.4421.3%2,838.0522.6%3,311.9726.4%Eliminated
Lance Allen1,538.8012.3%1701.8213.6%1,904.5015.2%Eliminated
Puneet Ahluwalia818.956.5%889.437.1%Eliminated
Maeve Rigler759.626.1%Eliminated

General election

Endorsements

Hala Ayala (D)
State officials
State legislators
Individuals
Organizations
Winsome Sears (R)
U.S. Representatives
State officials
State legislators
Individuals
Organizations

Polling

Graphical summary
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Hala
Ayala (D)
Winsome
Sears (R)
OtherUndecided
the polling company, inc. (R)[A]September 17–19, 2021700 (LV)± 3.7%34%24%3%40%
Virginia Commonwealth UniversitySeptember 7–15, 2021731 (LV)± 6.9%33%30%20%16%
University of Mary WashingtonSeptember 7–13, 20211,000 (A)± 3.1%38%38%6%[b]18%
528 (LV)± 4.1%41%47%2%[c]10%
Monmouth UniversityAugust 24–29, 2021802 (RV)± 3.5%43%42%2%14%
Christopher Newport UniversityAugust 15–23, 2021800 (LV)± 3.6%52%42%1%6%
Roanoke CollegeAugust 3–17, 2021558 (LV)± 4.2%42%36%2%20%
Virginia Commonwealth UniversityAugust 4–15, 2021770 (RV)± 5.4%38%31%19%12%
~747 (LV)± 5.5%39%31%17%12%
JMC Analytics and Polling (R)June 9–12, 2021550 (LV)± 4.2%42%36%22%

Results

Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2021
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticHala Ayala
RepublicanWinsome Sears
Write-in
Total votes 100.00%

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ None/Would not vote with 4%, other candidate with 2%
  3. ^ None/Would not vote and other candidate with 1%

References

  1. ^ Regardless of who wins the election, it will be the first time in Virginia history that a female will become Lieutenant Governor.“Constitution of Virginia – Article V. Executive”. law.lis.virginia.gov.

  2. ^ a b c d e Olivo, Antonio; Vozzella, Laura (October 5, 2020). “Crowded field in 2021 Va. lieutenant governor’s race”. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  3. ^ Olivo, Antonio (July 14, 2020). “Virginia Del. Hala Ayala announces bid for lieutenant governor”. Washington Post.
  4. ^ Vozzella, Laura (December 21, 2020). “Del. Mark Levine joins the crowded race for Virginia lieutenant governor”. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  5. ^ Vozzella, Laura. “Norfolk City Council member Andria McClellan to run for Virginia lieutenant governor”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  6. ^ CAIN, ANDREW. “Fairfax NAACP leader Sean Perryman announces Democratic bid for LG”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2020-10-14.
  7. ^ Domingo, Ida (2020-10-20). “Delegate Sam Rasoul announces candidacy for Virginia Lt. Governor”. WSET. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  8. ^ Baylor, Kaicey (2020-09-22). “Pittsylvania County native announces candidacy for Virginia Lt. Governor”. WSET. Retrieved 2020-10-05.
  9. ^ amy.friedenberger@roanoke.com 540-981-3356, Amy Friedenberger. “Paul Goldman drops out of lieutenant governor race”. Roanoke Times. Retrieved 2021-04-19.
  10. ^ Brown, Bob. “Guzman withdraws from lieutenant governor’s race, will vie to keep her House seat”. Richmond Times Dispatch. Retrieved 2021-04-17.
  11. ^ Albiges, Marie. “Charlottesville’s Kellen Squire ends bid for lieutenant governor”. pilotonline.com. Retrieved 2020-09-10.
  12. ^ “Virginia Lt. Gov. Fairfax announces plan to run for governor in 2021”. WTKR. 2019-12-19. Retrieved 2020-09-10.
  13. ^ a b c d e f Leonor, Mel (April 26, 2021). “Northam endorses Ayala for lieutenant governor”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  14. ^ a b c d e f MATTINGLY, JUSTIN. “Northern Virginia delegate Hala Ayala announces bid for lieutenant governor”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved Dec 16, 2020.
  15. ^ a b c Yoon, Erica (4 June 2021). “Editorial: Everything seems to be going right for Rasoul”. The Roanoke Times. Retrieved 5 June 2021.
  16. ^ a b “STATE AND LOCAL CANDIDATES”.
  17. ^ a b c d e f “Gun Sense Candidate Lookup”.
  18. ^ “Here are the 30 candidates endorsed by the LGBTQ Victory Fund in 2021”. Metro Weekly. February 24, 2021.
  19. ^ “Endorsing Incumbents (Including McAuliffe)”. Falls Church News-Press. May 7, 2021. Our endorsement for governor in the June 8 Democratic primary, then, is McAuliffe.
  20. ^ Alston, K. (4 December 2020). “REPRESENTATIVE ELAINE LURIA ENDORSES ANDRIA MCCLELLAN FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR”. Hampton Roads Messenger. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  21. ^ “Lynwood Lewis backing Andria McClellan in Democratic lieutenant governor race”. The Augusta Free Press. January 13, 2021. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  22. ^ “Marsden endorses Andria McClellan for Democratic Party lieutenant governor nomination”. The Augusta Free Press. 12 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  23. ^ “Technology, innovation leaders endorse Andria McClellan for lieutenant governor”. The Augusta Free Press. February 15, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  24. ^ “Nye endorses Andria McClellan in Democratic Party lieutenant governor race”. Augusta Free Press. 17 January 2021. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  25. ^ O’Connell, Michael (14 October 2020). “Perryman Officially Enters VA Lieutenant Governor’s Race”. Reston, VA Patch. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g Creed, Wayne (16 May 2021). “Perryman continues to gather momentum in bid for Lt. Governor”. CAPE CHARLES MIRROR. Retrieved 16 May 2021.
  27. ^ a b Hand, Mark (11 March 2021). “Virginia Governor’s Race Turns Into Battle Over Endorsements”. Fairfax City, VA Patch. Retrieved 12 March 2021.
  28. ^ “Lt. Governor Candidate Perryman Tours Downtown Leesburg”. Loudon Now. 15 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  29. ^ @OurBlackParty (June 4, 2021). “Our Black Party is proud to endorse @SeanPerrymanVA for LT. Gov. in the VA Primary on Tuesday, 6/8” (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  30. ^ Marans, Daniel (May 5, 2021). “Elizabeth Warren Endorses Sam Rasoul For Lt. Governor Of Virginia”. HuffPost.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j “Del. Cia Price endorses Del. Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor”. Augusta Free Press. April 19, 2021. Archived from the original on April 19, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  32. ^ a b “Del. Sally Hudson endorses Del. Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor”. Augusta Free Press. May 4, 2021. Retrieved May 4, 2021.
  33. ^ “Del. Kathy Tran endorses Del. Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor”. Augusta Free Press. May 7, 2021. Retrieved May 7, 2021.
  34. ^ “Events – Virtual Fundraiser for Sam Rasoul for Virginia Lt. Governor”. The Arab Daily News. December 13, 2020. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  35. ^ “Former Attorney General Mary Sue Terry endorses Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor”. Augusta Free Press. April 28, 2021. Archived from the original on April 28, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  36. ^ a b “CASA in Action endorses Sam Rasoul for lieutenant governor”. Augusta Free Press. April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  37. ^ “Sunrise Virginia endorses Sam Rasoul in Democratic Party lieutenant governor race”. Augusta Free Press. March 2, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  38. ^ Janfaza, Rachel (March 22, 2021). “Sunrise Movement endorses Jennifer Carroll Foy for Virginia governor”. CNN. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  39. ^ The Washington Post Editorial Board (March 2, 2021). “Opinion: The Post’s endorsements in Virginia’s Democratic primary”. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 26, 2021.
  40. ^ a b c Cheslow, Daniella (October 5, 2020). “GOP’s Tim Hugo And Del. Elizabeth Guzman File To Run For Virginia Lt. Gov”. DCist. Archived from the original on Dec 21, 2020. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  41. ^ “CASA in Action Endorses Elizabeth Guzman for Lieutenant Governor”. casainaction.org. December 30, 2020. Retrieved 14 February 2021.
  42. ^ “Virginia Primary Election Results”.
  43. ^ “Unorthodox Republican contest for Virginia governor breeds confusion, suspicion”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2021-07-01.
  44. ^ Ley, Ana. “Winsome E. Sears, once a local Republican on the rise, announces bid for lieutenant governor”. The Virginian Pilot. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  45. ^ Cain, Andrew (September 28, 2020). “Northern Virginia business consultant Puneet Ahluwalia announces GOP run for LG”. The Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  46. ^ “2021 Nomination”. Republican Party of Virginia. Retrieved 2021-03-26.
  47. ^ “Bell endorses Hugo for lieutenant governor”. CBS 19 News. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  48. ^ “Virginia GOP Convention, Lieutenant Governor Nominee Ranked Choice Voting Election Results Visualization”. rcvis.com. RCVis. May 12, 2021.
  49. ^ “Congratulations to @HalaAyala and @MarkHerringVA on their victories in Virginia last night! Looking forward to working with both as we win up and down the ballot this November! @vademocrats”.
  50. ^ “Our Candidates”.
  51. ^ Justin Faulconer (May 25, 2021). “Watch Now: Cline, Amherst GOP crowd rally for Youngkin in governor’s race”. Amherst New Era-Progress.
  52. ^ a b “Winsome Sears Shocks Race for Lieutenant Governor, Receives Endorsement of Amanda Chase and Octavia Johnson”. 30 March 2021.
  53. ^ “Amanda Chase endorses Sears”. 30 March 2021.
  54. ^ https://nsjonline.com/article/2021/05/political-newcomer-youngkin-former-delegate-sears-win-virginia-gop-races/
  55. ^ “Candidate Profile for Winsome Sears”.
  56. ^ https://www.nrapvf.org/articles/20210722/nra-endorses-miyares-and-sears-in-virginia
  57. ^ https://ourgunfreedoms.com/nra-skips-youngkin-endorsement-backs-other-gop-statewide-candidates/
  58. ^ https://richmond.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/nra-skips-youngkin-endorsement-backs-other-gop-statewide-candidates/article_bbfb0c1a-8d87-5612-bac4-57bfc9f71980.html
  59. ^ https://virginia.gop/winsome-sears-wins-republican-lg-nomination/
  60. ^ “Conservative PAC that supports female candidates makes initial 2022 endorsements”. 21 June 2021.
  61. ^ “2022 Candidates”.
  62. ^ https://www.americanveteransvote.com/endorsements/

External links

Official campaign websites

Cite error: There are <ref group=upper-alpha> tags or {{efn-ua}} templates on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist|group=upper-alpha}} template or {{notelist-ua}} template (see the help page).


Kaye Kory

Current Position: Virginia House Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: Virginia House of Delegates District 38
Former Positions: Fairfax County School Board from 1999 – 2009

Delegate Kaye Kory was elected as the State Delegate for the 38th District in November 2009 and was sworn in on January 6, 2010.  She represents parts of Fairfax County. She currently serves as Chair of the Counties, Cities and Towns committee​​, and the committees on Finance and Public Safety

Though Delegate Kory has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

For more information, see this post on Kaye Kory.

Tom Pafford

Current Position: Virginia House Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: Virginia House of Delegates District 38

Tom Pafford initially began his foray into attempting to gain political office by running off of a single point, transgender students in schools. While he lost that election, Tom has since shifted his sights to running for the Virginia House of delegates, expanding his campaign to cover multiple issues, most of which covering education.

For more information, see this post on Tom Pafford.

Issues

Kaye Kory

Civil Rights

Advocating for Women

Fighting for women’s rights is at the forefront of my career. 

​As a legislator and a community activist, I have worked to establish women’s reproductive rights and reproductive justice, as well as to bring a high profile to these issues.  Whether a patron of a reproductive rights bill, an anti-discrimination bill or a menstrual equity bill and an advocate for  passage, and working to ensure implementation, I actively seek broader social justice goals in our education system and in our criminal justice system.  I have organized community action in Iowa, Rhode Island and Virginia to support these goals.  I became an elected School Board Member and Delegate to pursue equity and create leadership opportunities for women and girls, and strengthen our pro-choice support.​

Through founding and chairing the Women’s Reproductive Health Care Caucus in the Virginia General Assembly, I have built a strong base to support reproductive justice and push for change.  I have attended and spoken at rallies and marches at the Capitol and traveled with the ERA bus.  My successful bill, HB83 (2018), requiring prisons and jails to provide menstrual supplies at no charge and upon request — instead of an allotted amount — for incarcerated women was the first in the nation.  I have gone into jails and prisons to learn firsthand the specifics of health care offered to women.  I have also organized a public panel of formerly incarcerated women to publicize the travesties and inequities in our criminal justice system and hope to schedule more in the future.

Establishing civil equality and the right to choose reproductive health care should not be the century-long fight that it has become.  Unfortunately, equality looks like a threat to the privileged.  This has been borne out again and again.  Not one more generation of women should have to fight this fight.  Our Constitution must establish legal equality for women.  Until that time, I will fight against gender inequity everywhere I find it.

Education

Standing Strong for our Families

I am fighting for our fair share of state funds for education and transportation; I am also protecting teachers’ salaries and retirement plans. I refuse to support cuts in programs for children with special needs and in core community services.

increase in public education funds and a 5% raise for teachers and instructors during the 2019 reconvened legislative session.  Moreover, these significant achievements for public education were agreed to in a Republican-controlled General Assembly.  Imagine what we could do with a Democratic majority in 2020 and beyond!

Educators endorse my re-election! ​

I am excited and honored that our teachers have endorsed my re-election in recognition of my push for state investment in pre-K-12 education.  The FEA and VEA join me in striving to offer our children the excellent education they deserve.

Equitable education access for students of diverse backgrounds. ​

One important issue facing our public schools that is not discussed often enough is Virginia’s outdated funding formula identifying ratios for full-time instructional positions to students with limited English proficiency — also called ESL (English as Second Language) students and ELLs (English Language Learners).  Our ESL students deserve the same quality education as their peers.  That’s why we need to update the current ratio so our ESL students are able to spend more time with specialized instructors to have greater opportunities to catch up.  I patroned HB362 and HB694 in previous legislative sessions at the General Assembly.  I unfortunately received no support from the GOP-controlled House of Delegates and both bills were tabled on party-line votes in Subcommittee.  I look forward to having a Democratic majority in 2020 so we can finally address this issue.

Virginia’s public schools: the foundation of our Commonwealth’s future. ​

Anyone who knows me knows my longstanding career spanning over 20 years supporting Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS).  I have stood with partner organizations like the Fairfax Education Association (FEA) and Virginia Education Association (VEA) to help lead the charge in our push for investment in pre-K-12 education.  Investing in public education in our Commonwealth shows our students that we are working hard to support their learning and growth, as they are the foundation all of our futures.  That’s why I am pleased to announce that after working hard and advocating for public education in Richmond at the General Assembly, we were able to pass a $378 million

Environment

Working to Protect our Environment

I am fighting for our right to clean air and water. I will always vote to prevent pollution and bring green energy business to Virginia. This includes utilizing my membership of the Special Energy Subcommittee of the House Committee on Commerce and Labor, where all energy-related legislation in the House must go before we determine whether a bill can advance to full Committee. I have also been appointed the Virginia State Lead for the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators since 2017.

Electric power restructuring, modernization, and consumer rate reform.

​Over-charging directly resulted from a rate freeze enacted in 2015 to provide funding for the mandatory greenhouse gas reduction proposed for Virginia as part of the federal Clean Power Act. Due to steps Virginia had already taken to reduce emissions, the percentage reduction requirements we faced was going to be more costly to achieve than our neighboring states who had yet to put in place some of the lower cost measures that we had. However, with the election of President Trump, the proposed regulations were reversed and we no longer faced a mandate. The accumulated money, therefore, became an over-charge on consumer electric rates since the stated need for it did not materialize. Under the legislation passed in the General Assembly in 2018, there was a $200 million rebate through a reduction in consumer bills in spring 2018 and another $150 million rebate in summer 2018 after a full determination was made of the effect of the December federal tax reduction act.​

Although the Clean Power Act was reversed, it spoke to the serious crisis of climate change accelerated by over-dependence on fossil fuels. With or without federal mandates, I have a long-standing commitment to developing green energy and reducing consumption. I do not believe that Dominion has done enough. As such, I fully supported provisions in the legislation to:

  • Bring on-line 5,000 megawatts of wind and solar, which is 10 times the current commitment and is enough to serve 1.25 million homes;
  • Spend $1 billion for energy efficiency in the next decade, which includes $13 million per year from the company-funded Energy Share Weatherization program that is not in the rate base and is focused on low income households; and
  • Carry out State Corporation Commission (SCC) approved grid transformation to promote non-peak energy use and provide for net metering to allow relatively small-scale solar generation to be sold back and used throughout the grid.

I not only advocated provisions directing the SCC to consider funding robust investments in green energy, I also supported provisions for modernizing the grid to promote conservation, guard against cyber-security breaches, and improve dependability —- particularly by undergrounding wires in neighborhoods with a high rate of power outages. As we saw in the March 2018 Nor’easter, strategic undergrounding in the most vulnerable areas needs to be systematically carried out. Not only is it important to have the ability to centrally pinpoint outages, but sophisticated equipment is affected by peak power demand brown-outs and the grid needs to be able to respond.

These considerations depend on robust professional financial review by the SCC in assuring that rates properly cover:

  • the service currently provided;
  • expenditures to maintain, improve, and maximize service; and
  • investments to achieve the most cost-effective, reliable service into the future.​

Success in the 2018 General Assembly Legislative Session.

  • The General Assembly ended rate freezes as of January 1, 2018.
  • The General Assembly returned to regular rate reviews every 3 years.
  • The SCC can order refunds and rate cuts after just one — not two — consecutive periods of over-earnings and can do so in between aforementioned triennial reviews.
  • The General Assembly put an end to “double-dipping” that had included the value of investments already paid for in full by ratepayers in calculating a rate of return on those investments that was to be covered in setting future rates.
  • The General Assembly required the SCC to report back after each triennial review regarding solar, wind, and grid transformation, as a way to underscore the SCC’s responsibility to hold energy utilities accountable for achieving the goals that have been set and to establish an historic base for the SCC to enforce the provision that requires $50 million dollars a year in base rate reductions if investments in renewable energy and grid transformation are not made.

Health Care

Fighting to Keep Medicaid Expansion

I will continue to fight against threats to cut funding to Medicaid expansion and work to ensure that all Virginians can receive affordable and quality health care.

An historic moment: Medicaid expansion in Virginia. 

I fought alongside my Democratic colleagues for nearly a decade to expand Medicaid in Virginia.  When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, they included money for states to expand Medicaid coverage.  But General Assembly Republicans refused that money and stranded 400,000 working Virginians without healthcare.

With the help of grassroots advocates, and my colleagues in both the House of Delegates and Senate, we were finally able to pass Medicaid Expansion for those 400,000 uninsured working Virginians.

The passage of Medicaid expansion in the 2018 Legislative Session freed up hundreds of thousands of dollars in our state budget, which allowed us to fund additional critical needs such as education, mental health, and transportation across the Commonwealth.  Governor Northam’s Medicaid Expansion bill-signing ceremony on the Capitol steps in Richmond in summer 2018 was an historic moment and I was proud to be a part of it.  The passage of Medicaid expansion in Virginia was made possible by the pressure exerted by the unprecedented number of Democratic office holders elected in the 2018 Blue Wave.   There is strength in numbers, which enabled us to finally pass Medicaid expansion legislation and offer healthcare to for some 400,000 working, yet uninsured, Virginians.

Infrastructure

Budget and Transportation

Too many Republicans and Democrats in Richmond believe that a “one size fits all” model can apply to creating the budget and fixing transportation. These advocates of the Dillon rule could not be farther from the truth. The fact of the matter is a decision made without concern over a specific locality is a decision doomed for failure. As your delegate, I promise to conduct my work on the budget and transportation issue in a way that reflects the needs of the 38th District.Working along side with local officials and community leaders Short-term Fixes and Long-term Solutions for Our Transportation Problems

Tom Pafford

Source: Campaign Website

Race:

I understand

My stepfather was African American. In the 1980s, my mother married a Black Man. This was a big deal at the time as society looked down on such marriages. He treated me excellently. And so have other African Americans. They are true Patriots of our Republic.

I understand

I am Married to a Woman of Color

My wife is Asian of Indian ancestry. We have been married for 24 years. It is very discomforting to witness violence against Asians and I will work to end it. I am an aficionado of Asian cultures and very proud of the Asian Patriots I interact with daily.

I am Married to a Woman of Color

Systemic Racism

As a White male, I have seen and felt the racism of some against People of Color. It does exist. You will not meet many White people who have directly experienced it themselves. I completely understand the uncomfortable feeling and the anger. Racism is not built into our systems, but is keep alive by some who use the system to be racist. Our systems are benevolent and harm no one. I will work to remove the real cause of Racism.

Education:

After School Programs

After-school programs that protect children and help working parents have been cut. I will work to ensure that schools have after-school programs for your children.

Police in Schools

The police in schools are there to protect your child and teachers. Funding for maintaining police in schools has been cut. I will work to increase funding to keep the police in our schools.

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technolog(TJHSST)

TJHSST was the number one high school in America. It was a school for intellectually gifted students. TJHSST was not the average high school and only those who passed an admissions test, based on merit, were allowed to attend — and that admissions test was hard! Students who had the intellect, the study habits, and the drive to achieve passed. The Asian community has a family structure that “pushes” their children to excel, and their children strive to be the best. As such, Asian students were around 75% of the student body at TJHSST. This summer, the Fairfax County School Board removed the admissions test and in its place installed a lottery system to allow all eight-graders an opportunity to be admitted to TJHSST. To ensure that all accepted students could actually pass the courses at TJHSST, the academics standards were lowered. TJHSST is now just another high school. I will work to return TJHSST to its former status as the number one high school in America for our intellectually gifted students.

Equity

Equity is advertised as truly creating policies and regulations that generate fairness and justice for all by letting everyone see the same “game of life” and provide the same opportunities to all. The removal of the admissions test based on merit is an example of Equity in practice. Because the admission test differentiated between intellectual students and average students, Equity required the School Board to change to a lottery system. It also required a lowering of the academic standards to allow all students the opportunity to pass high school. Advertised Equity and Equity in practice are two different truths. And students, parents, families, and communities lose when Equity is imposed.

Sex Education

As academic standards are being lowered in all of our schools, Sex Education is being raised in its importance. So much so, that Sex Ed is taught in every subject – math, English, history, etc. And, it is very different from the Sex Education classes of the 1970s to the 2000s. All forms of sex are taught – heterosexual and homosexual – with visual aids, videos, literature. Over 100 different genders are taught – not just man and woman. Hundreds of new pronouns are taught to address others by their chosen gender. And students and teachers are required to use this Sexual instruction in everyday life. I will work to remove much of the Sexual Education now being taught in our schools and replace it with more academic studies. Have you asked your child what they are learning in Sex Ed? You will be surprised!

Transgender Protections

I know that some children do declare Transgender status and are bullied both in school and out of school. Bullying of these students cannot be allowed. However, the Department of Education’s Transgender Protections regulations removes parental control of your child and places control firmly in the hands of the State. The consequence of this is harassment, intimidation, and threats to the parents should they disagree with their child’s decision. A parent’s firm disagreement could allow the State to remove your child from your home and custody. I will work to replace the current Transgender Protections with regulations that place the parents in charge of their children.

Transgender Students and School Bathrooms

Part of the Transgender Protections regulations permits Transgender boys and girls to use the bathroom of their chosen gender. Therefore, girls will find boys in the girl’s bathroom and boys will find girls in the boy’s bathroom. Besides the shock of finding a person of the opposite sex in the bathroom, this is a safety issue for all students and teachers. I will work to stop this.

Critical Race Theory (CRT)

CRT teaches that the United States of America is unjust, unfair, and racist! It claims the USA cannot be changed as the unfairness, the injustice and the racism is systemic, built into all the fabric of society. The change CRT works for is a revolution of the American system starting with an overhaul of the Constitution as it was created by slave owners, the removal of all history as it reminds people of our racist past, and the rewriting of history to illustrate our unfairness, our injustice, and our racism. I will work to remove CRT from the curriculum and replace it with history, social studies, and civics that teach all students how the US Constitution, our laws, and our institutions work for them not against them.

X
Kaye Kory 2Kaye Kory

Current Position: State Delegate for District 38 since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Delegate Kaye Kory was elected as the State Delegate for the 38th District in November 2009 and was sworn in on January 6, 2010.  She represents parts of Fairfax County. She currently serves as Chair of the Counties, Cities and Towns committee​​, and the committees on Finance and Public Safety

Though Delegate Kory has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

Virginia Delegate Champions Bills for Workers and Environment
Kevin DauryFebruary 11, 2021 (Short)

Last week, Delegate Kaye Kory acted as chief co-patron of two important bills up for vote in the Virginia House of Delegates. The first is meant to assist Virginia workers through the creation of the office of the Secretary of Labor. The purpose of the second is to create a rebate program associated with the purchase or lease of electronic vehicles.

Both pieces of legislation passed in the House and will now require a Senate vote and the governor’s approval to become laws.

Regarding the bill for Virginia workers, Kory said, ““The passage of this bill will help the Commonwealth’s workers by cutting bureaucratic red tape that will streamline services to the workers who need help amid a historic pandemic.”

Animal welfare-related bills to note in General Assembly
Lacy Shirley February 10, 2021 (Short)

The Humane Cosmetics Act (SB 1379/HB 2250) introduced by Sen. Jennifer Boysko (D-Herndon) and Del. Kaye Kory (D-Falls Church) prohibits the testing of cosmetics on animals in Virginia and prohibits the sale of any cosmetic in Virginia that was developed or manufactured using animal testing.

There are many alternatives to testing new ingredients that do not involve animals. Rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, and rats are often the subjects used for cosmetic testing. When laboratory experiments end, the outcome for the lab animals is most often euthanasia.

Currently, Virginia is only one of four states that requires manufacturers to use alternative non-animal testing methods when available. The bills in the Senate and House are identical, and both passed with significant support, so they now cross over to the opposite chamber.

HB 2230 seeks to direct Virginia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to develop a program to educate people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their families and others about supported decision-making agreements.

HB 2230 is the result of a bill introduced last session by Del. Kaye Kory, D-Falls Church, which led to a work group study that recommended the language of the bill. Kory, a co-patron of the bill, also spoke before the vote, highlighting the long road the legislation has taken.

“Six years ago, when I was a member of the joint health care commission, I asked for a study on supported decision-making and it took until this year for us to finally put this language in code,” she said.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate for District 38 since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Delegate Kaye Kory was elected as the State Delegate for the 38th District in November 2009 and was sworn in on January 6, 2010.  She represents parts of Fairfax County. She currently serves as Chair of the Counties, Cities and Towns committee​​, and the committees on Finance and Public Safety

Though Delegate Kory has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

News

Virginia Delegate Champions Bills for Workers and Environment
Kevin DauryFebruary 11, 2021 (Short)

Last week, Delegate Kaye Kory acted as chief co-patron of two important bills up for vote in the Virginia House of Delegates. The first is meant to assist Virginia workers through the creation of the office of the Secretary of Labor. The purpose of the second is to create a rebate program associated with the purchase or lease of electronic vehicles.

Both pieces of legislation passed in the House and will now require a Senate vote and the governor’s approval to become laws.

Regarding the bill for Virginia workers, Kory said, ““The passage of this bill will help the Commonwealth’s workers by cutting bureaucratic red tape that will streamline services to the workers who need help amid a historic pandemic.”

Animal welfare-related bills to note in General Assembly
Lacy Shirley February 10, 2021 (Short)

The Humane Cosmetics Act (SB 1379/HB 2250) introduced by Sen. Jennifer Boysko (D-Herndon) and Del. Kaye Kory (D-Falls Church) prohibits the testing of cosmetics on animals in Virginia and prohibits the sale of any cosmetic in Virginia that was developed or manufactured using animal testing.

There are many alternatives to testing new ingredients that do not involve animals. Rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, and rats are often the subjects used for cosmetic testing. When laboratory experiments end, the outcome for the lab animals is most often euthanasia.

Currently, Virginia is only one of four states that requires manufacturers to use alternative non-animal testing methods when available. The bills in the Senate and House are identical, and both passed with significant support, so they now cross over to the opposite chamber.

HB 2230 seeks to direct Virginia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to develop a program to educate people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their families and others about supported decision-making agreements.

HB 2230 is the result of a bill introduced last session by Del. Kaye Kory, D-Falls Church, which led to a work group study that recommended the language of the bill. Kory, a co-patron of the bill, also spoke before the vote, highlighting the long road the legislation has taken.

“Six years ago, when I was a member of the joint health care commission, I asked for a study on supported decision-making and it took until this year for us to finally put this language in code,” she said.

Twitter

About

Kaye Kory

Source: Campaign page

Kaye and her husband Ross have lived in Fairfax County for over 35 years.  Kaye has her B.A. degree in English from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University.  She gravitated to the educational arena when seeking pre-K options when her three children were young.  Kaye was a frequent and vocal critic of many Fairfax County School Board and school administration policies.  She won a special election for the Mason District seat on the School Board in June of 1999.  After that first special election, Kaye won three regular elections by some of the largest margins for Democrats in the Mason District and across the County.  Kaye routinely turned out crowds to observe and testify at School Board meetings and work sessions.  Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her activist roots run broad and deep.

Kaye served as a counselor for troubled youth at “Runaway House” in our 38th District. She also worked with the Grey Panthers in Woonsocket Rhode Island, under the auspices of the activist Catholic Diocese there.  As well, Kaye was the Program Manager for a Community Agency on Aging and the Executive Director for Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax.  As Program Analyst for the Fairfax County Department of Community Action, Kaye did program assessment and grant writing for such programs as Head Start and the Medical Care for Children Program (nationally recognized by the Kennedy School at Harvard for public sector innovation). Kaye has been an active leader in a diverse range of community organizations including: the Annandale Chamber of Commerce; the Virginia League of Conservation Voters; and, the NAACP.   She has been a sustaining member of the Fairfax County Democratic Committee since 2001.  She has served on numerous Fairfax boards and committees including the Fairfax County Community Action Advisory Board, the Board (member and President) of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Partnership for Youth, the Fairfax County Association for the Gifted; the J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding President; renamed Justice High School Fund); the Fairfax County Boys and Girls club; and, the Hampton Court Homeowner’s Association.

Kaye gravitated to the educational arena when seeking pre-K options when her children were young. She soon emerged as a leader of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia (MSNV), one of the oldest in the region. She transitioned into PTA leadership positions following her children’s transition to the public schools.

Kaye won a special election for the Mason District seat on the Fairfax County School Board in June of 1999, following the resignation for health reasons of former member Fred Ward.   Fred supported Kaye in that election, even though Kaye was a frequent and vocal critic of many School Board and school administration policies.  Fred knew Kaye as a PTA activist at Sleepy Hollow Elementary, Glasgow Middle School and J.E.B. Stuart High School, a mother of three and a passionate and effective community builder. Kaye routinely turned out crowds to observe and testify at School Board meetings and work sessions.

Following that first special election, Kaye won three regular elections by some of the largest margins for Democrats in Mason District and across the County.

Professional

Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep:

She served as a counselor for troubled youth at “Runaway House” in the District. Kaye worked with the Grey Panthers in Woonsocket Rhode Island, under the auspices of the activist Catholic Diocese there.

As Program Manager for a Community Agency on Aging and Executive Director for Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax County, Kaye developed expertise in a wide range of programs affecting the elderly. She established a free transportation program for the elderly and handicapped in the Mount Vernon District of the County that was a predecessor to the County’s FastTran program.

As Program Analyst for the Fairfax County Department of Community Action, Kaye did program assessment and grant writing for such programs as Head Start and the Medical Care for Children Program (nationally recognized by the Kennedy School at Harvard for public sector innovation);

Community

Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County including the Fairfax County Community Action Advisory Board, the Board (member and President) of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Partnership for Youth, the Fairfax County Association for the Gifted; the J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding President); the Fairfax County Boys and Girls club; and the Hampton Court Homeowner’s Association.

Kaye and Ross served two years as VISTA volunteers (predecessor to AmeriCorps), working on housing and anti-poverty issues;
As a volunteer, while she had young children at home, Kaye developed and led a “Great Books” program for seniors working through Fairfax County Adult and Community Education and secured funding for Fairfax County Association for the Gifted Literary Magazine

Experience

Work Experience

  • Project Manager
    2019 to present

    (retired)

Education

  • B.A
    Miami University, OH
    2019 to 1969

Awards

  • The Montessori School of Northern Virginia, Woman of the Year (2019)
  • Fairfax County Police, Certificate of Appreciation (2019)
  • J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation, Kaye Kory Scholarship (2019)
  • Virginia League of Conservation Voters, 100% Legislative Hero Award (2019)
  • Virginia Education Association, Rookie Award, Solid as a Rock Award (2019)
  • Interfaith Council on Public Policy, Legislator of the Year (2019)
  • Sierra Club, Leadership Award (2019)
  • Drive Smart Virginia (2019)
  • Association for College Admission Counseling, Leadership Award (2019)

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Chicago, IL
Gender: Female
Race(s): Caucasian
Spouse: Ross C. Kory, Jr.
Children: Matthew, Alexander, and Caroline
Membership & Affiliation: NAACP League of Women Voters
Virginia League of Conservation Voters
EMILY’s List
Sleepy Hollow Elementary School PTA
Glasgow Middle School PTA
J.E.B. Stuart High School PTA (president, treasurer)
The Montessori School of Northern Virginia (president)
J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding president)
Fairfax County Boys & Girls Club (board member)
Annandale Chamber of Commerce
Virginia Democratic Women’s Caucus
ProgressVA

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Nancy Hedeen
Legislative Director:: Anika Rahman

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1038

District Office
6505 Waterway Drive
Falls Church, VA 22044
Phone: (703) 354-6024

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

For two years, Kory was a VISTA volunteer working on housing and anti-poverty issues. As a program adviser to a Community Agency on Aging and Executive Director at the Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax County, Kory established a free transportation for the elderly.

Kory became involved with the parent-teacher associations at her children’s schools, and was elected president and treasurer of the J.E.B. Stuart High School PTA.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)13,93493.26%
Write in (Write-in)1,0076.74%
TOTAL14,941

2017 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)16,02373.5%
Paul Byrne Haring (R)5,72326.3%
Write In (Write-in)510.2%
TOTAL21,797

2015 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)7,81973.8%
James Lewis Leslie (G)2,65525.1%
Write In (Write-in)1151.1%
TOTAL10,589

2013 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)12,53474.7%
James Lewis Leslie (G)4,08724.3%
Write In (Write-in)1664%
TOTAL16,787

2011 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)8,10676.4%
James Lewis Leslie (G)2,40222.6%
Write In (Write-in)970.9%
TOTAL10,605

2009 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)9,62159.5%
Danny R. Smith (R)6,50540.2%
Write In (Write-in)420.3%
TOTAL16,168

Finances

KORY, L KAYE has run in 6 races for public office, winning 6 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$396,913.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Militia, Police and Public Safety
Commerce and Labor
Finance

Subcommittees

Finance – Subcommittee #3
Commerce and Labor – Subcommittee #3
Militia, Police and Public Safety – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

Civic Education, Commission on
Health Care, Joint Commission on
House Commerce and Labor
House Finance
House Militia Police and Public Safety
Wireless Communications Infrastructure Group – Joint Subcommittees of House Commerce & Labor, Senate Commerce & Labor, and Senate General Laws & Technology

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Civil Rights

Advocating for Women

Fighting for women’s rights is at the forefront of my career. 

​As a legislator and a community activist, I have worked to establish women’s reproductive rights and reproductive justice, as well as to bring a high profile to these issues.  Whether a patron of a reproductive rights bill, an anti-discrimination bill or a menstrual equity bill and an advocate for  passage, and working to ensure implementation, I actively seek broader social justice goals in our education system and in our criminal justice system.  I have organized community action in Iowa, Rhode Island and Virginia to support these goals.  I became an elected School Board Member and Delegate to pursue equity and create leadership opportunities for women and girls, and strengthen our pro-choice support.​

Through founding and chairing the Women’s Reproductive Health Care Caucus in the Virginia General Assembly, I have built a strong base to support reproductive justice and push for change.  I have attended and spoken at rallies and marches at the Capitol and traveled with the ERA bus.  My successful bill, HB83 (2018), requiring prisons and jails to provide menstrual supplies at no charge and upon request — instead of an allotted amount — for incarcerated women was the first in the nation.  I have gone into jails and prisons to learn firsthand the specifics of health care offered to women.  I have also organized a public panel of formerly incarcerated women to publicize the travesties and inequities in our criminal justice system and hope to schedule more in the future.

Establishing civil equality and the right to choose reproductive health care should not be the century-long fight that it has become.  Unfortunately, equality looks like a threat to the privileged.  This has been borne out again and again.  Not one more generation of women should have to fight this fight.  Our Constitution must establish legal equality for women.  Until that time, I will fight against gender inequity everywhere I find it.

Education

Standing Strong for our Families

I am fighting for our fair share of state funds for education and transportation; I am also protecting teachers’ salaries and retirement plans. I refuse to support cuts in programs for children with special needs and in core community services.

increase in public education funds and a 5% raise for teachers and instructors during the 2019 reconvened legislative session.  Moreover, these significant achievements for public education were agreed to in a Republican-controlled General Assembly.  Imagine what we could do with a Democratic majority in 2020 and beyond!

Educators endorse my re-election! ​

I am excited and honored that our teachers have endorsed my re-election in recognition of my push for state investment in pre-K-12 education.  The FEA and VEA join me in striving to offer our children the excellent education they deserve.

Equitable education access for students of diverse backgrounds. ​

One important issue facing our public schools that is not discussed often enough is Virginia’s outdated funding formula identifying ratios for full-time instructional positions to students with limited English proficiency — also called ESL (English as Second Language) students and ELLs (English Language Learners).  Our ESL students deserve the same quality education as their peers.  That’s why we need to update the current ratio so our ESL students are able to spend more time with specialized instructors to have greater opportunities to catch up.  I patroned HB362 and HB694 in previous legislative sessions at the General Assembly.  I unfortunately received no support from the GOP-controlled House of Delegates and both bills were tabled on party-line votes in Subcommittee.  I look forward to having a Democratic majority in 2020 so we can finally address this issue.

Virginia’s public schools: the foundation of our Commonwealth’s future. ​

Anyone who knows me knows my longstanding career spanning over 20 years supporting Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS).  I have stood with partner organizations like the Fairfax Education Association (FEA) and Virginia Education Association (VEA) to help lead the charge in our push for investment in pre-K-12 education.  Investing in public education in our Commonwealth shows our students that we are working hard to support their learning and growth, as they are the foundation all of our futures.  That’s why I am pleased to announce that after working hard and advocating for public education in Richmond at the General Assembly, we were able to pass a $378 million

Environment

Working to Protect our Environment

I am fighting for our right to clean air and water. I will always vote to prevent pollution and bring green energy business to Virginia. This includes utilizing my membership of the Special Energy Subcommittee of the House Committee on Commerce and Labor, where all energy-related legislation in the House must go before we determine whether a bill can advance to full Committee. I have also been appointed the Virginia State Lead for the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators since 2017.

Electric power restructuring, modernization, and consumer rate reform.

​Over-charging directly resulted from a rate freeze enacted in 2015 to provide funding for the mandatory greenhouse gas reduction proposed for Virginia as part of the federal Clean Power Act. Due to steps Virginia had already taken to reduce emissions, the percentage reduction requirements we faced was going to be more costly to achieve than our neighboring states who had yet to put in place some of the lower cost measures that we had. However, with the election of President Trump, the proposed regulations were reversed and we no longer faced a mandate. The accumulated money, therefore, became an over-charge on consumer electric rates since the stated need for it did not materialize. Under the legislation passed in the General Assembly in 2018, there was a $200 million rebate through a reduction in consumer bills in spring 2018 and another $150 million rebate in summer 2018 after a full determination was made of the effect of the December federal tax reduction act.​

Although the Clean Power Act was reversed, it spoke to the serious crisis of climate change accelerated by over-dependence on fossil fuels. With or without federal mandates, I have a long-standing commitment to developing green energy and reducing consumption. I do not believe that Dominion has done enough. As such, I fully supported provisions in the legislation to:

  • Bring on-line 5,000 megawatts of wind and solar, which is 10 times the current commitment and is enough to serve 1.25 million homes;
  • Spend $1 billion for energy efficiency in the next decade, which includes $13 million per year from the company-funded Energy Share Weatherization program that is not in the rate base and is focused on low income households; and
  • Carry out State Corporation Commission (SCC) approved grid transformation to promote non-peak energy use and provide for net metering to allow relatively small-scale solar generation to be sold back and used throughout the grid.

I not only advocated provisions directing the SCC to consider funding robust investments in green energy, I also supported provisions for modernizing the grid to promote conservation, guard against cyber-security breaches, and improve dependability —- particularly by undergrounding wires in neighborhoods with a high rate of power outages. As we saw in the March 2018 Nor’easter, strategic undergrounding in the most vulnerable areas needs to be systematically carried out. Not only is it important to have the ability to centrally pinpoint outages, but sophisticated equipment is affected by peak power demand brown-outs and the grid needs to be able to respond.

These considerations depend on robust professional financial review by the SCC in assuring that rates properly cover:

  • the service currently provided;
  • expenditures to maintain, improve, and maximize service; and
  • investments to achieve the most cost-effective, reliable service into the future.​

Success in the 2018 General Assembly Legislative Session.

  • The General Assembly ended rate freezes as of January 1, 2018.
  • The General Assembly returned to regular rate reviews every 3 years.
  • The SCC can order refunds and rate cuts after just one — not two — consecutive periods of over-earnings and can do so in between aforementioned triennial reviews.
  • The General Assembly put an end to “double-dipping” that had included the value of investments already paid for in full by ratepayers in calculating a rate of return on those investments that was to be covered in setting future rates.
  • The General Assembly required the SCC to report back after each triennial review regarding solar, wind, and grid transformation, as a way to underscore the SCC’s responsibility to hold energy utilities accountable for achieving the goals that have been set and to establish an historic base for the SCC to enforce the provision that requires $50 million dollars a year in base rate reductions if investments in renewable energy and grid transformation are not made.

Health Care

Fighting to Keep Medicaid Expansion

I will continue to fight against threats to cut funding to Medicaid expansion and work to ensure that all Virginians can receive affordable and quality health care.

An historic moment: Medicaid expansion in Virginia. 

I fought alongside my Democratic colleagues for nearly a decade to expand Medicaid in Virginia.  When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, they included money for states to expand Medicaid coverage.  But General Assembly Republicans refused that money and stranded 400,000 working Virginians without healthcare.

With the help of grassroots advocates, and my colleagues in both the House of Delegates and Senate, we were finally able to pass Medicaid Expansion for those 400,000 uninsured working Virginians.

The passage of Medicaid expansion in the 2018 Legislative Session freed up hundreds of thousands of dollars in our state budget, which allowed us to fund additional critical needs such as education, mental health, and transportation across the Commonwealth.  Governor Northam’s Medicaid Expansion bill-signing ceremony on the Capitol steps in Richmond in summer 2018 was an historic moment and I was proud to be a part of it.  The passage of Medicaid expansion in Virginia was made possible by the pressure exerted by the unprecedented number of Democratic office holders elected in the 2018 Blue Wave.   There is strength in numbers, which enabled us to finally pass Medicaid expansion legislation and offer healthcare to for some 400,000 working, yet uninsured, Virginians.

Infrastructure

Budget and Transportation

Too many Republicans and Democrats in Richmond believe that a “one size fits all” model can apply to creating the budget and fixing transportation. These advocates of the Dillon rule could not be farther from the truth. The fact of the matter is a decision made without concern over a specific locality is a decision doomed for failure. As your delegate, I promise to conduct my work on the budget and transportation issue in a way that reflects the needs of the 38th District.Working along side with local officials and community leaders Short-term Fixes and Long-term Solutions for Our Transportation Problems

X
Tom PaffordTom Pafford

Current Position: Other
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 State Delegate

Tom Pafford 1

The AP also projected a victory for Democratic incumbent Del. Kaye Kory in the 38th District, which is in Fairfax County. Kory, who was first elected in 2009, led challenger Holly Hazard, an attorney and animal advocate, 62% to 38% with most precincts reporting.

The Republican in the race in November is Tom Pafford.

Summary

Current Position: Other
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 State Delegate

Tom Pafford 1

News

The AP also projected a victory for Democratic incumbent Del. Kaye Kory in the 38th District, which is in Fairfax County. Kory, who was first elected in 2009, led challenger Holly Hazard, an attorney and animal advocate, 62% to 38% with most precincts reporting.

The Republican in the race in November is Tom Pafford.

Twitter

Issues

Source: Campaign page

I understand

My stepfather was African American. In the 1980s, my mother married a Black Man. This was a big deal at the time as society looked down on such marriages. He treated me excellently. And so have other African Americans. They are true Patriots of our Republic.

I understand

I am Married to a Woman of Color

My wife is Asian of Indian ancestry. We have been married for 24 years. It is very discomforting to witness violence against Asians and I will work to end it. I am an aficionado of Asian cultures and very proud of the Asian Patriots I interact with daily.

I am Married to a Woman of Color

Systemic Racism

As a White male, I have seen and felt the racism of some against People of Color. It does exist. You will not meet many White people who have directly experienced it themselves. I completely understand the uncomfortable feeling and the anger. Racism is not built into our systems, but is keep alive by some who use the system to be racist. Our systems are benevolent and harm no one. I will work to remove the real cause of Racism.

X
Ed McGovern

Current Position: US Senator
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: US Senator
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

X
Kathy Tran 1Kathy Tran

Current Position: State Delegate for District 42 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate for District 42 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Twitter

About

Kathy Tran

Source: Campaign page

Delegate Kathy Tran (VA-42) and her parents fled Vietnam as boat refugees when she was just seven months old. On the voyage, she grew so sick she almost died at sea. Although many other countries offered them asylum, they waited 13 months for the United States to accept their application. Kathy’s family risked everything to come to America because this country has always represented hope, opportunity and freedom. Now, she’s fighting for the American values that brought her family here in the Virginia House of Delegates representing the people of the 42nd District in the Commonweatlh of Virginia.

Kathy has devoted her career to ensuring that all working families have the opportunity to achieve the American Dream. During her 12 years of service at the U.S. Department of Labor, she served in numerous leadership positions, including as the Acting Administrator for the Office of Workforce Investment and the Director of the Division of Policy, Legislation, and Regulation. In these roles, she provided strategic national leadership and technical assistance to the public workforce system, implemented the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, and helped veterans acquire the job training and employment services they needed to transition into the civilian workforce.

Kathy went on to work at the National Immigration Forum, one of the nation’s leading immigration advocacy organizations. There, she advocated for policies that prepare immigrants in the workforce to reach their full career potential.

Kathy graduated from Duke University and earned her Master of Social Work from the University of Michigan. The past president of her local PTA, she and her husband Matt live in West Springfield with their four children, Daven (8), Charlotte (6), Quinn (4), and baby Elise. They are avid Washington Nationals fans.

Experience

Education

  • BA History
    Duke University
    2019 to 2000
  • MSW
    University of Michigan
    2019 to 2003

Awards

  • Presidential Management Fellow (2003)

Personal

Place of Birth: Vietnam
Gender: Female
Race(s): Asian American
Religion: Buddhist
Spouse: Matthew Louis Reisman
Children: Daven Tran-Reisman, Quinn Tran-Reisman, Charlotte Tran-Reisman, and Elise Tran-Reisman

Membership & Affiliation

  • Temple B’nai Shalom
  • West Springfield Elementary School PTA (president)
  • Springfield District Democratic Committee
  • West Springfield Women Marchers Huddle

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Aditya Radhakrishnan, Rodrigo Valasquez-Soto
Administrative Assistant During Session: Charlotte Via

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1042

District Office
P.O. Box 2731
Springfield, Virginia 22152
Office:
Phone: (703) 828-7173

Web

Government Page, Twitter, Campaign Site

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Kathy Tran (born 1978) shares the distinction with Kelly Fowler of being the first Asian-American women to be elected to the U.S. state of Virginia’s House of Delegates in November 2017.[1] She is the first Vietnamese American elected official on any level in the Commonwealth and is a Duke University graduate with a Masters in Social Work degree from the University of Michigan.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Kathy K. L. Tran (D)16,17859.66%
Steve P. Adragna (R)10,90940.23%
Write-In (Write-in)300.11%
TOTAL27,117

2017 State Delegate

Kathy Tran (D)18,76161.0%
Lolita Isabel Mancheno-Smoak (R)11,96738.9%
Write in ()450.1%
TOTAL30,773

Finances

TRAN, KATHY K L has run in 1 race for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$662,147.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Science and Technology
Privileges and Elections

Subcommittees

Privileges and Elections – Subcommittee #3

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Ballotpedia

Issues

Civil Rights

Standing Up for Women

The fight for women’s equality has defined America. While we have made great strides, we have far to go. Women continue to face gender-based discrimination and violence. We continue to be underrepresented in critical areas, including in in-demand industries that can lead to better prosperity for ourselves and our families, and elected and appointed office. Kathy will continue the fight for women’s equality in Virginia – all of Virginia prospers when women are treated equally, when women thrive economically, and when women are free from violence.

Kathy will oppose any attempt by politicians to interfere in a woman’s right to make decisions about her own body. She will fight against any proposed legislation that would impose medically unnecessary restrictions on reproductive health care providers or limit the ability of a woman to make the best decision for her health with her doctor.

Kathy is proud to have been endorsed by Planned Parenthood Advocates of Virginia (PPAV), NARAL Pro-Choice Virignia, EMILY’s List, and Virginia’s List during the 2017 Election.


Democracy

Kathy and her family fled Vietnam as refugees when she was just seven months old. They risked everything to come to the United States because for them, this country represented hope, opportunity, and freedom. Hate is a problem, not a policy, and Kathy uses her voice as Delegate to stand against those who seek to undermine a welcoming and inclusive Virginia.

At a time when the most fundamental elements of a well-functioning democracy are being challenged across the country, Kathy fights against laws and practices that keep Virginians from exercising their right to vote or seek to weaken our vote through gerrymandering or the influence of big money in politics.

Economy

Kathy has spent her entire career working for all Americans to have the skills, training, and credentials to reach their full career potential. During her 12 years of service at the U.S. Department of Labor, she helped shape national workforce development policy and programs. Now, Kathy brings that expertise to the House of Delegates to ensure that Virginia is globally competitive and that our region attracts good jobs. She will always fight for workforce and education programs that build strong talent pipelines, and for worker’s rights as critical to economic growth and social mobility.

One of Kathy’s proudest accomplishments during her time at the U.S. Department of Labor was her work on the Veterans Opportunity to Work (VOW) Act, bipartisan legislation that helped expand employment services for transitioning service members and veterans. As Delegate, Kathy takes leadership in building partnerships with professional licensing boards, employers, industry associations, community colleges and others to make sure veterans are able to translate their intensive, world-class training and work experience to the civilian workforce. She will work to ensure that Virginia fulfills its obligation to our servicemembers and their families, and that our veterans have the tools and opportunities they need to succeed.

Kathy is proud to have been endorsed by a wide range of business and labor organizations during the 2017 Election, including:

  • The Northern Virginia REALTORS® Political Action Committee (NV/RPAC) and the REALTORS® Political Action Committee (RPAC) of Virginia
  • The Virginia AFL-CIO and the Northern Virginia Labor Federation
  • The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT)

Education

STRENGTHENING OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS

As a mom of four and the president of her local PTA, Kathy knows we need to ensure all children in Virginia have access to high-quality public education so they can thrive and compete. As Delegate, she fights to invest in our public school system to lower class sizes and increase teacher pay.

Kathy fights for affordable higher education, investment in our community colleges, and works to build strong career pathways from schools to the workforce. A former board member of the Esther Peterson Child Development Center at the U.S. Department of Labor, Kathy understands the critical importance of early childhood education in determining future academic success and will be a strong advocate in the General Assembly for universal pre-K.

Environment

The 42nd House District is home to Mason Neck State Park, one of our region’s greatest natural treasures. We must take action to not only protect Virginia’s natural heritage, but protect the future of our planet. Climate change is an existential threat, and requires urgent action. If our president refuses to address it, it is up to states to lead the way.

We need to focus on growing our clean energy industries in Virginia. We can be a global leader and innovator on solar, wind, and other renewable sources of energy, but it requires leadership at the state level.

At the U.S. Department of Labor, Kathy helped jumpstart the bio-energy industry in Montana. She helped bring together growers, economic development agencies, workforce development leaders, tribal governments, educational institutions, and other partners to put communities on a pathway to prosperity while producing renewable fuel sources. Kathy takes this experience and expertise to Richmond, and never stops fighting for Virginia’s clean energy future.

Kathy is proud to have been endorsed by the Virginia League of Conservation Voters (VALCV) and the Sierra Club during the 2017 Election.


Health Care

Expanding Access to Affordable Healthcare

Kathy will always work to protect and expand Virginians’ access to quality, affordable health care. Expanding Medicaid in the commonwealth would ensure that 400,000 vulnerable Virginians will no longer have to decide between paying for health care over other essentials, or waiting for a chronic condition to reach an emergency situation before seeking treatment.

Medicaid expansion also grows the economy, fueling the creation of new jobs in health care and social assistance. In fact, states with Medicaid expansion have experienced higher job growth in the health care sector than states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs. Further, every year billions of dollars in our federal taxes leave Virginia to support expanded Medicaid programs in other states; it is time for Virginians to also benefit.

Kathy will oppose any attempt by politicians to interfere in a woman’s right to make decisions about her own body, and will fight against any proposed legislation that would impose medically unnecessary restrictions on reproductive health care providers or limit the ability of a woman to make the best decision

Immigration

When Kathy was a baby, her family was welcomed here as refugees. She understands that those who seek the promise of opportunity, hope, and freedom in America help make that promise stronger.

Many of the issues facing immigrants and refugees today are issues Kathy faced growing up in the Vietnamese diaspora. That experience has informed her entire career. She has worked with immigrant communities across the country, from teaching ESL classes to detained asylum seekers in Newark, to encouraging entrepreneurship in Detroit’s Latino community, to running after-school programs for immigrant children in San Jose. In her most recent role at the National Immigration Forum, she advocated for policies that would help immigrants reach their full career potential.

Kathy supports comprehensive immigration reform that includes a pathway to citizenship and values family-based immigration while meeting our nation’s economic needs. In Virginia, she also works to expand citizenship preparation classes, opposes efforts to shift federal immigration enforcement responsibilities to state and local authorities, and continues to defend Virginia’s in-state tuition for DACA recipients.


Safety

Preventing Gun Violence

For Kathy, enacting common-sense gun violence prevention measures means protecting our children and our communities. Parents should not have to worry if their kids will be safe when they send them to school or when they go outside to play.

As Delegate, Kathy fights to keep guns out of the hands of criminals, domestic abusers, and those with severe mental illness. She pushes for universal background checks to close the loopholes for sales of firearms at gun shows and over the Internet, and fights to restore Virginia’s “One-Handgun-a-Month” rule to combat gun-running. Kathy also fights for an assault weapons ban and limits on high-capacity magazines.

Kathy is proud to have been endorsed by Americans for Responsible Solutions (ARS) PAC, and the Pride Fund to End Gun Violence during the 2017 Election.

Veterans

Honoring Veterans & Military Families

Our veterans and active duty service members have stood up in defense of our nation and our most fundamental values, and Kathy can be counted to stand up for them. Her brother David is a Combat Engineer Officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, and completed two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. Kathy and her family are tremendously proud of his service to our country, and it makes supporting veterans and military spouses a personal issue for her.

One of Kathy’s proudest accomplishments during her time at the U.S. Department of Labor was her work on the Veterans Opportunity to Work (VOW) Act, bipartisan legislation that helped expand employment services for transitioning service members and veterans. As Delegate, Kathy leads in building partnerships with professional licensing boards, employers, industry associations, community colleges and others to make sure veterans are able to translate their intensive, world-class training and work experience to the civilian workforce.

Kathy knows that military spouses also make sacrifices for their families, including giving up their own schooling and earning potential when they are relocated. Kathy was responsible for coordinating policies designed to help military spouses keep their credentials as they moved across the country, so that they could continue to maintain and grow their careers and provide for their families. In the House of Delegates, Kathy continues to advocate on behalf of military spouses and families.

Virginia has taken some important steps towards expanding access to quality health care services for veterans. Under Governor McAuliffe, Virginia became the first state to develop provider agreements between community health centers and the federal Veterans Administration (VA) through the Veterans Choice Program, which will allow veterans to have more quality health care options closer to home. Virginia is also building two new veterans care centers, including in nearby Fauquier County. In the House of Delegates, Kathy is committed to continuing to make progress on expanding access to quality health care for veterans across the Commonwealth.

Kathy is proud to have been endorsed by Iraq war veteran Congressman Seth Moulton, and New Politics, a bipartisan organization that supports national service alumni and military veterans running for public office during the 2017 Election.

X
Skip to toolbar