2021 VA Governor's Race 12021 VA Governor’s Race

The 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021, to elect the next governor of Virginia. Incumbent Democratic Governor Ralph Northam is ineligible to run for reelection, as the Constitution of Virginia prohibits the officeholder from serving consecutive terms.

The Democratic Party selected its candidate in a primary election on June 8, 2021. The Republican Party held a convention on May 8, 2021, at 37 polling locations throughout the state. On May 10, businessman Glenn Youngkin was declared the Republican nominee. Former Governor Terry McAuliffe won the Democratic primary. Teacher Princess Blanding is running under the newly formed Liberation Party.

As Youngkin rejects Texas-style ban, GOP ticket steers clear of anti-abortion rally in Richmond
Virginia Mercury, GRAHAM MOOMAW AND JACKIE LLANOS HERNANDEZSeptember 18, 2021 (Medium)

If it didn’t count as a banned weapon, she would have brought her sledgehammer, anti-abortion activist Victoria Cobb told the March for Life crowd Friday from the steps of the Virginia Capitol.

The hammer, she said, is a symbol of what the pro-life movement hopes to do to former Gov. Terry McAulffe’s “brick wall” for abortion rights.

“You are going to break down that wall,” Cobb, president of the socially conservative Family Foundation, told the group gathered on Capitol Square. “You are going to be the ones that do whatever it takes.”

Legal developments outside Virginia have pushed abortion to the forefront of this year’s elections, with activists on both sides stressing the high stakes in the gubernatorial contest between McAuliffe, a Democrat, and Republican Glenn Youngkin.

Three Republican lawmakers spoke at the third annual March for Life in Richmond, where marchers shouted chants against the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that established abortion as a constitutional right and booed at the mention of recent Democratic governors. The Family Foundation described the crowd as being in the thousands. Capitol Police estimated there were 600 attendees.

None of the three Republicans running for statewide office this year spoke at the event, forgoing a chance to speak to a sizable crowd to campaign elsewhere. Earlier this year, Youngkin was caught on camera expressing sympathy for the anti-abortion cause but adding he couldn’t press the issue to avoid turning off independent voters.

Virginia governor's race: Key takeaways from the 1st debate
Associated Press, Sarah RankinSeptember 17, 2021 (Medium)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin met Thursday in southwest Virginia for the commonwealth’s first gubernatorial debate of the general election season.

Much of the exchange between McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic Party fundraiser who is seeking a rare second term as governor, and Youngkin, a former business executive and political newcomer, dealt with vaccine mandates and abortion policy.

Here is a look at some other topics the candidates sparred over during the hourlong debate in a race that is being closely watched ahead of next year’s midterms:

Virginia's First Gubernatorial Debate
WUSA9September 16, 2021
Youngkin lends millions more to his gubernatorial campaign
Associated Press, MATTHEW BARAKATSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

Virginia gubernatorial candidates Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin each raised more than $11 million in the last two months, but Youngkin loaned his campaign an additional $4.5 million to give himself a significant advantage, according to the most recent campaign-finance reports.

The $4.5 million Youngkin, a GOP businessman making his first run for office, loaned his campaign is on top of $11.2 million he had already lent.

McAuliffe and other Democrats have long expressed fears that Youngkin, who made his fortune as an executive with The Carlyle Group investment firm, will be able to use his personal wealth to give his campaign an edge.

The reports, which were due Wednesday, cover the months of July and August. McAuliffe raised $11.5 million. Youngkin raised $11.2 million, not including the $4.5 million loan.

Takeaways from the first debate in Virginia’s governor’s race between McAuliffe and Youngkin
ABC 8 News, Dean Mirshahi, Jackie DeFuscoSeptember 16, 2021 (Short)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin sparred over COVID-19 vaccine mandates, abortion rights, tax policy and more during the first debate of Virginia’s governor’s race on Thursday night.

A new 8News/Emerson College poll released ahead of the debate showed the candidates are neck and neck.

On the night before early voting for the November 2 election begins in Virginia, the candidates made their key differences clear on the debate stage.

Thursday’s debate, which was held at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, was moderated by Susan Page, the Washington bureau chief of USA Today, with panelists Bob Holsworth, a Virginia political analyst, and WTVR-TV anchor Candace Burns.

McAuliffe and Youngkin spar over Covid vaccine requirements in first Virginia debate
Dan Merica and Michael WarrenSeptember 16, 2021 (Short)

(CNN)Virginia gubernatorial candidates Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin sparred on Thursday over what each would do in the fight against the coronavirus, revealing a significant divide between the Democrat’s backing of vaccine mandates and the Republican’s argument that vaccination is a personal choice.

The fight over measures to combat Covid-19 was the focus of the first gubernatorial debate from the outset of the contest, with both candidates attempting to go on offense on the issue during the event hosted by Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia.
Youngkin argued that while he personally supports the Covid vaccine and wants everyone to get the shot, he believes “that individuals should be allowed to make that decision on their own.” He also pushed for McAuliffe to join him in taping a public service announcement to “encourage all the Virginians to get the vaccine.”
Pressed on whether he, as governor, would join his Republican colleagues and challenge President Joe Biden’s recent vaccine mandates, Youngkin did not give a direct “yes” or “no” answer, but said, “I don’t believe that President Biden has the authority to dictate to everyone that we have … to get the vaccine.” Biden announced earlier this month a series of new vaccine rules on federal workers, large employers and health care staff.
McAuliffe, a former governor of Virginia, fired back, calling Youngkin anti-vaccine and saying that he, as governor, would back up employers who mandate vaccines and would call for such mandates for people working in health care and in most education settings and for those pursuing higher education. The Democrat also said, after being pressed by moderator Susan Page, that he would support adding the Covid vaccine to those required for students older than 12, since the US Food and Drug Administration has authorized use of the vaccine for 12- to 15-year-olds.
“I am for requiring, mandate vaccinations. He’s not,” said McAuliffe, who is running for a second stint in office in a commonwealth that bars governors from serving successive terms. “He wants to do PSAs. PSAs aren’t going to get you anything. I want everybody to be vaccinated here in the commonwealth of Virginia.”

California’s recall election has understandably dominated headlines, but there are two other gubernatorial elections this November that might tell us more about the national environment: Virginia and New Jersey.

To be sure, President Joe Biden carried both of these states by double-digit margins in 2020, and neither state has been terribly hospitable to Republicans since former President Trump won the 2016 election. But in recent weeks, Biden’s approval rating has taken a sizable hit as the situation in Afghanistan has deteriorated and the delta variant of COVID-19 has complicated his efforts to steer the country out of the pandemic. In fact, Biden’s approval rating has fallen to about its lowest point (about 46 percent), while his disapproval rating is up to 49 percent, according to FiveThirtyEight’s presidential approval tracker. The upshot is that Biden’s worsening ratings could improve the GOP’s chances of winning these gubernatorial races, particularly in Virginia, which is a more competitive state than New Jersey and doesn’t have an incumbent seeking reelection. Here is the state of play in these two elections a little less than two months before November:

McAuliffe holds narrow lead in Virginia as Democrats face enthusiasm test
Politico, Zach MontellaroAugust 31, 2021 (Short)

A new Monmouth University poll shows the former Democratic governor slightly ahead of his GOP opponent, Glenn Youngkin.

Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds a narrow lead in this year’s race for his old job, according to a new poll released on Tuesday, setting up the November election as a major test of Democratic voters’ enthusiasm without Donald Trump in the White House.

The poll from Monmouth University found McAuliffe leading Republican businessman Glenn Youngkin, 47 percent to 42 percent among registered voters.

Monmouth ran a series of turnout scenarios and found that Youngkin did better when more irregular voters were included. And broadly, the Republican overperformed the former governor among voters who described themselves as “more enthusiastic” about this race compared to past gubernatorial contests, roughly a quarter of the electorate.

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Polling Data

PollDateSampleMoE
McAuliffe (D)
Youngkin (R)
Spread
RCP Average8/3 – 8/2946.040.8McAuliffe +5.2
Trafalgar Group (R)8/26 – 8/291074 LV3.04746McAuliffe +1
Monmouth8/24 – 8/29802 RV3.54742McAuliffe +5
Christopher Newport Univ.*8/15 – 8/23800 LV3.65041McAuliffe +9
Roanoke College8/3 – 8/17558 LV4.24638McAuliffe +8
VCU8/4 – 8/15770 RV5.24037McAuliffe +3

All Virginia Governor – Youngkin vs. McAuliffe Polling Data

Summary

The 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021, to elect the next governor of Virginia. Incumbent Democratic Governor Ralph Northam is ineligible to run for reelection, as the Constitution of Virginia prohibits the officeholder from serving consecutive terms.

The Democratic Party selected its candidate in a primary election on June 8, 2021. The Republican Party held a convention on May 8, 2021, at 37 polling locations throughout the state. On May 10, businessman Glenn Youngkin was declared the Republican nominee. Former Governor Terry McAuliffe won the Democratic primary. Teacher Princess Blanding is running under the newly formed Liberation Party.

News

As Youngkin rejects Texas-style ban, GOP ticket steers clear of anti-abortion rally in Richmond
Virginia Mercury, GRAHAM MOOMAW AND JACKIE LLANOS HERNANDEZSeptember 18, 2021 (Medium)

If it didn’t count as a banned weapon, she would have brought her sledgehammer, anti-abortion activist Victoria Cobb told the March for Life crowd Friday from the steps of the Virginia Capitol.

The hammer, she said, is a symbol of what the pro-life movement hopes to do to former Gov. Terry McAulffe’s “brick wall” for abortion rights.

“You are going to break down that wall,” Cobb, president of the socially conservative Family Foundation, told the group gathered on Capitol Square. “You are going to be the ones that do whatever it takes.”

Legal developments outside Virginia have pushed abortion to the forefront of this year’s elections, with activists on both sides stressing the high stakes in the gubernatorial contest between McAuliffe, a Democrat, and Republican Glenn Youngkin.

Three Republican lawmakers spoke at the third annual March for Life in Richmond, where marchers shouted chants against the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that established abortion as a constitutional right and booed at the mention of recent Democratic governors. The Family Foundation described the crowd as being in the thousands. Capitol Police estimated there were 600 attendees.

None of the three Republicans running for statewide office this year spoke at the event, forgoing a chance to speak to a sizable crowd to campaign elsewhere. Earlier this year, Youngkin was caught on camera expressing sympathy for the anti-abortion cause but adding he couldn’t press the issue to avoid turning off independent voters.

Virginia governor’s race: Key takeaways from the 1st debate
Associated Press, Sarah RankinSeptember 17, 2021 (Medium)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin met Thursday in southwest Virginia for the commonwealth’s first gubernatorial debate of the general election season.

Much of the exchange between McAuliffe, a longtime Democratic Party fundraiser who is seeking a rare second term as governor, and Youngkin, a former business executive and political newcomer, dealt with vaccine mandates and abortion policy.

Here is a look at some other topics the candidates sparred over during the hourlong debate in a race that is being closely watched ahead of next year’s midterms:

Virginia’s First Gubernatorial Debate
WUSA9September 16, 2021
Youngkin lends millions more to his gubernatorial campaign
Associated Press, MATTHEW BARAKATSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

Virginia gubernatorial candidates Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin each raised more than $11 million in the last two months, but Youngkin loaned his campaign an additional $4.5 million to give himself a significant advantage, according to the most recent campaign-finance reports.

The $4.5 million Youngkin, a GOP businessman making his first run for office, loaned his campaign is on top of $11.2 million he had already lent.

McAuliffe and other Democrats have long expressed fears that Youngkin, who made his fortune as an executive with The Carlyle Group investment firm, will be able to use his personal wealth to give his campaign an edge.

The reports, which were due Wednesday, cover the months of July and August. McAuliffe raised $11.5 million. Youngkin raised $11.2 million, not including the $4.5 million loan.

Takeaways from the first debate in Virginia’s governor’s race between McAuliffe and Youngkin
ABC 8 News, Dean Mirshahi, Jackie DeFuscoSeptember 16, 2021 (Short)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin sparred over COVID-19 vaccine mandates, abortion rights, tax policy and more during the first debate of Virginia’s governor’s race on Thursday night.

A new 8News/Emerson College poll released ahead of the debate showed the candidates are neck and neck.

On the night before early voting for the November 2 election begins in Virginia, the candidates made their key differences clear on the debate stage.

Thursday’s debate, which was held at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, was moderated by Susan Page, the Washington bureau chief of USA Today, with panelists Bob Holsworth, a Virginia political analyst, and WTVR-TV anchor Candace Burns.

McAuliffe and Youngkin spar over Covid vaccine requirements in first Virginia debate
Dan Merica and Michael WarrenSeptember 16, 2021 (Short)

(CNN)Virginia gubernatorial candidates Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin sparred on Thursday over what each would do in the fight against the coronavirus, revealing a significant divide between the Democrat’s backing of vaccine mandates and the Republican’s argument that vaccination is a personal choice.

The fight over measures to combat Covid-19 was the focus of the first gubernatorial debate from the outset of the contest, with both candidates attempting to go on offense on the issue during the event hosted by Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia.
Youngkin argued that while he personally supports the Covid vaccine and wants everyone to get the shot, he believes “that individuals should be allowed to make that decision on their own.” He also pushed for McAuliffe to join him in taping a public service announcement to “encourage all the Virginians to get the vaccine.”
Pressed on whether he, as governor, would join his Republican colleagues and challenge President Joe Biden’s recent vaccine mandates, Youngkin did not give a direct “yes” or “no” answer, but said, “I don’t believe that President Biden has the authority to dictate to everyone that we have … to get the vaccine.” Biden announced earlier this month a series of new vaccine rules on federal workers, large employers and health care staff.
McAuliffe, a former governor of Virginia, fired back, calling Youngkin anti-vaccine and saying that he, as governor, would back up employers who mandate vaccines and would call for such mandates for people working in health care and in most education settings and for those pursuing higher education. The Democrat also said, after being pressed by moderator Susan Page, that he would support adding the Covid vaccine to those required for students older than 12, since the US Food and Drug Administration has authorized use of the vaccine for 12- to 15-year-olds.
“I am for requiring, mandate vaccinations. He’s not,” said McAuliffe, who is running for a second stint in office in a commonwealth that bars governors from serving successive terms. “He wants to do PSAs. PSAs aren’t going to get you anything. I want everybody to be vaccinated here in the commonwealth of Virginia.”

California’s recall election has understandably dominated headlines, but there are two other gubernatorial elections this November that might tell us more about the national environment: Virginia and New Jersey.

To be sure, President Joe Biden carried both of these states by double-digit margins in 2020, and neither state has been terribly hospitable to Republicans since former President Trump won the 2016 election. But in recent weeks, Biden’s approval rating has taken a sizable hit as the situation in Afghanistan has deteriorated and the delta variant of COVID-19 has complicated his efforts to steer the country out of the pandemic. In fact, Biden’s approval rating has fallen to about its lowest point (about 46 percent), while his disapproval rating is up to 49 percent, according to FiveThirtyEight’s presidential approval tracker. The upshot is that Biden’s worsening ratings could improve the GOP’s chances of winning these gubernatorial races, particularly in Virginia, which is a more competitive state than New Jersey and doesn’t have an incumbent seeking reelection. Here is the state of play in these two elections a little less than two months before November:

McAuliffe holds narrow lead in Virginia as Democrats face enthusiasm test
Politico, Zach MontellaroAugust 31, 2021 (Short)

A new Monmouth University poll shows the former Democratic governor slightly ahead of his GOP opponent, Glenn Youngkin.

Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds a narrow lead in this year’s race for his old job, according to a new poll released on Tuesday, setting up the November election as a major test of Democratic voters’ enthusiasm without Donald Trump in the White House.

The poll from Monmouth University found McAuliffe leading Republican businessman Glenn Youngkin, 47 percent to 42 percent among registered voters.

Monmouth ran a series of turnout scenarios and found that Youngkin did better when more irregular voters were included. And broadly, the Republican overperformed the former governor among voters who described themselves as “more enthusiastic” about this race compared to past gubernatorial contests, roughly a quarter of the electorate.

i

Polling Data

PollDateSampleMoE
McAuliffe (D)
Youngkin (R)
Spread
RCP Average8/3 – 8/2946.040.8McAuliffe +5.2
Trafalgar Group (R)8/26 – 8/291074 LV3.04746McAuliffe +1
Monmouth8/24 – 8/29802 RV3.54742McAuliffe +5
Christopher Newport Univ.*8/15 – 8/23800 LV3.65041McAuliffe +9
Roanoke College8/3 – 8/17558 LV4.24638McAuliffe +8
VCU8/4 – 8/15770 RV5.24037McAuliffe +3

All Virginia Governor – Youngkin vs. McAuliffe Polling Data

About

First debate – September 16, 2021

Youngkin and McAuliffe met at Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia on September 16, 2021, one day before early voting began. The debate started with discussion over a recent COVID-19 mandate President Joe Biden signed requiring federal workers, employees of large companies, and contractors to be vaccinated. Youngkin doubted if Biden had the power to authorize the mandate, and supported personal choice for receiving the vaccine. McAuliffe supported the mandate and accused Youngkin of spreading “anti-vax” rhetoric.[126] Youngkin denied the claim.`

The discussion moved to climate change, where Youngkin stated he would use all sources of energy to address climate change without “putting [the] entire energy grid at risk for political purposes.” McAuliffe called for clean energy in the state by 2035 and stressed the idea for the state to be a production hub.

The discussion then moved to abortion, specifically the recent Texas Heartbeat Act signed by Texas Governor Greg Abbott (whom endorsed Youngkin).[127] When asked whether or not Youngkin would sign a similar bill, Youngkin stated that he would not sign the bill, and that he was pro-life and supports exclusions in cases such as rape, incest, and when the life of the mother is endangered and also supports a “pain-threshold” bill. In addition, Youngkin said he would “go on the offensive” to defund Planned Parenthood and stated McAuliffe was “the most extreme pro-abortion candidate in America today”. In response to Youngkin, McAuliffe stated he was a “brick wall” to women’s rights and would protect a woman’s decision over abortion and supports reducing the number of doctors needed to certify a third-trimester abortion from three to one.

The next discussion topic was over election integrity. After supporting an “Election Integrity Taskforce”, Youngkin stated he does not believe there has been “significant fraud”, and stated the issue of fraud as “a democracy issue”. Youngkin stressed that he believes that “Joe Biden’s our president” and criticized the withdrawal from Afghanistan. McAuliffe took note to Donald Trump’s endorsement of Youngkin, calling him a “Trump wannabe”.[126] Both candidates stated they would concede the election if the other came out on top.

The final discussion topic was over the economy. McAuliffe attacked Youngkin on his top economic advisor, Stephen Moore, who advised Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Youngkin defended Virginia’s right-to-work law.

Source: Wikipedia

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report[128]Lean DSeptember 15, 2021
Inside Elections[129]Likely DSeptember 15, 2021
Sabato’s Crystal Ball[130]Lean DSeptember 15, 2021

Videos

Virginia’s First Gubernatorial Debate

Published on September 16, 2021
By: WUSA9

Terry McAuliffe

Terry McAuliffe 2Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005; Chair, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign since 2008

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

For more information, see this Terry McAullife post.

Glenn Youngkin

Current Position: Republican Nominee for Governor of Virginia
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 Governor

Glenn Allen Youngkin (born December 9, 1966) is an American businessman who is the Republican nominee in the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election. Prior to entering politics, he spent 25 years at the private-equity firm The Carlyle Group, rising to become its CEO in January 2018.

He stepped down from the Carlyle Group in 2020, and in January 2021 he announced his candidacy for the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election, and won the Republican nomination on May 10, 2021.

For more information, see this Glenn Youngkin post.

Issues

Governance

Terry McAuliffe

n/a

Glenn Youngkin

Make Goverment Work For You

Virginia’s government is failing its fundamental mission – serving the people. Our system is broken as customer service at agencies such as the DMV and VEC disappears. Glenn will make government work by:

  • Fixing the DMV & the Virginia Employment Commission
  • Protecting our Constitutional Rights
  • Conducting a Statewide Transparency Audit to Root out Waste, Fraud & Abuse
  • Restoring Photo ID Laws & Making it Easy to Vote and Hard to Cheat
  • Investing More Money in Roads & Highways
  • Completing Long-Delayed Environmental Projects

Civil Rights

Terry McAuliffe

Lifting Up Black Virginians: Terry’s Plan to Create a Stronger, More Equitable Commonwealth

Creating Opportunities for Black Virginians

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will take on the systemic racism that plagues our Commonwealth. That means addressing racial disparities and creating opportunities for Black Virginians to build wealth through homeownership and by investing in Black-owned businesses. Terry will continue his fight to defend and advance civil rights by making the restoration of voting rights permanent in Virginia’s constitution, reforming the criminal justice system, and working to improve police-community relations. Terry will also ensure that Black Virginians have access to high-quality, affordable health care coverage and a world-class education, and promote equitable land use and access to safe and welcoming green spaces.

Glenn Youngkin

n/a

Economy

Terry McAuliffe

Creating Good-Paying Jobs and a Thriving Economy for All Virginians

Raise the Minimum Wage to $15 by 2024, Provide Paid Sick, Family & Medical Leave, Make Childcare More Affordable, and Create Pathways to Good-Paying Jobs for All Virginians

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the pervasive inequities in our systems and disproportionately impacted Black and Brown communities when it comes to education, minority-owned businesses, housing and health care. Terry’s plan will rebuild our economy again so that all Virginians can prosper.

As Governor, Terry will work to keep Virginians safely back at work and in schools, rebuild our thriving network of small businesses, and support our workforce with access to paid sick days, COVID-19 vaccines, affordable child care and hazard pay.

He will also make critical investments in building and training the workforce of the future and ensuring that people of all ages have the skills they need to be successful in the jobs of tomorrow.

Glenn Youngkin

Cut Costs For Virginians

The cost of living is rising for Virginians, and people are leaving the Commonwealth to look for jobs and start lives elsewhere. Glenn will tackle the rising cost of living and cut costs for Virginians by:

  • Eliminating Virginia’s Grocery Tax & Suspending the Recent Gas Tax Hike for 12 Months
  • Providing a One Time Tax Rebate of $600 for Joint Filers and $300 for Individuals
  • Ending Runaway Property Taxes by Requiring Voter Approval for Increases
  • Cutting Income Taxes by Doubling the Standard Deduction & Cutting Taxes on Veteran Retirement Pay

‍Reinvigorate Job Growth 

Add 400,000 Jobs & 10,000 Startups
Virginia’s jobs machine is broken. After zero job growth from 2013 through 2020, Virginia currently ranks 44th in job recovery during the pandemic and was recently ranked as the 49th best state to start a business. Glenn will jumpstart our economy by:

  • Keeping Virginia Open and Protecting Lives & Livelihoods
  • Protecting Virginians from Forced Unionization & Cutting Job Killing Regulations by 25%
  • Launching #JumpstartJobs to Develop Talent, Train Workers, Attract Investment, & Make Virginia the
  • Easiest State to Start a Business
  • Reinvigorating Small Business by Enacting a Small Business Tax Holiday & Ending the Tax on Rebuild VA and PPP Loans

Healthcare

Terry McAuliffe

Building a Healthier Virginia

Ensuring That Every Virginian Has Quality, Affordable Health Care

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will fight to make sure all Virginians have access to quality, affordable health care coverage and that no Virginian is forced to choose between medication or a meal. Terry will address racial, gender, and geographic disparities in access to coverage and outcomes by strengthening Medicaid, working with the federal government to implement a reinsurance program to lower health insurance premiums, protecting reproductive freedoms, and combating rising prescription drug prices by holding pharmaceutical companies accountable. As governor, Terry will also work to end unacceptable maternal mortality rates for Black women by expanding home visiting programs, improving access to quality care, ensuring access to lactation support, and mandating mental health screenings for pregnant and postpartum women.

Glenn Youngkin

n/a

Safety

Terry McAuliffe

Taking Action to Protect Virginians from Gun Violence

It’s time to Ban the Sale of Assault Weapons, Close Loopholes, and Treat Gun Violence as a Public Health Epidemic

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will send a clear message that gun violence has no place in the Commonwealth. He will ban the sale of assault weapons and get high-capacity magazines and ghost guns off of our streets. He will also close lethal loopholes that repeatedly allow firearms to get into the hands of dangerous individuals. By creating an Office of Gun Violence Prevention and creating a research Center of Excellence at a Virginia college or university, Terry will treat gun violence as the public health crisis it is and deploy evidence-based solutions to save lives.

Glenn Youngkin

Keep our Communities Safe

Failed leadership and dangerous policies have left Virginia less safe. With rising violent crime and the murder rate at a 20-year high, Glenn will keep our communities safe by:

  • Fully Funding Law Enforcement & Protecting Qualified Immunity for our Law Enforcement Heroes
  • Firing the Parole Board & Keeping Violent Criminals Off Our Streets
  • Launching #UnityInTheCommunity Programs Operation Ceasefire & Project Exile
  • Fixing Our Broken Mental Health System

Education

Terry McAuliffe

Ensuring that Every Child has Access to an Equitable, World-Class Education

$2 Billion Annual Investment to Raise Teacher Pay Above the National Average, Get Every Student Online, Expand Pre-K, and Eliminate Racial Disparities in Education. 

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will ensure that every student has access to an equitable, world-class education. His plan will invest a record $2 billion annually in education, which will raise teacher pay above the national average for the first time in Virginia history, give every 3 and 4-year-old in need access to pre-k, and get every student online. Terry will also address Virginia’s educator shortage and diversify our educator workforce through his Lucy Simms Educator Program. The Lucy Simms Program will cover education costs for students who commit to teaching for five years in one of Virginia’s public schools after graduation. Terry will also fight to make Virginia the best state in the nation for STEM-H and computer science education.

Glenn Youngkin

Restore Excellence In Education

Virginia’s students have fallen behind because of extended school closings, lower school standards, and political agendas. Glenn will empower parents and restore excellence and commonsense in education by:

  • Keeping Schools Open Safely Five Days a Week
  • Restoring High Expectations & Getting Every Student College or Career Ready
  • Ridding Political Agendas from the Classroom by Banning Critical Race Theory
  • Rebuilding Crumbling Schools, Raising Teacher Pay, & Investing in Special Education Programs
  • Creating at least 20 New Innovation Charter Schools across the K-12 Spectrum to Provide Choice
X
Terry McAullife 4Terry McAuliffe

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, National Association of Governors from 2016 – 2017; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

McAuliffe, Youngkin clash over abortion, COVID in 1st debate.
Associated Press, SARAH RANKIN and STEVE HELBERSeptember 17, 2021 (Medium)

GRUNDY, Va. (AP) — Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin clashed over abortion and vaccination policies Thursday in Virginia’s first gubernatorial debate of the general election season, as each sought to cast the other as extreme.

The candidates in the closely watched race met at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, a small town in southwest Virginia, where the debate got off to a relatively heated start, with cross-talk and occasional snide remarks.

The first questions of the night dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has left more than 12,000 Virginians dead and hospitalized tens of thousands more. The candidates’ answers highlighted the already clear differences about how they would approach attempting to manage the virus.

Asked his position on President Joe Biden’s sweeping new vaccine mandates issued earlier this month, Youngkin called himself a “strong advocate” for the COVID-19 vaccines but said he thought the president lacked the authority to “dictate” that workers receive one.

McAuliffe seeks dismissal of GOP lawsuit over paperwork
WAVY, Sarah RankinAugust 30, 2021 (Medium)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe asked a court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by Virginia Republicans that seeks to remove him from the ballot in this year’s closely watched race for governor over an alleged paperwork error.

In a filing Friday evening, attorneys for the former governor now running for a second term against GOP nominee Glenn Youngkin said the suit was based on a “legal lie” and would effectively invalidate hundreds of thousands of votes cast in the Democratic primary.

The complaint filed earlier this week by the Republican Party of Virginia against state election officials argued that McAuliffe should be disqualified from running in the November general election because of the omission of his signature on an official form declaring his candidacy.

Washington Post editorial board backs McAuliffe in Virginia governor's race
The Hill, Max GreenwoodSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

The Washington Post’s editorial board on Thursday endorsed Democrat Terry McAuliffe in the race for Virginia governor, throwing the support of one of the region’s largest newspapers behind his bid to reclaim his old job.

In endorsing McAuliffe, the paper’s editorial board described the former governor as “shrewd, pragmatic and tireless,” arguing that his “left-of-center” political leanings suited a state that has trended increasingly Democratic in recent years.

McAuliffe’s Republican opponent, Glenn Youngkin, meanwhile, has embraced many of the conservative policy proposals that voters in Virginia have largely rejected, the editorial board wrote.

Summary

Current Position: GMU Distinguished Visiting Professor since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 Governor
Former Position(s): Governor from 2014 – 2018; Chair, National Association of Governors from 2016 – 2017; Chair, Democratic National Committee from 2001 – 2005

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

News

McAuliffe, Youngkin clash over abortion, COVID in 1st debate.
Associated Press, SARAH RANKIN and STEVE HELBERSeptember 17, 2021 (Medium)

GRUNDY, Va. (AP) — Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin clashed over abortion and vaccination policies Thursday in Virginia’s first gubernatorial debate of the general election season, as each sought to cast the other as extreme.

The candidates in the closely watched race met at the Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, a small town in southwest Virginia, where the debate got off to a relatively heated start, with cross-talk and occasional snide remarks.

The first questions of the night dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has left more than 12,000 Virginians dead and hospitalized tens of thousands more. The candidates’ answers highlighted the already clear differences about how they would approach attempting to manage the virus.

Asked his position on President Joe Biden’s sweeping new vaccine mandates issued earlier this month, Youngkin called himself a “strong advocate” for the COVID-19 vaccines but said he thought the president lacked the authority to “dictate” that workers receive one.

McAuliffe seeks dismissal of GOP lawsuit over paperwork
WAVY, Sarah RankinAugust 30, 2021 (Medium)

Democrat Terry McAuliffe asked a court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by Virginia Republicans that seeks to remove him from the ballot in this year’s closely watched race for governor over an alleged paperwork error.

In a filing Friday evening, attorneys for the former governor now running for a second term against GOP nominee Glenn Youngkin said the suit was based on a “legal lie” and would effectively invalidate hundreds of thousands of votes cast in the Democratic primary.

The complaint filed earlier this week by the Republican Party of Virginia against state election officials argued that McAuliffe should be disqualified from running in the November general election because of the omission of his signature on an official form declaring his candidacy.

Washington Post editorial board backs McAuliffe in Virginia governor’s race
The Hill, Max GreenwoodSeptember 16, 2021 (Medium)

The Washington Post’s editorial board on Thursday endorsed Democrat Terry McAuliffe in the race for Virginia governor, throwing the support of one of the region’s largest newspapers behind his bid to reclaim his old job.

In endorsing McAuliffe, the paper’s editorial board described the former governor as “shrewd, pragmatic and tireless,” arguing that his “left-of-center” political leanings suited a state that has trended increasingly Democratic in recent years.

McAuliffe’s Republican opponent, Glenn Youngkin, meanwhile, has embraced many of the conservative policy proposals that voters in Virginia have largely rejected, the editorial board wrote.

Twitter

About

Terry McAuliffe 2

Source: Campaign page

Terry McAuliffe is a lifelong entrepreneur and proud Democrat who served as the 72nd Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia from 2014-2018. As governor, Terry focused on making the Commonwealth welcoming and inclusive and building a 21st Century economy that created good jobs and expanded economic opportunity for all Virginians.

During his tenure, Terry brought 200,000 good paying jobs to the Commonwealth, drove unemployment down, and raised personal income over 13%. He invested in workforce development and infrastructure, laid the groundwork for Virginia to be a national leader in clean energy, and helped build a solid cyber ecosystem in the Commonwealth.

Time and again, Terry fought the Republican-led legislature. He successfully secured a record $1 billion investment in education and expanded preschool to thousands of Virginia children. As Virginia’s first lady, Terry’s wife Dorothy made ending childhood hunger in the Commonwealth a priority. Thanks to her tireless advocacy, Virginia made tremendous strides in addressing this critical issue and schools have served 13 million more meals per year.

As governor, Terry served as a brick-wall against extreme Republican attacks on women’s health care rights. He kept open every women’s health clinic in the Commonwealth and vetoed all anti-women’s rights legislation passed by the General Assembly, including a bill that would have defunded Planned Parenthood in Virginia. In 2013, Terry campaigned proudly on his support for marriage equality, and he was the first Southern governor to officiate a gay wedding.

One of his proudest accomplishments was successfully reversing a racist Jim Crow law that disenfranchised hundreds of thousands of Virginians. Thanks to his efforts, more than 200,000 Virginians have now had their voting rights restored and are able to participate in our democracy. In December 2017, Terry was named “Public Official of the Year” by GOVERNING magazine.

A tireless champion for progressive policies, Terry has dedicated his life to electing Democrats. He got his start with President Jimmy Carter’s campaign when he was just 23 years old, and later served as co-chair of President Bill Clinton’s 1996 campaign and chairman of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign.

Terry has worked for the last 12 years to build the party infrastructure that led to flipping and keeping the Commonwealth blue. Since leaving office, he has continued to fight for progressive policies and campaigned for Democratic candidates across Virginia.

The youngest child from a middle class family, Terry started a business paving driveways for neighbors and local businesses at age 14. Since then, he has worked with and led dozens of businesses in diverse sectors of the economy helping to improve companies and create economic opportunity. Terry and Dorothy have been married for over 30 years and have five children. They live in McLean with their dogs Daisy and Trooper.

Contact

Email:

Web

Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia, GMU, Campaign Site, Sitio de la Campaña en Español, YouTube

Issues

Source: Campaign page

This year has been incredibly difficult for Virginians across the Commonwealth as we fight to get this pandemic under control and begin our economic recovery. But it has also shown us the best of who Virginians are and it has given us a big opportunity to address the challenges facing our future. Terry is running for governor because we need to think big and be bold to move the Commonwealth forward and create a better future for all Virginians.

Terry believes that now is the time to push Virginia forward to build a stronger and fairer post-COVID economy. As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will continue the fight for civil rights and voting rights, attract businesses to create the best jobs and raise wages, ensure all Virginians have access to quality affordable healthcare, build a clean energy economy to address climate change, and address the affordable housing crisis our communities are facing. Most importantly, Terry will make an unprecedented investment in education. The time is now to ensure a world-class education for every Virginia child. Our future and our children cannot wait.

Civil Rights

Reforming our Criminal Justice System to Create a Stronger, Fairer Commonwealth

Building a Fairer, More Equitable Criminal Justice System That Keeps Virginians Safe & Works For All

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will continue to work to reform a system that has disproportionately targeted and impacted Black and Brown Virginians for centuries. He will work to enshrine the automatic restoration of voting rights in Virginia’s constitution, equitably implement marijuana legalization, expand access to parole, reform outdated expungement laws, and create an Office for Returning Citizens. He will also work to rebuild trust between communities and law enforcement by increasing transparency and accountability, and investing in community policing initiatives, and body-worn camera programs. As governor, Terry will also solidify the transformation of Virginia’s juvenile justice system and investing in mental health and substance use disorder services.

Ensuring a More Inclusive, Open and Welcoming Virginia

Combating Hate Against LGBTQ+ Communities, Protecting Students, Improving Access to Care & Housing Stability

As the next governor of Virginia, Terry will build on the progress he and Democrats have made over the past eight years to uplift and prioritize the LGBTQ+ community. Terry will address inequities and disparities that LGBTQ+ people, particularly people of color, experience by improving data collection and leveraging data to better direct resources to meet their unique needs. He will pass an anti-bullying law to protect students, prohibit foster care and adoption agencies from discriminating against LGBTQ+ people, and expand access to culturally competent and inclusive health and mental health care. Terry will also address housing stability by leveraging federal housing dollars and working to establish safe and inclusive shelters.

Lifting Up Black Virginians: Terry’s Plan to Create a Stronger, More Equitable Commonwealth

Creating Opportunities for Black Virginians

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will take on the systemic racism that plagues our Commonwealth. That means addressing racial disparities and creating opportunities for Black Virginians to build wealth through homeownership and by investing in Black-owned businesses. Terry will continue his fight to defend and advance civil rights by making the restoration of voting rights permanent in Virginia’s constitution, reforming the criminal justice system, and working to improve police-community relations. Terry will also ensure that Black Virginians have access to high-quality, affordable health care coverage and a world-class education, and promote equitable land use and access to safe and welcoming green spaces.

Protecting Women’s Rights and Ensuring Gender Equality

Terry Will Always Be a Brick-Wall Against Attacks on Reproductive Health

For too long, women in Virginia have faced glaring inequities in the workplace, in health care and at home. Virginia can’t truly thrive until we root out and eliminate these inequities.

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will continue fighting for progressive policies to advance women’s rights and gender equality, particularly in light of a partisan, Republican-majority United States Supreme Court. First and foremost, that means passing an amendment to the Constitution of Virginia that permanently enshrines and codifies the protections of Roe v Wade in Virginia law.

Terry will also continue to address disparities in women’s health care coverage, ensuring access to quality prenatal care to improve outcomes and address maternal mortality, which disproportionately impacts Black and Brown mothers.

And he will tackle the pervasive systemic inequities that have disproportionately affected women, including pay inequity, lack of access to paid leave and lack of access to affordable child care.

As Virginia’s 72nd Governor, Terry served as a “brick wall” in protecting women’s health care rights from extreme Republicans attacks. He successfully halted the closing of women’s health clinics, keeping all of Virginia’s women health clinics open. He defended women’s access to health care by successfully reversing the restrictive regulations designed to force their closure.

Terry vetoed all anti-women legislation passed by the General Assembly – including multiple bills that would have defund Planned Parenthood in Virginia. He also created a Physical Evidence Recovery Kit (PERK) Work Group, which led to the testing of 2,902 previously untested PERKS and implementation of a comprehensive process for the consistent handling of PERKs collected from victims of sexual assault.

 

Economy

Creating Good-Paying Jobs and a Thriving Economy for All Virginians

Raise the Minimum Wage to $15 by 2024, Provide Paid Sick, Family & Medical Leave, Make Childcare More Affordable, and Create Pathways to Good-Paying Jobs for All Virginians

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the pervasive inequities in our systems and disproportionately impacted Black and Brown communities when it comes to education, minority-owned businesses, housing and health care. Terry’s plan will rebuild our economy again so that all Virginians can prosper.

As Governor, Terry will work to keep Virginians safely back at work and in schools, rebuild our thriving network of small businesses, and support our workforce with access to paid sick days, COVID-19 vaccines, affordable child care and hazard pay.

He will also make critical investments in building and training the workforce of the future and ensuring that people of all ages have the skills they need to be successful in the jobs of tomorrow.

Terry will achieve this through targeted investments in workforce training and development, partnering with businesses and our educational institutions to re-skill and retrain Virginians, and reimagining our K12 education system so that every child has access to a world-class education and is workforce ready upon graduation.

As Virginia’s 72nd Governor, Terry inherited a large budget deficit while facing the effects of the Great Recession sequestration. Despite these challenges, he oversaw record economic growth, bringing 200,000 new jobs to Virginia.

He made historic progress training Virginians for high-demand careers and 21st Century jobs, promoting education and training for in-demand areas like advanced manufacturing, logistics, transportation, trades and construction, IT and health care. This allowed thousands of Virginians to take on high-paying jobs without a two- or four-year degree. At the end of his term, Terry left Virginia with more than a $100 million budget surplus.

Read Terry’s plan to build an equitable post-COVID economy and invest in Virginia workers.

Establishing Virginia as the Best State in the Nation to Start and Grow a Business

Supporting Entrepreneurship and Building Strong Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in Virginia

While businesses and workers have been hit hard by this pandemic, there have also been unprecedented spikes in entrepreneurship and business startups, demonstrating how critical this industry will be to Virginia’s recovery. As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will fight to establish Virginia as not only the best state for business, but also as the best state for entrepreneurs and startups. He will create a cabinet-level advisor to develop and implement a statewide plan to support entrepreneurs. This plan will break down barriers and make it easier to start a new venture, provide support to backbone organizations and create access to capital, and ensure entrepreneurs have access to the resources they need to be successful. Terry will also create partnerships with institutions of higher education to coordinate research and development opportunities

Education

Ensuring that Every Child has Access to an Equitable, World-Class Education

$2 Billion Annual Investment to Raise Teacher Pay Above the National Average, Get Every Student Online, Expand Pre-K, and Eliminate Racial Disparities in Education. 

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will ensure that every student has access to an equitable, world-class education. His plan will invest a record $2 billion annually in education, which will raise teacher pay above the national average for the first time in Virginia history, give every 3 and 4-year-old in need access to pre-k, and get every student online. Terry will also address Virginia’s educator shortage and diversify our educator workforce through his Lucy Simms Educator Program. The Lucy Simms Program will cover education costs for students who commit to teaching for five years in one of Virginia’s public schools after graduation. Terry will also fight to make Virginia the best state in the nation for STEM-H and computer science education.

Making Higher Education More Affordable and Connecting Virginians to Opportunities

Investing in Our Workforce and Creating New Paths to Good-Paying Careers

Terry’s plan will give students a clear pathway to the workforce while removing the barriers preventing them from succeeding. As governor, Terry will create new, affordable pathways into the workforce by expanding workforce training programs at our community colleges and streamlining financial aid so more students can benefit from higher education. Terry will also ensure that once students are in school, they are able to make it to graduation by making it easier to transition to higher education, between institutions, and from education to the workforce. He will also ensure our students have access to the support they need to reach their goals.

Making Virginia the Best State in the Nation for STEM-H and Computer Science Education

Creating Opportunity for All Virginia Students to Achieve Careers in Fast-Growing Sector

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will make the Commonwealth the best state in the nation for STEM-H and computer science education and ensure all Virginia students, no matter their background or zip code, can access the growing STEM-H and computer science fields. To do so, Terry will integrate STEM-H and computer science principles across all subjects and grade levels, address the digital equity divide, leverage public-private partnerships to build the workforce of the future through virtual internships and regional innovation labs, increase supplemental learning opportunities, and attract high-paying jobs to every corner of the Commonwealth.

Health Care

Building a Healthier Virginia

Ensuring That Every Virginian Has Quality, Affordable Health Care

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will fight to make sure all Virginians have access to quality, affordable health care coverage and that no Virginian is forced to choose between medication or a meal. Terry will address racial, gender, and geographic disparities in access to coverage and outcomes by strengthening Medicaid, working with the federal government to implement a reinsurance program to lower health insurance premiums, protecting reproductive freedoms, and combating rising prescription drug prices by holding pharmaceutical companies accountable. As governor, Terry will also work to end unacceptable maternal mortality rates for Black women by expanding home visiting programs, improving access to quality care, ensuring access to lactation support, and mandating mental health screenings for pregnant and postpartum women.

Safety

Taking Action to Protect Virginians from Gun Violence

It’s time to Ban the Sale of Assault Weapons, Close Loopholes, and Treat Gun Violence as a Public Health Epidemic

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will send a clear message that gun violence has no place in the Commonwealth. He will ban the sale of assault weapons and get high-capacity magazines and ghost guns off of our streets. He will also close lethal loopholes that repeatedly allow firearms to get into the hands of dangerous individuals. By creating an Office of Gun Violence Prevention and creating a research Center of Excellence at a Virginia college or university, Terry will treat gun violence as the public health crisis it is and deploy evidence-based solutions to save lives.

Social Security

Supporting Virginia’s Seniors

Ensuring Quality and Affordability Later in Life

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will take a comprehensive approach to improving access to affordable, quality options for Virginia seniors that will enable them to age in place. His plan will protect seniors from COVID-19 by ensuring that every facility serving seniors requires their staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Terry will lower the cost of health care by tackling the rising cost of prescription drugs and holding Big pharma accountable, implementing a state reinsurance program to lower premiums, and standing up Virginia’s state health exchange. He will work with President Biden to create specialized savings plans that will allow seniors to cover the cost of care as they age.

Affordable Housing

Tackling the Eviction Crisis, Increasing Affordable Housing, Promoting Black & Brown Homeownership & Fighting Homelessness

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will work to ensure every Virginian has a place to call home. That means addressing the eviction crisis and increasing protections for renters. Terry will also increase the supply of affordable housing by investing in the Virginia Housing Trust Fund, spearheading zoning reform, and partnering with the Biden Administration to increase access to affordable housing vouchers. Terry will also work to fight systemic racism and promote Black and Brown homeownership by combating lending discrimination, strengthening down payment assistance programs, access to low-interest loans, and rent-to-own programs.

Agriculture & Forestry

Planting Innovation and Raising Opportunity on Virginia’s Working Lands

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will take a comprehensive approach to strengthening the agricultural and forestry economy by growing demand for Virginia agricultural products, facilitating innovation to expand supply, and supporting Virginia farmers and foresters. His plan will build a highly-specialized agriculture and forestry workforce through partnerships with institutions of higher education and community colleges, cultivate next-generation smart farming by expanding broadband access to every Virginian, and expand state matching funds for agricultural best management practices that support the transition to sustainability. Terry will establish Virginia agriculture and forestry as a model for upward mobility and growth by focusing on investing in the farmers and workers who are critical to Virginia’s economic future.

Clean Energy

Moving Virginia to 100% Clean Energy by 2035 to Create Good Jobs, Strengthen Climate Resilience & Protect Our Future

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will tackle the growing threat of climate change and ensure Virginia is resilient in the face of climate threats. That means accelerating Virginia’s path to 100% clean energy by 2035 and aligning Virginia with President Biden’s climate goals and efforts, investing in energy efficiency, decarbonizing Virginia’s transportation sector and creating good jobs of the future. Terry’s plan will ensure a just transition to clean energy that will protect consumers, lower utility bills, and break down environmental inequities that have disproportionately impacted Black and Brown communities

COVID-19

Continuing to Lead Virginia Out of This Pandemic and Into a Stronger Future

As Virginia’s next Governor, Terry will tackle inequities and rebuild a stronger, more equitable post-COVID economy. Terry will rebuild Virginia’s thriving network of small businesses, especially Black and Brown-owned businesses, that have been hit the hardest. His plan will raise the minimum wage to $15/hour by 2024, support caregivers, make childcare more affordable and ensure that every worker has access to paid sick, family and medical leave, as women, particularly women of color, are being driven out of the workforce. Terry will also create a seamless 5-year pathway to high-demand, good-paying careers by building on Governor Northam’s G3 program.

Combating Food Insecurity

Ensuring that Virginians have Access to Regular Nutritious Meals

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will work tirelessly to ensure Virginians have access to regular, nutritious meals. By working to increase participation in federal nutrition programs, Terry will get nutritious meals for thousands of more children in the Commonwealth. He will increase access to local foods through a comprehensive “Virginia Food for Virginia Families” agenda that will connect some of the world’s highest quality agricultural products with more families in need in the Commonwealth. Terry will also establish an interagency Food Security Council to address these issues holistically and in a data-driven manner. These efforts will address the long-standing equity issues that have made communities of color significantly more likely to struggle with food insecurity.

Prescription Drug Prices

Holding Big Pharma Accountable to Ensure Affordable Drug Prices

As Virginia’s next governor, Terry will make sure that no person has to choose between medication or a meal. He will empower the Virginia State Corporation Commission to serve as a watchdog for Virginia consumers by forcing drug companies to justify certain price increases and setting upper price limits when necessary. Terry will ensure consumers have information and explanations about cost increases by creating a Prescription Drug Sunlight Law. He will also fight to secure the lowest possible prices by pooling Virginia’s purchasing power for state agencies, implementing a pharmacy benefit carve-out model for Virginia’s Medicaid program, and exploring bulk purchasing as a way to lower costs.

Rural Economy

Investing in Rural Communities, Getting Every Virginian Online, Strengthening Education & Health Care, and Supporting Virginia Farmers

Terry will ensure that rural communities are prioritized in Virginia’s post-COVID economic recovery. He will get every Virginian online, promote access to virtual training and career opportunities and make telehealth available throughout rural areas. Terry will attract jobs by launching Virginia’s first intentional rural economic development hub and establishing rural communities as the energy innovation capitals of the East Coast. He will also invest in rural education and workforce development and will support the farmers who are vital to the success of our economy. Terry’s plan will create jobs, support families and drive sustainable economic growth in rural economies.

Wikipedia

Terence Richard McAuliffe (born February 9, 1957) is an American politician who was the 72nd governor of Virginia from 2014 to 2018.[1] A member of the Democratic Party, McAuliffe was co-chairman of President Bill Clinton‘s 1996 re-election campaign,[2] chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 2001 to 2005, and chairman of Hillary Clinton‘s 2008 presidential campaign. McAuliffe was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2009 Virginia gubernatorial election.

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, McAuliffe ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, and then defeated Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Libertarian Robert Sarvis in the general election.[1] McAuliffe is running for governor again, against Republican nominee Glenn Youngkin, in the 2021 gubernatorial election.[3] McAuliffe won the Democratic primary on June 8, 2021.[4] If McAuliffe wins the general election, he will be the first Virginia governor since Mills Godwin to serve two non-consecutive terms.

Early life and education

McAuliffe was born and raised in Syracuse, New York, the son of Mildred Katherine (née Lonergan) and Jack McAuliffe.[5][6] His father was a real estate agent and local Democratic politician. The family is of Irish descent.[7][8][9]

He graduated from Bishop Ludden Junior/Senior High School in 1975. In 1979, he earned a bachelor’s degree from the Catholic University of America, where he served as a resident adviser.[10] After graduating, McAuliffe worked for President Jimmy Carter‘s reelection campaign, becoming the national finance director at age 22. Following the campaign, McAuliffe attended Georgetown University Law Center, where he obtained his Juris Doctor degree in 1984.[11]

Business career

At the age of 14, McAuliffe started his first business,[12] McAuliffe Driveway Maintenance, sealing driveways and parking lots. According to The Washington Post, McAuliffe has “earned millions as a banker, real estate developer, home builder, hotel owner, and internet venture capitalist.”[13]

In 1985, McAuliffe helped found the Federal City National Bank, a Washington, D.C.–based local bank.[14] In January 1988, when McAuliffe was thirty years old, the bank’s board elected McAuliffe as chairman, making him the youngest chairman in the United States Federal Reserve Bank‘s charter association.[15]: 75–76  In 1991, McAuliffe negotiated a merger with Credit International Bank, which he called his “greatest business experience.”[16] McAuliffe became the vice-chairman of the newly merged bank.[16][17]

In 1979, McAuliffe met Richard Swann, a lawyer who was in the charge of fundraising for Jimmy Carter‘s presidential campaign in Florida. In 1988, McAuliffe married Swann’s daughter, Dorothy. In 1991, the Resolution Trust Corporation, a federal agency, took over the assets and liabilities of Swann’s American Pioneer Savings Bank.[16] Under Swann’s guidance, McAuliffe purchased some of American Pioneer’s real estate from the Resolution Trust Corporation. McAuliffe’s equal partner in the deal was a pension fund controlled by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). They purchased real estate valued at $50 million for $38.7 million;[16][18] McAuliffe received a 50% equity stake.[18] In 1996, McAuliffe acquired a distressed house-building company, American Heritage Homes, which was on the brink of bankruptcy.[16][19] McAuliffe served as chairman of American Heritage.[20] By 1998, McAuliffe had built American Heritage Homes into one of Central Florida’s biggest homebuilding companies.[21] By 1999, the company was building more than 1,000 single family homes per year.[22] In late 2002, KB Home bought American Heritage Homes for $74 million.[23]

In 1997, McAuliffe invested $100,000 as an angel investor in Global Crossing,[15] a Bermuda–registered telecommunications company.[24] Global Crossing went public in 1998.[25] In 1999, McAuliffe sold the majority of his holding for $8.1 million.[26] McAuliffe has faced criticism after making seven figures on his Global Crossing investment when the company declared bankruptcy a year later with 12,000 people losing their jobs.[27]

McAuliffe joined ZeniMax Media as company advisor in 2000.[28]

In 2009, McAuliffe joined GreenTech Automotive, a holding company, which purchased Chinese electric car company EU Auto MyCar for $20 million in May 2010.[29] Later that year, McAuliffe relocated GreenTech’s headquarters to McLean, Virginia, and the manufacturing plant was later based in Mississippi.[30][31][32] In December 2012, McAuliffe announced his resignation from GreenTech to focus on his run for governor of Virginia.[33][34][35] In 2013, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigated GreenTech Automotive and McAuliffe for visa fraud.[36] McAuliffe attempted to gain tax credits from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the state’s business recruitment agency, to build GreenTech Automotive’s factory in Virginia.[37] He refused to supply the VEDP with proper documentation of their business strategy and investors, which caused the VEDP to decline economic incentives for GreenTech Automotive.[37] McAuliffe later falsely claimed during his gubernatorial run that the VEDP was uncooperative and uninterested in GreenTech Automotive.[37] In 2017, GreenTech Automotive investors sued McAuliffe for fraud, with the firm then declaring bankruptcy in 2018.[38][39][40] McAuliffe gave 32 wealthy Chinese nationals EB-5 visas in exchange for $560,000 investments into GreenTech Automotive, which exceeded the Department of Homeland Security’s determined quota for GreenTech Automotive.[38][39]

Early political career

Relationship with the Clintons

McAuliffe had a prolific fundraising career within the Democratic Party and a personal and political relationship with Bill and Hillary Clinton.[16] McAuliffe and his staff raised $275 million, then an unprecedented sum, for Clinton’s causes while president. After Bill Clinton’s tenure ended, McAuliffe guaranteed the Clintons’ $1.35 million mortgage for their home in Chappaqua, New York. The deal raised ethical questions.[41][42] In 1999, he served as chairman of America’s Millennium Celebration under Clinton.[43] In 2000, McAuliffe chaired a fundraiser with the Clintons to benefit Vice President Al Gore, setting a fundraising record of $26.3 million.[44]

McAuliffe told to The New York Times in 1999, “I’ve met all of my business contacts through politics. It’s all interrelated.” When he meets a new business contact, he continued, “Then I raise money from them.”[16] He acknowledged that the success of his business dealings stemmed partly from his relationship with Bill Clinton, saying, “No question, that’s a piece of it.” He also credited his ties to former congressmen Dick Gephardt and Tony Coelho, his Rolodex of 5,000-plus names, and his ability to personally relate to people.[16] In 2004, he was one of the five-member board of directors of the Clinton Foundation.[45] He told New York Times reporter Mark Leibovich in 2012 that his Rolodex held 18,632 names.[46]

2000 Democratic National Convention

In June 2000, as organizers of the 2000 Democratic National Convention were working to raise $7 million, convention chairman Roy Romer resigned to become superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. McAuliffe immediately accepted appointment as Romer’s replacement when asked on a phone call by presumptive presidential nominee Al Gore. Already in the news for a record $26 million fundraiser with Bill Clinton the month prior, McAuliffe promised that money would be a “non-issue” for the convention, and that the outstanding $7 million would be raised “very quickly”.[41] Many in the party praised McAuliffe’s selection, which was widely seen to represent the growth in his influence, with James Carville telling The New York Times that “his stock is trading at an all-time high”.[47][48]

Chair of the Democratic National Committee

In February 2001, McAuliffe was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and served until February 2005.[49] During his tenure, the DNC raised $578 million and emerged from debt for the first time in its history.[50] Prior to serving as chairman of the DNC, McAuliffe served as chairman of the DNC Business Leadership Forum in 1993 and as the DNC finance chairman in 1994.[51][15]: 88, 210 

In 2001, McAuliffe founded the Voting Rights Institute.[52] In June 2001, McAuliffe announced the founding of the Hispanic Voter Outreach Project to reach more Hispanic voters.[15]: 296–297  The same year, he founded the Women’s Vote Center to educate, engage and mobilize women at the local level to run for office.[53][15]: 297 

In the period between the elections of 2002 and the 2004 Democratic convention, the DNC rebuilt operations and intra-party alliances. McAuliffe worked to restructure the Democratic primary schedule, allowing Arizona, New Mexico, Michigan and South Carolina to vote earlier; the move provided African-American and Hispanic communities and labor unions greater inclusion in presidential primaries. According to The Washington Post, the move bolstered United States Senator John Kerry‘s fundraising efforts.[54] The DNC rebuilt its headquarters and McAuliffe built the Democratic Party’s first National Voter File, a computer database of more than 175 million names known as “Demzilla.”[55][56] During the 2004 election cycle, the DNC hosted six presidential debates for the first time.[57]

As chairman, McAuliffe championed direct mail and online donations and built a small donor base that eliminated the party’s debt and, according to the Washington Post, “could potentially power the party for years”.[58] Under his leadership, the DNC raised a total of $248 million from donors giving $25,000 or less during the 2003-2004 election cycle.[59]

In January 2005, a few weeks before his term ended, McAuliffe earmarked $5 million of the party’s cash to assist Tim Kaine and other Virginia Democrats in their upcoming elections. This donation was the largest non-presidential disbursement in DNC history, and was part of McAuliffe’s attempt to prove Democratic viability in Southern states in the wake of the 2004 presidential election.[60] Kaine was successful in his bid, and served as the governor of Virginia from 2006 to 2010.

Post-DNC

McAuliffe (left) interacts with staffers and volunteers at Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign headquarters

McAuliffe was co-chair of the Hillary Clinton 2008 presidential campaign[61] and one of her superdelegates at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.[62]

In 2012, he was a visiting fellow at Harvard University‘s John F. Kennedy School of Government. In addition to several faculty and student lectures, McAuliffe hosted a segment entitled “The Making of a Candidate: From Running Campaigns to Running on my Own.”[63]

2009 gubernatorial campaign

McAuliffe campaigning for governor in 2009

On November 10, 2008, McAuliffe formed an exploratory committee aimed at the Virginia gubernatorial election in 2009.[64] According to The Washington Post, McAuliffe believed he would prevail “because he [could] campaign as a business leader who can bring jobs to Virginia.”[64] He also cited his ability to raise money for down-ticket Democratic candidates.[64] McAuliffe raised over $7.5 million during the campaign and donated an additional $500,000 to himself.[65][66]

In the primary election, McAuliffe faced two high-profile Democrats, state senator Creigh Deeds, the 2005 Democratic nominee for Attorney General of Virginia, and Brian Moran, a former Virginia House of Delegates Minority Leader. On June 9, 2009, McAuliffe placed second with 26% of the vote; Deeds received 50% and Moran garnered 24%.[67][68]

Governor of Virginia (2014–2018)

2013 election

McAuliffe campaigning for governor in 2013

On November 8, 2012, McAuliffe emailed supporters announcing his intention to run for governor of Virginia in 2013. In his email he stated, “It is absolutely clear to me that Virginians want their next Governor to focus on job creation and common sense fiscal responsibility instead of divisive partisan issues.”[69]

On April 2, 2013, McAuliffe became the Democratic nominee, as he ran unopposed.[70] In the general, McAuliffe campaigned against Republican nominee (and sitting Attorney General of Virginia) Ken Cuccinelli, and Libertarian nominee Robert Sarvis. McAuliffe pulled off an upset win, as Republicans had dominated recent state elections and Cuccinelli was seen as the outgoing Republican governor’s hand-picked successor. McAuliffe won 47.8% of the vote; Cuccinelli collected 45.2%, and Sarvis garnered 6.5%.[1] McAuliffe broke a 40-year trend and was the first candidate of the sitting president’s party elected governor of Virginia since 1973.[71]

Tenure

McAuliffe and the inaugural VSP Capital Campout, 2015

McAuliffe took the oath of office on January 11, 2014. Following the ceremony, McAuliffe signed four executive orders, including one instituting a ban on gifts over $100 to members of the administration,[72] and an order prohibiting discrimination against state employees for sexual orientation and gender identity.[73] The other executive orders dealt with government continuity.[73]

As governor, McAuliffe issued a record 120 vetoes.[74] He vetoed bills mainly concerning social legislation, including women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, the environment and voting rights.[75][74][76] Throughout his term, the state legislature did not overturn any of the vetoes he issued.[77][78] During his tenure, Virginia collected more than $20 billion in new capital investment, $7 billion more than any previous governor.[79][80] He participated in more than 35 trade and marketing missions to five continents, more than any other preceding governor, to promote state tourism and other products.[81][82]

In 2014, President Obama appointed McAuliffe to the Council of Governors.[83][84] That same year, the Chesapeake Bay Program appointed him to chair its executive council.[85] McAuliffe was elected as vice chair of the National Governors Association in July 2015 and became chair of the organization in July 2016.[86][87]
In June 2016, the Biotechnology Innovation Organization named McAuliffe “Governor of the Year”.[88]

In 2017, Governing named McAuliffe “Public Official of the Year” recognizing his economic development work in the state, including 200,000 new jobs created and a drop in unemployment.[82] During his term, unemployment fell from 5.7% to 3.3% and personal income rose by 14.19%.[82][89] PolitiFact noted McAuliffe, like many other governors, had little control over their state’s economic performance, with Virginia’s economy following national trends.[90] Also in 2017, NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia honored McAuliffe with the Brick Wall Award.[91] That year, he was also named one of StateScoop’s State Executives of the year.[92][93] McAuliffe has repeated false claims that he turned a budget deficit into a surplus during his tenure.[94]

McAuliffe, among registered voters in Virginia, maintained neutral-to-positive approval ratings during his tenure, but he was less popular than Bob McDonnell, Tim Kaine, and Mark Warner.[95]

Healthcare reform

After the Republican-controlled Virginia House of Delegates blocked his plans to expand Medicaid, McAuliffe unveiled his own plan titled “A Healthy Virginia.” He authorized four emergency regulations and issued one executive order allowing for use of federal funds (made available by the Affordable Care Act to any state seeking to expand its Medicaid program to increase the number of poor citizens who had access to health insurance).[96] McAuliffe’s last hope for full Medicaid expansion ended when a Democratic state senator, Phillip Puckett of Russell County, resigned from his Republican-leaning seat. As a result, Virginia Democrats’ razor-thin majority in the state senate flipped in favor of the Republicans, giving them control of both halves of the state’s legislature.[97]

Economic development

Terry McAuliffe, CEO of Dominion Resources Inc. Thomas F. Farrell II, and Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, after signing a ceremonial solar panel, August 2, 2016

In addition to healthcare reform, a major initiative of the McAuliffe’s administration over the first year was economic development, with McAuliffe using his business and political contacts to close deals for the commonwealth.[98] He helped close a deal to bring Stone Brewing to Richmond[99] and landed a $2 billion paper plant in the Richmond suburbs. McAuliffe also helped broker a deal with the Corporate Executive Board to locate its global headquarters in Arlington which created 800 new jobs.[100] McAuliffe also worked deals to restore service in Norfolk from Carnival Cruise Lines and Air China service to Dulles International Airport.[101] In February 2016, McAuliffe announced that Virginia was the first state to functionally end veteran homelessness.[102] In 2017, McAuliffe announced that Nestle USA was moving its headquarters from California to Virginia. He had worked with the company for more than a year to secure the move.[103][104] McAuliffe also helped with bringing Amazon’s second headquarters to Virginia in 2018.[105]

Voting rights

On April 22, 2016, McAuliffe signed an executive order restoring voting rights to more than 200,000 convicted felons in Virginia.[106] The order was initially overturned by the Supreme Court of Virginia for violating the Constitution of Virginia, ruling that the Governor does not have the authority to grant blanket pardons and restorations of rights.[107] On August 22, 2016, McAuliffe announced that he had restored the voting rights to almost 13,000 felons individually using an autopen.[108][109][110] Republican leadership in the state filed a contempt-of-court motion against McAuliffe for the action, which the court dismissed.[111][112] By the end of his term, McAuliffe had restored voting rights for 173,000 released felons, more than any governor in U.S. history.[113][114] The blanket restoration has remained controversial, with individuals like convicted serial child sexual abuse felon Nathan Larson being granted suffrage.[115][116] McAuliffe’s blanket restoration was opposed by several Democratic Commonwealth’s Attorneys, including Theo Stamos of Arlington County, Ray Morrogh of Fairfax County, and Paul Ebert of Prince William County; McAuliffe later retaliated against them by supporting progressive primary challengers seeking to oust Stamos and Morrogh with Ebert retiring.[117][118]

FBI investigation

On May 23, 2016, it was reported that the Federal Bureau of Investigation was investigating McAuliffe “over whether donations to his gubernatorial campaign violated the law.” One example cited was a $120,000 donation from Chinese businessman Wang Wenliang. According to CNN, Wang’s status as a legal permanent resident of the United States could make the donation legal under U.S. election law.[119]

Immigration

On January 31, 2017, McAuliffe appeared with Attorney General Mark Herring to announce that Virginia was joining the lawsuit Aziz v. Trump, challenging President Donald Trump‘s immigration executive order.[120] On March 27, 2017, McAuliffe vetoed a bill that would have prevented sanctuary cities in Virginia.[121][122]

Death penalty

While describing himself as “personally opposed” to death penalty,[123] McAuliffe, presided over the three last executions carried in Virginia, before it was abolished in 2021 under his successor Ralph Northam.[124] Governor McAuliffe also commuted two death sentences, that of Ivan Teleguz and William Joseph Burns.[125]

Post-governorship

After the 2016 presidential election, the media speculated McAuliffe could be a potential candidate in the 2020 United States presidential election.[126] Speculation intensified after Democrat Ralph Northam won the 2017 Virginia gubernatorial election by a wider than expected margin, which media reports suggested strengthened his credibility.[127]

On November 30, 2017, McAuliffe’s confidantes told The Hill he was “seriously considering a 2020 presidential run.”[128]

In February 2018, he began serving as the state engagement chair of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee.[129]

McAuliffe initially called for Governor Ralph Northam to resign in 2019 after Northam’s history of committing racially insensitive acts were made public; McAuliffe stated he regretted calling for Northam’s resignation later that month.[130][131] McAuliffe called for Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax‘s resignation following several allegations of sexual assault against Fairfax came-to-light in 2019; Fairfax called McAuliffe a “racist” for supporting his accusers.[132][133][134] Fairfax stated that McAuliffe treated him like George Floyd and Emmett Till.[135][136][137] Former Democratic governor Doug Wilder, who served as Virginia’s first Black governor, criticized McAuliffe for inconsistency on race issues and supporting Ralph Northam and Mark Herring after they were outed for engaging in blackface, stating, “Is what Northam and Herring did all right by any standard?”[138] Wilder also said that McAuliffe pushed aside Black politicians.[138]

On April 17, 2019, McAuliffe announced that he would not pursue the presidency in 2020 and would support Democrats in the 2019 Virginia elections.[139] After calling for Joe Morrissey‘s resignation from the House of Delegates for having sex with a female minor in 2015 — Morrissey had employed her as a part-time receptionist — McAuliffe campaigned for Morrissey in the 2019 elections with McAuliffe helping Morrissey raise campaign funds.[140][141][142] McAuliffe said he “respect[ed]” Morrissey’s fighting spirit at a campaign fundraiser for Morrissey.[143]

2021 gubernatorial campaign

Campaign logo, 2021

On December 8, 2020, McAuliffe posted a video to his Facebook page announcing his return campaign for governor.[144] On June 8, 2021, McAuliffe won the Democratic primary, garnering 62% of the vote, defeating four other candidates.[4] He will face Republican Glenn Youngkin in the general election. Their first debate was canceled after Youngkin refused to attend, citing his objection to moderator Judy Woodruff over a donation she made to the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund in 2010; Youngkin has committed to three other debates with McAuliffe.[145] In June, according to PolitiFact, McAuliffe made a “pants on fire” claim when he stated, “I inherited the largest budget deficit in the history of the state from the Republicans;” he actually inherited a balanced budget from his Republican predecessor.[146] McAuliffe announced his support for “Northam’s newly announced mask mandate” in August 2021.[147] Also in August 2021, McAuliffe voiced his support for vaccine mandates.[148]

Political positions

Abortion

In 2013, McAuliffe said he supports “keeping existing Virginia laws on when abortions are legal.”[149] He opposes new state health and safety regulations on abortion clinics.[150][151]

On February 21, 2017, Governor McAuliffe vetoed a bill that would have defunded Planned Parenthood in Virginia.[152]

In 2019, according to PolitiFact, McAuliffe made a “full flop” on late-term abortions, initially opposing a bill to deregulate them in February before supporting the same bill in April.[153]

Education

McAuliffe has argued for workforce development, with education proposals being funded through savings from the proposed Medicaid expansion.[154] McAuliffe reduced accreditation standards in public schools.[155] McAuliffe has falsely stated he raised education funding to record levels.[156]

Healthcare

McAuliffe supports the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. He supports expanding Medicaid, arguing that taxes Virginians pay would return to Virginia.[149]

Energy and environmental issues

McAuliffe believes human activity has contributed to global warming, and characterizes clean energy as a national security issue.[157] He supports reducing dependence on foreign oil through investment in technologies such as carbon capture and storage, solar farms, and offshore wind turbines.[157][158] Billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer and the League of Conservation Voters endorsed McAuliffe.[159][160]

In his 2009 campaign, McAuliffe said, “I want to move past coal. As governor, I never want another coal plant built.”[161] In his 2013 campaign, McAuliffe said he supported tougher safety requirements on coal plants.[149] He also announced his support for the Environmental Protection Agency‘s Clean Power Plan, which would limit the amount of carbon dioxide that could be emitted by power plants, making it difficult to build new coal-fired plants and to keep old ones operating.[162]

In 2017, McAuliffe filed a request with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management that Virginia’s coastal areas be excluded from a program to open up the East Coast to offshore drilling.[163][164]

In May 2017, McAuliffe issued an executive order for Virginia to become a member of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) to cut greenhouse gases from power plants. It was the first southern state to join.[165][82]

Gun rights

McAuliffe is a hunter and owns several shotguns.[166] McAuliffe supports universal background checks for gun sales,[167][168] as well as “a renewal of the state’s one-a-month limit on handgun purchases,… a ban on anyone subject to a protection-from-abuse order from having a gun and the revoking of concealed-handgun permits for parents who are behind on child-support payments.”[168] McAuliffe has also called for an assault weapons ban in Virginia.[169]

In January 2016, McAuliffe reached a compromise with Republicans, allowing interstate holders of concealed carry permits in Virginia, nullifying Attorney General Mark Herring‘s previous ruling, effective February 1, 2016. The deal will also take guns from domestic abusers and will require state police to attend gun shows to provide background checks upon request from private sellers.[170]

Impeachment

In August 2018, McAuliffe stated “that’s something we ought to look at”, referring to President Trump’s impeachment. He argued that if “President Obama had gone to Helsinki and done what President Trump had done, you would already have impeachment hearings going on.”[171]

LGBT rights

McAuliffe supports same-sex marriage and supported the United States Supreme Court ruling in June 2015 that deemed the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional.[172]

In 2013 during his gubernatorial candidacy, McAuliffe declared his support for same-sex marriage and was the first candidate to do so.[173][174]

Transportation

McAuliffe supported the bipartisan transportation bill that passed the General Assembly in 2013. He is in favor of the Silver Line, which would expand Metrorail services into Fairfax and Loudoun counties.[175] In May 2011, according to PolitiFact, McAuliffe made a “pants on fire” claim when he stated Virginia has no mechanism to repay transportation bonds; the commonwealth does in fact have one.[176]

Personal life

Terry McAuliffe and his family at Twin Lakes State Park, 2015

McAuliffe married Dorothy Swann on October 8, 1988.[177] They reside in McLean, Virginia with their five children.[178] Their son Jack attended the United States Naval Academy and became a Marine.[178][179]

In March 2018, McAuliffe was appointed as a visiting professor at George Mason University.[180]

Memoirs

McAuliffe authored two books that both appeared on the New York Times Best Seller list.[181][182]

Terry McAuliffe’s memoir, What a Party! My Life Among Democrats: Presidents, Candidates, Donors, Activists, Alligators, and Other Wild Animals, was published in 2007 with Steve Kettmann and made the New York Times Best Seller List, debuting at #5 in February 2007.[182]

Among anecdotes told in the memoir was McAuliffe wrestling an eight-foot, 260-pound alligator for three minutes to secure a $15,000 contribution for President Jimmy Carter in 1980.[183] McAuliffe and the alligator would appear on the cover of Life magazine.[183] Others included hunting with King Juan Carlos of Spain, golf outings with President Bill Clinton, and reviving the Democratic National Convention.[184] McAuliffe also wrote about the September 11 attacks and his experiences in the Democratic National Committee office immediately after.[185] McAuliffe was criticized for writing he felt like a “caged rat” when he was unable to raise campaign funds for the Democratic Party after 9/11, left his wife crying with their newborn child to raise money for the Democrats, and left his wife in the delivery room to attend a party for a Washington Post reporter.[186]

In 2019, McAuliffe wrote a second book, entitled Beyond Charlottesville, Taking a Stand Against White Nationalism.[187][188] In August 2019, the book made the New York Times Best Seller List.[189]

Electoral history

2009
2009 Virginia gubernatorial Democratic primary[190]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Creigh Deeds 158,845 49.77
DemocraticTerry McAuliffe84,38726.44
DemocraticBrian Moran75,93623.79
Total votes319,168 100.00
2013

McAuliffe ran unopposed in the 2013 Virginia gubernatorial Democratic primary.

2013 Virginia gubernatorial election[191]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Terry McAuliffe 1,069,859 47.75
RepublicanKen Cuccinelli1,013,35545.23
LibertarianRobert Sarvis146,0846.52
Write-in11,0910.50
Total votes2,240,314 100.00
2021
2021 Virginia gubernatorial Democratic primary[192]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Terry McAuliffe 307,367 62.10
DemocraticJennifer Carroll Foy98,05219.81
DemocraticJennifer McClellan58,21311.76
DemocraticJustin Fairfax17,6063.56
DemocraticLee J. Carter13,6942.77
Total votes494,932 100.00

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External links


X
Glenn Youngkin 1Glenn Youngkin

Current Position: Republican Nominee for Governor of Virginia
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 Governor

‍Glenn Youngkin is a homegrown Virginian who grew up in Richmond and Virginia Beach. As his father changed jobs, Glenn learned that moving around didn’t equal moving up – nothing was handed to him. From his first job washing dishes and frying eggs at a diner in Virginia Beach, Glenn embraced hard work and responsibility to help his family when his father lost his job. His determination to succeed earned him multiple high school basketball honors in Virginia and an athletic scholarship to college.

After earning an engineering degree at Rice University, and his MBA at Harvard Business School, Glenn and his wife Suzanne moved to Northern Virginia. Glenn landed a job at The Carlyle Group, where he spent the next 25 years. Working his way to the top of the company, Glenn played a key role in building Carlyle into one of the leading investment firms in the world. His efforts have helped fund the retirements of teachers, police officers, firefighters and other frontline public servants and supported hundreds of thousands of American jobs.

Source: Campaign page

Virginia Republican gubernatorial nominee Glenn Youngkin broke with former President Trump on Thursday on whether he believes Democrats will cheat in the upcoming election.

“No, I think we’re going to have a clean, fair election and I fully expect to win,” Youngkin told moderator Susan Page at the first Virginia general election debate of the cycle.

Additionally, Youngkin said he did not believe there had been significant fraud in Virginia’s elections.

The Republican candidate for governor in Virginia, Glenn Youngkin, issued a challenge of sorts this week to his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, inviting him to film a joint public service announcement promoting vaccination against COVID-19.

It was a ploy that could be clever, but maybe too clever by half.

Certainly Youngkin’s gambit had the benefit of being an appeal for bipartisan cooperation that could spur an increase in vaccination. He has also run a TV ad in which he says, “I chose to get the COVID vaccine. It’s your right to make your own choice, and I respect that. I do hope you’ll choose to join me in getting the vaccine.”

Youngkin seeks to reverse Virginia GOP's Trump-era carnage
Politico, Zach MontellaroMay 11, 2021 (Short)

Less than 12 hours after Glenn Youngkin locked up the GOP nomination for Virginia governor on Monday night, former President Donald Trump barreled into 2021’s most competitive statewide election.

“Glenn is pro-Business, pro-Second Amendment, pro-Veterans, pro-America, he knows how to make Virginia’s economy rip-roaring, and he has my Complete and Total Endorsement!” Trump wrote in a statement Tuesday morning that was circulated by his political action committee.

Trump’s endorsement came after Youngkin emerged from a contentious nominating battle seeking to lock down the Republican base. But unlike states like Arkansas or South Carolina — red states where Trump has already made endorsements in a 2022 gubernatorial race — the former president’s support in Virginia carries more risks than benefits.

Trump’s presidency ushered in an era of defeats for Virginia Republicans: a Democratic sweep of statewide elections in 2017, the loss of three swing congressional seats in 2018 and, finally, Democrats flipping both state legislative chambers in 2019, giving Democrats complete control of Richmond for the first time since 1994.

Summary

Current Position: Republican Nominee for Governor of Virginia
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 Governor

‍Glenn Youngkin is a homegrown Virginian who grew up in Richmond and Virginia Beach. As his father changed jobs, Glenn learned that moving around didn’t equal moving up – nothing was handed to him. From his first job washing dishes and frying eggs at a diner in Virginia Beach, Glenn embraced hard work and responsibility to help his family when his father lost his job. His determination to succeed earned him multiple high school basketball honors in Virginia and an athletic scholarship to college.

After earning an engineering degree at Rice University, and his MBA at Harvard Business School, Glenn and his wife Suzanne moved to Northern Virginia. Glenn landed a job at The Carlyle Group, where he spent the next 25 years. Working his way to the top of the company, Glenn played a key role in building Carlyle into one of the leading investment firms in the world. His efforts have helped fund the retirements of teachers, police officers, firefighters and other frontline public servants and supported hundreds of thousands of American jobs.

Source: Campaign page

News

Virginia Republican gubernatorial nominee Glenn Youngkin broke with former President Trump on Thursday on whether he believes Democrats will cheat in the upcoming election.

“No, I think we’re going to have a clean, fair election and I fully expect to win,” Youngkin told moderator Susan Page at the first Virginia general election debate of the cycle.

Additionally, Youngkin said he did not believe there had been significant fraud in Virginia’s elections.

The Republican candidate for governor in Virginia, Glenn Youngkin, issued a challenge of sorts this week to his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, inviting him to film a joint public service announcement promoting vaccination against COVID-19.

It was a ploy that could be clever, but maybe too clever by half.

Certainly Youngkin’s gambit had the benefit of being an appeal for bipartisan cooperation that could spur an increase in vaccination. He has also run a TV ad in which he says, “I chose to get the COVID vaccine. It’s your right to make your own choice, and I respect that. I do hope you’ll choose to join me in getting the vaccine.”

Youngkin seeks to reverse Virginia GOP’s Trump-era carnage
Politico, Zach MontellaroMay 11, 2021 (Short)

Less than 12 hours after Glenn Youngkin locked up the GOP nomination for Virginia governor on Monday night, former President Donald Trump barreled into 2021’s most competitive statewide election.

“Glenn is pro-Business, pro-Second Amendment, pro-Veterans, pro-America, he knows how to make Virginia’s economy rip-roaring, and he has my Complete and Total Endorsement!” Trump wrote in a statement Tuesday morning that was circulated by his political action committee.

Trump’s endorsement came after Youngkin emerged from a contentious nominating battle seeking to lock down the Republican base. But unlike states like Arkansas or South Carolina — red states where Trump has already made endorsements in a 2022 gubernatorial race — the former president’s support in Virginia carries more risks than benefits.

Trump’s presidency ushered in an era of defeats for Virginia Republicans: a Democratic sweep of statewide elections in 2017, the loss of three swing congressional seats in 2018 and, finally, Democrats flipping both state legislative chambers in 2019, giving Democrats complete control of Richmond for the first time since 1994.

Twitter

About

Service to Others, Solutions for All

Glenn Youngkin has long heard a call to service and committed time to serving his community and the people around him. Glenn volunteered to coach multiple youth basketball teams, and he served on the boards of many non-profit organizations, including the Virginia Ready Initiative, Virginia Tech’s Innovation Campus Advisory Board, the Museum of the Bible, and the Meadowkirk Retreat Center.

He also served as Church Warden at Holy Trinity Church in Northern Virginia and is a member of the Business Council and the American Enterprise Institute’s National Council.

Contact

Email:

Web

Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia

Issues

Source: Campaign page

The Game Plan

One party Democrat control is failing Virginians: our recovery from the pandemic ranks in the bottom 10 among states, our students are behind in school, violent crime has risen to 20-year highs, and much of government, like the Virginia Employment Commission and Department of Motor Vehicles, is broken. People are voting with their feet and leaving the Commonwealth.

It’s time for bold leadership. Glenn will make sure Virginia has better-paying jobs, the best schools, the safest communities, and a government that works for you. His game plan will create 400,000 jobs and make sure every student graduates career or college ready.

Glenn will cut exploding costs for families and relieve the burdens of inflation and taxes. He will cut regulations to create jobs and make it easier for innovators and entrepreneurs to get small businesses moving again. He will restore our high standards for schools and our students, ban critical race theory, invest in our teachers and schools, and empower parents with real choices.

He will defend – not defund – our law enforcement heroes, end human trafficking, and rescue our failing mental health system. And Glenn will make state government honest, efficient, and modern.

While moving forward on these priorities, Glenn will protect our constitutional rights.

The result will be a Commonwealth where businesses can prosper, students can thrive, communities are safe, and people – not politicians – are in charge.

It’s going to take a new kind of leader, not a failed politician looking for a second chance, to make it happen. When Glenn is Governor, we will get it done together.

Governance

Make Goverment Work For You

Virginia’s government is failing its fundamental mission – serving the people. Our system is broken as customer service at agencies such as the DMV and VEC disappears. Glenn will make government work by:

  • Fixing the DMV & the Virginia Employment Commission
  • Protecting our Constitutional Rights
  • Conducting a Statewide Transparency Audit to Root out Waste, Fraud & Abuse
  • Restoring Photo ID Laws & Making it Easy to Vote and Hard to Cheat
  • Investing More Money in Roads & Highways
  • Completing Long-Delayed Environmental Projects

Economy

Cut Costs For Virginians

The cost of living is rising for Virginians, and people are leaving the Commonwealth to look for jobs and start lives elsewhere. Glenn will tackle the rising cost of living and cut costs for Virginians by:

  • Eliminating Virginia’s Grocery Tax & Suspending the Recent Gas Tax Hike for 12 Months
  • Providing a One Time Tax Rebate of $600 for Joint Filers and $300 for Individuals
  • Ending Runaway Property Taxes by Requiring Voter Approval for Increases
  • Cutting Income Taxes by Doubling the Standard Deduction & Cutting Taxes on Veteran Retirement Pay

‍Reinvigorate Job Growth 

Add 400,000 Jobs & 10,000 Startups
Virginia’s jobs machine is broken. After zero job growth from 2013 through 2020, Virginia currently ranks 44th in job recovery during the pandemic and was recently ranked as the 49th best state to start a business. Glenn will jumpstart our economy by:

  • Keeping Virginia Open and Protecting Lives & Livelihoods
  • Protecting Virginians from Forced Unionization & Cutting Job Killing Regulations by 25%
  • Launching #JumpstartJobs to Develop Talent, Train Workers, Attract Investment, & Make Virginia the
  • Easiest State to Start a Business
  • Reinvigorating Small Business by Enacting a Small Business Tax Holiday & Ending the Tax on Rebuild VA and PPP Loans

Education

Restore Excellence In Education

Virginia’s students have fallen behind because of extended school closings, lower school standards, and political agendas. Glenn will empower parents and restore excellence and commonsense in education by:

  • Keeping Schools Open Safely Five Days a Week
  • Restoring High Expectations & Getting Every Student College or Career Ready
  • Ridding Political Agendas from the Classroom by Banning Critical Race Theory
  • Rebuilding Crumbling Schools, Raising Teacher Pay, & Investing in Special Education Programs
  • Creating at least 20 New Innovation Charter Schools across the K-12 Spectrum to Provide Choice

Safety

Keep our Communities Safe

Failed leadership and dangerous policies have left Virginia less safe. With rising violent crime and the murder rate at a 20-year high, Glenn will keep our communities safe by:

  • Fully Funding Law Enforcement & Protecting Qualified Immunity for our Law Enforcement Heroes
  • Firing the Parole Board & Keeping Violent Criminals Off Our Streets
  • Launching #UnityInTheCommunity Programs Operation Ceasefire & Project Exile
  • Fixing Our Broken Mental Health System

Wikipedia

Glenn Allen Youngkin[2] (born December 9, 1966)[3] is an American businessman who is the Republican nominee in the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election. Prior to entering politics, he spent 25 years at the private-equity firm The Carlyle Group, rising to become its CEO.

He stepped down from the Carlyle Group in 2020, and announced his candidacy for the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election in January 2021. Youngkin won the Republican gubernatorial nomination on May 10, 2021.

Early life and education

Youngkin was born in Richmond, Virginia.[4] He is the son of Ellis (née Quinn) and Carroll Wayne Youngkin. His father played basketball for Duke University and worked in accounting and finance.[5] When Youngkin was a teenager, the family moved from Richmond to Virginia Beach.[6] He attended Norfolk Academy in Norfolk, Virginia, graduating in 1985.[7]

Youngkin attended Rice University on a basketball scholarship,[8] playing four NCAA Division I seasons with Rice Owls men’s basketball in the Southwest Conference where he totaled 82 points and 67 rebounds in his career.[9] He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering and a Bachelor of Arts in managerial studies in 1990.[10] He earned an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1994.[11]

Career

Early career

After graduating from Rice in 1990, Youngkin joined the investment bank First Boston,[10] where he handled mergers and acquisitions and capital market financing.[12] The company was bought out by Credit Suisse and became Credit Suisse First Boston; Youngkin left in 1992 to pursue an MBA.[13][10]

In 1994, after receiving his MBA, he joined the management consulting firm McKinsey & Company.[13][10][14]

The Carlyle Group

In August 1995,[14] Youngkin joined the private-equity firm The Carlyle Group, based in Washington, D.C.,[13] initially as a member of the U.S. buyout team.[10] In 1999, he was named a partner and managing director of Carlyle.[15][16] He managed the firm’s UK buyout team (2000–2005)[10][17] and global industrial sector investment team (2005–2008), dividing his time between London and Washington.[15][18]

In April 2008, Carlyle’s founders asked Youngkin to step back from deal-making to focus on the firm’s broader strategy.[19][20] In 2009 the founders created a seven-person operating committee, chaired by Youngkin, which oversaw the non-deal, day-to-day operations of Carlyle.[20][21] In 2009 Youngkin also joined, along with Daniel Akerson, the firm’s executive committee, which had previously consisted solely of the three founders.[21][22]

When Carlyle’s chief financial officer Peter Nachtwey left suddenly in late 2010, Youngkin became interim CFO[23] until Adena Friedman was hired as CFO late March 2011.[24] In 2010, Youngkin joined the firm’s management committee.[25][20] Youngkin was chief operating officer of the Carlyle Group from March 2011 until June 2014.[26]

Youngkin played a major role in taking Carlyle public, supervising the initial public offering.[20][27][28][23][29][30]

In June 2014, he became co-president and co-chief operating officer with Michael J. Cavanagh, who joined the Carlyle Group from JPMorgan Chase.[31][32] Together they helped develop and implement the firm’s growth initiatives and managed the firm’s operations on a day-to-day basis.[33] Cavanagh left the firm in May 2015 to become CFO of Comcast, leaving Youngkin as president and COO of Carlyle.[34]

Co-CEO

In October 2017, the Carlyle Group announced that its founders would remain executive chairmen on the board of directors but step down as the day-to-day leaders of the firm; they named Youngkin and Kewsong Lee to succeed them, as co-CEOs, effective January 1, 2018.[19] As co-CEOs, Youngkin oversaw Carlyle’s real estate, energy, infrastructure businesses, and investment solutions businesses; Lee oversaw the firm’s corporate private equity and global credit businesses.[35][36] Youngkin and Lee also joined the firm’s board of directors when they became co-CEOs.[30]

During Youngkin and Lee’s tenure as co-CEOs, they oversaw the firm’s transition from a publicly traded partnership into a corporation.[37][38][39]

Bloomberg News described the co-CEO relationship as “awkward … and increasingly acrimonious” and Lee gained sole control after 2 12 years.[29] In July 2020, Youngkin announced that he would retire from the Carlyle Group at the end of September 2020, stating his intention to focus on community and public service efforts.[40][37] In 2020, Youngkin and his wife founded a nonprofit, Virginia Ready Initiative, focusing on connecting unemployed people in the state with job-training programs and potential employers.[41][42][43][44]

2021 gubernatorial election

Campaign sign for Glenn Youngkin

In January 2021, Youngkin announced that he would seek the Republican Party‘s nomination for governor of Virginia.[45][6] A first-time candidate, Youngkin’s vast personal wealth gave him the ability to self-fund his candidacy,[46][47] and he spent at least $5.5 million of his own money on his primary campaign.[48]

Youngkin won the Virginia Republican Party state convention on May 10, 2021, after multiple rounds of ranked-choice voting across 39 locations across the state, becoming the party’s nominee for Virginia governor. He defeated six other candidates.[48] All the Republican candidates, including Youngkin, stressed their allegiance to Donald Trump and Trumpism,[47] although other candidates for the nomination, such as state Senator Amanda Chase, were the most vocally pro-Trump.[49] Trump endorsed Youngkin after he captured the party’s nomination.[49]

When seeking the Republican nomination for governor, Youngkin for months refused to acknowledge that President Joe Biden won the presidency legitimately. Youngkin dodged or deflected questions on the subject, which became an issue after Trump refused to accept his defeat by Biden. After Youngkin won the Republican nomination, he shifted his position, stating that Biden was the legitimate president.[50][51]

During Youngkin’s primary campaign, he pledged to “stand up against all of the legislation that has been passed by the Democrats”; to be a staunch opponent of abortion; and to repeal gun legislation that had been enacted under Democrats, including a red flag law, a handgun purchase limitation of one per month, and universal background checks.[52] After winning the nomination, he de-emphasized these social issues, seeking to appeal to suburban swing voters.[52] In July, he was caught on a hot mic telling an activist that he would limit his comments about abortion during the campaign so that he would not alienate independent voters.[53][54]

He will face the Democratic nominee, former governor Terry McAuliffe, in the general election. On July 12, 2021, Youngkin refused to meet with McAuliffe in the Virginia Bar Association (VBA) debate, citing his objection to the moderator, Judy Woodruff, for a donation she made to the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund in 2010. The VBA had held a gubernatorial debate every election year since 1985. Youngkin has committed to three future debates with McAuliffe.[55] McAuliffe and Youngkin had their first debate on September 16, 2021, hosted by the Appalachian School of Law.[56] Youngkin said he supported the COVID-19 vaccine, but opposed vaccine requirements. In light of the controversial Texas Heartbeat Act, Youngkin criticized the law, stating he instead favors a “pain threshold bill,” which occurs around the 20th week of pregnancy.[57][58]

Personal life

Youngkin lives in Great Falls, Virginia with his wife Suzanne and their four children.[59] As of May 2021, he had an estimated net worth of over $300 million.[1]

Youngkin is a Christian and previously served on the vestry of Holy Trinity Church in McLean, Virginia.[60]

Youngkin stands 6 feet 7 inches (201 cm) tall.[61]

References

  1. ^ a b Schneider, Gregory S.; Vozzella, Laura (May 12, 2021). “Virginia, Meet Glenn Youngkin – The Republican Nominee for Governor Who Both Parties Are Racing to Define”. The Washington Post.
  2. ^ Nisen, Max (October 24, 2013). “11 Rockstar Executives Who Earn More Than Their CEOs”. Business Insider. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  3. ^ “Glenn Allen Youngkin”. Companies House. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  4. ^ “FCRC February Meeting Highlights”. FauquierGOP. February 5, 2021. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  5. ^ “Carroll Wayne Youngkin”. Dignity Memorial. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  6. ^ a b “Millionaire investor joins Virginia governor contest”. Associated Press. January 27, 2021. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  7. ^ “Glenn Youngkin ’85 Helps Create Nonprofit Aimed At Supporting Unemployed Workers”. Norfolk Academy News. Norfolk Academy. June 30, 2020. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  8. ^ Vozzella, Laura (January 27, 2021). “Former Carlyle executive Glenn Youngkin joins race for Virginia governor”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  9. ^ “Glenn Youngkin”. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 25, 2021.
  10. ^ a b c d e f “The 2006-07 Rice Owls Basketball Media Guide” (PDF). Rice Owls. p. 3. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  11. ^ “Two HBS Alumni To Lead Carlyle Group”. Harvard Business School. October 27, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  12. ^ “QinetiQ Group plc Notice of AGM”. Investegate. June 27, 2006. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  13. ^ a b c Kelly, Jason; Perlberg, Heather (June 4, 2018). “Meet Private Equity’s Next Generation”. Bloomberg. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  14. ^ a b “Memorandum submitted by the Carlyle Group”. Parliament of the United Kingdom. January 15, 2003. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  15. ^ a b “Glenn Youngkin Named Head of the Global Industrial Team”. The Carlyle Group. September 1, 2005. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  16. ^ “Form 8-K”. The Carlyle Group. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. October 23, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  17. ^ “Carlyle’s World, Glenn Youngkin’s Mandate”. PRLog. Privcap. February 11, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  18. ^ Kinder Morgan, Inc. (February 22, 2012). “Form 10-K: Annual Report for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011” (PDF). AnnualReports.com. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  19. ^ a b Gottfried, Miriam (October 27, 2017). “Carlyle’s Next Generation: A Deal Whiz and a Homegrown Quarterback”. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  20. ^ a b c d Kelly, Jason (2012). The New Tycoons: Inside the Trillion Dollar Private Equity Industry That Owns Everything. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 31–32, 40.
  21. ^ a b “Carlyle 2009 Annual Report” (PDF). EastCountyMagazine.org. The Carlyle Group. 2010. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  22. ^ “Generation Next”. Private Equity International. May 28, 2010. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  23. ^ a b Alesci, Cristina (December 13, 2010). “Carlyle Finance Chief Peter Nachtwey Leaves Firm”. Bloomberg News. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  24. ^ Gottlieb, Jenna (February 15, 2011). “Carlyle names new CFO”. Private Equity International. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  25. ^ “Carlyle 2010 Annual Report” (PDF). PEDaily.cn. The Carlyle Group. 2011. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  26. ^ “Form 8-K”. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The Carlyle Group. October 23, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  27. ^ Sender, Henny; Espinoza, Javier (October 25, 2017). “Carlyle profiles: closer look at founders and new management”. Financial Times. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  28. ^ Sender, Henny (December 12, 2010). “Carlyle faces setback for listing plans”. Financial Times. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  29. ^ a b Perlberg, Heather (July 23, 2020). “Carlyle Co-CEO’s Abrupt Exit Caps a Long, Awkward Power Struggle”. Bloomberg News. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  30. ^ a b Banerjee, Devin (October 25, 2017). “Carlyle’s Billionaire Founders Hand Reins to New Leaders”. Bloomberg News. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  31. ^ Heath, Thomas L. (March 25, 2014). “Carlyle Group names Cavanagh and Youngkin as co-presidents”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  32. ^ Dezember, Ryan (February 26, 2015). “Carlyle Founders Took In $800 Million in 2014”. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  33. ^ “Carlyle poaches Dimon protege”. The Australian. Dow Jones Newswires. March 26, 2014. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  34. ^ Roumeliotis, Greg (May 11, 2015). “Comcast names Carlyle Group’s Michael Cavanagh as CFO”. Reuters. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  35. ^ Bray, Chad (October 26, 2017). “Private equity Carlyle Group names Kewsong Lee, Glenn Youngkin as new leaders”. Australian Financial Review. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  36. ^ Espinoza, Javier; Massoudi, Arash (October 25, 2017). “Carlyle names executives to succeed its co-founders”. Financial Times. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  37. ^ a b Lewis, Adam (July 21, 2020). “Carlyle co-CEO Glenn Youngkin to retire, leaving reins to Kewsong Lee”. PitchBook. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  38. ^ Gottfried, Miriam (July 31, 2019). “Carlyle to Abandon Partnership Structure and Dual-Class Shares”. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  39. ^ Louch, William (July 21, 2020). “Carlyle Co-CEO Glenn Youngkin to Step Down”. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  40. ^ Wiggi, Kaye; Vandevelde, Mark (July 21, 2020). “Carlyle co-chief Glenn Youngkin to step down”. Financial Times. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  41. ^ “Reskilling for a changing economy: A discussion with Glenn Youngkin”. McKinsey & Company. September 1, 2020. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  42. ^ Georgescu, Peter (January 21, 2021). “A Scalable System To Lower Unemployment”. Forbes. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  43. ^ Pierceall, Kimberly (June 29, 2020). “Nonprofit offers extra $1,000 to unemployed Virginians who get re-trained for a new career”. The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  44. ^ “Glenn Youngkin announces run for Virginia governor”. WAVY. January 27, 2021. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  45. ^ Vozzella, Laura (January 11, 2021). “Political newcomer with ability to self-fund to enter race for Virginia governor”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  46. ^ Gabriel, Trip (May 11, 2021). “In Virginia, a Fight Over the Suburbs in the Governor’s Race”. The New York Times.
  47. ^ a b Karson, Kendall; Scanlan, Quinn (May 7, 2021). Trumpy, Trumpier and Trumpiest’: Virginia GOP to vote on nominee for governor in post-Trump era”. ABC News.
  48. ^ a b Gabriel, Trip (May 10, 2021). “Glenn Youngkin Declares Victory as G.O.P. Nominee for Virginia Governor”. The New York Times. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  49. ^ a b Barakay, Matthew (May 15, 2021). “Virginia GOP nominee’s independence from Trump up for debate”. Associated Press.
  50. ^ Oliver, Ned (May 12, 2021). “After months of refusing to say Biden won legitimately, Youngkin says, ‘Of course.. Virginia Mercury.
  51. ^ Fiske, Warren (May 19, 2021). “Youngkin shifts position on the legitimacy of Biden’s election”. PolitiFact.
  52. ^ a b Vozzella, Laura (May 25, 2021). “Glenn Youngkin, GOP nominee for Virginia governor, goes mum on guns and abortion”. The Washington Post.
  53. ^ Pope, Michael (July 8, 2021). “A Hot Mic Could Have Lasting Impacts on the Gubernatorial Race”. wvtf.org. WVTF. Retrieved July 14, 2021.
  54. ^ “Video shows Glenn Youngkin saying he can’t fully discuss abortion or risk losing independent Virginia voters”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  55. ^ Vozzella, Laura. “Youngkin to skip marquee debate over moderator’s donation to Clinton Bush Haiti Fund”. The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved July 14, 2021.
  56. ^ Leonor, Mel. “McAuliffe and Youngkin split on COVID mandates, abortion and energy policy in first debate”. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  57. ^ Rankin, Sarah; Helber, Steve (September 17, 2021). “McAuliffe, Youngkin Clash Over Abortion, COVID in 1st Debate”. US News. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  58. ^ Fiske, Warren (September 17, 2021). “Fact-checking the first McAuliffe-Youngkin debate”. PolitiFact. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  59. ^ “A Conversation with David Rubenstein Moderated by Glenn Youngkin”. Harvard Business School Club of Chicago. November 2020. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  60. ^ “HTC Vestry’s Statement on Racial Unity”.
  61. ^ “Glenn Youngkin”. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
Party political offices
Preceded by
Ed Gillespie
Republican nominee for Governor of Virginia
2021
Most recent


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2021 Lt. Governor's Race 12021 VA Lt. Governor’s Race

The 2021 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021. Incumbent lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax was eligible to run for a second term, but instead ran for governor

Virginia GOP Lt. Gov. nominee lays off campaign staff ahead of election
The Hill, Julia ManchesterSeptember 8, 2021 (Medium)
Virginia GOP lt. gov. nominee lays off campaign staff ahead of election
© Getty Images

Winsome Sears, the GOP candidate in Virginia’s lieutenant governor race, laid off her entire campaign staff 55 days out from Election Day in the commonwealth.

A former Sears campaign staffer, who was laid off, told The Hill that the entire team, including the campaign manager, was let go on Wednesday. Staff was notified by a law firm about the termination and no reason was given for the layoffs, according to the former staffer.

The Richmond-based GOP consulting firm Creative Direct is now in charge of the campaign.

“Like any campaign, we have to make strategic decisions that best position us for victory,” Tucker Davis, a senior Sears campaign adviser, said in a statement to reporters. “We are focused on running a lean campaign over the next 55 days, and using all of our resources to get our message out to voters.”

Davis said in the same statement that Sears was in “a strong position to become Virginia’s next lieutenant governor.”

Summary

The 2021 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021. Incumbent lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax was eligible to run for a second term, but instead ran for governor

News

Virginia GOP Lt. Gov. nominee lays off campaign staff ahead of election
The Hill, Julia ManchesterSeptember 8, 2021 (Medium)
Virginia GOP lt. gov. nominee lays off campaign staff ahead of election
© Getty Images

Winsome Sears, the GOP candidate in Virginia’s lieutenant governor race, laid off her entire campaign staff 55 days out from Election Day in the commonwealth.

A former Sears campaign staffer, who was laid off, told The Hill that the entire team, including the campaign manager, was let go on Wednesday. Staff was notified by a law firm about the termination and no reason was given for the layoffs, according to the former staffer.

The Richmond-based GOP consulting firm Creative Direct is now in charge of the campaign.

“Like any campaign, we have to make strategic decisions that best position us for victory,” Tucker Davis, a senior Sears campaign adviser, said in a statement to reporters. “We are focused on running a lean campaign over the next 55 days, and using all of our resources to get our message out to voters.”

Davis said in the same statement that Sears was in “a strong position to become Virginia’s next lieutenant governor.”

About

Source: Ballotpedia

Hala Ayala (D) and Winsome Sears (R) are running in the general election for lieutenant governor of Virginia on November 2, 2021. Ayala won the June 8 Democratic primary with 39.1% of the vote, followed by Sam Rasoul (D) with 25.3%.[1] Winsome Sears defeated Tim Hugo in the fifth round of ranked-choice voting with 54% of the vote to Hugo’s 46% in the May 8 Republican convention.[2]

In a Roanoke College poll conducted between August 3 and August 17, 2021, Ayala led Sears 42% to 36%. In the same poll, a plurality of respondents (26%) chose the economy as the most important issue. Other issues included COVID-19 (9%), race relations (7%), education (7%) and health care (6%).[3]

As of June 30, Ayala led Sears in fundraising, with $1,610,917 in total contributions to Sears’ $750,351. A number of state legislators, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam (D), The Washington Post, and EMILY’s List endorsed Ayala. Sears received endorsements from U.S. Rep. Bob Good (R), Maggie’s List, and the National Rifle Association. Click here to see more noteworthy endorsements.

Ayala, who was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 2017, has emphasized her experience in the legislature, saying she “has already helped shepherd some of the Democratic Majority’s biggest successes and knows how to get things done.” Ayala said she would “focus on an inclusive economy that ensures every Virginian can put food on the table and keep a roof over their heads” through increasing the minimum wage, investing in affordable housing, and mandating hazard pay for essential workers.[4]

Sears, a former Marine and member of the House of Delegates from 2002-2004, said her views are based on “her service to the Commonwealth and her Country, her faith, and her belief in equal opportunity for all Virginians.” She said she would “support policies that keep taxes low, reduce regulations, and promote small businesses,” and “that reduce the cost of living for Virginians,” including maintaining Virginia’s Right-to-Work Law, providing tax breaks for small businesses, and reducing state excise and income taxes.[5]

The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the Virginia State Senate and may cast tie-breaking votes. The lieutenant governor is first in the line of succession to the governor; in the event the governor dies, resigns, or otherwise leaves office, the lieutenant governor becomes governor. Of the four lieutenant governors who have been elected since 2002, three were Democrats and one was a Republican.[6] Two of them, Tim Kaine (D) and Ralph Northam (D), went on to become governor. The lieutenant governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and, unlike the governor, may run for re-election.

Click on candidate names below to view their key messages:


Ayala

Sears
This election is a battleground race. Other 2021 battlegrounds include:
  • City council elections in Dallas, Texas (May 1, 2021, general elections)
  • Denver Public Schools, Colorado, elections (2021)
  • Mayoral election in New York, New York (June 22, 2021, Democratic primary)

 

Election Updates

  • August 21, 2021: In a Roanoke College poll conducted between August 3 and August 17, 2021, Ayala led Sears 42% to 36%.[7]

Source: Ballotpedia

Wikipedia

The 2021 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election will be held on November 2, 2021. Incumbent lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax was eligible to run for a second term, but instead ran for governor.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Withdrawn

Declined

Endorsements

Hala Ayala
Governor
State delegates
Organizations
Andria McClellan
Federal officials
State senators
Individuals
Organizations
Sean Perryman
State delegates
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Xavier Warren
Organizations
Elizabeth Guzman (withdrawn)
State delegates
Organizations

Polling

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Hala AyalaElizabeth GuzmanMark LevineAndria McClellanSean PerrymanSam RasoulXavier WarrenOtherUndecided
Roanoke CollegeMay 24 – June 1, 2021637 (LV)± 3.9%16%3%7%7%3%11%2%45%
Christopher Newport UniversityApril 11–20, 2021806 (LV)± 3.9%2%4%2%2%1%12%2%1%64%

Results

Results by county and independent city:

Ayala
  •   Ayala—60–70%
  •   Ayala—50–60%
  •   Ayala—40–50%
  •   Ayala—30–40%
Rasoul
  •   Rasoul—<30%
  •   Rasoul—30–40%
  •   Rasoul—40–50%
  •   Rasoul—50–60%
  •   Rasoul—60–70%
  •   Rasoul—70–80%
  •   Rasoul—80–90%
Levine
  •   Levine—30–40%
Warren
  •   Warren—30–40%
  •   Warren—40–50%
Democratic primary results[42]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Hala Ayala 181,168 37.64%
DemocraticSam Rasoul116,81624.27%
DemocraticMark Levine53,73511.16%
DemocraticAndria McClellan51,01510.60%
DemocraticSean Perryman38,9258.09%
DemocraticXavier Warren19,9094.13%
DemocraticElizabeth Guzmán (withdrawn)19,8034.11%
Total votes481,365 100.00%

Republican convention

After months of uncertainty, the Republican Party of Virginia State Central Committee decided to hold an “unassembled convention” to select their nominees for governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, as opposed to holding a state run primary. The convention was held May 8 using ranked choice voting.[43]

Candidates

Nominated at convention

Defeated at convention

  • Puneet Ahluwalia, business consultant[45]
  • Lance Allen, security company executive[2]
  • Glenn Davis, member of the Virginia House of Delegates and candidate for lieutenant governor in 2017[2]
  • Tim Hugo, former member of the Virginia House of Delegates (2003–2020)[2]
  • Maeve Rigler, business executive[46]

Endorsements

Tim Hugo
State delegates

Results

Round-by-round result visualization of the Ranked Choice Voting election

Virginia GOP Convention, Lieutenant Governor Nominee [48]
CandidateRound 1Round 2Round 3Round 4Round 5
Votes%Votes%Votes%Votes%Votes%
Winsome Sears4,075.6832.5%4,300.1134.3%4,626.7036.9%5,425.9143.2%6,827.8954.4%
Tim Hugo2,824.1722.5%2,987.2023.8%3,184.7625.4%3,816.1130.4%5,726.1145.6%
Glenn Davis2,536.7720.2%2,675.4421.3%2,838.0522.6%3,311.9726.4%Eliminated
Lance Allen1,538.8012.3%1701.8213.6%1,904.5015.2%Eliminated
Puneet Ahluwalia818.956.5%889.437.1%Eliminated
Maeve Rigler759.626.1%Eliminated

General election

Endorsements

Hala Ayala (D)
State officials
State legislators
Individuals
Organizations
Winsome Sears (R)
U.S. Representatives
State officials
State legislators
Individuals
Organizations

Polling

Graphical summary
Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Hala
Ayala (D)
Winsome
Sears (R)
OtherUndecided
the polling company, inc. (R)[A]September 17–19, 2021700 (LV)± 3.7%