Executive Branch

The statewide elected officials are governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

All three officers are separately elected four-year terms in years following Presidential elections (1997, 2001, 2005, etc.) and take office in January of the following year. Virginia is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (the others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New Jersey). The last gubernatorial election was in 2017, and the next will occur in 2021.

The governor serves as chief executive officer of the Commonwealth and as commander-in-chief of its militia. The Constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself in office (though a governor is allowed to serve multiple non-consecutive terms). The Lieutenant Governor, who is not elected on the same ticket as the governor, serves as president of the Senate of Virginia and is first in the line of succession to the governor. The Lieutenant Governor is allowed to run for reelection. The Attorney General is chief legal advisor to the governor and the General Assembly, chief lawyer of the Commonwealth and the head of the Department of Law. The attorney general is second in the line of succession to the governor. Whenever there is a vacancy in all three executive offices of governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, then the Speaker of the House of the Virginia House of Delegates becomes governor.

 

Secretary of Administration

The five state agencies in the Administration secretariat manage the Commonwealth’s buildings and grounds, administer employee policies and benefits, oversee elections, safeguard human rights, work to improve manager-employee relations in state government, direct state funds to constitutional officers, and oversee the Commonwealth’s information technology.

Grindly Johnson currently serves as Secretary of Administration for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In her role, she oversees the Compensation Board, the Department of Elections, the Department of General Services, the Department of Human Resource Management, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency and the Office of the Chief Data Officer.

Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry

The Virginia Secretariat of Agriculture and Forestry was created in 2004. It oversees the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Virginia Department of Forestry. Governor Mark Warner appointed former Delegate Robert Bloxom as the first secretary.

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

The Secretary of Commerce and Trade is dedicated to developing and growing an economy that works for all Virginians. Our 12 agencies are dedicated in assisting Virginians in a variety of ways, enabling them to actively contribute to our economy. We strive to utilize the great assets of Virginia to help sustain its status as the best place to live, work, and conduct business.

Secretary of the Commonwealth

The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth is responsible for assisting the Governor in a number of different capacities and has team members to oversee the following areas:

  • Appointments
  • Authentications and Notary
  • Conflict of Interest/Public Records
  • Extraditions
  • Lobbyist Registration
  • Pardons
  • Restoration of Rights
  • Service of Process
  • Constituency Engagement
  • Constituent Services

Secretary of Education

The Secretary of Education provides guidance and support to the Virginia Department of Education, the Virginia Community College System, and the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, as well as Virginia’s public and private higher education and research centers.

Secretary of Finance

The Secretary of Finance provides guidance to the four key agencies within the Finance Secretariat. These agencies handle all the financial transactions of the Commonwealth — from collecting taxes, to paying bills, to distributing aid to localities.

Their responsibilities include:

  • forecasting and collecting revenues
  • managing the Commonwealth’s cash and investments
  • selling bonds
  • overseeing internal audits
  • making strategic financial plans
  • preparing and executing the Commonwealth’s budget.

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

The Secretary of Health and Human Resources oversees twelve state agencies which provide often-vital services to Virginians. Individuals with disabilities, the aging community, low-income working families, children, caregivers and the provider network are supported through the work of this Secretariat.

In addition, our agencies license health practitioners and ensure safe drinking water in the Commonwealth.

Secretary of Natural Resources

The Secretary of Natural Resources advises the Governor on natural resources issues and works to advance the Governor’s top environmental priorities. The Secretary oversees five agencies that protect and restore the Commonwealth’s natural and historic resources. The Secretary’s office and all of the natural resources agencies work together to uphold the provisions of Article XI of the Virginia Constitution:

Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security

Building a Safer More Resilient Virginia
The Secretariat also assists the Governor in the development and implementation of public safety and homeland security policies. The Secretariat supports the Governor’s strategic priorities through four established pillars of interagency collaboration:  All-Hazards Emergency Response, Reducing Recidivism, Preventing Gun Violence, and Smart Policing.

Secretary of Transportation

The Secretary of Transportation is committed to creating and maintaining a multimodal network that connects Virginians to jobs, education, and health care across the Commonwealth and serves as the platform for Virginia’s economy.  Working collaboratively, we can advance this network by tying transportation decisions to economic competitiveness and identifying innovative solutions to transportation challenges.

Agencies the Secretariat oversees move people and goods by rail, water, transit, and over our roadways. Our sea ports, airports, space port, bridges, tunnels, and highways serve as global gateways for the Commonwealth, opening Virginia to economic opportunity by creating access to regional, national, and world markets.

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

The Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs serves the Commonwealth in four critical ways.

First, it oversees the Virginia Department of Veteran Services (DVS), whose mission is to serve Virginia’s Veterans, Guardsmen, Reservists, and their family members, by ensuring they receive timely transition, employment and education assistance, benefits, health care and long-term care and recognition they have earned through service to our Nation and Commonwealth. The Secretary distinguishes and elevates issues and opportunities for Veterans and transitioning Service members in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Of primary importance are the employment, health care, and education needs of our Veterans. With the seventh-largest Veteran population in the Nation and the greatest number of Veteransin the workforce per capita, the Secretariat maintains a particular focus on employment of our newest generation of Veterans who have the current skills needed here in the Commonwealth.

Second, the Secretariat serves as the primary liaison for the Commonwealth to the United States Department of Defense and its military communities. It leads the Governor’s initiatives focused on relationship building with and support of our military and defense installations and the communities surrounding them. Through the Governor’s Virginia Military Advisory Council (VMAC) and active Secretariat community involvement, the Commonwealth continues to be an engaged host in support of the military and defense missions in the state.

Next, the Secretary oversees the Virginia Department of Military Affairs (DMA), DMA’s mission is to effectively integrate military and homeland defense capabilities into applicable state operations; employ, train, and manage the Virginia Militia, consisting of the Virginia National Guard (the Virginia Army National Guard and the Virginia Air National Guard) and the Virginia Defense Forces; and to ensure the safety of the citizens of the Commonwealth during declared emergencies.

Lastly, the Secretariat oversees the Veteran Service Foundation (VSF). The VSF provides supplemental funding to programs, services, and initiatives of the Department of Veteran Services when state and federal resources are unavailable. All charitable donations to VSF stay right here in the Commonwealth and go toward providing access and services to Virginia Veterans.

We are honored to serve the Commonwealth and our Veterans , and look forward to working with you to continue to make Virginia the most Veteran and military friendly state in the Nation.

Executive BranchExecutive Branch

The statewide elected officials are governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

All three officers are separately elected four-year terms in years following Presidential elections (1997, 2001, 2005, etc.) and take office in January of the following year. Virginia is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (the others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New Jersey). The last gubernatorial election was in 2017, and the next will occur in 2021.

The governor serves as chief executive officer of the Commonwealth and as commander-in-chief of its militia. The Constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself in office (though a governor is allowed to serve multiple non-consecutive terms). The Lieutenant Governor, who is not elected on the same ticket as the governor, serves as president of the Senate of Virginia and is first in the line of succession to the governor. The Lieutenant Governor is allowed to run for reelection. The Attorney General is chief legal advisor to the governor and the General Assembly, chief lawyer of the Commonwealth and the head of the Department of Law. The attorney general is second in the line of succession to the governor. Whenever there is a vacancy in all three executive offices of governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, then the Speaker of the House of the Virginia House of Delegates becomes governor.

 

Summary

The statewide elected officials are governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

All three officers are separately elected four-year terms in years following Presidential elections (1997, 2001, 2005, etc.) and take office in January of the following year. Virginia is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (the others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New Jersey). The last gubernatorial election was in 2017, and the next will occur in 2021.

The governor serves as chief executive officer of the Commonwealth and as commander-in-chief of its militia. The Constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself in office (though a governor is allowed to serve multiple non-consecutive terms). The Lieutenant Governor, who is not elected on the same ticket as the governor, serves as president of the Senate of Virginia and is first in the line of succession to the governor. The Lieutenant Governor is allowed to run for reelection. The Attorney General is chief legal advisor to the governor and the General Assembly, chief lawyer of the Commonwealth and the head of the Department of Law. The attorney general is second in the line of succession to the governor. Whenever there is a vacancy in all three executive offices of governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, then the Speaker of the House of the Virginia House of Delegates becomes governor.

 

About

Source: Wikipedia

The statewide elected officials are governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

All three officers are separately elected to four-year terms in years following Presidential elections (1997, 2001, 2005, etc.) and take office in January of the following year. Virginia is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (the others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New Jersey). The last gubernatorial election was in 2017, and the next will occur in 2021.

The governor serves as chief executive officer of the Commonwealth and as commander-in-chief of its militia. The Constitution does not allow a governor to succeed himself in office (though a governor is allowed to serve multiple non-consecutive terms). The Lieutenant Governor, who is not elected on the same ticket as the governor, serves as president of the Senate of Virginia and is first in the line of succession to the governor. The Lieutenant Governor is allowed to run for reelection. The Attorney General is chief legal advisor to the governor and the General Assembly, chief lawyer of the Commonwealth and the head of the Department of Law. The attorney general is second in the line of succession to the governor. Whenever there is a vacancy in all three executive offices of governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, then the Speaker of the House of the Virginia House of Delegates becomes governor.

Web

Cabinet Website

Cabinet

Source: Wikipedia

The Virginia Governor’s Cabinet is a body of the most senior appointed officers of the executive branch, responsible for advising the governor. It is composed of the following offices, nominated by the governor and then presented to the Virginia General Assembly for confirmation:

The current Cabinet is serving under Governor of Virginia Ralph Northam.

  • Chief of Staff
  • Secretary of the Commonwealth
  • Secretary of Administration
  • Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry
  • Secretary of Commerce and Trade
  • Secretary of Education
  • Secretary of Finance
  • Secretary of Health and Human Resources
  • Secretary of Natural Resources
  • Secretary of Public Safety
  • Secretary of Transportation
  • Secretary of Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security

Many executive branch agencies have the authority to promulgate regulations. Proposals to create or amend state regulations are often subject to review by the executive branch.

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Secretary of AdministrationSecretary of Administration

The five state agencies in the Administration secretariat manage the Commonwealth’s buildings and grounds, administer employee policies and benefits, oversee elections, safeguard human rights, work to improve manager-employee relations in state government, direct state funds to constitutional officers, and oversee the Commonwealth’s information technology.

Grindly Johnson currently serves as Secretary of Administration for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In her role, she oversees the Compensation Board, the Department of Elections, the Department of General Services, the Department of Human Resource Management, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency and the Office of the Chief Data Officer.

Summary

The five state agencies in the Administration secretariat manage the Commonwealth’s buildings and grounds, administer employee policies and benefits, oversee elections, safeguard human rights, work to improve manager-employee relations in state government, direct state funds to constitutional officers, and oversee the Commonwealth’s information technology.

Grindly Johnson currently serves as Secretary of Administration for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In her role, she oversees the Compensation Board, the Department of Elections, the Department of General Services, the Department of Human Resource Management, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency and the Office of the Chief Data Officer.

About

Grindly Johnson, Secretary of Administration

Previously, Grindly Johnson served as Deputy Secretary of Administration since January 2018 and before that, served as Deputy Secretary of Transportation in the McAuliffe Administration, where she led the effort to establish a first-in-the-nation sustainable toll relief program, for which she has won numerous awards. She also served as Chief of Administration for the Virginia Department of Transportation, the third largest transportation agency in the nation, where she directed the divisions of Communications, Civil Rights, Human Resources and Training, Administrative Services, and Safety and Performance Management.

Prior to that, Grindly served as the agency’s Chief of Equal Business and Employee Opportunity and held a number of private sector positions, including as an accountant, financial analyst, and community relations consultant. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from Norfolk State University.

Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer

Carlos Rivero is the Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Prior to his appointment, Rivero served as Chief Data Officer and Chief Enterprise Architect for the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Transit Administration in Washington, D.C. Rivero has also worked at the National Oceanic and AtmosphericAdministration’s Southeast Fisheries Science Center in Miami, Florida, as a physical scientist and as a Research Associate at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, where he developed a passion for geospatial information systems, ecological modeling, and data.

Rivero earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies from Florida International University and a Master of Science in Business Intelligence and Analytics from Saint Joseph’s University, focusing on database design, data management, business intelligence, big data, and data analytics.

Chief Data Officer Website 

Asif Bhavnagri, Assistant Secretary of Administration

Asif Bhavnagri has been appointed Assistant Secretary of Administration. He most recently served as Policy Advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security, a position he held since 2016. He also served as a Press Assistant in Governor McAuliffe’s Communications Office. A native of Richmond, Asif is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University where he studied Political Science and African American Studies. He also worked as an intern in the Virginia General Assembly, assisting members of the House of Delegates on a variety of issues from healthcare to education.

Contact

Email: Taylor A. O’Sullivan

Locations

Office of the Secretary of Administration
Patrick Henry Building
1111 East Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: (804) 225-4501

Web

Website

Departments

Department of General Services

Source: Website

The Department of General Services is an intra-governmental service organization that administers the capital outlay budget; it provides services to state agencies and local government such as procurement and fleet services.

Department of Human Resource Management

Source: Website

The Department of Human Resource Management is the central state agency responsible for administering, developing, and overseeing the state’s human resource management system. Areas specifically included are: compensation and policy, equal employment, health benefits, workers’ compensation, employee information, and training.

Department of Elections

Source: Website

The Department of Elections coordinates and supervises the work of local electoral boards, registrars, and election officials to obtain uniformity in practices and proceedings in all elections.

Virginia Information Technologies Agency

Source: Website

The Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) is the Commonwealth’s consolidated information technology organization. VITA supports the Commonwealth by providing cybersecurity, IT infrastructure services and IT governance to state agencies and institutions of higher education.

Compensation Board

Source: Website

The Compensation Board reviews and approves annual budgets submitted by constitutional officers and reimburses localities for the state’s share of authorized salaries and expenses of constitutional officers and their employees.

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Secretary of Agriculture and ForestrySecretary of Agriculture and Forestry

The Virginia Secretariat of Agriculture and Forestry was created in 2004. It oversees the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Virginia Department of Forestry. Governor Mark Warner appointed former Delegate Robert Bloxom as the first secretary.

Summary

The Virginia Secretariat of Agriculture and Forestry was created in 2004. It oversees the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Virginia Department of Forestry. Governor Mark Warner appointed former Delegate Robert Bloxom as the first secretary.

About

Source: VDACS website

The Secretariat of Agriculture and forestry combined are Virginia’s largest private sector industry. According to a 2017 economic impact study conducted by Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia, agriculture and forestry have a combined economic impact of $91 billion annually.  Agriculture generates more than $70 billion per annum, while forestry induces over $21 billion. The industries also provided nearly 450,000 jobs in the Commonwealth.

The Three Priorities

As Secretary, I am excited to focus on three priority issues related to Governor Northam’s vision of building a Virginia that works better for every family, no matter who they are or where they live. Agriculture and forestry are the Commonwealth’s largest private industries, with a combined annual economic impact of over $91 billion, and the health of these industries affects communities around Virginia, especially in rural areas. My team and our three agencies are committed to supporting rural economic development, preserving farmland and forestland across Virginia, and ensuring that all Virginians, especially those who are most vulnerable, have access to safe, healthy foods.

The Virginia Secretariat of Agriculture and Forestry was created in 2004. It oversees the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Virginia Department of Forestry. Governor Mark Warner appointed former Delegate Robert Bloxom as the first secretary.

Promoting Rural and Economic Development

Given the importance of agriculture and forestry to the foundation of our economy, my team and I are committed to supporting the continued development of these industries as a both a growth engine and source of jobs throughout rural Virginia. We are dedicated to supporting the key functions of our agencies, such as inspecting and grading services and online permitting, to ensure seamless processes that create a growth-friendly environment and continued global competitiveness.

Furthermore, we are focused on growing our existing businesses and attracting new investment through the VDACS and VDOF market development programs. The Governor’s Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development (AFID) Fund is a key tool for spurring growth and investment.

We will continue to develop export opportunities for Virginia agriculture and forest products via our established network of trade offices around the globe, expert staff to offer marketing and regulatory assistance, and strategic trade missions to key markets with the Governor, department staff, and federal partners.

Supporting the expansion of broadband access is also a key initiative for Governor Northam and is an important driver of success of our rural economy. Farmers and agribusinesses depend on fast, reliable internet to conduct business in the 21st century global market and to make use of new agronomic tools, such as unmanned aerial vehicles and precision agriculture technology. We will be working with key partners throughout the Administration, such as the Secretary of Commerce and Trade and the Chief Broadband Advisor, to meet Governor Northam’s goal of ensuring all Virginians have access to broadband within the next decade.

Finally, we are excited about the prospects for economic development in areas such as agritourism, craft beverages, and aquaculture, and we will work with partners within Virginia Tourism, Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC), and the Secretariat of Natural Resources to support this growth. Furthermore, with the scheduled reopening of Colonial Downs this summer and new opportunities for thoroughbred racing in Virginia, we are excited to play a role in the growth of the equine industry, which has a long history and reputation of excellence in the Commonwealth.

Forest and Farmland Retention

Virginia is home to over 23 million acres of farm and forestland, and we are proud to support the preservation of these natural resources. Farms and working forests are the foundation of Virginia’s rural economy, and our land conservation efforts benefit landowners, local communities, and the environment.

Governor Northam has a bold vision of using a data-driven approach to identify the highest priority lands for conservation, including working farmland and forestland, and we are excited to play a part in this important goal. We want to ensure that landowners continue to have a large toolbox and many options at their disposal for land conservation.

As the next generation seeks to return to family businesses, one of the greatest challenges facing private landowners is intergenerational transfer. We are committed to providing transition and business planning resources, such as the successful Generation NEXT program, to farmers and forest landowners to ensure economic viability and the successful transfer from the current generation to the next one. And our Century Farms and Century Forests programs help recognize those families who are committed to preserving and working these landscapes.

A component of this viability is the continued health and productivity of the Commonwealth’s forests. While continuing to support our effective pine Reforestation of Timberlands (RT) program, we are also seeking to create a first-of-its-kind hardwood enhancement incentive program. While we have already made great strides in forest management, these initiatives will guarantee productive working forests for many generations to come.

Finally, aside from being an important economic engine, the Chesapeake Bay is one of the world’s greatest natural treasures, and agriculture and forestry have an important role to play in its health. Through the dedication of landowners and other partners, such as local Soil and Water Conservation Districts, these industries have already made major strides in meeting our goals, but our work is ongoing. Through our healthy watershed program, we are working to secure private sector investment to reduce runoff and improve the overall wellbeing of the entire Bay watershed. And we are working closely with the Secretariat of Natural Resources and our stakeholders in the agriculture and forestry industries in the development of the third phase Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP3) of the Bay’s total maximum daily load (TMDL).

Food Security

Governor Northam has made one the Administration’s top priorities giving every person, particularly every child, the same shot at a healthy, safe and successful life. To grow, learn, and succeed, it is critical for Virginians to have access to nutritious, safe, affordable foods.  10 percent of Virginia households were food insecure at least some time during the past year, meaning they lacked access to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members

Our goal is to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture.

We believe that the food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for increasing access to nutritious foods and is a central component for eliminating hunger in Virginia. During the Northam Administration, our efforts to address hunger and food security will include investments in strategies to provide children and families with three meals a day, 365 days a year and to strengthen the connection from farm to fork.

As we focus on agriculture as a vehicle for addressing food insecurity, there is a need for new, innovative strategies to grow community food access.  Expanding market opportunities for farmers through farmers’ markets, farm to school programs, and urban agriculture directly correlate to higher levels of food access in communities.

In collaboration with the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet, we will focus on building partnerships with community food access organizations, expanding access and participation in federal nutrition assistance programs, and seeking solutions to food insecurity through local agriculture initiatives.  Using a cross-secretariat approach, we will collaborate on efforts to expand access to healthy foods and meals through school nutrition and summer feeding programs.  Additionally, we will focus on addressing food deserts through healthy food retail, farmers’ markets, corner stores, mobile markets, and other initiatives.

Bettina Ring

Governor Ralph S. Northam appointed Bettina Ring in 2018 to serve as the fourth Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In this capacity, she supports the Governor’s mission of building a strong Virginia economy in agriculture and forestry, two of Virginia’s largest private industries, while also protecting the environment.

 

Contact

Email: Bettina Ring

Locations

Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry

P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-692-2511

Web

Website

Priorities

Source: VDACS webpage

Promoting Rural and Economic Development

Given the importance of agriculture and forestry to the foundation of our economy, my team and I are committed to supporting the continued development of these industries as a both a growth engine and source of jobs throughout rural Virginia. We are dedicated to supporting the key functions of our agencies, such as inspecting and grading services and online permitting, to ensure seamless processes that create a growth-friendly environment and continued global competitiveness.

Furthermore, we are focused on growing our existing businesses and attracting new investment through the VDACS and VDOF market development programs. The Governor’s Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development (AFID) Fund is a key tool for spurring growth and investment.

We will continue to develop export opportunities for Virginia agriculture and forest products via our established network of trade offices around the globe, expert staff to offer marketing and regulatory assistance, and strategic trade missions to key markets with the Governor, department staff, and federal partners.

Supporting the expansion of broadband access is also a key initiative for Governor Northam and is an important driver of success of our rural economy. Farmers and agribusinesses depend on fast, reliable internet to conduct business in the 21st century global market and to make use of new agronomic tools, such as unmanned aerial vehicles and precision agriculture technology. We will be working with key partners throughout the Administration, such as the Secretary of Commerce and Trade and the Chief Broadband Advisor, to meet Governor Northam’s goal of ensuring all Virginians have access to broadband within the next decade.

Finally, we are excited about the prospects for economic development in areas such as agritourism, craft beverages, and aquaculture, and we will work with partners within Virginia Tourism, Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC), and the Secretariat of Natural Resources to support this growth. Furthermore, with the scheduled reopening of Colonial Downs this summer and new opportunities for thoroughbred racing in Virginia, we are excited to play a role in the growth of the equine industry, which has a long history and reputation of excellence in the Commonwealth.

Forest and Farmland Retention

Virginia is home to over 23 million acres of farm and forestland, and we are proud to support the preservation of these natural resources. Farms and working forests are the foundation of Virginia’s rural economy, and our land conservation efforts benefit landowners, local communities, and the environment.

Governor Northam has a bold vision of using a data-driven approach to identify the highest priority lands for conservation, including working farmland and forestland, and we are excited to play a part in this important goal. We want to ensure that landowners continue to have a large toolbox and many options at their disposal for land conservation.

As the next generation seeks to return to family businesses, one of the greatest challenges facing private landowners is intergenerational transfer. We are committed to providing transition and business planning resources, such as the successful Generation NEXT program, to farmers and forest landowners to ensure economic viability and the successful transfer from the current generation to the next one. And our Century Farms and Century Forests programs help recognize those families who are committed to preserving and working these landscapes.

A component of this viability is the continued health and productivity of the Commonwealth’s forests. While continuing to support our effective pine Reforestation of Timberlands (RT) program, we are also seeking to create a first-of-its-kind hardwood enhancement incentive program. While we have already made great strides in forest management, these initiatives will guarantee productive working forests for many generations to come.

Finally, aside from being an important economic engine, the Chesapeake Bay is one of the world’s greatest natural treasures, and agriculture and forestry have an important role to play in its health. Through the dedication of landowners and other partners, such as local Soil and Water Conservation Districts, these industries have already made major strides in meeting our goals, but our work is ongoing. Through our healthy watershed program, we are working to secure private sector investment to reduce runoff and improve the overall wellbeing of the entire Bay watershed. And we are working closely with the Secretariat of Natural Resources and our stakeholders in the agriculture and forestry industries in the development of the third phase Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP3) of the Bay’s total maximum daily load (TMDL).

Food Security

Governor Northam has made one the Administration’s top priorities giving every person, particularly every child, the same shot at a healthy, safe and successful life. To grow, learn, and succeed, it is critical for Virginians to have access to nutritious, safe, affordable foods.  10 percent of Virginia households were food insecure at least some time during the past year, meaning they lacked access to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members

Our goal is to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture.

We believe that the food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for increasing access to nutritious foods and is a central component for eliminating hunger in Virginia. During the Northam Administration, our efforts to address hunger and food security will include investments in strategies to provide children and families with three meals a day, 365 days a year and to strengthen the connection from farm to fork.

As we focus on agriculture as a vehicle for addressing food insecurity, there is a need for new, innovative strategies to grow community food access.  Expanding market opportunities for farmers through farmers’ markets, farm to school programs, and urban agriculture directly correlate to higher levels of food access in communities.

In collaboration with the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet, we will focus on building partnerships with community food access organizations, expanding access and participation in federal nutrition assistance programs, and seeking solutions to food insecurity through local agriculture initiatives.  Using a cross-secretariat approach, we will collaborate on efforts to expand access to healthy foods and meals through school nutrition and summer feeding programs.  Additionally, we will focus on addressing food deserts through healthy food retail, farmers’ markets, corner stores, mobile markets, and other initiatives.

 

Departments

Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Source: VDACS website

Established in 1877, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) promotes the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture, provides consumer protection and encourages environmental stewardship.

The agency is headquartered in Richmond and has several field offices, four regional diagnostic animal health laboratories and a global network of representatives promoting Virginia products internationally.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) promotes the economic growth and development of Virginia agriculture, encourages environmental stewardship, and provides consumer protection. VDACS is responsible for approximately 60 state laws and 70 regulations and includes the Division of Animal and Food Industry Services, Division of Charitable Gaming, Division of Consumer Protection, and the Division of Marketing. For more information, click on the VDACS logo to go to their website.

Agency Head: Dr. Jewel H. Bronaugh
Dr. Jewel H. Bronaugh is the 16th Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Dr. Bronaugh previously served as the Executive Director of the Center of Agriculture Research, Engagement and Outreach (CAREO) and the Dean of the College of Agriculture at Virginia State University, and as Virginia’s State Executive Director for the USDA/ Farm Service Agency.

Department of Forestry

Source: DOF Website

The Department of Forestry (DOF) is responsible for the protection of 15.8 million acres of forest land from fire, insects, and disease; management of forests and other state lands; and public assistance through professional forestry advice and technical management programs. Forestland provides 60 percent of the land cover in the Commonwealth. For more information, click on the DOF logo to go to their website.

Agency Head: Rob Farrell

Rob Farrell was appointed State Forester of Virginia by Governor Ralph Northam in January 2018.  Prior to this, he served as the Deputy State Forester for the past five years and he has been with the agency since 2000.  Prior to the VDOF, Rob worked as an arborist and urban forester in Maryland and Virginia.  He is a Certified Arborist and has a B.S. and M.S. in Forestry from Virginia Tech.

Virginia Racing Commission

Source: VRC Website

The Virginia Racing Commission (VRC) is responsible for the oversight and ensuring the safety and health of Virginia’s horse racing industry, as well as monitoring pari-mutuel wagering in the Commonwealth.

Agency Head: David Lermond
David Lermond has been with the Virginia Racing Commission for 15 years and has served as its Executive Secretary for the last three. Prior to that, he served as the Commission’s Deputy Executive Secretary and Fiscal Officer and is also an accredited Steward/Judge by the Racing Officials Accreditation Program which allowed him to perform the duties as a Steward for Thoroughbred racing and a Judge for Standardbred racing in the Commonwealth. Mr. Lermond was the Director of Simulcasting at Delaware Park Racetrack for ten years before accepting his position with the Virginia Racing Commission, giving him a total of over 25 years of experience working within the horse racing industry.
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Secretary of Commerce and TradeSecretary of Commerce and Trade

The Secretary of Commerce and Trade is dedicated to developing and growing an economy that works for all Virginians. Our 12 agencies are dedicated in assisting Virginians in a variety of ways, enabling them to actively contribute to our economy. We strive to utilize the great assets of Virginia to help sustain its status as the best place to live, work, and conduct business.

Summary

The Secretary of Commerce and Trade is dedicated to developing and growing an economy that works for all Virginians. Our 12 agencies are dedicated in assisting Virginians in a variety of ways, enabling them to actively contribute to our economy. We strive to utilize the great assets of Virginia to help sustain its status as the best place to live, work, and conduct business.

About

Contact

Email: Secretary

Locations

Office of the Secretary of Commerce and Trade
Patrick Henry Building 1111 East Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: 804)786-2211

Web

Website

Leaders

Brian Ball, Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Brian Ball was appointed Secretary of Commerce and Trade in April of 2018.  He previously served in the Northam Administration as Special Advisor for Economic Development and Deputy Secretary of Commerce and Trade.

Prior to joining the Northam Administration, Brian was an attorney at Williams Mullen where he concentrated his practice in mergers and acquisitions, securities laws and corporate governance matters. Brian served as a trusted advisor to senior management, boards of directors and audit and special board committees handling such matters as internal investigations and activist shareholders.  He also regularly represented clients before state and federal administrative agencies and the Virginia General Assembly.  Brian served on the firm’s board of directors and as its General Counsel.

Brian graduated with high distinction from the University of Virginia where he was an Echols Scholar and a member of Phi Beta Kappa.  He received his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Virginia. He is admitted to practice in Virginia, the District of Columbia and California. He served as an assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California from 1981 to 1982.

Brian and his wife Jennifer, formerly of Waynesboro, reside in Richmond.  They have two children.

Cassidy Rasnick, Deputy Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Cassidy Rasnick serves as Deputy Secretary of Commerce and Trade for Rural Economic Development. Prior to her appointment, Rasnick managed the state’s economic development efforts for two of the Commonwealth’s largest industries – agriculture and forestry – while serving as manager of the office of business development at the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and previously, as Deputy Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry for Governor McAuliffe. Before joining the McAuliffe administration, she worked for the Virginia Manufacturers Association and the Virginia Craft Brewers Guild. Rasnick also spent more than five years working for United State Senator Mark Warner.

A native of Botetourt County, Rasnick is a graduate of James Madison University and the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership.

Departments

Department of Housing and Community Development

Source: Website

Committed to creating safe and affordable housing by regulating building and fire codes while investing more than $100 million each year into affordable housing and community development projects throughout the Commonwealth.

Virginia Housing Development Authority

Source: Website

Promotes access to home loans, homeowner and homebuyer education to ensure quality, affordable housing for all in Virginia.

Department of Small Business and Supplier Diversity

Source: Website

Promotes economic growth by engaging Virginia businesses and provides business certifications to ensure fairness in the procurement process for all Virginia’s small, women-owned and minority owned businesses.

Department of Labor and Industry

Source: Website

Promotes healthy workplaces, best employment practices, job training opportunities through registered apprenticeships, the protection of children from hazardous employment, and the safe operation of boiler and pressure vessels.

Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy

Source: Website

Enhancing the development and conservation of energy and mineral resources in a safe and environmentally sound manner to support a more productive economy.

Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation

Source: Website

Administers and enforces laws and regulations necessary for the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of the Commonwealth.

Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission

Source: Website

Works to promote economic growth and development in tobacco-dependent communities in the Commonwealth by administering grant programs and indemnification payments.

Virginia Economic Development Partnership

Source: Website

Recruits and encourages the expansion of businesses, industries and entrepreneurship in the Commonwealth; creates employment with higher income opportunities; significantly increases capital investment, the expansion of the tax base, and international trade.

Virginia Employment Commission

Source: Website

Provide the Commonwealth’s workforce with services that promote maximum employment, unemployment benefits and labor market information to enhance the economic stability of Virginia.

Virginia Tourism Corporation

Source: Website

Serves to promote and develop tourism and motion picture industries to stimulate Virginia’s economy while enhancing the quality of life for all those in the Commonwealth.

Initiatives

Economic Development
Continuing to develop Virginia’s economy so all Virginians have the opportunity to succeed is vitally important. Our office wants every region of Virginia to achieve robust economic growth, including rural Virginia and other economically distressed areas. This prosperity will allow all companies to know that the Commonwealth of Virginia is the best place for them to grow, develop and prosper.

A top priority of this administration it to foster small businesses by expanding access to capital for start-ups and impact investing. The diligent work of our office and our resourceful agencies will continue to make sure that all Virginians have ample opportunities and that Virginia has an economy that works for everyone.

Broadband
Expanding access to broadband is critical in making a Virginia which works for everyone. In the 21st Century economy, communities which lack basic access to broadband are at a major economic and educational disadvantage. This undertaking will be spearheaded by our Chief Broadband Advisor. Our office will coordinate efforts to allow all regions of the Commonwealth to get connected.

Through the usage of state and federal resources along with private investment: our office is confident we can expand broadband to many communities that are in desperate need of it.

For resources to support a locality, planning district commission, internet service provider, or citizen interested in expanding broadband in their community, please go to: https://www.commonwealthconnect.virginia.gov
Energy
Virginia should lead in the expansion of renewable energy, the development of offshore wind, and the promotion of energy efficiency. Through partnerships with stakeholders, we will work to increase investment in clean energy throughout the Commonwealth. Our office will work to promote solar, offshore wind, and onshore wind projects to make renewable energy a major economic driver for our state.

With an increased focus on energy efficiency, we will work with utilities, local government, and the private sector to increase access to energy efficiency programs for all citizens despite their income.

We are currently creating our 2018 Energy Plan, a strategic vision for the Commonwealth’s energy policy for the next 10 years. Click here to learn more about that process.

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Auto Draft 25Secretary of the Commonwealth

The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth is responsible for assisting the Governor in a number of different capacities and has team members to oversee the following areas:

  • Appointments
  • Authentications and Notary
  • Conflict of Interest/Public Records
  • Extraditions
  • Lobbyist Registration
  • Pardons
  • Restoration of Rights
  • Service of Process
  • Constituency Engagement
  • Constituent Services

Summary

The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth is responsible for assisting the Governor in a number of different capacities and has team members to oversee the following areas:

  • Appointments
  • Authentications and Notary
  • Conflict of Interest/Public Records
  • Extraditions
  • Lobbyist Registration
  • Pardons
  • Restoration of Rights
  • Service of Process
  • Constituency Engagement
  • Constituent Services

About

Contact

Locations

Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth
1111 East Broad Street, 4th Floor
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: 804) 786-2441
Fax: Fax: 804-786-9549

Web

Website

Kelly Thomasson

Source: Webpage

Kelly Thomasson was reappointed as Secretary of the Commonwealth by Governor Northam after serving in that role since 2016. 

As Secretary of the Commonwealth, Kelly is passionate about creating a state government that is open and welcome to everyone.  Kelly assists the Governor in recruiting and appointing over 3,000 qualified, service-minded individuals to serve on Virginia’s boards, commissions and councils.  In addition, the office serves the Commonwealth through managing clemency petitions, restoration of civil rights, extraditions, service of process, authenticating documents and commissioning Notaries Public. The Secretary of the Commonwealth acts as the Governor’s liaison to Virginia’s Indian Tribes, as well as the Council on Women.

Kelly joined Governor McAuliffe’s administration as Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth in 2014, and was appointed as Secretary in 2016.  Prior to that service, she worked for Senator Mark Warner for 13 years in various capacities, including Projects Director in his U.S. Senate office and Director of Scheduling in the Office of the Governor. Kelly is a native of Richmond and received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Virginia Commonwealth University. She is involved in many local community activities, including serving on the board of the Ashland Main Street Association.  Kelly serves on the Lead Virginia Board of Directors and was appointed by Governor McAuliffe to serve on the Virginia Information Technology Advisory Council.  She is a graduate of Lead Virginia and was named Top 40 Under 40 by Style Weekly in 2017.

Services

Appointments

Source: Webpages

ABOUT BOARD AND COMMISSION APPOINTMENTS

Gubernatorial appointments are an ongoing process, with approximately 900 appointments being made throughout the year.

Please note that the majority of boards and commissions have certain qualifications of appointment that must be met as set forth in the Code of Virginia. Additional information about the boards and commissions may be found in the Annual Report of the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Also known as the “Blue Book,” the Report details the purpose, powers and duties of each board, seat qualifications or requirements by Code, and a listing of current board members.

The Governor makes appointments to three types of boards and commissions:

  • Advisory — An advisory board, commission or council serves as a formal liaison between the agency and the public, ensuring that the agency understands and responds to public concerns and that the activities of the agency are communicated to the public. Advisory boards provide advice and counsel to an executive branch agency.
  • Policy — A policy board, commission or council is specifically charged by statute to promulgate public policies or regulations. Policy boards may also be charged by statute with adjudicating violations of those policies or regulations.
  • Supervisory — A supervisory board, commission or council is responsible for agency operations, including approval of appropriations requests. Supervisory boards appoint the agency director, and the board ensures that the agency director complies with all board and statutory directives. Agency directors serve at the pleasure of the board.

FACTORS TO CONSIDER

Serving the Commonwealth of Virginia on a board or commission is both an honor and a privilege. Public service, however, is not for everyone. Individuals applying for a board or commission should be aware of the following:

As expected in an open and democratic government, the activities of boards and commissions are subject to public and press scrutiny.

Applicants who are selected by the Governor to serve will be required to complete a financial disclosure statement as a condition of serving on the board or commission.

Unless otherwise specified by law, most boards and commissions meet quarterly each year. However, some boards may meet more frequently due to the responsibilities and functions of the board.

Authentications

Source: Webpage

The purpose of an authentication by our office is to verify to foreign governments that certain Virginia officials are in good standing.  Depending on the destination country, the authentication is issued either as a Great Seal or an Apostille. The authentication only verifies that the Virginia Notary, Virginia Clerk of Court, or Virginia Deputy State Registrar is listed in our system, and they have notarized or issued your document correctly. Authentication at the state level is not required for documents to be used within the United States or its territories. The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth does not regulate what documents are required by the foreign government. Documents issued by the FBI would be authenticated by the US State Department, not by the Virginia Secretary of the Commonwealth.

Documents must be properly notarized by a Virginia notary (as allowed by law) within the past 12 months prior to presenting to our office for authentication.

Pardons

Source: Webpage

General Information

Pardons are considered for exceptional situations. Usually Virginia governors are reluctant to substitute their judgment for that of the courts. However, if an individual feels able to provide substantial evidence of such exceptional circumstances, he or she may submit a petition for pardon to the Governor. (If this petition for clemency is denied, the petitioner has no right of appeal, but may reapply after a two-year period.)

Three Pardon Types

There are three types of pardons:

1. A Simple Pardon is a statement of official forgiveness. While it does not expunge (remove the conviction from) the record, it often serves as a means for the petitioner to advance in employment, education, and self-esteem. Evidence of good citizenship is required, as are favorable recommendations from the officials involved in the case and from the Virginia Parole Board.  Click here to get more information about Simple Pardons.

2. A Conditional Pardon is available only to people who are currently incarcerated. It is usually granted for early release and involves certain conditions; if you violate these conditions, you could be put back in prison. There must be extraordinary circumstances for an inmate to be considered for such a pardon. Click here to get more information about Conditional Pardons.

3. An Absolute Pardon is rarely granted because it is based on the belief that the petitioner was unjustly convicted and is innocent. An absolute pardon is the only form of executive clemency that would allow you to petition the court to have that conviction removed from your criminal record. Click here to get more information about Absolute Pardons.

All petitions for pardon require you to submit the Virginia Pardon Petition Questionnaire.

All pardons will be processed by the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s Office.

Extraditions

Source: Webpage

Extradition Policy in Virginia

Article IV, Section 2, Clause 2, of the United States Constitution defines extradition in the following way: “A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.”

The extradition process can be used to return those convicted of a crime, those charged with a crime, persons who escape from the Department of Corrections, and parole and probation violators.

In Virginia, the provisions governing extradition procedures are set forth in Sections 19.2-84 through 19.2-118 of the Code of Virginia (1950), as amended.

When Virginia is the demanding state, all extradition requests are reviewed by the Extradition Specialist in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth to ensure that they are complete and comply with the requirements of the asylum state. Once all the documents are complete, it is the Governor who formally requests the extradition. Finally, if the extradition is granted, the Governor requests one or more law enforcement officers, designated by the local Commonwealth’s Attorney, to retrieve the fugitive.

When Virginia is the asylum state, the extradition request is received by the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth from the demanding state. The extradition request is then forwarded to the Office of the Attorney General where it is reviewed for legal sufficiency. Once the Governor’s Office is satisfied that the demanding state has met the necessary requirements for extradition, a Governor’s Warrant is issued.

  • Extradition Manual – Word Doc (1.89Mb) | PDF (916kb)

Travel Orders

If you are a law enforcement representative and would like to submit your Travel Orders, you may use the link below.  If you are new to the system, you must create a new account which must be approved by the Director of Extraditions before you can submit Travel Orders.

Obtaining Governor’s Warrants

Requests for Governor’s Warrants are received and processed on behalf of the Governor by the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Information necessary to obtain a Governor’s Warrant is established in law and there is essentially no discretion or ability to grant waivers from requirements.

The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth is committed to working with Commonwealth’s Attorneys, their staffs and all other law enforcement officials to prevent any fugitive from escaping justice in Virginia. For this reason, the accompanying application forms and checklists for each type of Governor’s Warrant are provided to enable this office to have the necessary information for a Governor’s Warrant to be issued. Officials are not required to submit requests for a Governor’s Warrant on these forms, but doing so is highly recommended as a way to simplify the process and eliminate delay.

Time is of the essence in obtaining a Governor’s Warrant. A fugitive warrant/complaint pending serving a Governor’s Warrant will restrain a fugitive for 30 days, with a possible extension of up to 60 days. Typically, it takes 21 days from the time of submitting a request containing all necessary information to the time a Governor’s Warrant is served on the fugitive.

Should there be any questions regarding issuance of a Governor’s Warrant, please contact Christopher N. Frink, Director of Extraditions (804) 692-0116 .

Notary Commissions

Source: Webpage

The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth is responsible for the commissioning of Notaries Public in Virginia, pursuant to Section 47.1-8 of the Code of Virginia. At any given time, approximately 120,000 Virginians are commissioned as a Notary Public.

How to become a notary or renew your commission:

Please read information carefully.

Notary Application Eligibility and Information
To be eligible to apply for a Virginia Notary Public Commission, you must be: (1) at least eighteen years old, (2) able to read and write the English language, (3) be a legal resident of the United States, (4) live or work in the Commonwealth of Virginia, and (5) have not been convicted of a felony. Any person who has ever been convicted of a felony under the laws of the United States or this Commonwealth, or the laws of any other state, shall not qualify to be appointed and commissioned as a Virginia Notary Public unless such person has had his/her rights restored.

Non-residents of Virginia may be appointed as notaries if they are regularly employed in the state and perform notary services in connection with their employment. A non-resident notary who ceases to be regularly employed in Virginia must surrender his or her commission.

Virginia is a “self certifying state” and does not require classes or testing to qualify to become a notary public.

Restoration of Rights

Source: Webpage

Anyone convicted of a felony in Virginia automatically loses their civil rights – the right to vote, serve on a jury, run for office, become a notary public and carry a firearm. The Constitution of Virginia gives the Governor the sole discretion to restore civil rights, not including firearm rights. Individuals seeking restoration of their civil rights are encouraged to contact the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s office.

  • To be eligible for restoration of civil rights, an individual must have a felony conviction and be free from any term of incarceration and/or supervision resulting from felony conviction(s).
  • The Secretary of the Commonwealth gives priority consideration to individuals who request restoration of their civil rights. An individual seeking restoration of their civil rights may contact the Secretary of the Commonwealth using the button below or by calling (804) 692-0104.
  • The Secretary of the Commonwealth’s office has identified individuals who may meet the Governor’s standards for restoration of rights and those individuals will be considered for possible restoration in the order of when they were released from supervision.

Service of Process

Source: Webpage

Virginians who have incurred financial loss and are pursuing civil remedies through the judicial system may request service through the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth. The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s Service of Process Department will then serve notice of pending litigation to the defendant via certified mail.

Requests for service may be submitted either electronically via the online portal or via mail. Hard copies of all paperwork to be served must be received in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth at least 10 business days prior to the court date, whether submitting requests for service electronically via the online portal below or via mail. Requests for service are then processed within ten business days of the court date.

A fee of $28 is required for each service. Payment can be submitted by credit card via the online portal below (Visa, Discover, MasterCard, American Express) or by mail via check or money order (Made Payable to: The Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, Attn: Service of Process).

Virginia Indians

Source: Webpages

Archaeological evidence shows that people have been living in what is now Virginia as far back as 16-22,000 years ago. Virginia’s modern day tribes were firmly established in ancestral lands long before the English arrived to settle at Jamestown. These tribes contributed significantly to the newcomers’ ability to survive those first few years upon their arrival to present-day Virginia. Over the four hundred years since the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, Virginia’s native people have contributed greatly to the vitality of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the nation, and continue to do so.

Virginia State Recognized Tribes

TribeYear RecognizedLocation
Mattaponi17th centuryBanks of the Mattaponi River, King William Co.
Pamunkey17th centuryBanks of the Pamunkey River, King William Co.
Chickahominy1983Charles City County
Eastern Chickahominy1983New Kent County
Rappahannock1983Indian Neck, King & Queen County
Upper Mattaponi1983King William County
Nansemond1985Cities of Suffolk and Chesapeake
Monacan Indian Nation1989Bear Mountain, Amherst County
Cheroenhaka (Nottoway)2010Courtland, Southampton County
Nottoway of Virginia2010Capron, Southampton County
Patawomeck2010Stafford County

Seals of the Commonwealth

Source: Webpage

I would like to use the seals of the Commonwealth of Virginia:

Section 1-505 of the Code of Virginia provides that the seals of the Commonwealth are deemed the property of the Commonwealth; and no persons shall exhibit, display, or in any manner utilize the seals or any facsimile or representation of the seals of the Commonwealth for nongovernmental purposes unless such use is specifically authorized.

My company would like to use the seal on its products:

Pursuant to Section 2.2-122 of the Code of Virginia, the seals of the Commonwealth may be authorized for commercial purposes upon a finding that such use promotes an appropriate image of the Commonwealth, its heritage and its history, and that such use is carried out in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth. An individual shall be deemed qualified to protect and promote the image of the Commonwealth if it holds licenses to produce products associated with museums and sites of major historical importance in the Commonwealth.

The Secretary of the Commonwealth determines the appropriateness of any contract entered into for the commercial use of the seals of the Commonwealth, the product intended to be sold, any marketing activities undertaken to promote the sale of the product, and the pricing structure of the product.

Inquiries into the commercial use of the seals of the Commonwealth of Virginia should be directed to John Byxbe at the Department of General Services at 804-225-3796

Blue Book of the Commonwealth of Virginia

Source: Webpage

Pursuant to § 2.2-402 of the Code of Virginia, this report identifies, “(i) the boards of visitors of all public institutions, and other boards appointed by the Governor; (ii) all commissions issued under appointments made by the Governor, except commissions to notaries public; (iii) all departments, boards, councils, commissions, and other collegial bodies created in the executive branch of state government; and (iv) such other matters as the Governor requires.”

This online Blue Book provides users with a Web-accessible record that is presented to the Governor and General Assembly annually. There is no charge or fee to access this information.

Blue Book

Constituent Services and Community Engagement

Source: Webpage

The Governor’s Office of Constituent Services and Community Engagement facilitates communication with the Governor, processes requests for proclamations and other commemorative documents, and manages flag and other protocol related requests.

Some examples include: Birth of a Baby, Birthday, Graduation, Retirement, Class Reunion, and Proclamation.

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Secretary of EducationSecretary of Education

The Secretary of Education provides guidance and support to the Virginia Department of Education, the Virginia Community College System, and the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, as well as Virginia’s public and private higher education and research centers.

Summary

The Secretary of Education provides guidance and support to the Virginia Department of Education, the Virginia Community College System, and the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, as well as Virginia’s public and private higher education and research centers.

About

Contact

Email: Secretary

Locations

Office of the Secretary of Education
Patrick Henry Building
1111 East Broad Street
4th Floor
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 786-1151

Web

Website

Leaders

 Atif Qarni, Secretary of Education
Atif.Qarni@governor.virginia.gov

Prior to his appointment as Governor Northam’s Secretary of Education, Atif Qarni taught at Beville Middle School in Prince William County, leading courses in civics, economics, U.S History, and mathematics. He also served as a GED Night School Instructor. In 2016, Atif was recognized as the Dale City Teacher of the Year.

In addition to his work as an educator, Atif is a former Sergeant of the United States Marine Corps, and was deployed to Iraq in 2003 during Operation Iraqi Freedom. He has also served at the state level, having been appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe to the Small Business Commission in 2013.

Secretary Qarni holds a Bachelor’s in Sociology from George Washington University as well as a Master’s in History and teaching license from George Mason University.

Frances C. Bradford, Deputy Secretary of Education
Fran.Bradford@governor.virginia.gov

Fran Bradford has spent the past twenty-seven years championing Virginia higher education through the state and federal legislative and policy processes. She currently serves Deputy Secretary of Education for Governor Northam. Prior to this role, she was at the College of William & Mary for fourteen years, most recently serving as the Associate Vice President for Government Relations. Before arriving at William & Mary, Fran served in several communications and government relations roles at the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) from 1990-2003.  In the fall of 2005, she was called on to fill the position of Deputy Secretary of Education during the remaining months of Governor Mark Warner’s term.Ms. Bradford also serves on the Executive Board of the Virginia Network, an organization that promotes women’s leadership in higher education. She previously served as the Chair of the taskforce for the National Higher Education Government Relations Conference (Sponsored by CASE, AASCU, and APLU).

Ms. Bradford earned a Bachelor of Arts from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana and she holds a Masters of Public Administration from Virginia Tech. She also holds a certificate of completion from Virginia’s Commonwealth Management Institute. A native Virginian, she resides with her family in Richmond.

Tori Noles, Policy Advisor to the Secretary of Education
tori.noles@governor.virginia.gov

Tori Noles currently serves as the Policy Advisor to Atif Qarni, Virginia Secretary of Education. Tori is passionate about advancing equity in education, and works to ensure that every student, school, and educator in Virginia has the resources they need to flourish. Before joining the Northam Administration, Ms. Noles served as the Engagement and Opioid Prevention Coordinator at the Virginia Department of Social Services.

Ms. Noles graduated from the University of Richmond with a degree in Political Science and Philosophy, and previously served as a Governor’s Fellow in the McAuliffe Administration.
Hala Al-Tinawi, Executive Assistant
hala.al-tinawi@governor. virginia.gov
Hala Al-Tinawi currently serves as the Executive Assistant to Atif Qarni, Virginia Secretary of Education. Ms. Al-Tinawi believes that education is the first step to success and hopes to help make a positive impact on the field of Education in Virginia.Hala grew up in Chesterfield, Virginia, and graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a Bachelors’s in History and Psychology. She previously interned at the Virginia Museum of History and culture before going on to work as a Middle School History teacher.

Virginia Department of Education

Source: Website

Vision
The vision of the Virginia Department of Education is that Virginia will maximize the potential of all learners.

Mission
The mission of the Virginia Department of Education is to advance equitable and innovative learning.

Superintendent

Dr. James F. Lane was appointed Virginia’s 25th Superintendent of Public Instruction by Governor Ralph S. Northam, effective June 1, 2018. As state superintendent Dr. Lane serves as the executive officer of the Virginia Department of Education, which is the administrative agency for the commonwealth’s public schools. He leads the external functions of the agency and also manages the internal operations. Dr. Lane also serves as secretary of the state Board of Education.

Agency Leadership

Division of Budget, Finance, and OperationsKent Dickey, Deputy Superintendent
The Division of Budget, Finance, and Operations is responsible for distributing state and federal funds to school divisions and provides technical assistance to school divisions in the areas of finance, budget, teacher education and licensure, pupil transportation, child nutrition programs, and school facilities. It administers the Literary Fund school construction loan program, educational technology and school security equipment grants to divisions, and two education tax credit programs for donations to eligible entities.  The division provides services to the Department in the areas of finance, budget, financial systems and reporting, procurement, and internal support services.

Division of School Quality, Instruction, and Performance – Donald Fairheart,  Deputy Superintendent and Chief of Staff
The Division of School Quality, Instruction, and Performance leads the Department’s strategic initiatives to advance equitable student outcomes and comprehensive school quality.  Through tailored support to schools, the division implements Virginia’s continuous school quality and improvement interventions.   Additionally, the division leads the Department’s efforts aimed at advancing equity, closing achievement gaps, coordinating stakeholder engagement, and managing external communications and outreach strategies.  Finally, the Division is responsible for supporting the implementation of Virginia’s Standards of Learning, strengthening curriculum resources, supporting best practices in pedagogy and providing technical assistance to teachers and schools.

Division of School Readiness – Jenna Conway, Chief School Readiness Officer
The Division of School Readiness helps prepare all Virginia children for kindergarten by supporting birth to five programming, including the Virginia Preschool Initiative and Early Childhood Special Education. The division focuses on key classroom practices including: the use of high-quality curriculum and assessment, teacher-child interactions and individualized professional development, as well as strengthening family engagement.  The division also works with other state agencies that serve young children to build a more unified birth to five early childhood care and education system.

Department of Policy, Equity, and Communications – Holly Coy, Assistant Superintendent

The mission of the Department of Policy, Equity, and Communications is to assist the Virginia Board of Education, the governor and the General Assembly in the development of legislation, regulations, and policies that promote student learning and achievement and to provide timely and accurate information about public education in the commonwealth. Department staff serve as liaison to the Board, and support the Board in promoting education reform. The department monitors federal policies and refers them to other divisions for oversight. The department maintains working relationships with the news media, educational organizations, and school divisions to ensure timely distributing of accurate information concerning the Board of Education policies and the Agency actions.

Virginia Community College System

Our Mission
We give everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened.

A Six Year Strategic Plan for Virginia’s Community Colleges
Virginia’s community colleges serve an estimated 400,000 people across the state. The opportunities we provide include some of the most cutting-edge and highly-demanded training and education available.

But, simply accessing those opportunities is no longer enough. You have to earn a credential to make it count toward a career.

Over the next ten years, Virginia will need to fill 1.5 million jobs. The majority of these jobs will require a postsecondary credential – an associate degree and the certifications and licensures that are our bread-and-butter.

To accommodate the demand for these middle-skill-level jobs (more than a high school degree but less than a bachelor’s), Virginia’s Community Colleges are embarking on a new six-year strategic plan to triple the number of credentials that our students earn by the year 2021.

State Council of Higher Education for Virginia

Source: Website

The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) is the Commonwealth’s coordinating body for higher education. SCHEV was established by the Governor and General Assembly in 1956. Then as now, our mission, which is outlined in the Code of Virginia, is “to advocate and promote the development and operation of an educationally and economically sound, vigorous, progressive, and coordinated system of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and to lead state-level strategic planning and policy development and implementation based on research and analysis …. The Council shall also seek to facilitate collaboration among institutions of higher education that will enhance quality and create operational efficiencies and shall work with institutions of higher education and their boards on board development.”

To fulfill our mission, SCHEV makes higher education public policy recommendations to the Governor and General Assembly in such areas as capital and operating budget planning, enrollment projections, institutional technology needs, and student financial aid. SCHEV administers a variety of educational programs that benefit students, faculty, parents, and taxpayers. SCHEV serves as a catalyst to promote greater access, quality, affordability, and accountability throughout the system. SCHEV also helps policymakers, college administrators, and other concerned leaders work cooperatively and constructively to advance educational excellence.

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Secretary of FinanceSecretary of Finance

The Secretary of Finance provides guidance to the four key agencies within the Finance Secretariat. These agencies handle all the financial transactions of the Commonwealth — from collecting taxes, to paying bills, to distributing aid to localities.

Their responsibilities include:

  • forecasting and collecting revenues
  • managing the Commonwealth’s cash and investments
  • selling bonds
  • overseeing internal audits
  • making strategic financial plans
  • preparing and executing the Commonwealth’s budget.

Summary

The Secretary of Finance provides guidance to the four key agencies within the Finance Secretariat. These agencies handle all the financial transactions of the Commonwealth — from collecting taxes, to paying bills, to distributing aid to localities.

Their responsibilities include:

  • forecasting and collecting revenues
  • managing the Commonwealth’s cash and investments
  • selling bonds
  • overseeing internal audits
  • making strategic financial plans
  • preparing and executing the Commonwealth’s budget.

About

Secretary Aubrey L. Layne, Jr.

Aubrey L. Layne, Jr. serves as the Secretary of Finance in Governor Ralph S. Northam’s administration.  Having taken his oath of office on January 14, 2018, he currently oversees the four main finance agencies in the Commonwealth of Virginia: Department of Accounts; Department of Planning and Budget; Department of Taxation; and Department of the Treasury – along with the Virginia Resources Authority and the Virginia Board of Accountancy.

Previously, Governor Terence R. McAuliffe appointed Mr. Layne as Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Virginia – he served in this capacity from January 2014 – January 2018.  As the Secretary of Transportation, he oversaw seven agencies with over 10,000 employees and combined budgets of more than $6 billion.  Prior to his appointment, he represented the Hampton Roads area on the Commonwealth Transportation Board from 2006 until January 2014.

Before his service to the Commonwealth of Virginia, Mr. Layne most recently served as President of An Achievable Dream Academy in Newport News, Virginia, a unique partnership between Newport News Public Schools, the City of Newport News and the local business community to give students who are at risk of failure in school due to socioeconomic factors, a chance to succeed.

Also, Mr. Layne has served as President and Principal Broker of Great Atlantic Properties; he joined the company in 1994 and was responsible for operational activities, new business acquisition, and capital improvement strategy.  Prior to joining Great Atlantic, he has held various positions at Hofheimer’s Inc., and ended his tenure there as President.  Mr. Layne began his career as a Certified Public Accountant with KPMG.

Mr. Layne earned a B.S. in Accounting from the University of Richmond and received an MBA from Old Dominion University with a concentration in International Business.  In 2011, he completed the University of Virginia’s Sorensen Institute for Political Leaders program.

Secretary Layne and his wife, Peggy, reside in Richmond, Virginia.

Contact

Email: School

Locations

Aubrey Layne
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-786-2211

Web

Website

Agencies

Department of Accounts

Source: Website

The Department of Accounts (DOA) operates the state’s centralized automated accounting, payroll and fixed assets systems, and prepares the Commonwealth’s official financial statements. It ensures that all funds for state agencies and institutions are accounted for and spent according to state and federal laws and accepted accounting principles.

Department of Planning and Budget

Source: Website

The Department of Planning and Budget (DPB) develops and administers the state budget, which allocates money for state agencies and institutions. The agency also conducts policy analyses and evaluations of state programs and services and oversees the Commonwealth’s strategic planning and performance measurement efforts. In addition, the Department analyzes proposed state legislation, reviews regulations for need and clarity, and prepares economic impact statements on regulations.

Department of Taxation

Source: Website

The Department of Taxation collects taxes, deposits taxes with the state treasury, and administers the tax laws for individuals and corporations.

Department of the Treasury

Source: Website

The Department of the Treasury manages cash in the state treasury and makes payments based on authorizations from the Comptroller; it also issues and manages the state’s debt.

Unclaimed Property Division

Source: Website

The Unclaimed Property Division is responsible for returning money, stocks, bonds, dividends, utility deposits, insurance proceeds and tangible property to the rightful owners.

Virginia Resources Authority 

Source: Website

The Virginia Resources Authority infrastructure financing for local governments in the areas of water, wastewater, stormwater drainage, solid waste, brownfield remediation, public safety and airports.

Board of Accountancy

Source: Website

Regulates certified public accountants in Virginia through a program of examination, licensure of individuals and CPA firms, consumer protection through enforcement of statutes and regulations, continuing professional education and peer review oversight.

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Secretary of Health and Human ResourcesSecretary of Health and Human Resources

The Secretary of Health and Human Resources oversees twelve state agencies which provide often-vital services to Virginians. Individuals with disabilities, the aging community, low-income working families, children, caregivers and the provider network are supported through the work of this Secretariat.

In addition, our agencies license health practitioners and ensure safe drinking water in the Commonwealth.

Summary

The Secretary of Health and Human Resources oversees twelve state agencies which provide often-vital services to Virginians. Individuals with disabilities, the aging community, low-income working families, children, caregivers and the provider network are supported through the work of this Secretariat.

In addition, our agencies license health practitioners and ensure safe drinking water in the Commonwealth.

About

Daniel Carey, MD, MHCM

Daniel Carey, MD, MHCM, was appointed Secretary of Health and Human Resources by Governor Ralph Northam in January 2018. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Carey worked as a cardiologist and served as Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer at Centra, where his responsibilities included information technology services, patient quality and safety efforts, performance improvement initiatives, and functions of the medical staff at Centra’s 3 acute care facilities.

Dr. Carey held numerous leadership positions after joining Cardiology Associates of Central Virginia in 1997, which Centra later acquired in 2006. In 1998,, he became Medical Director of the Acute MI Program, and went on to serve as Director of the Cardiac Cath Lab and Medical Director of the Stroobants Heart Center. Dr. Carey then went on to become the President/Chief Physician Executive of the Centra Medical Group.

Dr. Carey has special interest in medical leadership, and in addition to his roles at Centra, has also served as President of the Lynchburg Academy of Medicine, the Medical Society of Virginia and the MSV Foundation.

In his current role, Dr. Carey is passionate about expanding access to affordable health care for Virginians; improving the Commonwealth’s behavioral health and developmental services programs; and making meaningful progress on issues such as substance use and addiction, women’s health, and children’s issues.

A long-time Virginia resident, Dr. Carey graduated from the University of Virginia and Harvard Medical School. He received his Master of Health Care Management from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He served for 15 year in the U.S. Air Force in both active duty an reserve status, earning the rank of Major. He currently resides in Richmond with his wife Kim, who is a registered nurse. In his spare time, Dr. Carey is a regular at Richmond’s Downtown YMCA.

Contact

Email: Secretary

Locations

Office of the Secretary of Health and Human Resources
Patrick Henry Building
1111 East Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: (804) 786-7765
Fax: (804) 786-3389

Web

Website

Agencies

Assistive Technology Loan Fund Authority

Source: Website

The Assistive Technology Loan Fund Authority offers low interest loans for a variety of special equipment to eligible applicants. The interest rate is normally well below normal market rates, and loans are available with no down payment and longer terms which reduces monthly payments. These low interest loans are made through our financial partner (SunTrust), are guaranteed through our financial partner, or are direct loans made by the Assistive Technology Loan Fund Authority.

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Source: Website

The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD) serves as the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council for addressing the needs of people with developmental disabilities as established under the federal “Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act” and the state “Virginians with Disabilities Act.” The Board provides opportunities for people with disabilities and family members to participate in planning and evaluating the delivery of disability services.

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Source: Website

The Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services focuses on improving the response to seniors and Virginians with disabilities who need some aid in maintaining their options for independence, safety and employment. DARS provides and advocates for the highest quality of services to help older Virginians and those with disabilities maximize and secure their employment, independence and full inclusion into society and guide the Commonwealth in preparing for an aging population. At the state level, this agency works with its community partners to enhance effectiveness in strategic planning, budgeting, program monitoring and evaluation, and training and technical support.

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Source: Website

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides leadership in the direction and development of public mental health, intellectual disability and substance abuse services.  This leadership involves: obtaining and allocating resources to Community Services Boards (CSBs) and state facilities in an effective and efficient manner; monitoring field operations; providing technical assistance and consultation; promoting client advocacy; systems planning; regulating and licensing programs and maintaining relationships with other human resource agencies.

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Source: Website

The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) is guided by their mission: to enable blind, visually impaired, and deafblind individuals to achieve their maximum level of employment, education, and personal independence. To assist individuals in achieving economic independence, the Department provides vocational assessments and training, job development, placement and follow-up. Residential and home instruction is provided in independent living, orientation and mobility, counseling, Braille, and training in the use of various adaptive technologies. DBVI collaborates with public school systems to assist in the education of blind, deafblind and visually impaired students. The Department also provides employment options for blind persons through the Business Enterprises and Virginia Industries for the Blind and its satellite store operations.

Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (

Source: Website

The Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (VDDHH) operates with the full understanding that communication is the most critical issue facing persons who are deaf or hard of hearing.  VDDHH works to reduce the communication barriers between persons who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families and the professionals who serve them. The foundation of all programs at VDDHH is communication – both as a service (through interpreters, technology and other modes) and as a means of sharing information for public awareness (through training and education).

Virginia Department of Health

Source: Website

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) operates by their mission to achieve and maintain optimum personal and community health by emphasizing health promotion, disease prevention, and environmental protection.

Virginia Department of Health Professions

Source: Website

The Virginia Department of Health Professions (DHP) works to assure the safe and competent delivery of health care to the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia through the process of examining, licensing and disciplining health care practitioners governed by one of the 13 state health care boards.

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Source: Website

The Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) strives to provide a system of high quality comprehensive health services to qualifying Virginians and their families. DMAS works to ensure that program integrity is maintained in the array of preventive, acute and long-term care services it provides, and that fraud, abuse, and waste are detected and eliminated to the maximum extent possible. DMAS encourages beneficiaries to take responsibility for improving their health outcomes and achieve greater self-sufficiency.

Virginia Department of Social Services

Source: Website

The Virginia Department of Social Services (DSS) operates under their mission: to serve Virginia’s citizens in need by providing services that nurture human dignity; creating and maintaining a stable environment for the children and families in Virginia; promoting responsible parenting; establishing the infrastructure that allows for the delivery of services at the local level; and fostering independence.

Office of Children’s Services

Source: Website

The Office of Children’s Services provides the highest quality information and support to the public, state government partners, and local CSA programs in the spirit of “empowering communities to serve youth.”

Formerly known as the Comprehensive Services Act (CSA)

Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth

Source: Website

The Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth (VFHY), formerly known as the Virginia Tobacco Settlement Foundation, was established by the Virginia General Assembly to reduce and prevent youth tobacco use and childhood obesity. VFHY promotes healthy living habits to children and teens in Virginia through a variety of methods, including: classroom programs; a multimedia youth marketing campaign; cutting-edge research; and funding enforcement of Virginia’s tobacco-access laws.

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Secretary of Natural ResourcesSecretary of Natural Resources

The Secretary of Natural Resources advises the Governor on natural resources issues and works to advance the Governor’s top environmental priorities. The Secretary oversees five agencies that protect and restore the Commonwealth’s natural and historic resources. The Secretary’s office and all of the natural resources agencies work together to uphold the provisions of Article XI of the Virginia Constitution:

Summary

The Secretary of Natural Resources advises the Governor on natural resources issues and works to advance the Governor’s top environmental priorities. The Secretary oversees five agencies that protect and restore the Commonwealth’s natural and historic resources. The Secretary’s office and all of the natural resources agencies work together to uphold the provisions of Article XI of the Virginia Constitution:

About

Source: Webpage

Conservation and Land Protection

Virginia’s land conservation investments are essential to making the Commonwealth a wonderful place to live and visit.  Land and water conservation protects the places we love, supports a high quality of life and fosters economic growth and prosperity.  In 2016, the Trust for Public Land reported that every $1 invested in land conservation returns $4 in economic value in natural goods and services in the form of improved air and water quality, carbon sequestration, and enhanced fish and wildlife habitat1. Governor Northam is dedicated to ensuring the highest conservation outcomes from state funds spent on protecting land.

Chesapeake Bay Restoration

The Chesapeake Bay is the world’s greatest estuary and one of our nation’s most significant natural resources.  As a Commonwealth we must ensure that we are responsible stewards of the Bay so that future generations can enjoy this natural treasure as much or more than we can.  The Bay provides recreation for Virginians and visitors, billions of dollars in economic activity, and tremendous numbers of jobs and products.  We are working with all of the other states in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, along with the federal government and the District of Columbia, to improve the Bay’s water quality and wildlife.

Climate

Climate change is an urgent and pressing challenge for Virginia, the United States, and the world. The Commonwealth is already feeling the impacts of global warming in the form of rising sea levels, increased flooding, and more extreme weather events. The Commonwealth has decided to act boldly to reduce climate pollution and mitigate the impacts of a warming world.

Resilience & Coastal Adaptation

As sea levels rise and climate change causes more significant and frequent weather events, Virginia must increase its resilience to sea level rise, flooding, and natural hazards. To address this growing risk for the Commonwealth and its citizens, Governor Ralph S. Notham signed Executive Order 24- Increasing Virginia’s Resilience To Sea Level Rise And Natural Hazards on November 2, 2018.  This executive order provides a pathway to increased resilience to these hazards in the Commonwealth and includes a provision for the Commonwealth’s first Coastal Resilience Master Plan, with the goal of aligning state efforts and assisting local governments in reducing flood risk through planning and implementing large-scale flood protection and adaptation initiatives.

Through the Virginia Flood Risk Management Standard, a first of its kind for any state, Virginia will improve flood protection in coastal areas by discouraging building in floodplains and incorporating sea level rise projections that have been developed based on the best available science and adopted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

 

Environmental Justice

It is important that no segment of the population, especially individuals most impacted and vulnerable, should bear disproportionately high or adverse effects from pollution. To ensure that all people and perspectives have a voice, the Commonwealth requires a consistent, action-oriented approach to incorporating environmental justice into decision-making. As a result, former Governor Terry McAuliffe established the Advisory Council on Environmental Justice via Executive Order 73 to provide independent advice and recommendations to the Executive Branch on environmental justice issues. Governor Northam looks forward to continuing this work under his leadership via executive order 29, ensuring the protection of all Virginians and our natural resources.

Historic Justice & Equity

Virginia’s 400 year history is difficult and complex, and Governor Northam is dedicated to telling the full and true story of our past. During the 2020 legislative session, the Governor championed legislation and budget priorities to advance historic justice and equity in Virginia.

In 2019, the Northam Administration also took several important steps to honor the tribal history of Virginia Indians and ensure they have an enduring home to continue their sacred traditions in the Commonwealth.

Wildlife Management

Science shows us that biodiversity loss and climate change are contributing to more frequent disease outbreaks. As forests and wetlands disappear, pathogens like Ebola, Zika and coronavirus jump more easily from animals to humans. Virginia recognizes the interconnected nature of our environment, climate change, and human health. This is why Governor Northam is committed to the protection of Virginia’s unique biodiversity and natural habitats.

Conservation Cabinet

In 2019, Governor Northam issued an executive order establishing the Governor’s Conservation Cabinet, an initiative to better protect Virginia’s vulnerable natural resources and improve environmental quality across the Commonwealth. The Secretary of Natural Resources chairs the Conservation Cabinet and leads the united effort to safeguard Virginia’s natural resources and landscape, and support the Governor’s long-term goal of achieving protection of the top ten percent of high conservation value lands in Virginia.

Matthew J. Strickler

J. Strickler is the Secretary of Natural Resources for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Prior to joining the Administration, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to Democratic members of the House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources. Originally from Lexington, Virginia, Matthew holds a master’s degrees in public policy and marine science from the College of William and Mary and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. He was a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in NOAA’s Office of International Affairs in 2007, and worked on U.S. Senator Mark Warner’s successful 2008 campaign. Immediately prior to his time on Capitol Hill, Matthew worked in the Virginia General Assembly as a legislative assistant to then-state Senator Ralph Northam.

Contact

Email: Secretary

Locations

Secretary of Natural Resources
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-786-0044

Web

Website

Agencies

Department of Conservation and Recreation

Source: Website

The Department of Conservation and Recreation works with Virginians to conserve, protect, and enhance their lands and improve the quality of the Chesapeake Bay and our rivers and streams, promotes the stewardship and enjoyment of natural, cultural and outdoor recreational resources, and insures the safety of Virginia’s dams.
http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/

Department of Environmental Quality

Source: Website

The Department of Environmental Quality is dedicated to protecting Virginia’s environment and promoting the health and well-being of the citizens of the Commonwealth. We accomplish this by planning and implementing environmental programs and by resolving issues efficiently, openly, fairly and consistently.

Department of Wildlife Resources

Source: Website

The Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR) mission is to protect Virginia’s wildlife and habitat and promote outdoor recreation. DWR’s range of wildlife conservation responsibilities and opportunities includes hunting and fishing, wildlife watching, public lands, boating, and outdoor recreation.

Home

Department of Historic Resources

Source: Website

The Department of Historic Resources’ mission is to foster, encourage, and support the identification, stewardship, and use of Virginia’s significant historic, architectural, archaeological and cultural resources.
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/

Marine Resources Commission

Source: Website

The Marine Resources Commission serves as stewards of Virginia’s marine and aquatic resources, and protectors of its tidal waters and homelands, for present and future generations.

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Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland SecuritySecretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security

Building a Safer More Resilient Virginia
The Secretariat also assists the Governor in the development and implementation of public safety and homeland security policies. The Secretariat supports the Governor’s strategic priorities through four established pillars of interagency collaboration:  All-Hazards Emergency Response, Reducing Recidivism, Preventing Gun Violence, and Smart Policing.

Summary

Building a Safer More Resilient Virginia
The Secretariat also assists the Governor in the development and implementation of public safety and homeland security policies. The Secretariat supports the Governor’s strategic priorities through four established pillars of interagency collaboration:  All-Hazards Emergency Response, Reducing Recidivism, Preventing Gun Violence, and Smart Policing.

About

Brian J. Moran, Secretary

Brian J. Moran was appointed by Governor McAuliffe in January 2014 and reappointed by Governor Northam in January 2018 as Virginia’s first Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security. The Office of the Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security is comprised of 10 state agencies and includes the Homeland Security Division. Secretary Moran serves as the Governor’s Homeland Security Advisor and the Governor’s Criminal Justice Advisor.

Throughout the course of his appointment, Secretary Moran has led the effort on numerous criminal justice reform and homeland security initiatives. The Virginia Department of Corrections enjoys the lowest recidivism rate in the nation for the third consecutive year. He has supervised the transformation of Virginia’s juvenile justice system. He negotiated raising the felony larceny threshold for the first time in 38 years. Secretary Moran also developed states’ response to permitted events and states’ preparedness for civil unrest after the events in Charlottesville in 2017.

Prior to his appointment, Secretary Moran served as a long time County prosecutor in Arlington, Virginia. In 1996, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates representing the city of Alexandria and Fairfax County, a seat he held for 13 years. He championed and sponsored legislation in the areas of child abuse, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug interdiction and elder abuse. He forged bipartisan coalitions and support to pass numerous pieces of legislation. Most notably, he created the felony drunk driving law and Alicia’s Law, which provides law enforcement the necessary tools to stop internet sexual predators from preying on our children.

Secretary Moran received his bachelor’s degree from Framingham State University and his Juris Doctor from the Columbus School of Law at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. In 2015, he was awarded the President’s award by the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police. He was recently elected to the Executive Committee of the Governors Homeland Security Advisors Council.

Jae K. Davenport, Deputy Secretary

Prior to her current appointment by Governor Northam as Deputy Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security, she served as Deputy Counsel to Governor Terry McAuliffe. Ms. Davenport began her professional career as a public defender in Franklin, Virginia, where she represented juveniles and adults charged with misdemeanors and felonies in three jurisdictions. Subsequently, she was the Standards of Practice and Legal Training Attorney for the Virginia Indigent Defense Commission (VIDC) where she oversaw the enforcement of the mandatory standards of practice, certification of court-appointed counsel and legal training for all public defenders and certified attorneys. She was also a legislative advocate for the VIDC.

Ms. Davenport was born in Seoul, Korea, but has spent most of her life in Richmond and earned her B.A. from Mary Baldwin College and J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law.

Shawn Talmadge, Deputy Secretary

Shawn Talmadge serves as Deputy Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security and Governor’s Homeland Security Advisor where he supervises the Secretariat’s Homeland Security Division and the Departments of Emergency Management, Fire Programs, and State Police.  He has served within the emergency response and homeland security field for over 25 years at the state and local level as an incident commander, critical care paramedic, firefighter, and hazardous materials technician, ultimately achieving the rank of Battalion Chief in the Hanover County Fire-EMS Department.

In his current role, Mr. Talmadge supervises a staff focused on the development of new initiatives and policies within critical infrastructure protection, cyber security, homeland security, and public safety communications interoperability.

Throughout his career in the Virginia National Guard, Shawn held a number of leadership roles including Battalion Commander, Executive Officer, Chief of Joint Operations, and Deputy Commander of the CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP).  He led a number of initiatives including the development of CERFP training standards and doctrine, established standardized response task forces to speed response to domestic emergencies, the development of less than lethal technologies, and managed counter UAS and detection operations.  His awards include the General Douglas MacArthur Leadership Award for recognition as the top company grade officer in the US Army, the Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (3rd award), the Purple Heart and others.  After two deployments to the Middle East, Shawn continues his service in the Virginia National Guard as the Operations Officer at Fort Pickett.

Previously, Mr. Talmadge was appointed as Virginia’s first Director of the Homeland Security and Resilience Staff Group under Governor McAuliffe’s administration where he re-established the Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee, led the state’s FirstNet evaluation process resulting in Virginia being the first to opt-in to the nationwide wireless network dedicated to public safety users, and established a variety of new critical infrastructure and cyber security initiatives designed to bolster the resilience of Virginia.

Shawn has coauthored national level, interagency response protocols to large-scale incidents, responded to numerous regional and state level disasters, and presented at conferences on various homeland security topics.  He received his Bachelor’s Degree from Virginia Tech in Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise and a Master’s Degree from the Virginia Commonwealth University in Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness.  He also holds the Certified Emergency Manager designation from the International Association of Emergency Managers.

Agencies

The Secretariat of Public Safety and Homeland Security is comprised of ten public safety agencies that help enhance the quality of Virginia’s citizens, visitors and businesses of the Commonwealth through public awareness, education, training, emergency response, disaster preparedness, prevention, policy development, enforcement, response, recovery and reentry.

Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority

Source: Website

The Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority (ABC) administers ABC laws with an emphasis on public safety by ensuring an orderly and regulated system for convenient sales and responsible consumption of alcohol. Virginia ABC generates a reliable stream of revenue for the Commonwealth through the collection of taxes on beer and wine sales, violation penalties, license fees, and the sale of distilled spirits at more than 375 ABC stores.

Commonwealth’s Attorneys’ Services Council

Source: Website

The Commonwealth’s Attorneys’ Services Council is an executive branch state agency responsible for coordinating and providing training, education, and services for Virginia’s prosecutors. The 120 elected Commonwealth’s Attorneys and their approximately 650 Assistants statewide depend on Council-sponsored training programs to meet the annual mandatory continuing legal education (MCLE) requirements mandated by the Virginia State Bar to maintain their licenses to practice law.

 Virginia Department of Corrections

Source: Website

The Virginia Department of Corrections is a model correctional agency that currently oversees the housing of 33,000 offenders and the supervision of over 58,000 offenders in the community. Virginia’s recidivism rate is the lowest in its history and the second lowest in the nation at 22.8%. The Department is also an innovative leader through the application of cutting edge research-based programs to improve offender transition success. These outstanding results are made possible by the employees of the Department who are committed to the highest professional standards and excellence in public service.

Department of Criminal Justice Services

Source: Website

The Department of Criminal Justice Services provides comprehensive planning and state-of-the-art technical and support services for the criminal justice system to improve and promote public safety in the Commonwealth. The Department of Criminal Justice Services is charged with planning and carrying out programs and initiatives to improve the effectiveness and functions of the criminal justice system as a whole.

Department of Emergency Management

Source: Website

The Department of Emergency Management protects the lives and property of Virginia’s citizens from emergencies and disasters through emergency preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts. The Department of Emergency Management coordinates the state’s emergency response efforts by working with local, state and federal partners, as well as private, nonprofit and volunteer organizations.

Department of Fire Programs

Source: Website

The Department of Fire Programs strives to be the internationally recognized and trusted leader in providing fire and emergency services support to communities throughout Virginia. It delivers funding, professional development, public fire and life safety education, research, operational support, advocacy, and technical assistance. The Virginia Department of Fire Programs provides programs and services to the citizens of all Virginia towns, cities and counties as well as more than 770 fire departments and approximately 40,000 firefighters.

 Department of Forensic Science

Source: Website

The Department of Forensic Science is a nationally accredited forensic laboratory system serving all state and local law enforcement agencies, medical examiners, and Commonwealth’s Attorneys in Virginia. The Department’s examiners provide technical assistance and training, evaluate and analyze evidence, interpret results, and provide expert testimony related to the full spectrum of physical evidence recovered from crime scenes.

Department of Juvenile Justice

Source: Website

The Department of Juvenile Justice protects the public through a balanced approach of accountability and comprehensive services that prevents and reduces juvenile delinquency through partnerships with families, schools, communities, law enforcement and others, while providing opportunities for delinquent youth to become responsible and productive citizens. The Department is responsible for the operation of Court Service Units that work with the judiciary and the Correctional Centers that provide physical security as well as discipline and treatment for wards committed to their care by the judiciary.

Virginia Parole Board

Source: Website

The Virginia Parole Board is responsible for determining who is to be released on discretionary parole. The Board takes into consideration many factors to determine whether an individual is suitable for release back into the community.  The Board is cognizant of their responsibility to both the individuals being considered for Parole and the citizens of the Commonwealth to best ensure the safety of society.

Virginia State Police

Source: Website

The Virginia State Police, independent yet supportive of other law enforcement and criminal justice agencies, provides high quality, statewide law enforcement services to the people of Virginia and our visitors. With 75 years of service to the citizens of the Commonwealth, the men and women of this statewide agency strive to fulfill their public safety mission while improving the quality of life for those living, working and visiting in Virginia.

Homeland Security Division

Source: Website

The Homeland Security Division of the Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security acts as the Cabinet-level State office for leading a unified effort to ensure a secure Commonwealth, a confident public, and a strong and resilient society and economy.

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Secretary of TransportationSecretary of Transportation

The Secretary of Transportation is committed to creating and maintaining a multimodal network that connects Virginians to jobs, education, and health care across the Commonwealth and serves as the platform for Virginia’s economy.  Working collaboratively, we can advance this network by tying transportation decisions to economic competitiveness and identifying innovative solutions to transportation challenges.

Agencies the Secretariat oversees move people and goods by rail, water, transit, and over our roadways. Our sea ports, airports, space port, bridges, tunnels, and highways serve as global gateways for the Commonwealth, opening Virginia to economic opportunity by creating access to regional, national, and world markets.

Summary

The Secretary of Transportation is committed to creating and maintaining a multimodal network that connects Virginians to jobs, education, and health care across the Commonwealth and serves as the platform for Virginia’s economy.  Working collaboratively, we can advance this network by tying transportation decisions to economic competitiveness and identifying innovative solutions to transportation challenges.

Agencies the Secretariat oversees move people and goods by rail, water, transit, and over our roadways. Our sea ports, airports, space port, bridges, tunnels, and highways serve as global gateways for the Commonwealth, opening Virginia to economic opportunity by creating access to regional, national, and world markets.

About

Shannon Valentine

Shannon Valentine was appointed Secretary of Transportation by Governor Ralph Northam in January 2018, and oversees a $5 billion multimodal transportation system crossing seven agencies with more than 10,000 employees.

As Secretary, she also serves as Chair of the Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB).

Valentine is a former Member of the Virginia House of Delegates, serving on the House Transportation and Courts of Justice Committees. Her legislative priorities focused on transportation, economic development, education, and ethics. She led bipartisan efforts to create transparent government, expand clean energy production, and invest in intercity passenger rail service for the first time in Virginia’s history.

Following an assignment as a Director of the Transportation Policy Council in 2013 for then Governor-elect Terry McAuliffe’s transition team, Valentine was appointed as the Lynchburg District representative to the CTB in May 2014. During this time, she created the first Regional Connectivity Study in Virginia that correlated transportation decisions with workforce, business expansion and recruitment and investment, covering eight modes of transportation.

For more than 25 years, she worked to create economic opportunity through housing, education and transportation. Valentine was named 2017 Transportation Woman of the Year by WTS Central Virginia Chapter. She has been honored with the Humanitarian Award by the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities, Democracy in Action Award by the League of Women Voters, Freedom Fighter Award by the NAACP, Woman of the Year in Government by the YWCA, and the Commonwealth Autism Services Award.

She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Virginia in economics. She graduated from the Sorensen Institute at UVA, and completed Education for Ministry, a four-year theology course through Sewanee University’s School of Theology.

Secretary Valentine is married to Dr. Mike Valentine, and has three children, Catherine, Jack and Brooke.

Contact

Email: Shannon Valentine

Locations

Secretary of Transportation
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-786-2211

Web

Website

Agencies

Virginia Department of Aviation

Source: Website

The Commonwealth of Virginia maintains one of the nation’s most comprehensive and advanced statewide aviation systems consisting of 66 public-use airports across the Commonwealth. This includes Dulles International and Reagan National airports. The Virginia Department of Aviation’s mission is to cultivate an advanced aviation system that is safe, secure and provides for economic development; promote aviation awareness and education; and provide the safest and most efficient flight services for the Commonwealth’s leadership and state agencies.

Department of Motor Vehicles

Source: Website

Virginia’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) serves 6.2 million licensed drivers and ID card holders with over 7.8 million registered vehicles. DMV also serves a wide array of businesses, including dealers, fuels tax customers, rental companies, driving schools, other state agencies, local governments and non-profit organizations.

DMV’s responsibilities include vehicle titling and registration, driver licensing and maintenance of driver and vehicle records. The agency also collects Virginia’s fuel tax, monitors the state’s trucking industry and serves as Virginia’s Highway Safety Office. In addition, DMV effectively enforces motoring and transportation-related tax laws, and efficiently collects and distributes transportation-related revenues.

DMV operates 75 customer service centers, five mobile customer service centers, 53 DMV Select offices, 13 permanent motor carrier service centers (weigh stations), 13 mobile weigh crews, a virtual customer contact center, automated telephone service, five DMV Connect teams, and a website that offers more than 40 transactions.

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Source: Website

The Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) is the Commonwealth’s advocate for promoting multi-modal transportation options to the general public, businesses, and community decision makers. DRPT supports both passenger and freight rail initiatives. The agency focuses on the movement of people and goods throughout the Commonwealth, with primary areas of activity including rail, public transportation, and commuter services. DRPT works with local, regional, state, and federal governments, as well as private entities to provide support for projects and programs.

There are more than a dozen railroad companies and services in Virginia, including Norfolk Southern, CSX, Amtrak, VRE, and nine shortline railroads.

DRPT’s partnership with the Port of Virginia provides the Commonwealth with a gateway to the global economy.

The agency supports over 41 transit services and 18 Transportation Demand Management agencies.

Virginia Department of Transportation

Source: Website

The Virginia Department of Transportation plans, delivers, operates and maintains a transportation system that is safe, enables easy movement of people and goods, enhances the economy and improves our quality of life.

Virginia has the third-largest state-maintained highway system in the country, with a $5.41 billion total annual budget. VDOT is responsible for 57,867-miles of roads, bridges and tunnels.

Motor Vehicle Dealer Board

Source: Website

The Motor Vehicle Dealer Board (MVDB) is dedicated to regulation and oversight of the new and used car and truck dealer industry. The Board’s responsibilities also include the licensing and regulatory responsibility for recreational vehicles, motorcycles, and trailer dealers from DMV to MVDB.

Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority

Source: Website

The Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority (VCSFA), also known as ‘Virginia Space,’ promotes commercial space activity, economic development and aerospace research within the Commonwealth.

Virginia Space serves as a driver for Virginia’s Economy by providing safe, reliable, and responsive space Access at competitive prices, and secure facilities for testing of unmanned vehicles for integration into the National Air Space.

Virginia Space owns and operates the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) and the MARS UMS Airfield.

Virginia Space aims to provide and is proud to offer full-service launch and drone testing facilities for commercial, government, scientific and academic users.

Virginia Port Authority

Source: Website

Cargo moving through Virginia Port Authority’s world-class facilities is transported from and to markets around the globe, carrying the goods and supplies that manufacturers, corporations, and individual consumers use in their everyday lives. This cargo is moved by way of:

  • 6 Terminals
  • 1,864 acres
  • 19,885 L.F. of berth
  • Up to 50’ deep berths
  • 30 miles of on-dock rail

Virginia Port Authority’s deep water harbor–the deepest on the US East Coast–shelters the world’s largest naval base; a robust shipbuilding and repair industry; a thriving export coal trade and the sixth largest containerized cargo complex in the United States.

The Virginia Inland Port (VIP) is an intermodal container transfer facility in Front Royal, Virginia (Warren County) owned by the Virginia Port Authority. VIP is approximately 60 miles west of Washington, D.C. The terminal brings The Port of Virginia 220 miles closer to inland markets and enhances service to the Washington D.C. / Baltimore Metro Region by providing rail service to the terminals in Hampton Roads. VIP also consolidates and containerizes local cargo for export.

Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment 

Source: Website

The Office of Intermodal Planning and Investment encourages the coordination of multimodal and intermodal planning across the various transportation options within Virginia. Oversees the SMART SCALE program, which is an objective means for selecting and allocating capitol transportation improvements throughout the Commonwealth.

Office of Transportation Innovation

Virginia realizes that embracing innovation and coordinating technological advances across transportation agencies will provide efficiencies, economic synergy and a platform for harnessing research and emerging business technology in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

The Office of Transportation Innovation is a new office that resides within OIPI and will focus on coordinating innovation among the commonwealth’s transportation agencies including Aviation, DRPT, Virginia Space, the Virginia Port Authority, VDOT and DMV.

The office will work across Virginia’s multimodal transportation system to identify opportunities, coordinate research, and create an entrepreneurial environment within the transportation sector. Its work will include Connected Corridors, Data Analytics, Integrated Applications, and Unmanned Systems that span space, land, water and aviation.

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Auto Draft 26Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

The Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs serves the Commonwealth in four critical ways.

First, it oversees the Virginia Department of Veteran Services (DVS), whose mission is to serve Virginia’s Veterans, Guardsmen, Reservists, and their family members, by ensuring they receive timely transition, employment and education assistance, benefits, health care and long-term care and recognition they have earned through service to our Nation and Commonwealth. The Secretary distinguishes and elevates issues and opportunities for Veterans and transitioning Service members in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Of primary importance are the employment, health care, and education needs of our Veterans. With the seventh-largest Veteran population in the Nation and the greatest number of Veteransin the workforce per capita, the Secretariat maintains a particular focus on employment of our newest generation of Veterans who have the current skills needed here in the Commonwealth.

Second, the Secretariat serves as the primary liaison for the Commonwealth to the United States Department of Defense and its military communities. It leads the Governor’s initiatives focused on relationship building with and support of our military and defense installations and the communities surrounding them. Through the Governor’s Virginia Military Advisory Council (VMAC) and active Secretariat community involvement, the Commonwealth continues to be an engaged host in support of the military and defense missions in the state.

Next, the Secretary oversees the Virginia Department of Military Affairs (DMA), DMA’s mission is to effectively integrate military and homeland defense capabilities into applicable state operations; employ, train, and manage the Virginia Militia, consisting of the Virginia National Guard (the Virginia Army National Guard and the Virginia Air National Guard) and the Virginia Defense Forces; and to ensure the safety of the citizens of the Commonwealth during declared emergencies.

Lastly, the Secretariat oversees the Veteran Service Foundation (VSF). The VSF provides supplemental funding to programs, services, and initiatives of the Department of Veteran Services when state and federal resources are unavailable. All charitable donations to VSF stay right here in the Commonwealth and go toward providing access and services to Virginia Veterans.

We are honored to serve the Commonwealth and our Veterans , and look forward to working with you to continue to make Virginia the most Veteran and military friendly state in the Nation.

Summary

The Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs serves the Commonwealth in four critical ways.

First, it oversees the Virginia Department of Veteran Services (DVS), whose mission is to serve Virginia’s Veterans, Guardsmen, Reservists, and their family members, by ensuring they receive timely transition, employment and education assistance, benefits, health care and long-term care and recognition they have earned through service to our Nation and Commonwealth. The Secretary distinguishes and elevates issues and opportunities for Veterans and transitioning Service members in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Of primary importance are the employment, health care, and education needs of our Veterans. With the seventh-largest Veteran population in the Nation and the greatest number of Veteransin the workforce per capita, the Secretariat maintains a particular focus on employment of our newest generation of Veterans who have the current skills needed here in the Commonwealth.

Second, the Secretariat serves as the primary liaison for the Commonwealth to the United States Department of Defense and its military communities. It leads the Governor’s initiatives focused on relationship building with and support of our military and defense installations and the communities surrounding them. Through the Governor’s Virginia Military Advisory Council (VMAC) and active Secretariat community involvement, the Commonwealth continues to be an engaged host in support of the military and defense missions in the state.

Next, the Secretary oversees the Virginia Department of Military Affairs (DMA), DMA’s mission is to effectively integrate military and homeland defense capabilities into applicable state operations; employ, train, and manage the Virginia Militia, consisting of the Virginia National Guard (the Virginia Army National Guard and the Virginia Air National Guard) and the Virginia Defense Forces; and to ensure the safety of the citizens of the Commonwealth during declared emergencies.

Lastly, the Secretariat oversees the Veteran Service Foundation (VSF). The VSF provides supplemental funding to programs, services, and initiatives of the Department of Veteran Services when state and federal resources are unavailable. All charitable donations to VSF stay right here in the Commonwealth and go toward providing access and services to Virginia Veterans.

We are honored to serve the Commonwealth and our Veterans , and look forward to working with you to continue to make Virginia the most Veteran and military friendly state in the Nation.

About

Source: Webpage

Initiatives

Carlos Hopkins

Carlos Hopkins currently serves as Virginia’s Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs, the state’s top official for coordinating state and federal resources to support Virginia’s veteran community and liaison with federal defense facilities.  Former Governor Terence R. McAuliffe appointed him Secretary on September 1, 2017, following Hopkins’ service over the previous 3 years as Counsel to the Governor where he advised the Governor on the impact current federal and state law might have on the Governor’s policy proposals.  Governor Ralph S. Northam reappointed him to a new four-year term.

Carlos was born in Columbia, SC and is a graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, SC, where he graduated with a degree in political science with a concentration in law and criminal justice.  He received his law degree from the University Of Richmond School Of Law and is licensed by the Virginia State Bar.

Carlos began his legal career at a small firm in the City of Richmond handling insurance defense cases and federal court appointed matters. He left private practice to join the Richmond Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office.  Carlos served seven years as a prosecutor in the City of Richmond where, as a Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney he supervised the office’s narcotics and Project Exile prosecutions, working closely with his federal and state counterparts to stem the flow of drugs and illegal firearms in the City. As the Deputy in charge of the office’s Manchester Courthouse Division, he supervised the prosecution of all cases occurring within the City of Richmond south of the James River.   He also prosecuted a broad range of felonies including capital murder, rape and numerous drug and firearm offenses.

After a brief stint managing a solo practice, Carlos returned to the public sector when he was asked to serve as the Training Director for the newly restructured Virginia Indigent Defense Commission, the state agency that manages Virginia’s public defender system.  The agency also determines the eligibility criteria for court appointed counsel-those attorneys who provide a legal defense for indigent persons accused of crimes that carry a potential penalty of incarceration or death.

In 2013, Carlos joined the Richmond City Attorney’s office after operating his own solo practice the previous two years. As a Deputy City Attorney, his practice areas focused on tax assessment and eminent domain litigation as well as public safety. He was instrumental in bringing together members of the administration and Council staff to address the issues surrounding the reclamation of derelict properties in the City. After Governor McAuliffe was elected to be Virginia’s next governor, Carlos was then tapped to be the Governor’s Counsel in January 2014.

In addition to his civilian legal experiences, Carlos currently serves as the Staff Judge Advocate for the 29th Infantry Division at Fort Belvoir. He has over 27 years of service in the Reserve and Guard forces of the United States as a Judge Advocate and former enlisted Soldier and, from July 2008-July 2009, he deployed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba  where he served as the Chief of Military Justice as part of Joint Task Force Guantanamo.

Carlos is an avid golfer and runner and has a son, Isaiah.

Contact

Email: Carlos Hopkins

Locations

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23218
Phone: 804-225-3826

Web

Website

Agencies

Department of Veterans Services

Source: Website

Offers a range of services for veterans and their family members

Department of Military Affairs

Source: Website

Plans, coordinates, maintains situational awareness, and employs forces for homeland security and homeland defense in order to respond to any incidents within the Commonwealth.

Virginia Veterans Services Foundation

Source: Website

The Virginia Veterans Services Foundation provides supplemental funding when state and federal resources are not available. Donations support selected programs and critical services offered through the Department of Veterans Services.

Joint Leadership Council

Source: Website

The Joint Leadership Council (JLC) consists of representatives of the majority of veterans service organization in the Commonwealth.  It advises the Department of Veteran Services on matters of concern to veterans and their families. The Council is active in identifying veterans’ needs and advocating in support of veterans issues that may be remedied through appropriate legislation or by other means.

Virginia War Memorial

Source: Website

The Virginia War Memorial is the Commonwealth of Virginia’s monument to honor the memory of Virginia’s men and women who demonstrated a willingness to serve and fight to defend our way of life from World War II to the present.

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