VA Competitive Districts – 2019 Elections

This post summarizes the 5 competitive Virginia Senate and 20 House of Delegate Districts in the recent elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide.

> To view all the Virginia competitive races in this post, select this post’s title.

> To view who won in your district, select the “Who represents me?” button above and enter your full street address. On your phone, select the icon on the left.

VA House 21 – 2019

District Description:  Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Kelly Convirs-Fowler since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Democrats had been angling for this seat for years. Fowler, a first-time candidate, picked it up in 2017, knocking off longtime delegate Ron Villanueva with 52 percent of the vote. This year Fowler, a real estate agent, faces Kane, a former city council member.”

District Map, candidate information, and links inside post …

VA House 28 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of Stafford (part); City of Fredericksburg (part)
Current Delegate: Bob Thomas since 2018 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats barely lost in 2017, this race has also voted Democratic in recent statewide elections, though by slimmer margins than some of the other districts Democrats are targeting. Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine won the district by 55 points last year and Northam won with 51 percent of the vote in 2017. The Republican incumbent, Bob Thomas, was taken out by former Stafford Supervisor Paul Milde in a nasty primary that saw Milde tack right on issues like abortion and health care, something most Republicans facing tight races have strayed away from and Democrats expect to play to their advantage in a general election.”

VA House 40 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of Fairfax (part)
Current Delegate: Tim Hugo since 2003 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Now the lone Republican representing Northern Virginia in the House, Hugo held onto his seat by just 100 votes in 2017. His challenger, Democrat Dan Helmer, has already raised more than $400,000 for his campaign. Hugo, whose represented the seat since 2003 is sitting on $796,000, and his party is bullish, arguing that if the seat was going to go Democratic, it would have happened in 2017.”

VA House District 13 – 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas Park
Current Delegate: Danica  Roem since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“A tougher lift for Republicans, but they say it’s in the realm of possibility. Roem, a former newspaper reporter and the first transgender woman elected to the statehouse, has a nationwide profile and is well liked. She faces Kelly McGinn, a former lawyer and congressional staffer, who opposed the ERA and has a history of opposing same-sex marriage, positions that echo the stances of Bob Marshall – the anti-LGBTQ delegate Roem toppled in 2017.”

VA House 10 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Clarke (part), Frederick (part), and Loudoun (part)
Current Delegate: Wendy Gooditis since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another 2017 rematch. Gooditis, a real estate agent, beat Minchew, a lawyer who held the seat since 2012, with just under 51 percent of the vote. Republicans say their candidate is well liked and poised to make a comeback. Democrats say the race will come down to turnout.”

VA 2019 House Competitive Districts

This post has summaries of the 20 House of Delegate Districts in the upcoming elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

To view this post, select the feature image or post title.

One can view a more detailed post on each competitive district in each candidate subcategory e.g. Southeastern VA House Candidates. To view ALL the candidates running for the 100 House districts, go to this slide show.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide. If you know of other competitive districts, we will be happy to consider them for inclusion in this post.

Virginia onAir curators will have a special focus on these districts and will attempt to provide a video recording of an interview with each of the candidates.

VA House 27- 2109

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part)
Current Delegate: Roxann Robinson since 2010 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another rematch from 2017. Barnett, a licensed counselor, came within 124 votes of beating Robinson, an optometrist who has represented the district since 2010. Democrats say they’re enthusiastic about his chances this year. As in Hugo’s case, Republicans note that if Barnett couldn’t off Robinson during a historic, anti-Trump wave, it’s unlikely he’ll be able to do it this year, when turnout is muted with no statewide candidates anchoring the top of the ticket.”

VA House District 31 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Fauquier (part) and Prince William (part)
Current Delegate: Liz Guzman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Another district where a Democratic newcomer toppled a long serving Republican last time around, in this case Scott Lingamfelter. Democrats sound confident Guzman, a social worker who won with 54 percent of the vote, has it locked down. Republicans, meanwhile, are jazzed about Jordan, a congressional staffer and one of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year.”

VA House District 50 – 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas
Current Delegate: Lee Carter since 2017 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Carter, the state’s only elected Democratic Socialist, flipped the reliably red district in 2017, winning with a 10 point margin. Republicans say they don’t think he’ll do as well now that his views – which can be polarizing even among Democrats – are better known. Democrats aren’t so concerned, saying they think Carter’s bigger challenge was winning the primary earlier this year.”

VA House District 51 – 2019

District Description:  County of Prince William (part)
Current Delegate Hala Ayala since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Huge turnout in 2017 handed this district to Democrats by a healthy 14 point margin, with Ayala, a computer security specialist, toppling Anderson, a former Air Force officer who had represented the area in the General Assembly since 2010. Republicans say they’re going to lean on Anderson’s name recognition as a longtime officeholder, but Democrats say they think that might be to his detriment, noting mail he sent out during the last campaign criticized as racist.”

VA House 66 – 2019

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part); City of Colonial Heights
Current Delegate: Kirk Cox since 1990 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Cox, the Republican speaker of the House, saw his district shift under the court-ordered redistricting plan from a seat in which Republicans had a 25.5 point advantage to a seat in which Democrats now hold a 6.5 point advantage (again, as calculated based on 2012 presidential election results). But a win for Democrats is far from a sure thing. Cox is well known from years of representing the area and has access to a massive $788,000 fundraising haul, which in typical years he’d use to boost other Republicans in tight races but is already tapping into to blanket the airwaves with television ads.”

VA House 68 – 2109

District Description: Counties of Chesterfield (part) and Henrico (part); City of Richmond (part)
Current Delegate: Dawn Adams since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Adams beat longtime delegate Manoli Loupassi in 2017. This year she faces Coward, a political consultant and the second of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year. Republicans say they doubt Adams, a nurse practitioner, has been helped by an unusual lawsuit filed by her former legislative aide alleging hacking.”

VA House 72 – 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“VanValkenburg, a teacher, was the first Democrat to even run for this seat in 10 years when he won in 2017 with just under 53 percent of the vote. Though the district has gotten consistently bluer each year, Republicans say they see an opening for Vandergriff, who unsuccessfully ran for school board and serves on a variety of community boards. For now, the money is on VanValkenburg’s side, who had raised $205,000 at last report, nearly twice as much as Vandergriff.”

VA House 73 – 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Debra Rodman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats flipped in 2017 where the winner, in this case Debra Rodman, opted to run for Senate rather than reelection. Willett, an attorney, and Kastleberg, an investment banker, are both making their first runs for office. Of the seats Republican’s hope to win back from Democrats this year, Northam’s margins in 2017 were thinnest here, with 53 percent of the vote. Combined with the fact that Democrats won’t have the advantage of running an incumbent,that has Republicans sounding confident.”

VA House 76 – 2019 Election

District Description: Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Suffolk (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Jones since 1998 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Once basically invincible, Jones, the Republican chair of the House money committee, was hardest hit by a court ordered-redistricting plan, which turned his reliable red district distinctly blue. Democrats there now hold a theoretical 15-point advantage, a figure calculated as part of the redistricting process based on 2012 presidential election results. Democrats are already spending money there on digital ads to boost Jenkins, a real estate agent. Neither Jones nor his party, however, are writing off the district. Republicans say their candidate is well known and well liked in the area, the result of years of hard campaigning.”

VA House 83 – 2019 Election

District Description: Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)

Current Delegate: Chris Stolle since 2010 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Stolle, who has held the seat for nine years, saw his district skew 12 points more Democratic as part of the court-ordered remedial redistricting plan, and Democrats had already been doing pretty well in the district, where Northam won in 2017 with 54 percent of the vote and Kaine won with 57 percent. Guy, a former school board member, has also been outraising Stolle, who Democrats note is one of a handful of Republicans being boosted by national Republican groups – something they view as a sign the party is worried.”

VA House 84 – 2019

District Description: City of Virginia Beach (part)a
Current Delegate: Glenn Davis since 2014 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Davis has represented the district since 2014 and, while it has tilted Democratic in recent statewide contests (Northam won with 54 percent of the vote), Trump still won here with 49 percent of the vote. But Democrats say Mallard, a teacher and the daughter of a coal miner, is a strong candidate. And they say if Republican inaction on gun violence is likely to resonate anywhere, it will be Virginia Beach, where a shooter killed 12 in May.”

VA House 85 – 2019

District Description:City of Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Cheryl Turpin since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Democrats flipped this district in 2017 by just 389 votes. Holcomb, the Republican sheriff’s deputy who lost in 2017, is back for a rematch, but Cheryl Turpin, who beat him, is not, opting instead to run for Senate. Democrats nominated Askew, a longtime political and campaign aide, to replace her. Republicans say the fact that their candidate is coming to the table with name recognition from a past campaign and a short stint as a delegate boosts their chances.”

VA House 91 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of York (part); Cities of Hampton (part) and Poquoson
Current Delegate: Gordon Helsel since 2011 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“This is another district that got a significantly bluer under a court-ordered redistricting plan. The Republican incumbent who held the seat, Gordon Helsel, decided not to run for reelection, which Democrats say boosts their chances because the GOP will be starting from scratch in terms of name ID.

Kaine won here with 57 percent of the vote and, so far Mugler, a longtime school board member who ran as a moderate in the Democratic primary, has far outraised Holcomb, a lawyer and lobbyist who represented the conservative Family Foundation.”

VA House 94 – 2019 Election

District Description:  City of Newport News (part)
Current Delegate: David Yancey since 2012 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“You may recall that two years ago this election resulted in a dead tie that was resolved via a random drawing from a bowl. Since then, a court-ordered redistricting plan gave Democrats a much bigger partisan advantage in the district. This year’s rematch once again pits incumbent Republican Yancey against Democrat Shelly Simonds. Democrats see it as their most obvious opportunity to pick up a seat. Money is already pouring in: Simonds has raised $290,000 so far and Yancey has raised $335,000.”

VA House 100 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Accomack and Northampton; Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Officeholder: Rob Bloxom since 2014 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Statewide Democrats have won here, but just barely. Nonetheless, Democrats are particularly enthusiastic about Hernandez, an attorney with the National Employment Law Center who has far outraised Bloxom. But Republicans say money isn’t everything and note that the 53 percent of the vote Northam captured here in 2017 isn’t necessarily all that impressive when you consider it’s the governor’s home turf.”

VA Competitive Districts - 2019 Elections 1VA Competitive Districts – 2019 Elections

This post summarizes the 5 competitive Virginia Senate and 20 House of Delegate Districts in the recent elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide.

> To view all the Virginia competitive races in this post, select this post’s title.

> To view who won in your district, select the “Who represents me?” button above and enter your full street address. On your phone, select the icon on the left.

Summary

This post summarizes the 5 competitive Virginia Senate and 20 House of Delegate Districts in the recent elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide.

> To view all the Virginia competitive races in this post, select this post’s title.

> To view who won in your district, select the “Who represents me?” button above and enter your full street address. On your phone, select the icon on the left.

Northern Virginia Senate Districts

VA Senate District 13

VA Senate 13 - 2019 Election

District Description: Loudoun County (Part), Prince William County (Part)
Current Senator: Richard Black since 2012 (R)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 13, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see John Bell’s post.
For more information, see Geary Higgin’s post.

Northern Virginia House Districts

VA House District 10

VA House 10 - 2019

District Description: Counties of Clarke (part), Frederick (part), and Loudoun (part)
Current Delegate: Wendy Gooditis since 2018 (D)To view an overview of VA House District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Wendy Gooditis’s post.
For more information, see Randy Minchew’s post.

VA House District 13

VA House District 13 - 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas Park
Current Delegate: Danica  Roem since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 13, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Danica Roem’s post.
For more information, see Kelly McGinn’s post.

VA House District 31

VA House District 31 - 2019

District Description: Counties of Fauquier (part) and Prince William (part)
Current Delegate: Liz Guzman since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 31, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Liz Guzman’s post.
For more information, see D.J. Jordan’s post.

VA House District 40

VA House 40 - 2019 Election

District Description: County of Fairfax (part)
Current Delegate: Tim Hugo since 2003 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 40, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Tim Hugo’s post.
For more information, see Dan Helmer’s post.

VA House District 50

VA House District 50 - 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas
Current Delegate: Lee Carter since 2017 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 50, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Lee Carter’s post.
For more information, see Ian Lovejoy’s post.

VA House District 51

VA House District 51 - 2019

District Description:  County of Prince William (part)
Current Delegate Hala Ayala since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 51, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Hala Ayala’s post.
For more information, see Richard Anderson’s post.

Central Virginia

There are currently no Senate Districts in Central Virginia that appear to be competitive at this time.

VA House District 28

VA House 28 - 2019 Election

District Description: County of Stafford (part); City of Fredericksburg (part)
Current Delegate: Bob Thomas since 2018 (R)

To view the VA House District 28 and its 2019 candidates, go here.

For more information, see Joshua Cole’s post.
For more information, see Paul Milde’s post.

Southcentral Virginia Senate Districts

VA Senate District 10

VA Senate 10 – 2019 Election

District Description: Powhatan County (All), Chesterfield County (Part), Richmond City (Part)
Current Senator: Glen Sturtevant since 2016 (R)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Glen Sturtevant’s post.
For more information, see Ghazala Hashmi’s post.

VA Senate District 12

VA Senate 12 – 2019

District Description: Henrico County (Part), Hanover County (Part)
Current Senator: Siobhan Dunnavant since 2016 (R)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 12, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Siobhan Dunnavant’s post.
For more information, see Debra Rodman’s post.

Southcentral Virginia House Districts

VA House District 27

VA House 27- 2109

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part)
Current Delegate: Roxann Robinson since 2010 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 27, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Roxann Robinson’s post.
For more information, see Larry Barnett’s post.

VA House District 66

VA House 66 – 2019

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part); City of Colonial Heights
Current Delegate: Kirk Cox since 1990 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 66, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Kirkland Cox’s post.
For more information, see Sheila Bynum-Coleman’s post.

VA House District 68

VA House 68 - 2109

District Description: Counties of Chesterfield (part) and Henrico (part); City of Richmond (part)
Current Delegate: Dawn Adams since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 68, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues,  go here.

For more information, see Dawn Adams’s post.
For more information, see Garrison Coward’s post.

VA House District 72

VA House 72 – 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 72, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see GayDonna Vandergriff’s post.
For more information, see Schuyler VanValkenburg’s post.

VA House District 73

VA House 73 - 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Debra Rodman since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 73, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Rodney Willett’s post.
For more information, see Mary Margaret Kastelberg’s post.

Southeastern Virginia Senate Districts

VA Senate District 6

VA Senate 6 – 2019

District Description: Accomack County (All), Mathews County (All), Northampton County (All), Norfolk City (Part), Virginia Beach City (Part)
Current Senator: Lynwood Lewis since 2014 (D)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 6, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Lynwood Lewis’s post.
For more information, see Elizabeth Lankford’s post.

VA Senate District 7

VA Senate 7 – 2019

District Description: Virginia Beach City (Part), Norfolk City (Part)
Current Senator: Frank W. Wagner since 2001 (R)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 7, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Cheryl Turpin’s post.
For more information, see Jen Kiggans’s post.

Southeastern Virginia House Districts

VA House District 21

VA House 21 - 2019

District Description:  Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Kelly Convirs-Fowler since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA House District 21, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Kelly Fowler ’s post.
For more information, see Shannon Kane’s post.

VA House District 76

VA House 76 – 2019 Election

District Description: Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Suffolk (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Jones since 1998 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 76, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Chris Jones’s post.
For more information, see Clinton Jenkins’s post.

VA House District 83

VA House 83 - 2019 Election

District Description: Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Stolle since 2010 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 83, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Chris Stolle’s post.
For more information, see Nancy Guy’s post.

VA House District 84

VA House 84 – 2019

District Description: City of Virginia Beach (part)a
Current Delegate: Glenn Davis since 2014 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 84, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Glenn Davis’s post.
For more information, see Karen Mallard’s post.

VA House District 85

VA House 85 – 2019

District Description:City of Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Cheryl Turpin since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA District 85, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Alex Askew’s post.
For more information, see Rocky Holcomb’s post.

VA House District 91

VA House 91 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of York (part); Cities of Hampton (part) and Poquoson
Current Delegate: Gordon Helsel since 2011 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 91, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Martha Mugler’s post.
For more information, see Colleen Holcomb’s post.

VA House District 94

VA House 94 – 2019 Election

District Description:  City of Newport News (part)
Current Delegate: David Yancey since 2012 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 94, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see David Yancey’s post.
For more information, see Shelly Simonds’s post.

VA House District 100

VA House 100 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Accomack and Northampton; Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Officeholder: Rob Bloxom since 2014 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 100, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Robert Bloxom’s post.
For more information, see Philip Hernandez’s post.

Southwestern Virginia

There are currently no Senate or House Districts in Southwestern Virginia that appear to be competitive at this time.

X
VA House 21 - 2019VA House 21 – 2019

District Description:  Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Kelly Convirs-Fowler since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Democrats had been angling for this seat for years. Fowler, a first-time candidate, picked it up in 2017, knocking off longtime delegate Ron Villanueva with 52 percent of the vote. This year Fowler, a real estate agent, faces Kane, a former city council member.”

District Map, candidate information, and links inside post …

Summary

District Description:  Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Kelly Convirs-Fowler since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Democrats had been angling for this seat for years. Fowler, a first-time candidate, picked it up in 2017, knocking off longtime delegate Ron Villanueva with 52 percent of the vote. This year Fowler, a real estate agent, faces Kane, a former city council member.”

District Map, candidate information, and links inside post …

VA House District 21

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #21

Kelly Fowler

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 21 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 21

For more information, see Kelly Fowler ’s post.

Kelly Convirs-FowlerKelly Fowler’s life has always been dedicated to the service of others. She’s worked as an elementary school teacher and owns her own small real estate business specializing in military family relocation and advocacy. She has been a resident of Virginia Beach since childhood and cares deeply for her community.

As a daughter to a military family, Kelly moved to Virginia Beach at a young age. She attended public school right here in Virginia Beach and received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees just up the road from her district at Virginia Wesleyan and Old Dominion.

In 2016, Kelly was fed up with the state of American politics. Donald Trump had just been elected president and her local representative was more beholden to his campaign contributors than his constituents. So she decided to take action. She organized marches, she ran for office, and on November 7th, 2017, she won.

Since being sworn in, Delegate Fowler has dedicated her public service career to creating a better future for her two young daughters, Tessa and Sophie. She was a key vote to expand Medicaid, raise teacher pay, and provide tax breaks to small businesses across Virginia. Once she is reelected with a Democratic Majority, she looks forward to passing the Equal Rights Amendment, taking steps to fight flooding and climate change, and taking bold action to curb gun violence in Virginia.

Delegate Fowler supports transparency and will serve with integrity, and will support legislation to ensure others do the same.

Shannon Kane

Current Position: Small business owner and City Council member
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 21

For more information, see Shannon Kane’s post.

VA House 21 - 2019 1Candidate for the House of Delegates, Shannon Kane was elected in 2014 to Virginia Beach City Council by a huge margin, winning every district throughout Virginia Beach, and was re-elected by an even larger margin in 2016.

Councilwoman Kane has been a champion of public safety by increasing funding for police officers and firefighters, increasing local funding for schools and teachers, and has worked closely with the business community to bring higher paying jobs to Virginia Beach.

But she is best known for her passionate advocacy to fund flooding solutions in City Council budgets and now will advocate for funding these needed solutions at the State level.

Shannon Kane is a small business owner in Virginia Beach who also is a strong advocate for the value of volunteerism and nonprofit groups in the community. She is President and founder of EWR Management Group in Virginia Beach, Immediate Past President of the Alzheimer’s Association of Southeast Virginia and served on the Executive Board of the Virginia Municipal League.

One of Shannon’s initiatives on Council has been her leadership on revitalizing the Lynnhaven Parkway business corridor and working with the Lynnhaven Business Association to beautify and modernize that important economic engine and attract more business activity and investment.

Another successful initiative of Shannon’s has been the We Feed program. Over 1,500 pounds of food was collected the inaugural year for the local Foodbank for the benefit of students in Virginia Beach Schools.

Before starting her own business, she served in leadership roles in the non-profit sector. She was Senior Director of Development of Physicians for Peace, President of Junior Achievement of Greater Hampton Roads, Executive Director of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and District Director of the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Shannon Kane is active in many civic groups, having served as President of the Virginia Beach Jaycees (where she was bestowed the honor of Lifetime Member), Chairman of the Lynnhaven River Day of VB2007 and foundation President of the East Coast Surfing Championships. Shannon also mentors a student company at the Kempsville Entrepreneurship Academy.

She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Communications and Public Relations from James Madison University, and her favorite title of all is “wife and mother”.

Issues

Democracy

Shannon Kane

Second Amendment
I’m a gun owner and I vigorously support the Second Amendment and defend our right to keep and bear arms. I support Virginia’s instant background checks and I believe that law-abiding citizens have the Constitutionally-protected right to protect their homes and families through gun ownership.

Economy

Shannon Kane

Virginia Beach thrives when Virginia Beach families thrive. I’m a small business owner who understands what it takes to create jobs and attract companies. Virginia Beach has done a great job attracting biomedical research and technology jobs. But economic development in the state still favors Northern Virginia. We need a delegate who will fight for Virginia Beach.

Education

Kelly Fowler

As a former elementary school teacher, I know that paying educators a fair wage makes it easier to keep and recruit the best teachers. It matters because we look to teachers to give our children the best education possible. That’s my hope for the children in our district—including my two daughters—and the reason why I fought so hard to push through a 5% pay raise for Virginia’s teachers.

Shannon Kane

I am a strong supporter of education and think it is a key to future success. As a member of City Council, I have voted to fully fund our schools and teachers. I’ve voted for every dollar of every School Board request. State support for schools has been behind and Virginia Beach has increased funding locally. Our delegate should secure more school funding from the state.

Environment

Kelly Fowler

We need to be proactive about flooding and sea-level rise. It all starts with acknowledging the problem—climate change—which is why I co-patroned a bill that brings awareness to flood zones when buying or renting properties. Further, I was proud to fight for a resolution to have Virginia Beach join the American Flood Coalition so we can tackle this problem together.

Shannon Kane

Funding to Stop the Flooding
Flooding is my motivating issue and since 2014 when I joined Virginia Beach City Council, I have supported over $40o million in local funding to address and mitigate flooding. I also voted to fund and support the Dewberry Study which is setting a path to implement solutions. But Virginia Beach residents cannot be the only ones paying the cost. I will lead the effort in state government for funding to stop flooding. Too little has been done and that must change, and I am running to lead that change.

 

Health Care

Kelly Fowler

In May of 2018, I was proud to provide a crucial vote to pass Medicaid Expansion in Virginia. After a more than four-year battle in the General Assembly, we finally overcame Republican obstruction to provide healthcare access to 400,000 Virginians. We could not have done this without you, and we could not have done this without the Blue Wave. When I won in 2017, the voters sent me to Richmond to get the job done, and I did. I will continue to fight for access to quality and affordable healthcare for all Virginians. Without affordable care, families in my district will not be able to go to work, send their kids to school, or aspire to reach the American Dream. I will always defend my constituents from Republican attacks on their healthcare.

Shannon Kane

Right to Life
I was disgusted by the House Democrats’ legislation for abortions at the moment of delivery. As a mother and a woman, I can’t imagine politicians or anyone for that matter supporting abortions at birth. Our nation should be a culture of respect for life, and these principles permeate our lives.

Immigration

Shannon Kane

America is a nation of legal immigrants and I support America’s melting pot and legal immigration. Those in the country illegally, either through illegal border crossings or overstaying visas, don’t have the rights of citizens and shouldn’t. The federal government has a Constitutional duty to enforce the nation’s borders.

Safety

Kelly Fowler

Gun violence has become a public health crisis in our country. Every single day, lives are needlessly taken by criminals who should not have access to firearms. Let me be clear – I am a gun owner. My husband, Dave, is a law enforcement officer. I support the 2nd Amendment and believe that law-abiding citizens should not have their rights infringed. However, it is imperative that we take steps to address gun violence by expanding background checks, limiting modifications like silencers and extended magazines, and ensuring domestic abusers and violent criminals aren’t able to have access to deadly weapons. So many elected officials have failed to address gun violence beyond “thoughts and prayers.” We need to take action. We need votes and laws.

Shannon Kane

An unsafe city will lose jobs and companies, have failing schools and begin a downward spiral that cities frequently can’t combat. As a member of Council, I have voted for significant investments in our public safety professionals to make sure we prevent that. I have supported both investments in salaries to help eliminate decades-long salary compression, and also funding for police camera technology. Our police, fire and rescue personnel must have the training and compensation to make sure we retain our great uniformed professionals and they keep Virginia Beach the safest city of its size in America.

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VA House 28 - 2019 ElectionVA House 28 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of Stafford (part); City of Fredericksburg (part)
Current Delegate: Bob Thomas since 2018 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats barely lost in 2017, this race has also voted Democratic in recent statewide elections, though by slimmer margins than some of the other districts Democrats are targeting. Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine won the district by 55 points last year and Northam won with 51 percent of the vote in 2017. The Republican incumbent, Bob Thomas, was taken out by former Stafford Supervisor Paul Milde in a nasty primary that saw Milde tack right on issues like abortion and health care, something most Republicans facing tight races have strayed away from and Democrats expect to play to their advantage in a general election.”

Summary

District Description: County of Stafford (part); City of Fredericksburg (part)
Current Delegate: Bob Thomas since 2018 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats barely lost in 2017, this race has also voted Democratic in recent statewide elections, though by slimmer margins than some of the other districts Democrats are targeting. Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine won the district by 55 points last year and Northam won with 51 percent of the vote in 2017. The Republican incumbent, Bob Thomas, was taken out by former Stafford Supervisor Paul Milde in a nasty primary that saw Milde tack right on issues like abortion and health care, something most Republicans facing tight races have strayed away from and Democrats expect to play to their advantage in a general election.”

VA House District 28

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #28

Joshua Cole

Current Position: Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 28

For more information, see Joshua Cole’s post.

Joshua Cole 1In 2017, Joshua Cole proudly ran for the Virginia House of Delegates to represent Virginia’s 28th District, becoming the first American-American, and youngest person to receive any party’s nomination, along the way. In an underfunded, hard-fought race, Josh finished less than 100 votes shy of having the honor of representing the 28th District.

Since then, Josh has served the state by acting as the Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler, fighting for the people by working alongside Delegate Convirs-Fowler on issues important to all Virginians, like fair housing. Simultaneously, Josh serves on Stafford County Public Schools Superintendent’s Equity, Diversity and Opportunity Committee, the Greater Fredericksburg Area Interfaith Council, as the President of the Stafford County NAACP and participates with numerous other local and community initiatives.

Clear in all of this work is Josh’s commitment to the communities of the 28th District. Raised in the 28th, Josh knows not only what it takes to live here, but what it means to build a home in Fredericksburg and Stafford County. He understands the excruciating drive along I-95 that is the bedrock of so many constituent commutes. He’s seen first-hand the ever-increasing cost of living in this community, and has sat with hardworking friends and neighbors, proud Virginians, who simply want to find a way to raise their family in the same town in which they grew up. Josh seeks to be your Delegate to he can fight to make this so, for all of them, and for you.

A product of the Stafford County Public School system, Joshua’s background in Virginia’s political affairs is rich, dating back to 2005, when he was appointed by the then-speaker, the Honorable William J. Howell, as a Page for the Virginia House of Delegates. That same year he was chosen as the Governor’s Page by Governor Mark R. Warner. He returned to the General Assembly again in 2016 as a Staff Assistant to the Clerk of the Virginia State Senate. As your Delegate, Josh will bring this experience to the fore to fight for a Virginia that serves all Virginians.

 

Paul Milde

Current Position: Businessman
Former: Chair, Stafford County Board of Supervisors from 2011 – 2017
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 28

For more information, see Paul Milde’s post.

Paul Milde III 1Paul Milde is a Stafford County businessman who served 12 years on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors. Paul has lived in Stafford since 1989 and has two grown children, Travis and Bailey. Paul is a lifelong entrepreneur who believes that with hard work and a willingness to innovate, we can find public policy solutions to even the thorniest of problems. Paul has a track record of success with this common-sense approach to government. His work to preserve Stafford’s Crow’s Nest peninsula proved that land preservation can be achieved without trampling property rights. As a three-time chairman of the Fredericksburg Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (FAMPO), Paul learned how important it is for our region to have a tenacious advocate for funding to address the perennial problem of traffic. Since his term on the Board of Supervisors ended in 2017, Paul has remained engaged in these and many other issues facing our region.

Issues

Economy

Joshua Cole

A living wage is about more than a paycheck, it’s about investing in our communities and our people. Yet our leaders in the General Assembly can’t be bothered to pass legislation that raises Virginia’s minimum wage from $7.25/hour. And, as I hear from my neighbors each and every week, this just isn’t cutting it anymore. Not when you need $65,000 a year to maintain a one bedroom apartment in Fredericksburg, not when the top 1% of Virginians make 17.7 times more than the bottom 99% (according to the Economic Policy Institute), and not when Stafford County is the #6 wealthiest county in America. We can do better, and as your delegate, I will do better.

As the son of a single mother, I saw firsthand what it takes to hold down a job in our state, and the hardworking spirit of Virginians. In the Capitol, I’ll fight for the men and women of the 28th District putting in an honest day’s work, day in and day out.

Paul Milde

Paul Milde understands high taxes and reckless spending cripple our economy’s growth. That’s why he cut millions of dollars in taxes, by:

Repealing the job-crushing Business, Professional, and Occupational (BPOL) Tax, and
Slashing personal property taxes.
As a result of Paul’s leadership, Stafford County’s job growth soared to first place in the state while the county’s bond rating was strengthened to AAA status.

As your Delegate, Paul will always stand for common-sense free market principles and against the socialist economic policies of the extreme left.

Education

Joshua Cole

In takes someone who understands our problems to fix our problems. A product of the Stafford County Public School System and now serving on Superintendent Kinzer’s Equity, Diversity, and Opportunity Committee, I know the problems our schools face not only from a student’s perspective but from that of a community member as well.

Solving our problems starts early, with early childhood education, and universal pre-school for all Virginia’s sons and daughters. As these children rise up through the public education system, they should be meet by facilities that receive a fair and equal distribution of state and local funding, to eliminate the inequalities that we see going on statewide.

Guiding these men and women through the halls of our institutions should be teachers who don’t just hear our praise, but feel it in their pocketbooks and wallets. An across-the-board pay raise for our teachers and paraprofessionals is not only required, but mandatory if we intend to keep the best and the brightest in Virginia educating our children.

Beyond this, ending the playground-to-prison pipeline is one of my top legislative priorities. Too many children are subject to overpunishment that puts them on a path curtailing their education and increasing the risk they engage in criminal activity. By simply practicing restorative justice within our schools, eliminating or reducing out of school suspensions for minor behavioral episodes, and reclassifying incidents away from criminal occurrences and back towards childhood outbursts, we can keep our children in the classroom and on a path to success.

Paul Milde

Paul Milde will work hard to improve infrastructure. Paul has a track record of developing infrastructure while on the Stafford Board of Supervisors. He’s been pivotal in starting, funding, and completing hundreds of infrastructure projects.

As your delegate, he will bring the fight to Richmond to get the infrastructure funding the Fredericksburg area so desperately needs.

Infrastructure

Joshua Cole

If you’re a Virginian with a driver’s license, then I don’t have to tell you about how our infrastructure can’t handle the Virginia of today, let alone the Virginia of tomorrow.

One of the worst commutes in America, in terms of traffic, is along the I-95 corridor from Fredericksburg to Washington, DC. But you already knew that. With so many of our residents heading up and down 95 each and every week, we need a delegate who will actually put forward the legislation to end this traffic nightmare, not just talk about the issue. We need solutions that will rebuild our roads and improve our public transportation options, not rhetoric that leaves us stuck in the same old gridlock. As your delegate, I’ll get gridlock out of the House of Delegates, and off of our streets and roads.

Paul Milde

Paul Milde will work hard to improve infrastructure. Paul has a track record of developing infrastructure while on the Stafford Board of Supervisors. He’s been pivotal in starting, funding, and completing hundreds of infrastructure projects.

As your delegate, he will bring the fight to Richmond to get the infrastructure funding the Fredericksburg area so desperately needs.

Preserving Stafford’s Treasures

Paul Milde

House of Delegates District 28 is home to one of our nation’s greatest treasures, George Washington’s Ferry Farm. Paul Milde helped protect this historic landmark. He also led the Board of Supervisors’ efforts to preserve The Crow’s Nest Natural Area Preserve and Government Island and helped to establish the Stafford Civil War Park and the Belmont Ferry Farm Trails. With Paul’s leadership, Stafford County preserved 10,000 acres during his 12-year tenure on the Board of Supervisors.

Paul also prioritized funding for voter approved parks and recreation projects such as the new baseball fields at Chichester Park and the soccer and football fields and swimming pool complex at Embrey Mill.

Civil Rights

Joshua Cole

Ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment

Until we pass the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), it is still remains legal to discriminate against Virginians on the basis of one’s gender. I refuse to stand idle while women and members of the LGBTQ+ community continue to be treated as second class citizens across the Commonwealth.  I believe that all people are created equal, regardless of their sex or gender identity. Virginia must become the 38th state to pass the ERA to meet the threshold for ratification in the United States Constitution, and I intend to make it happen.

Protecting Reproductive Freedom

Every year, conservatives in Richmond work tirelessly to deny citizens across the Commonwealth their reproductive liberty and body autonomy. I will work to block any attempt to criminalize abortion, silence victims of assault, and restrict access to contraceptives in Virginia.

 

Environmental Action

Joshua Cole

We have a lot to be thankful for in our district, but one of our greatest resources, one of the things we take most for granted, is the natural environment we’re blessed with in Stafford County and Fredericksburg. It can be a place we go for picnics and playgrounds, or, for the many farmers who populate our district, the means for income and employment. That’s why protecting our environment is a charge I take seriously.

This is about more than keeping our grass green. It’s about reducing the number of days with extreme heat, so we can keep our infrastructure from buckling. It’s about preserving green spaces so that we have a place to bring our children. It’s about holding bad actors who continue to pollute our beautiful Virginian environment accountable for their actions. I will work with, and for, the communities of our district so that we can leave behind a Virginia that is greener and greater than it is today.

Health Care

Joshua Cole

Passing Medicaid expansion was a huge win for Virginians, and long overdue. But with Republicans tacking on work requirements, the access to healthcare we should all have is being curtailed by those looking to play politics with our lives. Now, we’ve got a job to finish: repeal the requirements and pass Medicaid-for-All so every Virginian can see a doctor. No one should ever have to choose between spending money on medication or spending it on groceries. Virginia can, and must, do better.

But improving our healthcare system should not end there. In a state with such a large active and retired military population, especially here in the 28th district, it’s essential that we dedicate more time and resources to improving the systems we have in place to care for our veterans. Long wait times, uncovered care, and unkempt facilities are not how we show our respect for those who have given so much for all of us.

Criminal Justice Reform

Joshua Cole

It is now common cause, uniting Virginias of all political stripes, to champion the idea that our criminal justice system is in desperate need of reform. But the folks in Richmond continue to fail to act to right the wrongs of our penal codes. The effects of this misapplication of justice on our diverse community have been far and wide, and it’s time for them to come to an end.

It begins with a return to community policing. Our communities are built on strong ties between neighbors, and those should extend to relationships between our citizens and the police. Enabling that trust should be accelerated by the passing of a statewide requirement for force-wide use of body and dash cameras.

And rebuilding our communities also means creating sensible drug rehabilitation policies. Too many communities have been decimated by burdensome arrests and jail sentences caused by infractions related to issues of mental health and addiction. We see this happening more and more in the face of our opioid and heroin epidemic. But we’ve substituted incarceration for care. I’ll fight to make sure our government provides mental health and addiction care to those who have and will end up in legal trouble due to addiction, and that we help with their re-entry into society. Our system should not be one of just punishment, but progress too.

Housing

Joshua Cole

For over two decades, I’ve been fortunate enough to call the 28th District my home. But as I look around today, I see more and more families expressing difficulty finding an affordable place to live in Fredericksburg and Stafford County. It’s no surprise.

We know why this happens. With many in the district shuttling up I-95 for work every day, six-figure salaries from the NoVA area end up here in our area. Developers see these opportunities and our housing stock is proof of that. Those dollars and dealers inflate home values, pricing out the hardworking residents who work to keep our district moving forward. Shouldn’t the residents who work to make this community feel like home be able to afford a home of their own?

Our government can take meaningful steps to ensure that rent-controlled, workforce housing is available to all Virginians. I was proud to stand with Del. Convirs-Fowler as she introduced a bill to further restrict discrimination in housing practices. This is just the beginning though, and we’ve got a lot of work to do. We’ll make the 28th a place for everyone to live and work.

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VA House 40 - 2019 ElectionVA House 40 – 2019 Election

District Description: County of Fairfax (part)
Current Delegate: Tim Hugo since 2003 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Now the lone Republican representing Northern Virginia in the House, Hugo held onto his seat by just 100 votes in 2017. His challenger, Democrat Dan Helmer, has already raised more than $400,000 for his campaign. Hugo, whose represented the seat since 2003 is sitting on $796,000, and his party is bullish, arguing that if the seat was going to go Democratic, it would have happened in 2017.”

Summary

District Description: County of Fairfax (part)
Current Delegate: Tim Hugo since 2003 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Now the lone Republican representing Northern Virginia in the House, Hugo held onto his seat by just 100 votes in 2017. His challenger, Democrat Dan Helmer, has already raised more than $400,000 for his campaign. Hugo, whose represented the seat since 2003 is sitting on $796,000, and his party is bullish, arguing that if the seat was going to go Democratic, it would have happened in 2017.”

VA House District 40

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #40

Tim Hugo

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 40 since 2003
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 40

For more information, see Tim Hugo’s post.

Tim HugoTim, a lifelong Virginian and 30 year resident of Fairfax County.

Tim served as the President of CapNet – a technology association dedicated to educating and electing public officials who recognized the concerns of the technology community. He has also served as the Chief of Staff to the Chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Tim worked closely with the Chairman on groundbreaking national transportation legislation (“TEA-21’’). During the Administration of President George H. W. Bush, he was the Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Legislative Affairs.

In 2002, Tim was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates with almost 70% of the vote. He is currently third in leadership in the House of Delegates, serving as Majority Caucus Chairman. He also serves on the Commerce and Labor, Transportation, and Finance committees.

Tim earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of William and Mary and received a Kodak Fellowship for the Senior Managers in Government Program, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He and his wife Paula live in Clifton, Virginia with their four children.

Dan Helmer

Current Position: Business Strategist
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 40

For more information, see Dan Helmer’s post.

Dan Helmer 1Dan Helmer is a combat veteran, business strategist, Rhodes Scholar, husband, and father.  His wife, Karen, is a public school teacher, and their two young sons, Harris and Aaron, attend class in Fairfax County Public Schools.

Dan is the son and grandson of immigrants.  His grandparents came to this country as Holocaust survivors and refugees. In America, they were welcomed and found prosperity, freedom, and peace. Dan believes that this, the American Dream, belongs to all of us – no matter our color, our religion, where we were born, or who we love.

In order to defend the country that had done so much for his family, Dan joined the Army and attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.  He then served in Afghanistan, Iraq, South Korea, in numerous domestic postings, and finally here in Virginia.  Dan remains in the US Army Reserve.

In the private sector, Dan was a business strategist who advised American businesses and US government agencies on how to solve their most complex problems.

Dan is a leader who is ready to bring out-of-the-box thinking to deliver better transportation solutions to Northern Virginia, protect our children in school while ensuring they have a high quality education, and protecting Virginians’ access to quality, affordable healthcare.

Issues

Better Government

Tim Hugo

Taxes & Spending

Tim has consistently fought to hold the line on new or higher taxes, and has been a leader on eliminating wasteful and redundant state spending.

Tim is working to keep Virginia one of the top states in the nation to live, work, and raise a family. A big part of that goal is building a tax environment that fosters innovation and competition in business, and doesn’t overburden hard-working Virginian families. As such, he has been a leader in opposing efforts to increase real estate taxes, income taxes and sales taxes, as well as opposing legislation that would have allowed localities to raise income taxes

 

Civil Rights

Tim Hugo

2nd Amendment

Tim believes that the right to keep and bear arms is one of the most important rights that we have, and he will fight to protect that right for all of Virginia’s law-abiding citizens. Hand-in-hand with his commitment to protecting your 2nd Amendment rights is his firm resolve to  penalize those who use guns to commit a crime and obtain them illegally.

Sanctity of Life

Tim strongly believes that we should live in a society that promotes and protects the sanctity of human life and provide security for those who cannot protect themselves.

Dan Helmer

As your delegate, I will fight for a stronger and fairer Virginia. Regardless of the color of your skin, whom you love, where you were born, or what god you worship, we all have a stake in our Commonwealth’s future.

It is appalling that in 2019, the Republican delegate from our district cast the deciding vote against equality for women, including those I served side by side with in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Equal Rights Amendment has my full support during the next legislative session and I will work across the aisle to get it passed for Virginia and added to the U.S. Constitution.

We need to stand up for communities of color and immigrants in a time of hateful and divisive rhetoric and policy. Our community has benefited greatly from immigration from every part of the world, from Korea to Vietnam to India to El Salvador.  In the House of Delegates, I will ensure immigrants have access to the American Dream. I also will protect voting rights and stand up against white nationalist violence.

With the upcoming redrawing of our Commonwealth’s legislative districts, we need to combat gerrymandering and ensure that all voices have representation in our political system.

It’s time to end corrupt, pay-to-play politics in Richmond.  I support fundamental campaign finance reforms that end unlimited donations, donations from Corporate PACs, and unlimited coordination with special interest groups.

Economy

Tim Hugo

Jobs and Employment

Over the last decade, the Commonwealth of Virginia has consistently been rated a top state for business. Through lower taxes, reducing burdensome regulations, and less intrusion into the private sector, Virginia has become a national model for how to attract and retain businesses.

Tim has made one of his top priorities be that the Commonwealth remain a pro-business state. He has made an emphasis to sponsor legislation to help foster a 21st Century economy in Virginia.

HB2101 – Tim supported this legislation which establishes “High School to Work” partnerships to promote internships and apprenticeships among Virginia high school students.

HB1931 – Tim supported this legislation which states that an employer shall not be required to release, communicate, or distribute to a third party any current or former employee’s personal identifying information, unless required by federal law, state law, court order, warrant issued by a judicial officer, subpoena, or discovery.

Dan Helmer

I help run a small business that advises government agencies, non-profits, and companies on efficient spending. I know how to lead in managing our Commonwealth’s financial resources responsibly. Increasing funding for schools, infrastructure, and healthcare can work within our budget so long as we cut wasteful spending. Right now, the  hard-earned money that Northern Virginians pay in taxes does not come back to our community. This needs to change. I will fight to make sure that our district’s tax dollars are working for us.

An important part of healthy economic development is protecting labor unions and the right to unionize. I also support apprenticeships and trade schools and will work to increase trade job growth in the district and across the Commonwealth.

Education

Tim Hugo

Tim believes that every child in Virginia deserves a high-quality education. He has supported increased investment that puts more money in the classroom and pay raises for Virginia’s K-12 teachers in order to attract and retain the best teachers. Just this year, Tim supported the 2019 state budget which included a 5% teacher pay raise and $85.7 million in new funding for K-12 education.

Tim also has supported legislation that would lower class sizes in primary and secondary schools, giving students more time with their teachers and improving the quality of education.

Regarding higher education, Tim believes that Virginia’s public colleges and universities should admit more in-state students every year.  He has sponsored legislation to increase the share of in-state students at Virginia colleges and universities, so more of our kids can go to great schools.

In 2019, he voted to freeze tuition at Virginia colleges.  Tim Hugo supports reining in rising costs of college tuition.  Tim was also the chief co-patron of HB 1611, which will lower the cost of prepaid tuition contracts by more than $3,000 on an eight-semester tuition contract.  Both initiatives will help ease the cost of a college education on Virginia students and families

Dan Helmer

My wife Karen is a public school teacher, our kids go to Fairfax County public schools, and I graduated from a public high school. My education gave me incredible opportunities, including the chance to attend and graduate from West Point and become a Rhodes Scholar. I want all of our children to have the resources they need to succeed in school. That starts with adequately funding our classrooms and increasing teacher pay. Too often, students throughout Virginia are jammed into overcrowded classrooms and trailers, and quality educators are leaving the Commonwealth for more competitive salaries elsewhere.

Classroom safety must be a priority as well. My wife and the students she teaches should not have to practice active shooter drills during valuable learning time. We need to close the private sale and gun show loopholes and introduce common sense gun reform to protect our kids and our community, and we need to empower our police to ensure those who present a danger to themselves or others don’t have access to firearms.

Environment

Tim Hugo

Tim believes in prioritizing the conservation of Virginia’s natural beauty for future generations. From the Great Dismal Swamp to Great Falls, over 400 years Virginians have made a commitment to protect and treasure the Commonwealth’s natural wonders.

On energy, Tim believes that Virginia requires an all-of-the-above approach. Energy independence has been America’s “Achilles’ Heel” in the recent past. Providing cleaner and reliable energy is a monumental task looking to the future. It will require the help of solar and wind incorporated with our existing coal, natural gas, and nuclear energy options.

In 2018, Tim sponsored legislation removing barriers for solar project development, strengthening our grid infrastructure, and directing utilities to generate more power from renewable sources — specifically 5,000 megawatts of utility solar and wind energy.

Dan Helmer

As a leader in the Army, I never walked away from the hard problems. Climate change is one of those problems and it’s a pressing threat to our future. We can address it right here in our Commonwealth by removing the barriers that have stopped us from being able to invest in low-cost wind and solar energy.

We should aim to preserve the remaining rural character of the Occoquan Watershed and Prince William County’s rural crescent by ensuring that we take on irresponsible development and provide incentives for eco-friendly infrastructure and environmentally sustainable housing.

We need leadership that will move the Commonwealth forward into a greener future. That’s why I have made a commitment not to take money from corporate PACs or energy companies who want to influence politics at the expense of our environment.

Health Care

Tim Hugo

Tim believes a core function of government is to provide services to those most in need. Tim believes in taking real steps to improve and invest in the healthcare safety net to meet the needs of Virginia’s most vulnerable citizens.

That’s why Tim Sponsored:

This year, Tim co-sponsored HB 2267, which requires any health benefit plan amended, renewed, or delivered on or after January 1, 2018, to provide coverage for hormonal contraceptives (birth control), to cover up to a 12-month supply.

In 2015, Tim was the chief co-patron of HB 1940, which expanded coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder. Based on research by the Virginia Commonwealth University’s (VCU) Autism Center of Excellence report that the average age of diagnosis in Virginia is between six and seven years of age. This legislation expanded the coverage to individuals between the ages of two through ten.

In 2014, Tim’s legislation, HJ 93, designated the first week in October, as Chiropractic Health Week in Virginia. The chiropractic profession promotes musculoskeletal health and overall wellness by encouraging patients and the public to maintain a healthy lifestyle through good nutrition, regular exercise and restful sleep instead of relying solely on medication.

In 2014, Tim co-sponsored HB 387, which ensures a simple pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects is performed on every baby prior to discharge. This Bill saves lives. If left undetected, critical congenital heart defects can result in death or disability.  By ensuring screenings for all newborns, these life-threatening conditions can be caught prior to discharge.

In 2011, Tim co-sponsored HJR 643, which designates May as “Lyme Disease Awareness Month” in Virginia. Then in 2013, Tim co-sponsored HB 1933, which requires health care providers notify anyone tested for Lyme disease about the risk of false negatives to better protect Virginians.

Mental Health

After the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007, Tim became committed to addressing mental health issues so that many of our young people could receive the help they need in the hopes of preventing another tragedy. Working with his colleagues in 2008, the Virginia General Assembly enacted comprehensive mental health legislation including several pieces of legislation that Tim co-sponsored. Last year, the Governor signed his bill, HB 1075, which requires community service boards to provide hospitals with informational materials on substance and alcohol abuse services to minors.

During the 2013 General Assembly session, Tim introduced HB 1609 which strives to improve the coordination between public four-year higher education institutions, mental health facilities, and local hospitals. HB 1609 ensures that all four-year public colleges and universities have mechanisms in place in order to expand services available to students seeking treatment. Specifically it allows universities and community services boards to work together so that there is notification when a student is involuntarily committed, or when a student is discharged from a facility and he consents to such notification.

Opioid Addiction

The opioid epidemic affects the lives of Virginians across the Commonwealth. Tim and the entire General Assembly are working to solve this serious issue. Medications are often prescribed for longer than necessary, resulting in unused medication being improperly disposed, illegally sold or abused. In Virginia, the most common drug overdoses are from prescription opioids. Tim is working to help stop overprescribing and to help end this epidemic.

 Tim’s legislation, HB 1885, directs physicians who prescribe opiate painkiller medication to a patient for longer than seven days to contact the Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP). This allows prescribing physicians to see what, if any, controlled substances the patient is currently taking. This new directive helps limit overprescribing of painkillers.

The HB 2161 bill, which Tim co-sponsored, establishes educational guidelines for training health care providers in the appropriate use of opioids safe prescribing practices with the goal of preventing the overprescribing of opioids.

Dan Helmer

Every Virginian should have the financial means to see a doctor and get medicine when they are sick.  We need to protect healthcare for hundreds of thousands of Virginians – including tens of thousands of Veterans – who now have access to healthcare as a result of Medicaid expansion. I’ve worked with clients in the private sector to help reduce the prices they pay for goods, and in Richmond I’ll use those same skills to combat the rising costs of healthcare. We need to be working to make healthcare accessible and affordable for all. This also means fighting to protect health benefits for police and firefighters who have served the Commonwealth; they should be covered if they get cancer or face PTSD as a result of their service to our community.

Families need access to reproductive healthcare that includes cancer screenings, birth control, and safe and legal abortion. I will fight to ensure  family planning decisions are between a woman and her doctor, not at the whims of politicians in Richmond. I’ll also fight to remove taxes on feminine hygiene products to remove burdens on people who menstruate.

Infrastructure

Tim Hugo

Tim understands that transportation issues and road congestion are once again becoming a crisis in Northern Virginia. Tim Hugo opposes additional tolling on I-66 and on the Prince William and Fairfax County parkway and will continue to introduce legislation to give drivers more options to avoid I-66 tolls and supports their elimination altogether.

During his tenure in the House of Delegates, Tim has secured millions in critical transportation dollars for road construction projects in Northern Virginia, worked on countless projects to improve our local roads, and worked to get our fair share of transportation dollars from Richmond.

In 2018, Tim supported the NVTA’s Six Year Plan, which created a budget of over one billion dollars for road improvement projects in our region including:

  • Route 28 corridor roadway improvementsfrom the Fairfax County line to the City of Manassas
  • Route 28 corridor feasibility study—the beginning phase to identify upgrades that will reduce travel times and congestion along the Route 28 corridor
  • Construction of an interchangeat Route 234 and University Boulevard— this will improve travel time on the Route 234 corridor
  • Route 28 Widening: Route 29 to Prince William County Line
  • Fairfax County Parkway Wideningfrom Ox Road to Lee Highway which includes a grade separated interchange at the intersection of Popes Head Road

Dan Helmer

Each day, I face the same terrible traffic as most commuters in our district. For too long Richmond has failed to invest in our roads, mass transit system, and pedestrian infrastructure. As a result, our traffic is among the worst in the nation and it’s only getting worse. Politicians in Richmond seem out of touch with the reality faced by most of us and have stopped common-sense investments in fixing Route 28, preventing excess and off-peak tolls on 66, alleviating congestion on Braddock Rd and in Clifton, and fixing deadly intersections like the Fairfax County Parkway/Popes Head interchange.

We need leadership who will make infrastructure a priority. We need to start repairing broken roads and building new ones. Two-thirds of our secondary roads in Northern Virginia are in poor condition. This issue is affecting all of us and our families; it is making it hard for parents to get home from work in time to have dinner with their kids and increasing the costs of commuting.

Safety

Tim Hugo

Protecting Victims

Tim is committed to protecting victims of abuse, violence, and human trafficking. As your Delegate, he voted to require abusers who are convicted of domestic assault a second time to spend at least 60 days in jail so victims have time and space to recover.

Tim has also been a leader in Virginia’s fight against human trafficking having sponsored multiple pieces of legislation to combat this heinous crime. In 2011, he introduced HB 1898 which raised the penalty for abducting any individual for the purposes of prostitution or abducting a minor for child pornography to a felony. His next bill, HB 1606, made soliciting a minor for prostitution a felony as well.

In 2014, Tim then passed HB 485 to expand the toolbox for Virginia law enforcement to track down and prosecute suspected traffickers operating online. Finally, in 2015, he passed HB 1964 establishing Virginia’s first standalone sex trafficking statute and provided for felonies for any offender caught trafficking children, regardless of whether the victim was forced, intimidated, or coerced.

Veterans

Tim Hugo

Virginia is home to nearly 800,000 veterans, roughly 1 in 10 of all Virginians, which is why Tim, as a veteran, has advanced and backed legislation supporting veterans. Legislation that includes making it easier to transition into civilian life and ensuring veterans have the best care available. Tim supports providing resources to those who complete their active duty.

In 2016, Tim co-sponsored HB 477, to establish two new veteran care centers, in Hampton Roads and in Fauquier County, in order to help provide veterans with quality long-term healthcare.

In 2012, Tim co-sponsored several bills aimed at helping veterans, two of which provide a real estate tax exemption for disabled veterans. The bills clarify that real property held in specific trusts by a disabled veteran, a disabled veteran and spouse, or a surviving spouse of a disabled veteran, qualifies for the real estate tax exemption for the primary residence.

House Bill 195 directs governing boards of public institutions of higher education to implement policies awarding academic credit to students for educational experience gained from military service.

To improve the delivery of benefit services to veterans, he sponsored HB 1121, to increase the ratio of claims agents with the Department of Veterans Services to the number of veterans in the Commonwealth to one agent for every 23,000 veterans, a 12.5 percent increase in the number of claims agents.

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VA House District 13 - 2019VA House District 13 – 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas Park
Current Delegate: Danica  Roem since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“A tougher lift for Republicans, but they say it’s in the realm of possibility. Roem, a former newspaper reporter and the first transgender woman elected to the statehouse, has a nationwide profile and is well liked. She faces Kelly McGinn, a former lawyer and congressional staffer, who opposed the ERA and has a history of opposing same-sex marriage, positions that echo the stances of Bob Marshall – the anti-LGBTQ delegate Roem toppled in 2017.”

Summary

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas Park
Current Delegate: Danica  Roem since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“A tougher lift for Republicans, but they say it’s in the realm of possibility. Roem, a former newspaper reporter and the first transgender woman elected to the statehouse, has a nationwide profile and is well liked. She faces Kelly McGinn, a former lawyer and congressional staffer, who opposed the ERA and has a history of opposing same-sex marriage, positions that echo the stances of Bob Marshall – the anti-LGBTQ delegate Roem toppled in 2017.”

VA House District 13

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #13

 

Danica Roem

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 13 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 13

For more information, see Danica Roem’s post.

Danica RoemDanica Roem is an American journalist and politician of the Democratic Party. In the 2017 Virginia elections she was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, winning the Democratic primary for the 13th district on June 13, and the general election on November 7. She is the first openly transgender person to be elected to the Virginia General Assembly, and in January 2018 became the first to both be elected and serve while openly transgender in any U.S. state legislature. In December 2017 The Advocate named her as a finalist for its “Person of the Year”. In January 2018, Delegate Roem was included on the cover of Time Magazine in their “The Avengers” feature, highlighting new female candidates and elected officials from around the country.

Early life and education
Roem was born at Prince William Hospital and raised in Manassas, Virginia, the child of Marian and John Paul Roem. Her father committed suicide when she was three years old, and her maternal grandfather, Anthony Oliveto, acted as a father figure. Living in Manassas, Virginia for her whole life, she attended the majority of her schooling there. She went to Loch Lomond Elementary School for grades K-3, and then All Saints School for grades 4-8. She then attended Paul VI Catholic High School in Fairfax, Virginia and then went to her aunt and uncle’s alma mater, St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, New York to pursue journalism.[10] As a student at St. Bonaventure University, she had a 1.1 GPA her first semester and was more focused on music than homework. During her second semester, she made a comeback and raised her GPA to a 3.48 and made the Dean’s List. Her professors described her as tenacious, persistent, and one who worked for those who voices were often ignored. She moved back to Virginia after graduation.

Roem has stated that her role models growing up were Senator Chuck Colgan (D-29) and Delegate Harry Parrish (R-50) because, although they were affiliated with a party, they had more independent ideologies.

Journalism career
When Roem was a child, her grandfather would tell her, “the basis of my knowledge comes from reading the newspaper every day.” This influenced her to become a journalist. She was a journalist for ten and a half years. Her first job out of college, in 2006, was at the Gainesville Times in Gainesville, Virginia. Roem worked for nine years as the lead reporter for the Gainesville Times and Prince William Times. She then went to work as a news editor in August 2015 at the Montgomery County Sentinel in Rockville, Maryland, where she was employed there until December 2016. She then decided to run for public office. She said she has a wide knowledge of policy issues due to her journalism career. She won awards from the Virginia Press Association seven times.

Kelly McGinn

Current Position: Former Senior Counsel for International Human Rights
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 13

For more information, see Kelly McGinn’s post.

Values

Kelly grew up in a faith-filled, close-knit family that valued hard work and serving others. She babysat throughout high school for many families, earning enough money to visit her grandparents in Ireland for a summer and to self-finance her living expenses in college. Kelly’s family also regularly served at soup kitchens and volunteered in the community.

 

Patriotism

As a high school exchange student on a government scholarship program in Germany during the 80s, Kelly’s love of our country and her appreciation for our free market system grew. Visits to East Berlin and Moscow impressed upon her the stark reality that the communist system meant poverty and limited life options for millions of those walled inside the Eastern bloc.

Education

Kelly is a summa cum laude graduate of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University where she studied International Politics. She went on to earn a law degree at the University of Virginia Law School. She knows that promoting access to education and job training is vital to our community and that one’s education is not limited to formal schooling but is instead a lifelong endeavor. She’ll work to promote a rich cultural environment in our area where libraries, the arts, and civic organizations are valued.

Advocate

Kelly’s dream in law school was to be a human rights lawyer. It came true when she was hired as Senior Counsel for International Human Rights to Senator Sam Brownback of Kansas. Advocating on behalf of political prisoners, child slaves, and the poorest of the poor and serving as a voice for persecuted people around the world deepened Kelly’s passion to continue fighting for the most vulnerable at home and abroad.

Mom

Since she decided to become a full-time mother, Kelly has devoted herself to the most important work in the world – raising the next generation. She and her husband built their first home in Prince William County because they wanted their kids to grow up in a diverse community where they could play outside and truly enjoy the innocence of childhood. She believes parents are the first and most important teachers of their children and will fight to protect the rights of parents against governmental overreach into the upbringing of their children.

Issues

Better Government

Danica Roem

Increase Citizen Review

House Bill 2375, one of my three bills that passed during the 2019 session, increases transparency in local government by requiring governing bodies to hold a public hearing before fast-tracking a zoning ordinance change through a planning commission. They will also have to advertise that public hearing in the print edition of a newspaper and on the governing body’s website so it is in the public record at least two weeks ahead of the vote.

 When budget amendments arrived late this year in Richmond, I voted against cutting the amount of public review time from 48 hours to 24 hours before the General Assembly voted on them and adjourned. The rule change passed anyway, so I logged into Facebook that night and early the next morning and read page after page of the budget amendments live on camera so the public would know what we were voting on that Sunday.

I will keep fighting for citizens to have more access to information and continue my work to increase government transparency so you know exactly what your elected officials are doing with your time and your dime.

Strengthen the Freedom of Information Act

There’s no reason why Maryland’s government should be more open and accessible than Virginia’s government, yet that’s exactly where we find ourselves. I authored HB 940 (2018) HB 2507 (2019) to establish a state-level Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) ombudsman through the Office of the Attorney General. The Ombudsman would be a dedicated, independent, neutral position to streamline and mediate FOIA requests, and ensure that they are being addressed effectively and more efficiently between FOIA requestors and state agencies. I’ll bring this legislation back in 2020 so we can create this important position to help everyday citizens navigate the complex and confusing world of state agencies and public information.

I also filed HB 1603 (2018) to eliminate fees for the first two hours it takes an agency or governing body to fulfill a FOIA request. In many cases, these fees are designed to limit the public’s access to information, not strengthen it. I’ll continue working to make FOIA more accessible to the public and stand up to unnecessary exemptions that harm open government.

Increase Accessibility

Through the first half of 2019, I hosted or participated in 20 local town hall meetings in the greater Prince William County area since January 2018, including events in each of the four communities I represent: Manassas, Manassas Park, Gainesville and Haymarket. Being present and available in the community is the same work ethic I showed for more than nine years as your local reporter. As your local elected official, I remain accessible and accountable to you.

On many nights during the 2019 session, I posted two-minute videos recapping my day in Richmond so my constituents would know what I was doing on their behalf. I take my commitment to open government seriously and will continue to do so on behalf of the people of the Thirteenth District.

In 2018 (HB 1309) and 2019 (HB 2250), I introduced legislation to establish a Shield Law to prevent reporters from being jailed for protecting a confidential source. I also signed on as the chief co-patron of a bill introduced by another reporter-turned-delegate, Chris Hurst, D-12th, to prevent school officials from censoring student journalists.  I’ll continue advocating for a free and open press so aspiring journalists and professional reporters alike can hold government officials accountable and report vetted facts to the public.

Prevent Child Warfare Fraud

One of my other government accountability bills that was signed into law is HB 2339 (2019), which allows the Department of Social Services to work with the Department of Taxation to modify existing child support orders and prevent child welfare fraud. I had to wage an epic fight for this bill on the floor of the House of Delegates and prevailed as a freshman member of the minority party because I learned the rules and procedures and built a reputation as a bipartisan consensus seeker who always works in good faith.

The relationships I built across the aisle during my time in office so far allowed this bill to pass out of the House of Delegates and Senate. I’m committed to maintaining those relationships so I can make a good law even better in 2020 by allowing the Department of Social Services to notify Virginians that they are eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other benefits.

 

Democracy

Danica Roem

Enact Real Campaign Finance Reform

Not only have I refused to accept any money from for-profit corporations, their PACs, their trade associations and their lobbyists, I introduced HB 562 (2018) to ban public service corporations from donating to elected officials because the regulated should not be to have undue influence over their regulators.

Through my advocacy to reform our campaign finance system and eliminate conflicts of interest, I’ve led by example both on the campaign trail and in the General Assembly through my actions.

I pledged not to take any money from Dominion Energy before the Activate Virginia pledge even existed in 2017. I continue to rely on people power to fund my campaigns and on my constituents to help me craft our legislation, not on corporations

 

Civil Rights

Danica Roem

Ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment

On Feb. 21, 2019, a 50-50 vote in the House of Delegates ended our chance this year for Virginia to become the 38th and final state needed to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The ERA text states the following:

Section 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

Section 3: This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.

I wore my mother’s 43-year-old “Women’s Bicentennial” ERA medallion necklace almost daily during session in 2019. Ratification of the ERA has an 81 percent favorability rating in Virginia. Its support goes across party lines and ideologies. I’ll continue advocating for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment so we are all considered equal under the Constitution.

Championing Your Rights

The Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the Bill Rights ensures your right to privacy so you can have the autonomy to make your own reproductive health care choices and marry the consenting adult you love. That’s why we need to update the Code of Virginia to remove discriminatory language and ensure equal rights of all Virginians.

My legislative record is solidly on the side of justice and inclusion so we provide equity and equality for women, people of color, LGBTQ people, immigrants, workers, the disabled, seniors, students, people experiencing homelessness, survivors of sexual assault and human trafficking and all of my constitutions who need a hand up.

I’m proud to stand up for my constituents no matter what they look like, where they come from, how they worship if they do or who they love because of who they are, not despite it.

Kelly McGinn

Defending the Most Vulnerable

The life of every single Virginian is important to Kelly. That’s why she’ll fight for the littlest Virginians among us and is 100% pro-life and pro-woman. As an adoptive mom, Kelly is passionate about helping unite families through foster care and adoption. She believes respecting life means looking out for people at every stage including the seriously ill, people in economic distress, and the elderly.

Economy

Danica Roem

Creating a Fairer Tax System

When the majority caucus this year proposed disproportionately extending federal tax cuts to people making more than $50,000 a year while providing barely anything for those who earned less, I fought for all of my constituents to be included until half of the tax cuts went to people making less than $50,000.
I’ll continue supporting a fair, equitable tax system that takes care of all of my constituents, including making the Earned Income Tax Credit fully refundable, without playing political games. That’s why I voted for conformity of the tax code this year and last year so my CPA constituents could do their work in a timely manner without the uncertainty of waiting for the Virginia General Assembly to do its job. I’ll continue legislating in a fiscally responsible manner to make sure Virginia pays its bills and maintains its AAA bond rating.

Kelly McGinn

Kelly knows our economy thrives when government gets out of the way. She and her husband have run a small business and recognize that entrepreneurship is key for economic growth. We must continue to make Virginia the best place to do business, grow our local economy, and create high-quality jobs.

Education

Danica Roem

Raising Teacher Pay

When I voted to fulfill my campaign promise to expand Medicaid to 400,000 uninsured constituents, the state government was able to bring home $371 million from the federal government, which freed up enough money in the state budget to tackle major education funding issues. By casting this vote, I also fulfilled another campaign promise to raise teacher pay. By voting for the approved FY 2019-2020 budget and related amendments in 2019, I voted to raise salaries for public school instructional staff by 5 percent. This is a great start but not the end of this important issue as we work to make sure Prince William County teachers do not have the lowest salaries in Northern Virginia while also bringing Virginia above the national average for teacher salaries. The budget also included the In-State Undergraduate Tuition Moderation Fund to prevent tuition hikes in higher education. I’ll continue to work across the aisle to fully fund K-12 and higher education while taking care of our students, instructional staff and administrators.

Feeding Hungry Kids

For the 2018 and 2019 General Assembly sessions, I have worked with one of my Gainesville constituents to author legislation to ensure Virginia students do not go hungry at school. During the 2019 session, I introduced and passed into law HB 2400 to require all public school districts throughout Virginia to post prominently on their websites an online portal for parents to apply for free and reduced meals for their children. There are thousands of children throughout Virginia, including Prince William County and Manassas Park who are eligible for free and reduced school meals but are not enrolled because completed paper applications never made it back to school. Having an online system that’s easy to find on the school division website will allow parents to apply on their own time and without the social stigma of having to turn in a paper form declaring that their income allows them to be qualified for the program in the first place. The law goes into effect July 1, 2019, so I will monitor our local school divisions to make sure they are compliant.

Leading By Example

When Google offered me $2,500 in exchange of using two seconds of a video of me for their International Women’s Day 2018 ad, I declined taking the money for myself. Instead, I asked Google to pay off $2,500 worth of school meal debts in the 13th District. This money was used to pay off all school meal debt at Loch Lomond Elementary School in Manassas, PACE West in Gainesville and took care of almost all the debt at Sinclair Elementary School in Manassas.

Meanwhile, I contributed hundreds of dollars to the “Settle the Debt” campaign to pay off school meal debts in Prince William County as my Gainesville constituent Adelle Settle raised more than $40,000 to pay off school meal debts across Prince William County Schools.

While it’s important to pay down existing debts, it’s even more important to address the systemic problems that cause debt in the first place. I will continue to advocate for maximizing enrollment in the federal Community Eligibility Program so more schools can provide meals without charge to students while I continue to advocate for the reduction and elimination of school meal debts at the state level.

Eliminating School Meal Shaming

No student should be shamed for their parents’ income situation. In addition to introducing anti-school meal shaming legislation in 2018 as a constituent service request, I signed on as the chief-co-patron of Del. Patrick Hope’s HB 50 (2018) and worked with him to pass this legislation to prevent students from being forced to wear a wristband or do chores as a result of having school meal debt. HB 50 also requires all communication concerning school meal debt to be addressed to the parent, not the student because children should just be able to focus on learning instead of being shamed for debt that their parents/guardians owe. In fact, parents often don’t know what happens when their kids carry school meal debts. I authored HB 2462 (2019) to require school districts inform parents of the policies, procedures and consequences for students carrying school meal debt. I also introduced HB 2376 (2019) to ban school officials from forcing students to throw away meals after they’ve been served to them because the student carries school meal debt or their parents/guardians cannot afford their meals. Thankfully, this shaming practice does not apply in Prince William or Manassas Park but it exists in other parts of Virginia. While HB 2462 and HB 2376 had bipartisan support of more than 50 co-patrons each – a majority of the House of Delegates – the Chairman of the House Education Committee recommended for them to instead be considered for administrative implementation through the Code of Virginia. I’ve followed up with Education Secretary Atif Qarni since then to make sure that happens. I believe forcing a student to throw away a meal should be explicitly banned in the Code of Virginia instead of at the will of the agency, so I will reintroduce that legislation to prohibit that form of school meal shaming.

Being Accessible to Student Constituents

It’s one thing for a legislator to make time for adults when the adults can vote for them. It’s another to make time for students who are too young to vote. I serve all of my constituents, regardless of their eligibility to vote and the best place to interact with students is to meet them where they’re at: school. In 2017, I heard from Manassas Park residents that they felt invisible to their elected officials so I told them that would stop with me and started engaging with my student constituents at school. Two weeks after I won the 2017 campaign, I toured every public school in Manassas Park.

In May of 2018, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine and I hosted a student-led gun prevention roundtable at Manassas Park High School where we answered questions and heard public policy ideas from Manassas Park, Stonewall Jackson, Patriot and Hylton high school students. When Stonewall Jackson High School students asked me to attend a public hearing about the proposed boundary lines for the 13th high school in Prince William County, I went and listened to the students express their frustration that the proposed lines packed students of color at one school while diluting the presence of students of color at Patriot and Battlefield High Schools.

I have conducted student town halls at Stonewall Jackson High School and the George Mason University Science and Technology campus in Manassas. By writing and passing commending resolutions in the House of Delegates, my team and I have honored educators and students alike from Prince William and Manassas Park, and twice joined the Battlefield BEST Club as they, in partnership with the Virginia Student Training and Refurbishment (STAR) Program, gave away refurbished laptops to families who needed them at Sinclair and Tyler Elementary Schools.

I attended the Manassas Park High School senior awards ceremony and sat on stage at each of the graduation ceremonies for every public high school in western Prince William County as well as the eighth grade promotion ceremony at Manassas Park Middle School, the fifth grade promotion ceremonies at Piney Branch, Sinclair, Sudley, Manassas Park Elementary Schools and even the second grade promotion ceremonies at Cougar Elementary School.

Whether it’s an outdoor festival at Osbourn Park High School to raise money for hurricane survivors in Puerto Rico, joining the advisory board for the George Mason University Science and Technology campus or testifying in front of our local school boards in favor of including LGBTQ students and staff in their non-discrimination policies (which are now implemented both in Prince William and Manassas Park), I’ve been present in our community, accessible and accountable as I’ve advocated for our community. I’ll continue to do so as your delegate.

Creating Equitable, Safe and Fun Learning Environments

During the 2019 session, I signed onto Del. Jeff Bourne’s HB 1600, to address the statewide of problem of black students and disabled students being disproportionately more likely to be given long-term suspensions from schools than other students. The bill, now signed into law, reduces the length of long-term suspensions from 364 days – the highest in the nation – to 45 days except in the most severe circumstances. Simply put, a child cannot learn while rehabilitating their behavior if they are being taken out of school for months at a time without education. This legislation marks the first major crack we took in the House of Delegates at addressing the school-to-prison pipeline, one of the policy promises I made during my 2017 campaign.

In Northern Virginia, we heard parents raise awareness about how denying elementary school students 15-minutes of recess in a day is actually detrimental to children as they need that unstructured time to reset and unwind before continuing their education. In 2018, I signed on as a co-patron to Del. Karrie Delaney’s HB 1419, to allow school divisions to count recess as instructional time in elementary schools. After the bill was signed into law, the Prince William County School Board was the first in the commonwealth to adopt it, so students in kindergarten through fifth grade now have an additional 15 minutes of recess per day. I’ll continue working with my colleagues who advocate on behalf of students to improve their learning environment inside and outside of the classroom.

Kelly McGinn

Quality educational opportunities are vital as we raise our next generation. Kelly will work with local school board officials to help our young people get the very best education here at home and affordable access to our state colleges and universities.

Health Care

Danica Roem

Expanding Health Care Insurance Coverage

Expanding Medicaid to 400,000 uninsured Virginians – including 3,800 of my constituents – was the single most consequential and important vote I cast during my first term because I know what it’s like to be uninsured. More than 279,000 Virginia adults enrolled in Medicaid in less than five months – far surpassing enrollment timeline expectations. Passing Medicaid expansion through the budget also included historic investments in mental and behavioral programs across the state as well as much needed funding to combat the opioid crisis.

At the same time, hundreds of thousands of Virginians who earn more than $17,256 per year remain uninsured or underinsured with $5,000 deductible plans that leave many people functionally uninsured. Meanwhile, even more Virginians have health insurance premiums that keep rising.

That means we need to stay vigilant. Here’s what we can do:

1) Maximize Medicaid expansion enrollment: I’ll continue working with the Department of Social Services in Prince William County and the City of Manassas Park to make sure than each and every one of the 3,800 constituents I represent, who are eligible for Medicaid expansion, have all the information they need to enroll if they so choose. My office has assisted many constituents in applying for coverage under Medicaid expansion and is happy to continue doing so in the future. Please visit www.coverva.org for eligibility and enrollment information.

2) Create a public option: I’ll keep encouraging our federal delegation to pass U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine’s Medicare-X Choice Act, which would create a public option that could drastically reduce the uninsured and underinsured populations in Virginia. This would build on Medicare to create a public plan offered on the individual and small business health exchanges, giving Americans the option to choose between existing private insurance plans or a public option. The Medicare-X legislation is currently under consideration in Congress. If there is no action on it at the federal level by 2021, I’ll work with my colleagues in the House of Delegates to re-examine how we can use the framework from the Marketplace Virginia proposed compromise from five years ago as a means of establishing a state-level public option while preserving Medicaid expansion.

3) Fight “junk” plans: I have voted against “buyer-beware” proposals lacking even some of the most basic protections that would dilute the health insurance market pool and raise insurance premiums on people with pre-existing conditions. I’ll continue working to make sure our legislature strengthens the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in Virginia and does not undermine it.

Covering Your Health Care Needs

Far too often, doctors prescribe their patients treatments that health insurers simply won’t cover because they’re not required to do so. I worked hard to close some of these health insurance coverage gaps for my constituents during my first term in office and I remain dedicated to making sure your health care needs are not excluded from coverage.

1) Mental Health: While I support fully implementing the recommendations of the Deeds Commission, I’m continuing my work to emphasize suicide prevention in the commonwealth. I was honored to earn the 2018 Virginia Counselors Association’s “Legislator of the Year” award for my advocacy on behalf of mental health care causes, including my resolution HJ 138 that would have ensured all employees in a school district are trained to identify the signs of suicidal ideation in students. I also voted for HB 2053 (2019) and the budget amendments this past session that allocated $12.2 million to improve the student-to-counselor ratio to start making progress on this issue. I’ll continue supporting our counselors, school psychologists and social workers to make sure our most vulnerable students receive the care they need.

2) Autism Spectrum-Related Healthcare: In 2018, I introduced HB 1113 to eliminate the age cap for autism-related health insurance coverage on behalf of one of my Manassas Park constituents and a group of moms in Prince William County. In 2019, I signed on as a co-patron of HB 2577 to eliminate (2019) all age requirements for autism-related health insurance coverage. This year, we got it done. I’ll continue to advocate for my autistic and Aspie constituents, especially students who are at risk of being misunderstood and mistreated by peers or staff due to a lack of awareness and training.

3) Mechanical Prosthetic Devices: For my amputee constituents, I introduced HB1478 (2018) and HB 2669 (2019) to require health insurers to cover doctor-prescribed mechanical prosthetic devices, such as myoelectric, biomechanical or microprocessor-controlled devices. HB 2669 requires doctor prescribed mechanical prosthetic devices with a Medicare code to be covered under all health plans regulated by the commonwealth. This is an opportunity to give members of the limb loss community, such as one of my constituents, access to the care they need, when they need it. HB 2669 was referred to the Health Insurance Reform Commission for further consideration. I’ll continue advocating for the limb loss community as a means of improving the mental and physical quality-of-life of my constituents.

4) LGBTQ HealthcareWhether it’s access to PrEP, IVF treatments or transition-related health care, LGBTQ health care is health care. I signed on as the chief co-patron to HB 1466 (2018) and HB 1864 (2019) to ensure health insurance coverage for transition-related healthcare in Virginia. None of my constituents should have their health care needs rejected when they are following their doctors’ orders and this is a key issue as I champion non-discrimination in general for my LGBTQ constituents.

Kelly McGinn

Kelly knows we must reduce healthcare costs and ensure access to lifesaving treatment for those with preexisting conditions. She will work with public health experts to bring market solutions to the healthcare industry and keep more dollars in your pocket.

Environment

Danica Roem

Ban Above-Ground Transmission Lines Near I-66

As the lead reporter of the Gainesville Times, I was at Silver Lake in 2006 when activists floated balloons 155-feet-high in the air so we could see how a proposal from Dominion Energy to build transmission lines along the Interstate 66 corridor would affect the environment.

Eight years later, I identified Amazon as the owner of the controversial data center in Haymarket on Sept. 10, 2014 when Dominion Energy officials refused to name their corporate client when they proposed building 110-foot-high transmission lines along the I-66 corridor again.

Simply put, the people of Haymarket and Gainesville have had enough of these drawn out fights against corporate giants spanning the last 13 years.

When legislators proposed to include the hybrid route for the Haymarket Transmission Line in a large bill (SB 966/HB 1558) favored by Dominion Energy in 2018, I actually read the text and found out that the bill would actually allow above-ground transmission lines:

“§ 8. Approval of a proposed transmission line for inclusion in this program shall not preclude the placing of existing or future overhead facilities in the same area or corridor by other transmission projects.”

In Catholic school we would call this “sin by omission” as the bill simply does not mention above-ground transmission lines rather than including provisions to ban them. I called this out on the House floor (video) and voted against the bill. After the legislation passed the House, that line was stripped from the bill.

I take constituent requests very seriously. When my Haymarket and Gainesville constituents contacted my office by an overwhelming majority in opposition to the Haymarket Transmission Line project, I filed HB 2469 (2019) to ban above-ground transmission lines in perpetuity along the Interstate 66 corridor between Gainesville and Haymarket. With many of my constituents in Richmond to testify for the bill, we challenged Dominion head-on in the House Commerce and Labor Committee. I earned bipartisan support for my bill this time around and plan to build upon that in 2020 to finally pass the legislation.

I also carried HB 556 (2018) to allow citizen groups like the Coalition to Protect Prince William County to recover some of their legal fees from the State Corporation Commission to level the playing field between small constituent advocacy organizations and public service corporations like Dominion Energy.

Meanwhile, I filed HB 562 (2018) to ban public service corporations like Dominion from being able to donate to political campaigns so regulated monopolies don’t have undue influence over their regulators.

I don’t take Dominion’s money or money from any for-profit corporation, their PACs, their lobbyists or trade associations.

Controlled Development

As a member of the House Counties, Cities and Towns Committee, I sit on Subcommittee 2, which deals with legislation regarding residential developments. My legislative philosophy in most circumstances is that I generally try to empower localities to make their own land-use decisions as the people closest to the area know the most about their environment and property.

When those issues relate to Prince William County, the first question I ask if how will this bill affect residential development: will it make it easier for the Board of County Supervisors to bring development under control and will it be a tool the Board of County Supervisors can be counted on to use responsibly?

While other local governing bodies in Virginia are likely to use the proffer bill (HB 2342, 2019) that passed this year responsibly, I had severe concerns about whether Prince William County  would fall into the same old habits that created the county’s over-development problem in the first place. We need to have adequate, existing infrastructure for roads, schools, water and first responders in place before approving new developments. We need public policy that prioritizes infrastructure development before residential development.

That’s why I’ve attended a number of MIDCO and Planning Commission meetings regarding the Kline Farm and The Reserve at Long Forest in Manassas as those developments directly affect my Signal Hill and Yates Ford constituents. As a state delegate, I only speak in front of local elected governing bodies upon invitation, so I do not try to use the heavy hand of the state government to tell local elected officials how to do their jobs. At the same time, I do speak in front of appointed bodies, citizen organizations and listen to constituent feedback so I can take their ideas and make the best, most informed decisions I can for the people of the Thirteenth District in Richmond.

Infrastructure

Danica Roem

Fix Route 28 Now!

During the 2017 campaign, you may have seen my “Fix Route 28 Now!” yard signs and if you ever heard me speak, I’m sure it was one of the first things I mentioned. It’s my #1 issue because I know how it affects my constituents’ lives.

As a lifelong resident of the Manassas part of Prince William County, I covered our transportation issues for over nine years as the lead reporter of the Gainesville and Prince William Times. Prior to my journalism career it was a problem my family dealt with every single workday as my mother commuted up and down Route 28 for 40 years. I’m proud of the significant progress we’ve made since 2017. However, the people of the Thirteenth District elected me to fix the problem, not just improve it.  Fixing Route 28 remains my top legislative priority along with alleviating traffic congestion along Interstate 66.

Expand Mass Transit

Shortly after I was elected in November 2017, I met with Bob Schneider, Executive Director of the Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation Commission, and discussed the need to expand OmniRide bus service to Gainesville and Haymarket.

In 2018, I fulfilled my 2017 campaign promise to work across the aisle in favor of putting a floor on the Northern Virginia regional motor fuels tax and we got it done with HB 768/SB 896. Because of that vote, I was able to fulfill another campaign promise to expand mass transit in western Prince William County because the revenue from the motor fuels tax allocated $7.86 million more to the PRTC, allowing the PRTC board to launch the first ever OmniRide commuter bus linking Haymarket and northern Gainesville to Arlington on December 17, 2018.

As of now, four buses make six stops each along the westbound side of Heathcote Boulevard corridor and five locations near Metro stations in Arlington. This Sept. 9, two eastbound stops are due to be added at Carterwood and Sheringham.

The more mass transit options we provide for commuters, the more passenger vehicles we can remove each day from Interstate 66. I’ll continue advocating and legislating to make this happen.

Improve Dangerous Intersections

During the last two years, two fatal traffic accidents have shook Gainesville as we’ve mourned those who died at intersections Rollins Ford Road and Estate Manor Drive and Heathcote Boulevard and U.S. 29.

It shouldn’t take a fatality for us to improve road safety. That’s why I worked for months with VDOT to improve the Heathcote/29 intersection, which happened on June 29, 2019 with the additional lane paving for commuters along northbound U.S. 29 turning left onto Heathcote Boulevard.

I also worked for months with VDOT on coming up with alternative intersection designs at three intersections along Rollins Ford Road and held three bipartisan town halls dedicated to gathering feedback from my constituents so VDOT would know what options the people who live in the area prefer. VDOT has since presented us with alternative intersection designs for the area. I’ll continue to listen to what my constituents want for the area and work to secure funding to implement them.

Fully Fund the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority

In 2018, we had the opportunity in the General Assembly to both provide dedicated funding for the Metro and simultaneously preserve enough money with the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) to keep funding more fixes for Route 28, such as the 6-7-8 lane hybrid widening in Centreville. Before the Reconvene Session in April, where the General Assembly considers the Governor’s proposed amendments and vetoes, I wrote a letter to the Governor urging him to amend HB 1539 (2018) to keep the NVTA from losing $35.1 million per year to fix our roads and multi-modal projects. Given that HB 1539 called for transferring money from the NVTA to fund Metro, I asked the Governor to offer amendments to safeguard NVTA funding that only applied to the six Metro compact jurisdictions – Alexandria, Arlington, Falls Church, Loudoun, Fairfax County and Fairfax City – not Prince William County, Manassas or Manassas Park. The Governor did exactly that in Recommendation #16 to HB 1539, which the majority caucus killed on a party-line vote of 51-48. As an immediate consequence of that vote that left crucial transportation funding on the table, Fairfax County decided to proceed only with the six-lane widening of Route 28 in Centreville instead of the 6-7-8 lane hybrid widening option that would widen the road to six lanes in the south near Compton Road and eight lanes by Route 29.

However, I would not accept defeat when that transportation funding was lost. I spoke out on floor of the House of Delegates and called for NVTA funding to be restored by inserting a provision in the Interstate 81 bill (HB 2718, 2019) that included bringing back $20 million per year to the NVTA without raising taxes in Northern Virginia. This time, when the funding amendment arrived, I worked hard behind the scenes to whip support and helped deliver 48 Democratic votes for the amendment while 12 of 51 Republicans crossed the aisle to vote along with us. This allowed us to deliver and approve the largest transportation funding bill in six years.

In addition, I will continue to advocate for Del. Vivian Watts’ legislation, HB 2085 (2019), to restore another $30 million of funding for the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority. Combined with the $20 million I helped bring back this year, that will restore $50 million annually — and that does not even include the money that would come from the localities.

Northern Virginia candidates and politicians routinely talk about bringing back transportation funding from Richmond. In under two years in office, I helped secure $20 million a year for Route 28 improvements and other Northern Virginia regional transportation projects. I’m not afraid to take tough votes, fulfill my campaign promises and deliver the results I’ve promised for the people of the Thirteenth District.

Kelly McGinn

Better Roads

We all know our roads need work. Route 28, in particular, is an ongoing traffic bottleneck that we need to fix. Increasing traffic congestion is not just a drain on our time but it is also a safety concern as it can lead to aggressive driving and more accidents. Kelly will fight for our fair share of transportation funding so that we can finally get traffic congestion under control.

Safety

Danica Roem

Gun Violence Prevention

As of May 26, 2019, 73 of the 110 homicides committed in greater Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area have come from people being shot to death, including in Prince William County, according to the Washington Post. Gun violence also makes up an untold number of suicides and assaults in the region. It is possible to prevent people from killing other people or themselves without infringing upon someone’s Second Amendment rights for lawful self-defense and recreation.
This is why I signed onto legislation to require universal background checks (HB 140, 2018), prohibit bump stocks (HB 41, 2018) and allow localities to regulate firearms in government buildings (HB 261, 2018). I also support enacting “red flag” laws to allow a judge to issue an emergency substantial risk order to prohibit someone who is in imminent danger of hurting themselves or others from purchasing, possessing or transportation a firearm (HB 198 (2018) and HB 1763 (2019).
As we work across the aisle on this issue, we must involve our student constituents in the discussion. In May 2018, I hosted a student-led roundtable discussion with U.S. Senator Tim Kaine on gun-violence prevention at Manassas Park High School. Student participants from Manassas Park, Stonewall Jackson, Patriot and Hylton High School shared their stories, offered innovative policy solutions and stressed the critical need for gun violence prevention legislation as they feared for their safety in school and the local community. Our students and community deserve to live free from the threat of gun violence.
I’ll continue to support gun violence prevention bills where there is existing precedent in Virginia or other states for bipartisanship so we can get something done that is effective and data-driven.

Kelly McGinn

There is nothing more important than keeping our children and community safe. Kelly will work with law enforcement, faith leaders, public health officials, and community members to find common sense solutions to problems facing our citizens. Kelly is particularly concerned about the rise of gangs, opioid addiction, and human trafficking in our community.

Veterans

Kelly McGinn

As the wife of a West Point graduate, Kelly understands the unique challenges facing military families. She will fight to make sure our active duty military personnel, veterans, and military families receive the benefits and resources that they’ve earned.

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VA House 10 - 2019VA House 10 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Clarke (part), Frederick (part), and Loudoun (part)
Current Delegate: Wendy Gooditis since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another 2017 rematch. Gooditis, a real estate agent, beat Minchew, a lawyer who held the seat since 2012, with just under 51 percent of the vote. Republicans say their candidate is well liked and poised to make a comeback. Democrats say the race will come down to turnout.”

Summary

District Description: Counties of Clarke (part), Frederick (part), and Loudoun (part)
Current Delegate: Wendy Gooditis since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another 2017 rematch. Gooditis, a real estate agent, beat Minchew, a lawyer who held the seat since 2012, with just under 51 percent of the vote. Republicans say their candidate is well liked and poised to make a comeback. Democrats say the race will come down to turnout.”

VA House District 10

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #10

Wendy Gooditis

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 10 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 10

For more information, see Wendy Gooditis’s post.

Wendy GooditisWendy was raised to work hard and serve others. She grew up in Cranbury, New Jersey with two older brothers. Her father spent his childhood in rural Alabama during the Great Depression, where his family had scraped and saved to buy milk for him as an infant. As an adult, he rode in a commuter van over two hours each day to work, but still found time to teach Wendy how to play the piano and work hard for what she believed in.

Her mother and grandmother were public school teachers. In the 1930s, Wendy’s grandmother pushed social limits to earn her graduate degree, and Wendy’s mother followed suit. From them, Wendy learned early the importance of education, perseverance, and working women.

In college, Wendy applied her equestrian background to service. She worked as a student mounted marshal for the Rutgers Police, logging 30 hours a week with a full course load. After graduation, following in her family’s tradition of strong, working women, Wendy went on to lead a team of mid-career men at Bell Laboratories when she was 26 years old.

After she met Chris, her husband of 25 years, Wendy made the move to Virginia. Following the birth of her children in the mid-1990s, Wendy became enamored with education. She received her Masters in Education from Shenandoah University. During her career in education she taught in the Clarke County public school system, at an area private school, and partially homeschooled her children. As her kids entered college, Wendy knew that she would need to help pay the tuition bills. She joined RE/MAX as a realtor in 2013, and has been there since.

Like millions of other Americans in 2017, Wendy decided that she had to get off the sidelines. She co-founded an Indivisible chapter in the predominantly red Clarke County. However, she knew that was not enough. After deciding to run for the 10th district seat in the spring, she stormed to victory on November 7th 2017 beating 3 term incumbent Randy Minchew.

Randy Minchew

Current Position: Attorney
Former: State Delegate for VA House District 10 from 2011 – 2017
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 10

For more information, see Randy Minchew’s post.

A native Northern Virginian, Randy has lived and worked in Virginia’s 10th House of Delegates District for more than 20 years.

Following graduation from Langley High School in Fairfax County, Randy studied public policy and economics at Duke University.

Randy followed his interest in law enforcement and criminal prosecution after his graduation from Duke and took a position with District Attorney’s office in Durham County, North Carolina, where he worked closely with police and prosecutors. This formative experience is where he witnessed firsthand the corrosive effect of crime and learned the importance of vigorous prosecution of criminals, led him to return to Virginia to study law at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, where he served as an editor on the W&L Law Review. Upon graduating from W&L, Randy received an appointment as a personal law clerk to the Honorable A. Christian Compton, Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia in Richmond.

Randy’s leadership in and service to the community has taken many forms over the past 20 years. A founding member and two-term Chairman of the Loudoun County Economic Development Commission as well as a founding member and chair of the Rural Economic Development Task Force.

Randy has consistently advocated for public policies that create jobs, preserve a favorable business climate, and lead to meaningful transportation improvements during his many years of service to the community, including years spent on the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, the Loudoun County Finance Board, the Citizens’ Tax Equity Committee, and the Loudoun Judicial Center Task Force.

Randy, an Eagle Scout, has been an avid outdoorsman and conservationist from his early days as a Boy Scout. He has remained active with the Boy Scouts of America, twice serving as Chairman of the Goose Creek District – 4,300 scouts strong – as well as serving as Scoutmaster of both Leesburg Troop 998 and 2010 National Scout Jamboree Troop 521. In 2010, in appreciation of his years of work for what he proudly calls “the most successful youth leadership movement in the history of the world,” Randy was awarded Scouting’s highest adult leader recognition, the Silver Beaver.

Randy also holds a Diploma in Theology from Virginia Theological Seminary and is an active Lay Eucharistic Minister and Visitor at St. James Episcopal Church in Leesburg. After serving as General Counsel for the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Randy was awarded a Life Membership by the Club for his work in conservation land acquisition and trail preservation, and can still be found on occasion hiking and maintaining his section of the Appalachian Trail along the Loudoun-Clarke County line south of Route 7.

Randy is a PADI Certified Rescue Diver and a trained Wilderness First Aid Responder and enjoys skiing, mountain climbing, and Rugby. He is a Life Member of the NRA and gun owner. Randy has been married since 1991 to his wife, Teresa, who is equally committed to giving back to the community, having served on either the Town of Leesburg’s Planning Commission or Board of Architectural Review for many years, along with other non-profit and philanthropic pursuits. Together with their son Jack, Randy and Terri live in and are the stewards of their historic home in Leesburg, built in 1899 and a designated Virginia Historic Landmark.

Issues

Education

Wendy Gooditis

As a career educator and mom of two, Wendy understands that our communities are only as strong as our schools. In Richmond, she fights for competitive public schools so that each child in Virginia can learn and succeed.

The wage for Virginia public school teachers is about $7,000 under the national average. Because Wendy’s mom and grandmother were public school teachers, she understands firsthand the impact of underpaid educators. This life experience makes her a staunch supporter of a living wage and benefits for public educators, so that Virginia can recruit and retain the nation’s top talent. She knows that investing in Virginia’s families means investing in Virginia’s teachers.

Randy Minchew

Randy knows that a strong education system is key to the future of our commonwealth. A strong education system will attract the best employers to our area and building a strong diversified economy. Randy will fight to reduce class sizes and for more in-state spots at our universities. He will always stand up for Northern Virginia to ensure we get our fair share of funding for education.

Economy

Wendy Gooditis

Wendy believes that the economy should work for everyone, giving each Virginian a fair shot. That means competitive public and technical education systems, a living minimum wage and jobs for our veterans. It also means the protection of worker rights and labor unions as well as equal economic opportunity for all Virginians. It means government investment in public infrastructure so that we can can build better roads, bike lanes and transit systems. Virginia’s economy is developing quickly, and we must take steps to ensure that our workforce is well trained and paid so that it can grow, compete and prosper.

Randy Minchew

Jobs

Randy understands that businesses can best create jobs when taxes are low, limited government principles are observed, and the government remains focused on its core responsibilities, such as providing high-quality public education and adequate transportation infrastructure.

Taxes and Spending

Randy will continue to identify and work to eliminate wasteful spending and will demand strict accountability for how our tax dollars are spent. As our Delegate, Randy will strive to keep taxes low to foster the creation of jobs, allow for thriving businesses and farms, and fight unnecessary expansion of government.

Health Care

Wendy Gooditis

Suicide rates are on the rise in Virginia, especially among women.Lawmakers are trying to figure out ways to reverse the trend. Since 2010, the suicide rate among women in Virginia has increased 24 percent.

Freddy Mejia at the Commonwealth Institute says a number of factors may have contributed. “Making sure that mental health is accessible to this population is crucial. We also know that increased access to lethal means, such as illicit and prescription drugs as well as firearms, may have contributed to this rise.”

Earlier this year, Delegate Wendy Gooditis, a Democrat from Northern Virginia, introduced a bill that requires the state to issue an annual report to lawmakers about suicide prevention. “My family was horrifically affected by the loss of my brother this year following a couple of years of suicide attempts, so in my personal and professional opinion anything we can do to spread the word and help these people is really important.”

Randy Minchew

Healthcare costs are spiraling out of control. Randy knows we must reduce the cost of Healthcare and ensure access to healthcare for those with pre-existing conditions.

Environment

Wendy Gooditis

Wendy believes that everyone should receive the health care they need and deserve. She knows how critical state support can be – until recently, Wendy and her family purchased their healthcare through the Affordable Care Act.

Wendy voted to expand Medicaid. As a result an estimated 400,000 Virginians don’t have to keep making the impossible choices between paying healthcare bills or paying the mortgage. She also understands that Medicaid expansion is good for Virginia’s economy – through a healthy workforce and the creation of about 30,000 new jobs.

About a week into her candidacy, Wendy lost her brother, Brian, to mental illness. He had been denied Medicaid in Virginia for years. She’s fighting so that Virginia families don’t have to experience what hers did. In the United States we don’t abandon the most vulnerable among us, we help and care for them.

Randy Minchew
N/A

Redistricting & Voting Rights

Wendy Gooditis

Gerrymandering is the issue that first got Wendy out of her chair at a town hall back in February 2017. As a 19-year resident of the district, she has watched its lines be contorted and redrawn.

Wendy believes that free and fair elections are tenets of our democracy. Voters should be choosing their politicians instead of politicians choosing their voters. She has supported a constitutional amendment in Virginia to ensure that district lines are not drawn to favor any individual or political party. Furthermore, she firmly opposes any effort to make voting harder — and is appalled by Virginia House Republicans efforts to require photo identification for absentee ballots and multiple forms of state ID at the voting booth.

Randy Minchew
N/A

Infrastructure

Wendy Gooditis
N/A

Randy Minchew

Transportation

Randy has worked persistently to improve our congested regional roadways through thoughtful and appropriate public transportation infrastructure. Randy has consistently sought and supported enhanced funding for road improvements and has worked tirelessly to fund needed maintenance of rural roads.

Energy

Randy is an advocate for alternative energy innovation and use of clean-burning natural gas for electric power production. To that end, during the 2013 General Assembly session, Randy successfully patroned groundbreaking, landmark legislation which expands the ability of Virginia citizens to produce energy from renewable sources.

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VA 2019 House Competitive Districts

This post has summaries of the 20 House of Delegate Districts in the upcoming elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

To view this post, select the feature image or post title.

One can view a more detailed post on each competitive district in each candidate subcategory e.g. Southeastern VA House Candidates. To view ALL the candidates running for the 100 House districts, go to this slide show.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide. If you know of other competitive districts, we will be happy to consider them for inclusion in this post.

Virginia onAir curators will have a special focus on these districts and will attempt to provide a video recording of an interview with each of the candidates.

Summary

This post has summaries of the 20 House of Delegate Districts in the upcoming elections on November 5, 2019.  Each district has a short description of its boundaries, pictures of the candidates, a link to a post focused on the candidates and their positions on issues, and links to posts on each candidate.  Feature image for this post shows the regional location for each of these districts.

To view this post, select the feature image or post title.

One can view a more detailed post on each competitive district in each candidate subcategory e.g. Southeastern VA House Candidates. To view ALL the candidates running for the 100 House districts, go to this slide show.

In compiling this post, we used Ned Oliver’s Virginia Mercury article as a guide. If you know of other competitive districts, we will be happy to consider them for inclusion in this post.

Virginia onAir curators will have a special focus on these districts and will attempt to provide a video recording of an interview with each of the candidates.

Northern Virginia House Districts

VA House District 10

District Description: Counties of Clarke (part), Frederick (part), and Loudoun (part)
Current Delegate: Wendy Gooditis since 2018 (D)

VA House District 10 - Wendy Gooditis & Randy Minchew

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Wendy Gooditis’s post.
For more information, see Randy Minchew’s post.

VA House District 13

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas Park
Current Delegate: Danica  Roem since 2018 (D)

VA House District 13 - Danica Roem & Kelly McGinn

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Danica Roem’s post.
For more information, see Kelly McGinn’s post.

VA House District 31

District Description: Counties of Fauquier (part) and Prince William (part)
Current Delegate: Liz Guzman since 2018 (D)

VA House District 31 - Liz Guzman & D.J. Jordan

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Liz Guzman’s post.
For more information, see D.J. Jordan’s post.

VA House District 40

District Description: County of Fairfax (part)
Current Delegate: Tim Hugo since 2003 (D)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Tim Hugo’s post.
For more information, see Dan Helmer’s post.

VA House District 50

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas
Current Delegate: Lee Carter since 2017 (D)

VA House District 50 - Lee Carter & Ian Lovejoy

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Lee Carter’s post.
For more information, see Ian Lovejoy’s post.

VA House District 51

District Description:  County of Prince William (part)
Current Delegate Hala Ayala since 2018 (D)

VA House District 51 - Haya Ayala & Richard Anderson

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Hala Ayala’s post.
For more information, see Richard Anderson’s post.

Central Virginia House Districts

VA House District 28

District Description: County of Stafford (part); City of Fredericksburg (part)
Current Delegate: Bob Thomas since 2018 (R)

VA House 28 - 2019

To view the VA House District 30 and its 2019 candidates, go here.

For more information, see Joshua Cole’s post.
For more information, see Paul Milde’s post.

Southcentral Virginia House Districts

VA House District 27

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part)
Current Delegate: Roxann Robinson since 2010 (R)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Roxann Robinson’s post.
For more information, see Larry Barnett’s post.

VA House District 66

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part); City of Colonial Heights
Current Delegate: Kirk Cox since 1990 (R)

VA House 66 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Kirkland Cox’s post.
For more information, see Sheila Bynum-Coleman’s post.

VA House District 68

District Description: Counties of Chesterfield (part) and Henrico (part); City of Richmond (part)
Current Delegate: Dawn Adams since 2018 (D)

VA House 68 - 2109

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues,  go here.

For more information, see Dawn Adams’s post.
For more information, see Garrison Coward’s post.

VA House District 72

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg since 2018 (D)

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see GayDonna Vandergriff’s post.
For more information, see Schuyler VanValkenburg’s post.

VA House District 73

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Debra Rodman since 2018 (D)

VA House 73 - 2019 2

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Rodney Willett’s post.
For more information, see Mary Margaret Kastelberg’s post.

Southeastern Virginia House Districts

VA House District 21

District Description:  Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Kelly Convirs-Fowler since 2018 (D)VA House 21 - 2019

 

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Kelly Fowler ’s post.
For more information, see Shannon Kane’s post.

VA House District 76

District Description: Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Suffolk (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Jones since 1998 (R)

VA House 76 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Chris Jones’s post.
For more information, see Clinton Jenkins’s post.

 

VA House District 83

District Description: Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Stolle since 2010 (R)

VA House 83 - 2019 1

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Chris Stolle’s post.
For more information, see Nancy Guy’s post.

VA House District 84

District Description: City of Virginia Beach (part)a
Current Delegate: Glenn Davis since 2014 (R)

To view an overview of VA House District 84, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Glenn Davis’s post.
For more information, see Karen Mallard’s post.

VA House District 85

District Description:City of Virginia Beach (part)
Current Delegate: Cheryl Turpin since 2018 (D)

VA House 85 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Alex Askew’s post.
For more information, see Rocky Holcomb’s post.

VA House District 91

District Description: County of York (part); Cities of Hampton (part) and Poquoson
Current Delegate: Gordon Helsel since 2011 (R)

VA House 91 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 91, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Martha Mugler’s post.
For more information, see Colleen Holcomb’s post.

VA House District 94

District Description:  City of Newport News (part)
Current Delegate: David Yancey since 2012 (R)

VA House 94 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see David Yancey’s post.
For more information, see Shelly Simonds’s post.

VA House District 100

District Description: Counties of Accomack and Northampton; Cities of Norfolk (part) and Virginia Beach (part)
Current Officeholder: Rob Bloxom since 2014 (R)

VA House 100 – 2019

To view an overview of VA Senate District 10, its 2019 candidates, and their positions on key issues, go here.

For more information, see Robert Bloxom’s post.
For more information, see Philip Hernandez’s post.

Southwestern Virginia

There are currently no House Districts in Southwestern Virginia that appear to be competitive at this time.

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VA House 27- 2109VA House 27- 2109

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part)
Current Delegate: Roxann Robinson since 2010 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another rematch from 2017. Barnett, a licensed counselor, came within 124 votes of beating Robinson, an optometrist who has represented the district since 2010. Democrats say they’re enthusiastic about his chances this year. As in Hugo’s case, Republicans note that if Barnett couldn’t off Robinson during a historic, anti-Trump wave, it’s unlikely he’ll be able to do it this year, when turnout is muted with no statewide candidates anchoring the top of the ticket.”

Summary

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part)
Current Delegate: Roxann Robinson since 2010 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another rematch from 2017. Barnett, a licensed counselor, came within 124 votes of beating Robinson, an optometrist who has represented the district since 2010. Democrats say they’re enthusiastic about his chances this year. As in Hugo’s case, Republicans note that if Barnett couldn’t off Robinson during a historic, anti-Trump wave, it’s unlikely he’ll be able to do it this year, when turnout is muted with no statewide candidates anchoring the top of the ticket.”

VA House District 27

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #27

Roxann Robinson

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 27 since 2010
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 27

For more information, see Roxann Robinson’s post.

Roxann RobinsonDr. Roxann Robinson is a highly respected optometrist and small business owner. For 30 years she owned and operated her optometric practice here in Chesterfield County. During that time she grew the practice from two employees to nine. A firm believer in helping others, Roxann is actively involved in many programs that improve our community’s quality of life. She has served as the Clinical Director of Opening Eyes, a program that provides vision exams to Special Olympic athletes. As a part of the Chesterfield business community, Dr. Robinson works with locals schools to insure that underprivileged children have the proper eyesight in order to see and learn. Roxann has served on the Board of Directors at the Manchester Family YMCA and is a member of her local Rotary club. Roxann and Michael Lind, her husband, have called Chesterfield home for 34 years.

Honors

  • Owner of successful small business for over 30 years
  • Past President: Virginia Optometric Association
  • Past President: Virginia Academy of Optometry
  • Clinical Director of Opening Eyes, a program that provides vision exams to Special Olympics participants
  • Virginia Optometrist of the Year (2000)
  • Appointed by Governor Gilmore to the Virginia Board of Optometry
  • Has testified in front of the General Assembly regarding Optometric issues

“For 34 years I have been a self-employed optometrist. Chesterfield has been home since 1983. I have seen our community flourish during those years and have enjoyed the exceptional quality of life we experience in Chesterfield County. I understand the challenges facing our community and I will work diligently to preserve our quality of life. As a small healthcare business owner, I am well aware of how government red tape, regulations, and taxes are obstacles to business creation and expansion. I believe that creating new jobs, re-invigorating our workforce and giving the next generation the tools they need to be economically independent must be the top priority for the General Assembly. As your Delegate for the past seven years, I support ethics reforms and believe that we need transparency at every level of our government. We’ve made motions in the right direction, but I believe in continuing these reforms to protect your voice and ensure that the people’s work is done.

Larry Barnett

Current Position: Mental Health Support Services
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 27

For more information, see Larry Barnett’s post.

Larry Barnett 1Larry has a commitment to Chesterfield County that runs deep and has served our residents for three decades. As a leader with Chesterfield County Mental Health Support Services, he developed and implemented innovative, caring, and effective programs for those affected by mental illness. He developed a reputation as a skilled collaborator and problem-solver who got things done. He was a key player in various projects that improved access to mental health and substance abuse services. These projects involved partnerships with schools, hospitals, advocacy groups, and law enforcement and other first responders.

With a proven record of improving the lives of some of our most vulnerable residents, Larry decided to continue his public service to Chesterfield by running for the Virginia House of Delegates in the 27th District. In 2017, he ran a spirited, grassroots campaign and finished surprisingly close as a first-time candidate, shocking many by coming within 128 votes of winning.

Larry’s hard work and intelligence, coupled with his open, collaborative, and caring spirit, showed voters that he was someone who would effectively represent them in the General Assembly. In 2019, he is bringing his talent and enthusiasm to bear as he runs again to represent the citizens of Chesterfield County.

Larry’s Coast Guard family provided him with a strong example of service. His family, like many in the military, moved around the US before planting roots in Virginia. He received his undergraduate degree from Virginia Commonwealth University before earning a master’s degree in Rehabilitative Counseling from VCU. He is a licensed professional counselor.

Larry and his wife Pat live in Midlothian. Their daughter Eileen attended Chesterfield public schools and now lives in Charlottesville.

Issues

Civil Rights

Roxann Robinson

Delegate Robinson promotes women’s issues and interests by supporting opportunities to which women can avail themselves. She created a resolution that made May Women’s Maternal Mental Health Month to help raise awareness for the psychological effects pregnancy, labor, and early childhood can have on a mother. Additionally, she supports reforms to protect young women on college campuses to ensure that places of learning aren’t hindered by concerns of sexual assault. She believes in balancing the rights of the victims and ensuring public safety at the institution

Larry Barnett

Equality

Throughout my career, I have worked with individuals from all walks of life, while listening to the issues that are important to our community. These experiences have strengthened my belief in equal treatment for all people, regardless of age, gender, race, sexual orientation, gender identity, income level, or religious belief. Everyone in Virginia should have the opportunity to live, work, and fully participate in society without the fear of discrimination. I am a staunch supporter of the ERA and want to see the gender wage gap closed. My pledge to fight for equality for everyone has earned me the endorsements of the Virginia Chapter of the National Organization of Women and the LGBT Democrats of Virginia.

Economy

Roxann Robinson

Delegate Robinson believes that tax increases contribute to further hardship for taxpayers and should not be used as a one-step, fast solution. As your Delegate, she will work to limit government spending to reduce taxes on Virginia families and small businesses. She prioritizes a balanced budget and believes that it is more important to use funds appropriately rather than raising taxes.

Economic Opportunity

Having been a small business owner for thirty years, Delegate Robinson has a unique understanding of the day-to-day challenges faced by small business owners. Because of this, she does not support legislation that stifles hard-working business owners and instead promotes legislation that helps to expand small business. She knows that these family-owned businesses are the backbone to the economy in our community in Chesterfield.

Larry Barnett

Economic Development

I believe in the dignity of work and building an economy where all people have an equal opportunity to succeed. Virginia has low unemployment and is one of the best states in which to do business in the nation. Let’s keep it that way by making sure we have affordable housing, good job opportunities, and a healthy workforce. Local businesses are vital and contribute a great deal to our community. A well-trained and educated workforce will ensure that established businesses and new, innovative ventures will continue to expand and thrive, sustaining our local economy.

Education

Roxann Robinson

Education Reform

As a member of the Education Committee, Delegate Robinson is committed to ensuring that Chesterfield County’s public schools remains among the best in the Commonwealth. She believes that local school boards, not bureaucrats in Richmond, should be making decisions about their local schools. During the last two years, she has introduced legislation to repeal the Labor Day School Start Date law, commonly known as the Kings Dominion Law. The legislation, if passed, would allow local school districts the ability to choose when students go back to class. This past year she was appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe to serve on the SOL Innovation Committee which reviews and makes recommendations to the General Assembly on ways to improve Virginia’s SOLs. With her support, the General Assembly voted to reduce the number of SOL tests from 28 to 17.

Larry Barnett

I am a steadfast supporter of public schools and believe investing in our children is the best way to prepare for a better future. This starts with universal early childhood education. Most families want excellent public schools and hope their children have an equal opportunity to obtain a first-rate education. To recruit and retain top-notch teachers who can provide this education, we need to pay them well – at least at the national average. To maintain high quality schools, we need to lower student/teacher ratios and empower teachers to have greater classroom autonomy, while reducing the focus on standardized testing. A strong, vibrant public education system attracts families to Chesterfield, ensuring the future viability of our community, and helps to power our local economy with well-educated young people. My firm support for public education has earned me an endorsement from the Virginia Education Association.

Better Government

Roxann Robinson

Ethics Reform

Delegate Robinson supports honest and transparent government at every level. She voted for a $100 annual limit on all gifts to lawmakers, and the creation of a bipartisan body to advise lawmakers on ethical issues. Though these are steps in the right direction, she intends to support future efforts to increase government transparency accountability.

Democracy

Larry Barnett

Gerrymandering

Currently, elected representatives can choose their voters rather than voters choosing their representatives. I am a supporter of OneVirginia2021, a group that is working to create fair political boundaries in Virginia. I support an independent commission as the best alternative for providing voters with districts that are compact, contiguous, and fairly drawn.

Campaign Finance

I believe campaign finance regulations in Virginia need to be significantly improved. Our democratic process will be better served if candidates and representatives are prohibited from accepting campaign funds from corporate PACs. In addition, we can protect against undue influence on campaigns by capping individual donations at $10,000. Most importantly, I believe candidates and representatives should never be allowed to use campaign funds for personal use.

Environment

Larry Barnett

I have been endorsed by the Sierra Club for my position on safeguarding our clean air and water and protecting the environment for future generations. I will work tirelessly to protect and preserve Virginia’s valuable natural resources. I fully support the development of innovative, sustainable, and renewable energy and technology sources, such as solar and wind, that will enable Virginia to move toward a better future. I have pledged to not accept funds from Dominion or Appalachian Power to avoid the appearance of undue influence and focus on serving the people I represent.

Safety

Larry Barnett

Gun Violence Prevention

As a healthcare professional, I see gun violence as an epidemic and one of our top public health crises. I support common sense efforts to effectively reduce gun violence. This includes universal background checks whenever firearms are purchased and emergency protective orders that enable family members to temporarily remove firearms from loved ones during a crisis. I have been endorsed by Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Public Safety

I believe people want to live in a safe community with well-trained police officers who respond with compassion and respect when there is an emergency. As the Chesterfield County Crisis Intervention Training Coordinator for many years, I helped plan, develop, and implement a cross-departmental initiative that equipped police officers, sheriffs, fire-fighters, 911 dispatch officers, and other emergency personnel with the skills to safely de-escalate and defuse situations when people are in crisis. My work has made me an even stronger proponent of our local law enforcement.

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VA House District 31 - 2019VA House District 31 – 2019

District Description: Counties of Fauquier (part) and Prince William (part)
Current Delegate: Liz Guzman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Another district where a Democratic newcomer toppled a long serving Republican last time around, in this case Scott Lingamfelter. Democrats sound confident Guzman, a social worker who won with 54 percent of the vote, has it locked down. Republicans, meanwhile, are jazzed about Jordan, a congressional staffer and one of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year.”

Summary

District Description: Counties of Fauquier (part) and Prince William (part)
Current Delegate: Liz Guzman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Another district where a Democratic newcomer toppled a long serving Republican last time around, in this case Scott Lingamfelter. Democrats sound confident Guzman, a social worker who won with 54 percent of the vote, has it locked down. Republicans, meanwhile, are jazzed about Jordan, a congressional staffer and one of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year.”

VA House District 31

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #31

Liz Guzman

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 31 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 31

For more information, see Liz Guzman’s post.

Liz Guzman 1Elizabeth Guzman is a public administrator and a social worker who resides in Dale City. Elizabeth and her husband Carlos have four children and live in Ridgefield Estates. In between ballet and tap lessons, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts activities, judo practices, and swimming lessons at the Dale City Recreation Center, Elizabeth works tirelessly as a Court Appointed Service Advocate for CASA CIS to prevent child abuse, a PTO representative for Penn Elementary School, and as a “Cookie Mom” for her youngest daughter’s Girl Scout troop. The Guzman family are active and long-time members of Harvest Life Changers Church in Woodbridge. The Guzmans also attend Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

Elizabeth came to the United States from Peru as a single mom, looking for a better future for her oldest daughter. Sheremembers those early years; working three jobs in order to afford a one-bedroom apartment for her and her daughter. Despite graduating with honors from high school in Peru, Elizabeth’s parents could not afford to send her to college. With her love of learning Elizabeth persevered, and enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College, obtaining her degree in Office Administration and Management. Elizabeth also holds a Bachelor’s in Public Safety from Capella University, a Master’s in Public Administration from American University, and a Master’s in Social Work from the University of Southern California.

Elizabeth is a long time resident of Prince William County, living in the community for more than 15-years – in spite of elected officials like Chairman Corey Stewart, who worked to divide the community and threaten the Hispanic community, which Elizabeth is a proud member of. She fell in love with Prince William County because of all of the opportunity the area offered to her as a community leader and homeowner, and her desire to raise her children in a diverse, engaging environment.

Elizabeth was elected in 2017 to become the first Hispanic female immigrant to join the 400 year old Virginia General Assembly. She now proudly represents Virginia’s 31st House District that covers Fauquier and Prince William County.

Elizabeth has been working in the public sector for 10 years, and currently works as the Division Chief for Administrative Services for the Center for Adult Services for the City of Alexandria. Her personal and professional experience have given her strong insight into the needs of the 31st House of Delegates district, and Elizabeth cares about the many challenges residents in Prince William County and Fauquier County face. Elizabeth will fight as a strong advocate for the needs of the 31st District, whether that’s legislating for change in Richmond, or attending a community meeting in Catlett.

D.J. Jordan

Current Position: Public Relations
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 31

For more information, see D.J. Jordan’s post.

Darrell Jordan 1Darrell H. “D.J.” Jordan Jr. hasn’t always been a fan of politics, but he likes public policy and he loves people.

D.J. is running for the Virginia House of Delegates to make sure our state government ensures our basic freedoms and equal opportunity to succeed…. not to obtain power, disparage political opponents, or benefit his own career. If you look at his background, you’ll see that he has tried to help create more opportunity for children and families in his community.

D.J. was born and raised in the Tidewater, Virginia area by parents who escaped poverty through family commitment, education, entrepreneurship, and hard work. D.J. earned a Bachelors of Science in Communications from Liberty University, and played on the football team as a student-athlete. He also earned a Masters in Public Management from The Johns Hopkins University. He worked in the United States Congress for ten years in several offices, including the House Committee on Small Business.

Prior to coming to Capitol Hill in 2008, he worked in broadcast journalism at CNN and also Fox News. D.J. now works for a public relations firm in Alexandria, Virginia. In 2017, D.J. completed a four-year term on the Virginia State Board of Social Services, which oversees the foster care system and welfare programs in Virginia. During the last year of his term, D.J. was unanimously voted to serve as its Chairman. D.J. currently serves his community with the Prince William County Fatherhood Initiative, and is an Alternate Commissioner on the Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation Commission (PRTC), a transit agency that runs the OmniRide bus system. Over the last several years, D.J. has been an assistant coach with the American Pride Youth Football League (APYFL), and he has been a TV broadcast commentator for college football games. He is also a member of the 20/20 Bipartisan Justice Center, a national justice reform organization, and serves on the Board of Directors of Virginia’s Kids Belong, a nonprofit that helps foster children. D.J. and his wife, Glorya, have four children, and have fostered and also adopted from foster care. They live in the Winding Creek neighborhood in Woodbridge, and are members of Move Church in Lake Ridge.

Issues

Civil Rights

D.J. Jordan

D.J. believes that all human life has dignity and worth, no matter the age, size, race, or socioeconomic status. D.J. is committed to a state government and community that encourages charities and nonprofits to assist people in need of assistance at every stage of life, from the elderly to those facing unplanned pregnancies. A society that does not protect its most vulnerable members is a society that believes that some lives matter more than others; in Virginia, we must avoid this type of culture.

Economy

Liz Guzman

Elizabeth believes that no hard-working Virginian should struggle with putting food on the table for their families due to low wages or a lack of economic opportunity. Elizabeth is a strong believer in raising the minimum wage, so that families in the 31st district and across the Commonwealth aren’t working 50-60 hour weeks and still having to choose between paying their bills and feeding their families. For Elizabeth establishing a living wage and promoting economic development is a family issue, because if individuals are making higher wages this will allow them the opportunity to spend more time with their families.

Elizabeth will work to promote economic development opportunities in Prince William and Fauquier County, so that more residents will be able to work rewarding, high-paying jobs closer to home.Each day Elizabeth commutes more than 45 miles to work, due to the lack of high-paying jobs in Prince William and Fauquier that are competitive with the wages and opportunities of surrounding localities

D.J. Jordan

While growing up, D.J.’s father was a information technology engineer, small business owner, and entrepreneur. For him, small business wasn’t just a concept, it was something that put food on the table for the family. D.J. believes that our state government must create policies that make Virginia one of the best states to start, grow, and innovate through small business. As America experiences economic disruption due to technology in the digital age, D.J. will fight to make sure Virginia is not only prepared for the future of work, but leading the way in agri-business, entrepreneurship, innovation, vocational trades, and job creation.

Taxes

Virginians are taxed at nearly every stage of life, from birth until death. D.J. believes that our state government should adequately fund basic core functions, especially public safety and transportation, but should keep taxes as low as possible to allow families to keep more of their hard-earned money and build wealth that lasts generations. D.J. will advocate for a tax code that is simple and consistent, and not full of special tax breaks and preferences for favored corporations and special interest organizations.

Education

Liz Guzman

As a mother of four, two of which face mental health challenges, Elizabeth knows the struggle parents face when ensuring that their children are getting a quality education – particularly for those what need additional mental health or disability services. As Delegate for the 31st District, Elizabeth has fought to expand funding and opportunities for early childhood education to ensure that all children in Virginia have adequate access.

Elizabeth is also committed to working to restore funding for public schools, and to find funding and innovative solutions to deal with the challenge of growing class sizes, high teacher turnover rates, and teacher pay. In Richmond she will continue to advocate for a better student to counselor ratio in our schools, and is dedicated to closing the education gap that is present in diverse communities across the state.

D.J. Jordan

D.J. believes education is one of the most important factors that leads to upward mobility and opportunity for families across Virginia. There are no Republican schools, or Democrats schools; there are only schools. To help the next generation compete on a global stage, every child in Virginia deserves to have access to a high-quality public school, no matter their family income or zip code. Virginia must ensure that taxpayer money is spent on the classroom and paying our hardworking teachers, and less on bureaucracy. State government must also realize that our children and families are diverse and may have uniquely different educational needs, and therefore deserve to have access to diverse ways of learning that work best for them, including homeschooling and other options.

Environment

Liz Guzman

Elizabeth understands that climate change is real and we need to act now. She wants to ensure that the Virginia we enjoy today will be available for her children and the next generation 20 years from now. One of Elizabeth’s top priorities is protecting Virginia’s many beautiful landmarks, natural spaces, and farmland areas. Elizabeth’s grandparents were farmers, which gives her strong insight on the growing importance of protecting area farmland. She will continue to ensure that it will be there for generations to come by promoting agribusiness and agricultural opportunities in the 31st district, and supporting small family farms.

D.J. Jordan

D.J. is an environmental conservationist who believes in responsible environmental stewardship. The answer to our generational climate challenges is effective stewardship and strategic planning based on science, facts, and sound research, not extreme partisanship. D.J. supports a balanced approach to environmental stewardship that incentivizes innovation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. D.J. also supports efforts to clean-up the Chesapeake Bay, especially programs that reduce phosphorous, nitrogen and sediment pollution in our stormwater and waterways. He also supports the preservation of Prince William County’s Rural Crescent and open rural space; the over-development of forests and farmland in the region robs the Chesapeake watershed of its natural ability to filter pollutants before they reach our streams, rivers, and the Bay.

Health Care

Liz Guzman

Delegate Guzman was one of the very first champions for Medicaid Expansion in Virginia when she started to run, and true to her word she provided results her first legislative session. Elizabeth believes that healthcare is a human right and that we must do better to take care of our neighbours. She believes that workers deserve time off to go see the doctor or visit loved ones when they are ill without using vacation time to do as much. Now that we have expanded healthcare access across Virginia it is time that people are able to use it for preventative care before their situations get worse.

D.J. Jordan

The cost of healthcare delivery and complexity of payment is a major problem for many Virginians. But rather than pursue government-run healthcare, Virginia should work to address the root issue: the massive growth of healthcare costs. To make healthcare more affordable, D.J. supports a number of reforms that improve physician and facility connectivity, streamlines care delivery, incentivizes wellness and prevention, and reforms drug pricing regulations.  D.J. also believes that Virginia should be at the forefront of breakthrough research and innovation to find cures for disease and illness.

Infrastructure

D.J. Jordan

If elected, D.J’s top policy focus will be reducing traffic congestion for Prince William and Fauquier County residents. D.J. has commuted to work inside-the-beltway nearly his entire adult life (since 2002 to be specific). He has experienced first-hand the stress of traffic congestion, and the unnecessary amount of time away from family. D.J. believes government should be limited in its core functions, but what it performs, it must be done well. Transportation is one of those core functions of government that must improve in Virginia. D.J. believes we should be forward-thinking and comprehensive in how we address our traffic congestion. We must move beyond partisan finger-pointing and work together on solutions that involve enhanced bus transit, rail, road construction, more tele-working options, and even the relocation of federal offices.

Safety

Liz Guzman

Elizabeth respects the 2nd Amendment and would never do anything to impact the lives of law-abiding gun owners, but we need reasonable gun safety reforms. Violent criminals and domestic abusers should not have the means to do greater harm again. She believes that it is time for comprehensive background checks not only at gun shows but also for all private sales. She is in support of the Safe Virginia Initiative that aims to help keep our schools safe by examining the root cause of gun violence.

D.J. Jordan

Foster Care and Human Trafficking

Virginia ranks high in the nation for supporting biological families with children who are at risk of being placed in foster care. However, Virginia ranks very poorly for foster youth who age out of foster care without a permanent family situation. Children in foster care are among the worst for falling prey to human trafficking – nearly 60 percent of child sex trafficking victims have a history in the child welfare system. As a foster and adoptive parent, D.J. has a great passion for child protective services and improving the lives of children in foster care. For four years, D.J. served on the State Board of Social Services, which oversees the Virginia foster care system. He believes that Virginia should ensure that law enforcement, public schools, social services, charities, and the business community must work together to serve foster kids, and also prevent vulnerable children from being trafficked.

Veterans

Liz Guzman

The 31st District is home to many veterans and their families. Elizabeth wants to ensure that we take care of them by ensuring they have access to all the services that Virginia offers. According to the National Coalition of Homeless Veterans, one million veterans currently face homelessness due to shortage of affordable housing in Northern Virginia and lack of support to transfer the skills they learned during their service. When veterans are not able to transfer their skills they are pushed into low-paying jobs that do not provide them with enough support for their families

D.J. Jordan

Virginia is one of the states with the highest per capita veteran populations in America, and the 31st District is home to one of the largest veteran populations in the state. Although D.J. never served in the military, he grew up in Tidewater, Virginia with a family of more than a dozen individuals who served in uniform, mostly in the Navy. D.J. is grateful and proud of our military, and is committed to honoring the promises this nation has made to our veterans and their families, such as health benefits and educational opportunities. D.J. is committed to ensuring that Virginia is one of the best states for taking care of those who have worn the uniform and their families, throughout their life.

Immigration

Liz Guzman

As an immigrant to this country Elizabeth wants to ensure that diversity is something that is never disrespected in our Commonwealth. She knows the struggles of adjusting to a new place and will fight for a more inclusive Virginia where all communities are welcome. Elizabeth believes that immigrants make america great and that we must do everything we can to protect our Dreamers.

Providing licenses to all those eligible to drive in the 31st District would open up driver’s ability to get insurance on their vehicles and require individuals to take driver’s tests and properly register with the state’s motor vehicle agency. Making licenses available to all residents would bring much-needed revenue back into Virginia– revenue we are losing to Washington DC and Maryland, where they do allow for undocumented residents to get a license.

By allowing undocumented residents to get a license, we strengthen families– with the permission to drive safely and legally to work, school, and elsewhere, undocumented families can participate more fully in society without the constant fear of being. Unlicensed, uninsured drivers cause damage claims that cost other policyholders. More licensed and insured drivers will reduce the number of accidents and lower insurance rates for all.

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VA House District 50 - 2019VA House District 50 – 2019

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas
Current Delegate: Lee Carter since 2017 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Carter, the state’s only elected Democratic Socialist, flipped the reliably red district in 2017, winning with a 10 point margin. Republicans say they don’t think he’ll do as well now that his views – which can be polarizing even among Democrats – are better known. Democrats aren’t so concerned, saying they think Carter’s bigger challenge was winning the primary earlier this year.”

Summary

District Description: County of Prince William (part); City of Manassas
Current Delegate: Lee Carter since 2017 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

” Carter, the state’s only elected Democratic Socialist, flipped the reliably red district in 2017, winning with a 10 point margin. Republicans say they don’t think he’ll do as well now that his views – which can be polarizing even among Democrats – are better known. Democrats aren’t so concerned, saying they think Carter’s bigger challenge was winning the primary earlier this year.”

VA House District 50

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #50

Lee Carter

Current Position: US Senator for VA House District 50 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 50

For more information, see Lee Carter’s post.

Lee joined the Marine Corps during the beginning of the ‘Global War on Terror’, and worked in technological repair in a Special Operations-capable support unit, completing tours in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. His unit was also one of the first to respond to Haiti, following the devastating earthquake in 2010.

Throughout Lee’s career and civic engagement his focus has been on helping others — whether that was in his service in the Marine Corps, helping provide cancer patients with consistent care by maintaining biomedical radiation therapy equipment, or assisting small local businesses with IT support.

Ian Lovejoy

Current Position: Owner of RHS, Reliant Hiring Solutions
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 50

For more information, see Ian Lovejoy’s post.

Ian Lovejoy 1Ian was raised in a working-class family in rural Appalachia. One of the first members of his family to go to college, Ian focused on academics and was Concord University’s first Rhodes Scholar nominee.  Ian went on to attend graduate school at Virginia Tech (#GOHOKIES). After college, Ian held many positions in organization leadership, including managing a national medical supply company and a local home care agency- one of our region’s largest employers. Ian knows that a quality education- be it through college, apprenticeships, trade schools or high school CTE- is pivotal to ensuring our future. 

Ian’s mother, a small business owner, instilled in her son an entrepreneurial spirit, leading Ian to establish Reliant Hiring Solutions (RHS), a specialized recruitment firm. Headquartered in Manassas, RHS has grown to be a national leader in professionally managed job fairs, helping thousands of job seekers find employment throughout our region and the nation. Ian knows the important role a quality job plays for our community and families and is committed to supporting employment in our area. 

In 2012, Ian became one of the youngest people ever elected to the Manassas City Council, a position to which he was re-elected in 2016. Ian has served in many roles on city council, including Chairman of the Economic Development and Land Use Committee, leading during a pivotal time of job creation and economic expansion in the City surrounding area. Ever an advocate for the tax payer, Ian has championed spending restraint and an “innovation before taxation” approach to governance.

As delegate, Ian will continue his commitment to serving as a voice for the entire community, work to support businesses large and small and fight to preserve the quality of life our families enjoy.

Issues

Education

Lee Carter

Lee supports raising teacher pay, and in 2019 he introduced HB 1764 which would allow teachers to stand up and demand better working conditions without fear of reprisal. Lee supports massive investment in school capital improvements, the elimination of as many SOLs as possible, and he opposes all attempts to privatize education (e.g. charter schools).

Ian Lovejoy

Ensure a World Class Education

As your Delegate, improving our education will be a top priority of mine. On City council, I have worked with teachers, parents, and stakeholders to improve our schools in Manassas and will continue to do so as your Delegate.

If elected to serve you:

  • I will work to put more tax dollars in the classroom so that our children can receive the best education possible. By retaining great teachers and hiring additional teachers while lowering class sizes, we can work together in achieving better outcomes for our kids.
  • I’ll work to pass legislation that expands education options for our kids, puts more money in the classroom, and gives our local school systems the flexibility they need to educate our kids best.
  • I support a tuition freeze on colleges and universities while we work to bring down the overall cost of higher education, because Virginians should have the opportunity to pursue a degree regardless of their socioeconomic status.
  • I will fight for policy that demands “Truth in Advertising” within higher education, so that prospective students are fully informed of the cost to pursue their degree and the average income level to expect once entering a specific field with their degree.

I will put our kids first in Richmond. Not every school is the same, neither are their specific needs, but that won’t stop me from working to ensure the best school for your child is the one closest to home.

Health Care

Lee Carter

Lee’s vote to expand Medicaid was one of the proudest moments of his life, and people are signing up faster than expected for the program. But there are still over half a million Virginians with no health insurance whatsoever, and over a million more who have insurance but can’t afford to use it. Lee won’t stop fighting until we achieve universal coverage in Virginia.

Ian Lovejoy

Make Healthcare Accessible and Affordable

One of the most important issues impacting our quality of life is the growing cost of healthcare. With a growing population, our region is less able to meet the rising expectations for healthcare. Our reliance on the Federal Government, to provide the access and quality healthcare we expect, must be measured going forward.

If elected to serve you:

  • I will work with both parties in developing a compact with other states that allows regional insurance     companies to sell across state lines, adding options to the marketplace and lowering costs.
  • I will support legislation that promotes “truth in advertising” so that consumers know how much they will be
  • charged before they get the bill, and forcing different healthcare systems to compete with each other, lowering prices for all.
  • I will fight to expand micro-hospitals in Prince William County in order to save time for those who currently must travel longer distances than necessary for medical treatment.
  • I will work with local stakeholders to ensure the proposed medical school at George Mason is built, ensuring expanded access to quality care in our area.

Our elected leaders can and should do more than stand by waiting for Washington DC to get its healthcare policies right. We must work together in finding ways to improve healthcare while lowering its financial burden. As your Delegate, I will do just that in the General Assembly.

Infrastructure

Lee Carter

Lee believes we need to build a world-class mass transit system capable of providing for Northern Virginia’s ever-growing population and reducing commuting times. Lee supports increased funding for public transportation and has consistently opposed new tolls. He supports upgrading existing intersections to alleviate bottlenecks and safety issues and will push for night and weekend service for the VRE.

Ian Lovejoy

Take Action on Traffic

Traffic congestion is a growing crisis in our area and the expensive tolls are more than a headache for commuters, they are a huge burden. Every second we spend in traffic is a second spent away from our families and detracts from or quality of life, while costly tolls is an expense that disproportionately effects hardworking Virginians.

Our legislature continues to kick the can down the road. Whether it’s funding the widening of I-28 and Prince William County Parkway or building new infrastructure, our elected leaders can’t seem to work together. Manassas and Prince William County Commuters cannot afford to wait any longer.

If elected to serve you:

  • I will work to bring legislators together to identify ways we can work to solve our traffic issues by reforming the state funding formula to fix our roads, not wasteful projects that don’t ease congestion.
  • A priority on traffic and transportation requires a budget that reflects this commitment and I will make it a priority of mine on day one to ease traffic congestion on rt. 28.
  • I will Fight for more local autonomy over transportation dollars, which will allow us to make Rollins Ford Road and other local corridor’s safer and more prepared to handle increasing traffic.
  • I will continue to oppose putting tolls on the prince William parkway and will fight to lower-or even eliminate- costly tolls on I-66 that should have never been put there in the first place.

I’m not going to Richmond with an agenda and I don’t plan to play politics; I’m dedicated to finding real solutions to our traffic problems and I am ready to take on the challenge for your family.

Civil Rights

Lee Carter

Defending and Demanding Women’s Rights

Lee knows that reproductive rights are human rights. He is an unapologetic supporter of a woman’s right to choose and will never support legislation that limits women’s access to healthcare. He will also continue the fight for pay equity, workplace rights, and increased protection from domestic violence and sexual assault.In 2019, Lee co-sponsored HJ 579 to ratify the ERA, and he won’t stop fighting until women have constitutionally protected equality.

LGBTQ Equality

Lee supports immediately passing legislation to prohibit discrimination in employment, public accommodation, public contracting, apprenticeship programs, housing, banking, and insurance on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. He also supports repeal of the constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, and he’ll work to remove provisions in the Code of Virginia that prohibit same-sex marriage.

Democracy

Lee Carter

Voting Rights

Voting is foundational to democracy, and Lee supports efforts to make it easier for people to vote. Lee supports repealing Virginia’s voter ID law and instituting no excuse early voting and same-day voter registration. He also supports ranked-choice voting.

Economy

Lee Carter

EconomicsLimiting Corporate Influence in Virginia Politics

Lee refuses to accept campaign contributions from all for-profit entities, including all corporate donors. He supports banning corporate contributions and establishing a system of publicly financed elections.

Consumer Protection

Lee believes elected officials should protect consumers from predatory behavior. In Virginia, loan sharks have been able to prey on vulnerable people in their times of need, and that’s why Lee was a co-patron on HB 47, the Payday Lending Prohibition Act. Lee also introduced HB 1755 to establish net neutrality in Virginia.

Environment

Lee Carter

Lee refuses contributions from the fossil-fuel industry and opposes the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, the Mountain Valley Pipeline, and fracking. In 2019, he co-sponsored HB 1635 to stop new fossil-fuel infrastructure construction. Lee supports massive investments in green energy and believes consumers should be able to purchase or produce their own renewable energy.

Affordable Housing

Lee Carter

We have a crisis of housing affordability – housing costs are the single largest squeeze on residents of Manassas and Prince William County. Lee supports a wide variety of policies to lower the cost of housing, including cooperative ownership and a public option for housing.

Criminal Justice Reform

Lee Carter

Lee believes we need to stop criminalizing poverty, end cash bail, abolish private prisons, and end the application of the death penalty. In 2019, Lee introduced HB 2373 to legalize cannabis in Virginia. He also introduced HB 1761prohibiting government purchase of goods and services produced by prison labor.

Better Government

Ian Lovejoy

Demand Reasonable Taxation

The tax burden facing North Virginia residents has only increased, making it difficult for small businesses to thrive and forcing families on fixed incomes out of the communities they’ve lived for generations.

We can do better. Government, when managed correctly, can run efficiently and protect core services without making our area too expensive for fixed-income and middle class families.

If elected to serve you:

  • I will work to cut taxes on Virginians and eliminate wasteful and unnecessary government spending.
  • I will lead our legislature in identifying ways to utilize technology to streamline services, consolidate    unnecessary paper-work and maintain transparency among state agencies in order to save taxpayer dollars.
  • I will bring policy to the governor’s desk that gives more autonomy for municipal government to use tax dollars at their discretion, giving communities more control over their own destiny.
  • I will strive to identify innovative funding solutions to future projects in order to rely less on you and your family’s income to meet our state’s needs or wants.

 

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VA House District 51 - 2019VA House District 51 – 2019

District Description:  County of Prince William (part)
Current Delegate Hala Ayala since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Huge turnout in 2017 handed this district to Democrats by a healthy 14 point margin, with Ayala, a computer security specialist, toppling Anderson, a former Air Force officer who had represented the area in the General Assembly since 2010. Republicans say they’re going to lean on Anderson’s name recognition as a longtime officeholder, but Democrats say they think that might be to his detriment, noting mail he sent out during the last campaign criticized as racist.”

Summary

District Description:  County of Prince William (part)
Current Delegate Hala Ayala since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Huge turnout in 2017 handed this district to Democrats by a healthy 14 point margin, with Ayala, a computer security specialist, toppling Anderson, a former Air Force officer who had represented the area in the General Assembly since 2010. Republicans say they’re going to lean on Anderson’s name recognition as a longtime officeholder, but Democrats say they think that might be to his detriment, noting mail he sent out during the last campaign criticized as racist.”

VA House District 51

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #51

Hala Ayala

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 51 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 51

For more information, see Hala Ayala’s post.

Hala AyalaAs a member of Prince William County community for over 35 years and elected as Delegate in 2017, Hala Ayala gives a new, needed voice for the 51st House District of Virginia.

AN ADVOCATE FOR WORKING FAMILIES

Hala has personally experienced the challenges of single motherhood and lack of access to affordable health insurance. She understands the concerns of working families today. She has fought for raising the minimum wage, equal pay and affordable access to health care as the founder and former president of the Prince William County chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW).

A DEDICATED PUBLIC SERVANT
Hala worked her way up from a service job without health insurance to become a cybersecurity specialist with the Department of Homeland Security. For over 17 years, she worked to protect our nation’s information systems, enforce security measures, and prevent attacks by safeguarding computers, networks and data from criminal intrusion and security breaches.  She’s ready to use that same determination and work ethic to ensure that Prince William County families can flourish.

A CHAMPION FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN VIRGINIA
Hala helped organize Virginia for the Women’s March on Washington in January. She helped organize buses to transport people to DC and raised money to help with the expenses for those who would not otherwise be able to participate. As former president of the Prince William County chapter of NOW, she fought for equal pay for equal work so that women get paid equally for the same work. Hala also served on Governor Terry McAuliffe’s Council on Women.

Only 17 of Virginia’s 100 state delegates are women. Hala believes that the number should be higher to make sure that all voices are heard, in order to create a better future for all Virginians.

Richard Anderson

Current Position: Retired Air Force
Former: State Delegate for VA House District 51 from 2010 – 2018
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 51

For more information, see Richard Anderson’s post.

Richard Anderson 1“I’m a born-and-bred Virginian, and I’ll be a Virginian for the rest of my days. I’m a husband, father, grandfather, and your neighbor, and my #1 priority is looking out for you and your family. After 30 years as an Air Force officer and eight years in the Virginia House of Delegates, I’m totally committed to making life better for working families in Prince William County and across Virginia.”

Rich Anderson is a native Virginian who retired from the Pentagon in 2009 as a highly-decorated 30-year Air Force colonel. That same year, he was elected to represent the 51st House District in the Virginia General Assembly for eight years (2010-2018). While there, he chaired the House Science and Technology Committee and the General Assembly Military and Veterans Caucus. He also sat as a member of the House Appropriations Committee, House Finance Committee, House General Laws Committee, and House Transportation Committee. Over the course of his legislative service, his fingerprints were on almost all groundbreaking legislation for military veterans and Virginia’s science and technology community. Rich is a graduate of Virginia Tech and is married to Occoquan District Supervisor (Prince William County) Ruth Anderson, also a retired Air Force officer. They are the parents of three children, have seven grandchildren, and have lived in Woodbridge for nearly 20 years

Issues

Civil Rights

Hala Ayala

  • Fight for women’s health care to make sure access to birth control is available.
  • Protect Planned Parenthood and defending a woman’s ability to make her own health decisions.
  • Champion policies that help working families like paid family leave, paid sick leave and increasing the minimum wage.
  • Stand up for equal pay for equal work, so women who work the same job as men can earn the same living.

Education

Hala Ayala

  • Expanding Pre-K
  • Reducing overcrowding in classrooms and in schools
  • Investing more in school infrastructure and construction
  • Retaining and recruiting the best teachers
  • Helping our schools be safe places, free from discrimination and bullying
  • Working to keep the costs of Virginia’s great colleges and universities affordable
  • Making sure our local community colleges and vocational programs have the resources to educate Virginia’s young people

Richard Anderson

Rich believes competitive compensation packages will attract and retain quality educators. He helped raise teacher pay, put more dollars in the classroom, and restored control of schools to parents, teachers, and local leaders. Rich is committed to making sure every student in Virginia has an education that prepares them for success in college, in their careers, and in life.

Economy

Richard Anderson

Taxes

As a member of the House Appropriations Committee, Rich helped write eight balanced budgets, opposed tax increases, and focused on responsible spending. He also worked across the aisle with his colleagues to add billions of dollars to the Virginia rainy day fund. Making sure your taxes stay as low as possible was and always will be one of his top priorities.

Jobs for Small Business

While serving as your Delegate, Rich voted to help small businesses and job creators with tax credits, easier online paperwork for new businesses, and protections for home-based businesses. He worked hard to keep taxes low, help small businesses grow, and keep Virginia among the best places in the nation to do business. For eight years, he received top scores of 100% from the Chamber of Commerce. The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) rated him as A+ on behalf of 6,000+ Virginia small businesses. When elected, he will continue this pathway of progress for Virginia businesses and working families.

Infrastructure

Hala Ayala

  • Investing in the Virginia Railway Express (VRE) and Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation Commission (PRTC) so commuters will have viable alternative transportation options.
  • Supporting legislation to study the prospect of extending Metro lines into Prince William County.
  • Incentivizing carpooling and public transportation usage to become reliable options for those residents who choose not to have a car.

Richard Anderson

Rich sat for eight years on the House Transportation Committee. Rich will continue his fight to get our fair share of state transportation dollars to Northern Virginia, leverage smart transportation technologies to relieve congestion, and give local communities more control of transportation decisions. Rich will work hard to achieve real solutions to the traffic problems we face daily and get you back to your families sooner.

Health Care

Hala Ayala

Not a Choice, But a right

  • Expanding Medicaid in Virginia to more than 400,000 people, including more than 12,000 people in Prince William County
  • Opposing President Trump’s Obamacare repeal and protecting all Virginians’ access to healthcare, including those with preexisting conditions
  • Fighting extremist politicians in Richmond to protect Planned Parenthood funding and access to lifesaving preventive care.

Hala’s son was born with complications that required urgent medical attention. Her job, at the time, offered no health insurance. Thankfully, she qualified for Medicaid and her son was able to get the help he needed. Hala wants affordable access to healthcare for all Virginians.

However, President Trump and Richmond Republicans want to deny accessible healthcare for hundreds of thousands of Virginians. As Delegate, Hala will fight for quality, affordable healthcare by:

  • Expanding Medicaid in Virginia to more than 400,000 people, including more than 12,000 people in Prince William County
  • Opposing President Trump’s Obamacare repeal and protecting all Virginians’ access to healthcare, including those with preexisting conditions
  • Fighting extremist politicians in Richmond to protect Planned Parenthood funding and access to lifesaving preventive care.

Richard Anderson

Veterans

Richard Anderson

Chaired the General Assembly Military and Veterans Caucus

A 30-year Air Force colonel, Rich chaired the General Assembly Military and Veterans Caucus that oversaw all legislative programs for 800,000 Virginia veterans. In partnership with House Speaker Kirk Cox, he patroned the bill that created the Northern Virginia Veterans Care Center, now under construction to provide quality healthcare to military veterans. He also patroned the bill that created the Virginia Values Veterans (V3) program that has put 45,000 veterans to work with competitive salaries and full benefits. Rich will continue to work for Virginia veterans by aggressively fighting for legislation that protects veteran benefits and broadens employment opportunities for men and women who have served our nation.

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VA House 66 – 2019VA House 66 – 2019

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part); City of Colonial Heights
Current Delegate: Kirk Cox since 1990 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Cox, the Republican speaker of the House, saw his district shift under the court-ordered redistricting plan from a seat in which Republicans had a 25.5 point advantage to a seat in which Democrats now hold a 6.5 point advantage (again, as calculated based on 2012 presidential election results). But a win for Democrats is far from a sure thing. Cox is well known from years of representing the area and has access to a massive $788,000 fundraising haul, which in typical years he’d use to boost other Republicans in tight races but is already tapping into to blanket the airwaves with television ads.”

Summary

District Description: County of Chesterfield (part); City of Colonial Heights
Current Delegate: Kirk Cox since 1990 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Cox, the Republican speaker of the House, saw his district shift under the court-ordered redistricting plan from a seat in which Republicans had a 25.5 point advantage to a seat in which Democrats now hold a 6.5 point advantage (again, as calculated based on 2012 presidential election results). But a win for Democrats is far from a sure thing. Cox is well known from years of representing the area and has access to a massive $788,000 fundraising haul, which in typical years he’d use to boost other Republicans in tight races but is already tapping into to blanket the airwaves with television ads.”

VA House District 66

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #66

Kirkland Cox

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 66
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 66

For more information, see Kirkland Cox’s post.

Kirkland CoxKirk Cox was first elected from the 66th District to the House of Delegates in 1989. The 66th House District includes all of Colonial Heights and parts of Chesterfield. Kirk is proud to represent the very district where he grew up and graduated from High School. Following his graduation from Colonial Heights High School, he graduated from James Madison University where he holds a B.S. in both Political Science and General Social Science.

On January 10, 2018, Kirk was unanimously elected as Speaker of the House by the members of the House of Delegates. Upon being sworn in, Kirk became the first Speaker in state history from Colonial Heights, the first Speaker to represent a portion of Chesterfield County since the 1800s, and the first Speaker whose profession was that of a public school teacher.

Despite serving as Speaker of the House, Kirk’s priority has always been his hometown district. As Delegate Kirk is honored to represent many of the same students he taught in the classroom during a teaching career that spanned three decades. During the majority of his career, he would serve in Richmond during the day and work on teaching lesson plans at night. As a government teacher, Kirk always believed students learned best by being able to see first hand the workings of their government. Many times, Kirk would welcome his students to the Capitol so they could see first-hand representative democracy in action.

Kirk’s history as a teacher gives him a unique aspect about the job teachers perform everyday. That is why Kirk has fought to make sure teacher’s receive the pay they deserve, supporting 4 pay raises for teachers in the past 6 years, including a 5% raise in 2019.

Kirk works tirelessly to make Colonial Heights, Chesterfield, and all of Virginia the best place to live, work, and raise a family. In addition to championing a quality public education system, Kirk is also dedicated to improving veteran services, supporting citizens with disabilities, increasing economic development opportunities, and creating jobs.

Most important to Kirk is listening to what ideas and concerns are on the minds of the constituents he represents. He credits many of his major legislative successes to the suggestions made by constituents who he meets while knocking on doors in their community.

Just in 2019, Kirk championed legislation to lift the age cap on Autism related healthcare coverage, make our schools some of the safest in the nation, protect the unborn, take care of our veterans and their families, and provide tax relief to hard working middle class families.

Kirk lives in Colonial Heights with his wife, Julie. Colonial Heights is where they met while in High School, and later where they raised their four sons—Lane, Carter, Blake, and Cameron. The Coxes are members of The Heights Baptist Church where he serves as a Deacon. Kirk is active in the Colonial Heights community and previously coached youth baseball for 14 seasons.

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

Current Position: Real Estate
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 66

For more information, see Sheila Bynum-Coleman’s post.

Sheila Bynum-Coleman 1Sheila is a proud lifelong resident of Chesterfield County. She is a #MomOnAMission to bring true representation to the people of District 66.

Sheila Bynum-Coleman is a native of Chesterfield County where she attended Monacan High School. Sheila received her B.A. from the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Sheila is a mother of five children, all of whom have attended Chesterfield Public Schools. A successful small business owner and community advocate, Sheila first got involved in politics once her delegate decided it wasn’t worth his time to discuss her child with special needs. Since then, she has made it her mission to advocate for improved school services for children with learning disabilities.

Sheila has also dealt with one of a parent’s worst nightmares: her daughter was shot in 2016. While she thankfully survived, Sheila is determined to ensure that as few families as possible in our community experience the trauma and grief of having a loved one affected by senseless gun violence.

But in many ways, Sheila is a Chesterfield success story. She has a background in real estate and construction, maintaining several successful small businesses. She was also appointed by former Governor Terry McAuliffe as the first African American woman to the Board of Contractors.

Sheila spends much of her free time teaching classes for first time home buyers, leading entrepreneurial development workshops, and coaching businesses on fiscal management. Sheila helps numerous organizations such as Veterans Helping Veterans, which supports our veterans in the Richmond Area.

Issues

Economy

Kirkland Cox

Creating Virginia Jobs

Kirk understands the vital importance of helping businesses create new jobs. As a Delegate, he works to help bring both new businesses and new jobs to the Commonwealth. In 2016, Kirk successfully carried legislation creating the Virginia Growth and Opportunity Board (GO Virginia). This business-driven initiative facilitates greater collaboration between the business community, higher education, and local governments. By aligning the needs of the three segments, we will encourage the creation of good-paying jobs in high demand fields, and make economic development dollars go further. Overall, Kirk understands that the General Assembly must support legislation that will improve economic growth, create private sector jobs, and significantly decrease burdensome regulations on our small businesses.

2019 Session – Small Business

HB2440 Intangible personal property; classification and exemption of certain business property. (Campbell, R.-R-24) Classifies as intangible property, and exempts from taxation, personal property that is employed in a trade or business, has an original cost of less than $25, and is not classified as machinery and tools, merchants’ capital, or short-term rental property. Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 1-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. HB2197 Summary judgment; limited use of discovery depositions and affidavits. (Gilbert-R-15) Allows for the limited use of discovery depositions and affidavits in support of or in opposition to a motion for summary judgment, provided that the only parties to the action are business entities and the amount at issue is $50,000 or more.
Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate (25-Y, 15-N). Signed into law by Governor.

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

Virginia’s minimum wage has remained at $7.25 for years, despite the escalating cost of living — it’s literally a poverty wage for working single mothers. Juggling several jobs is not uncommon, in an effort to make ends meet. Sheila believes that if someone works 40 hours a week, they should be able to provide for their families, and she will work towards that goal

Education

Kirkland Cox

Promoting a World Class Education

As a retired public school teacher with 30 years of in-classroom experience and the father of four public school graduates, Kirk believes that a world-class education system is critical to growing Virginia’s economy. Kirk’s vision for K-12 education is rooted in increased accountability and encouraging innovation in the classroom. He supported increased funding targeted to classrooms—not school bureaucracy – and co-patroned legislation adding more school choice options and reducing the number of SOL tests. Kirk led the effort to fund teacher pay raises in the state budget in 2014 and 2017. Additionally, the state’s adopted budget sent 35% of lottery funds, or $191 million, back to local school divisions with no strings attached.

2019 Session – Education & School Safety

HB1729 Guidance counselors; changes name to school counselors, staff time. (Landes-R-25) School counselors; nomenclature; staff time. Changes the name of guidance counselors to school counselors and requires each school counselor employed by a school board in a public elementary or secondary school to spend at least 80 percent of his staff time during normal school hours in the direct counseling of individual students or groups of students.
Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB2018 Career and Technical Education Work-Based Learning Guide; Bd of Education shall review and revise. (Peace-R-97) Board of Education; Career and Technical Education Work-Based Learning Guide. Requires the Board of Education to review and revise, in consultation with certain stakeholders and no later than December 1, 2019, its Career and Technical Education Work-Based Learning Guide to expand the opportunities available for students to earn credit for graduation through high-quality work-based learning experiences such as job shadowing, mentorships, internships, and externships.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB2014 Family First Prevention Services Act; statutory alignment. (Peace-R-97) Family First Prevention Services Act; statutory alignment. Aligns the Code of Virginia with the Family First Prevention Services Act of 2018. The bill contains an emergency clause for provisions of the bill relating to background checks for employees of, volunteers at, and contractors providing services to juveniles at children’s residential facilities.
Status: Passed the House 93-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1930 Concussions in student-athletes; guidelines, policies, and procedures shall be biennially updated. (Richard P. Bell-R-20) Concussions in student-athletes; guidelines, policies, and procedures. Requires (i) the Board of Education to collaborate with various stakeholders to biennially update its guidelines on policies to inform and educate coaches, student-athletes, and student-athletes’ parents or guardians of the nature and risk of concussions, criteria for removal from and return to play, risks of not reporting the injury and continuing to play, and the effects of concussions on student-athletes’ academic performance and (ii) each local school division to biennially update its policies and procedures regarding the identification and handling of suspected concussions in student-athletes.
Status:Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB1734 Virginia Center for School and Campus Safety; threat assessment, case management tool. (Marshall -R-14) Virginia Center for School and Campus Safety; threat assessment; case management tool. Requires the Virginia Center for School and Campus Safety to develop a case management tool for use by public elementary and secondary school threat assessment teams and requires such threat assessment teams to use such tool to collect and report to the Center quantitative data on its activities.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2449 Scholastic records; disclosure of directory information. (Wilt-R-2) Scholastic records; disclosure of directory information. Provides that a school or institution of higher education may disclose certain directory information of a student to certain internal persons for educational purposes or internal business if the student has not opted out of such disclosure. Under current law, such disclosures require written consent. The bill also provides an exception for state and federal law requirements from the prohibition of such disclosures.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

Increasing Access and Affordability to Higher Education

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

Teachers in Virginia face significant challenges. They are underpaid, as salaries have remained stagnant while living costs continue to soar. The current legislature has not adequately funded our schools, and the result is crumbling buildings and overcrowded classrooms. Excellent public education is crucial to ensure our graduates can meet the needs of Virginia’s businesses and to enhance property values in our state.

Civil Rights

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

Women’s Rights

Women’s rights are under attack in this country, and Virginia is no exception. It is crucial to win more seats in our state legislature. Bills affecting a woman’s right to choose will be on the ballot next year, and we must protect a woman’s right to make her own medical decisions.

Additionally, the Equal Rights Amendment needs only one more state to ratify it — another reason why we need to flip VA blue this November.

LGBTQ Rights

Sheila is strong support of LGBTQ rights here in Virginia. Equality is equality. Period. She believes that no one should be discriminated against because of their identity—especially in the workplace or at home. While the Republican leadership killed off a bill that enjoyed bipartisan support to ban discrimination, flipping VA blue will help move this issue forward.

Health Care

Kirkland Cox

Fighting the Heroin and Prescription Drug Crisis

The ongoing heroin and prescription drug crisis impacts families from all walks of life in all corners of our Commonwealth. In the House of Delegates, Kirk supported common sense legislation aimed at cracking down on pill mills and doctors that over prescribe. Kirk has observed the effects of heroin use first hand by visiting inmates in the Heroin Addiction and Recovery Program (HARP) started by Sheriff Karl Leonard at Chesterfield County Jail. During the 2017 session, Kirk successfully passed legislation to create a statewide pilot program for addiction recovery programs, modeled off HARP. Kirk will continue fighting the heroin and prescription drug crisis and support legislation meant to keep Virginians safe.

2019 Session – Healthcare
HB2247 Optometry, Board of; adds requirements for members. (Robinson-R-27) Adds to the requirements for the five licensed optometrist members of the Board of Optometry that they be individuals who at the time of appointment (i) have met all requirements for practice as an optometrist and are qualified to engage in the full scope of the practice of optometry and (ii) are actively engaged in the delivery of clinical care to patients for an average of at least 20 hours per week.
Status: Passed the House 98-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1970 Telemedicine services; payment and coverage of services. (Kilgore-R-1) Requires insurers, corporations, or health maintenance organizations to cover medically necessary remote patient monitoring services as part of their coverage of telemedicine services to the full extent that these services are available.
Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2260 Health insurance; catastrophic health plans. (Robinson-R-27) Authorizes health carriers to offer catastrophic plans on the individual market and to offer such plans to all individuals.
Status: Passed the House 51-Y, 48-N. Passed the Senate 27-Y, 11-N.

HB2538 Balance billing; emergency and elective services. (Ware-R-65) Requires a facility where a covered person receives scheduled elective services to post the required notice or inform the covered person of the required notice at the time of pre-admission or pre-registration.
Status: Passed the House 9-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2559 Electronic transmission of certain prescriptions; exceptions. (Pillion-R-4) Provides certain exceptions, effective July 1, 2020, to the requirement that any prescription for a controlled substance that contains an opioid be issued as an electronic prescription.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2639 Health care shared savings; incentive programs. (Byron-R-22) Requires health carriers to establish a comparable health care service incentive program under which savings are shared with a covered person who elects to receive a covered health care service from a lower-cost provider. Incentive payments are not required for savings of $25 or less.
Status:Passed the House 97-Y, 1-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1971 Health professions and facilities; adverse action in another jurisdiction. (Stolle-R-87) Provides that the mandatory suspension of a license, certificate, or registration of a health professional by the Director of the Department of Health Professions is not required when the license, certificate, or registration of a health professional is revoked, suspended, or surrendered in another jurisdiction based on disciplinary action or mandatory suspension in the Commonwealth.
Status: Passed by the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

HB1917 DOC; Director to establish health care continuous quality improvement committee. (Stolle-R-87) Requires the Director of the Department of Corrections to establish a health care continuous quality improvement committee, consisting of the Director and specified health care professionals employed by the Department.
Status: Passed the House 98-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y,0 -N.

HB2558 Medicaid recipients; treatment involving opioids or opioid replacements, payment. (Pillion-R-4) Prohibits health care providers licensed by the Board of Medicine from requesting or requiring a patient who is a recipient of medical assistance services pursuant to the state plan for medical assistance to pay out-of-pocket costs associated with the provision of service involving (i) the prescription of an opioid for the management of pain or (ii) the prescription of buprenorphine-containing products, methadone, or other opioid replacements approved for the treatment of opioid addiction by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction.
Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1640 Health carriers; services provided by nurse practitioners. (Ransone-R-99) Requires health insurers and health services plan providers whose policies or contracts cover services that may be legally performed by licensed nurse practitioners to provide equal coverage for such services when rendered by a licensed nurse practitioner. The bill contains an enactment that exempts the measure from the requirement that the Health Insurance Reform Commission review any legislative measure containing a mandated health insurance benefit or provider. The bill has a delayed effective date of October 1, 2019.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2318 Naloxone; possession and administration by school nurses and local health department employees. (McGuire-R-56) Possession and administration of naloxone; school nurses; local health department employees. Adds school nurses, local health department employees that are assigned to a public school pursuant to an agreement between the local health department and school board, and other school board employees or individuals contracted by a school board to provide school health services, to the list of individuals who may possess and administer naloxone or other opioid antagonist, provided that they have completed a training program.
Status: Passed the House 95-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1952 Patient care team; podiatrists and physician assistants. (Campbell-R-6) Establishes the definition of “patient care team podiatrist” and amends the definition of “physician assistant.” The bill modifies the supervision requirements for physician assistants by establishing a patient care team model.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y 0-N. Passed Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

HB2126 Accident and sickness insurance; step therapy protocols. (Davis-R-84) Requires carriers issuing health benefit plans to utilize certain clinical review criteria to establish step therapy protocols. The measure establishes clinical review criteria used to establish such protocols and requires carriers to establish a process by which a patient or provider may seek a step therapy override exception determination.
Status:Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1682 Dental services; contracts between carriers and providers, PPO network arrangement, etc. (Ware – R – 65) Establishes limits on the ability of a health insurer or other person to sell or otherwise grant access, as provided in a dentist’s or oral surgeon’s provider contract, to a third-party carrier. Access as provided in a provider contract refers to the right to have dental services provided by the participating provider to the enrollees of the third-party carrier in accordance with the terms of a provider contract. The measure provides that such access may be granted only if it is expressly permitted by the provider contract and notice is given to the affected participating providers.
Status: Passed the House 98-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2169 Physician assistants; licensure by endorsement. (Thomas-R-28) Physician assistants; licensure by endorsement. Authorizes the Board of Medicine to issue a license by endorsement to an applicant for licensure as a physician assistant who (i) is the spouse of an active duty member of the Armed Forces of the United States or the Commonwealth, (ii) holds current certification from the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, and (iii) holds a license as a physician assistant that is in good standing, or that is eligible for reinstatement if lapsed, under the laws of another state, the District of Columbia, or a United States possession or territory.
Status: Passed the House 96-Y, 0-N. Passed Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

Veterans

Kirkland Cox

Helping Our Veterans

A strong supporter of the military, veterans, and their families, Kirk has introduced over 120 pieces of legislation designed to make life easier for active duty military, veterans, and their families. Kirk worked tirelessly to fund the establishment of a veterans’ care center in Richmond and subsequent buildings and expansions in Salem, Prince William, and Hampton Roads. His efforts led to funding for the expansion of the Virginia War Memorial and its Paul & Phyllis Galanti Education Center. Kirk introduced legislation establishing the Wounded Warrior Program (now the Virginia Veteran & Family Support program) in Virginia to better assist service members with TBI and PTSD, as well as their families. To ensure veterans receive their earned benefits, he has fought to increase the number of authorized veterans’ claim officers and to invest in the development of the automated claims system that will lessen the time a claim takes.

2019 Session – Veterans

HB1623 Military families; relocation to the Commonwealth; student registration. (Cole-R-88) Permits any student whose parent has received orders to relocate to a duty station in the Commonwealth to register for courses and other academic programs and participate in the lottery process for charter schools and college partnership laboratory schools in the school division in which such student will reside at the same time and in the same manner as students who reside in the local school division. The bill requires each such student to provide to the school board proof of residency in the local school division no later than 10 days after his parent establishes such residency.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1636 Trespass; unmanned aircraft system; military airfield or military helicopter landing zone; penalty. (Knight-R-81) Provides that any person who knowingly and intentionally causes an unmanned aircraft system to enter the airspace within one mile of the boundary of any military airfield or military helicopter landing zone in the Commonwealth, for any reason, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
Status: Passed the House 98-Y, 0-N, 1-A. Passed the Senate 39-Y, 1-N.

HB1655 Real property tax exemption for disabled veterans; surviving spouse’s ability to change residence. (Miyares-R-82)Enacts as law an amendment to subdivision (a) of Section 6-A of Article X of the Constitution of Virginia that was adopted by the voters on November 6, 2018, which applies the real property tax exemption for surviving spouse of a disabled veteran to such spouse’s principal place of residence regardless of whether spouse moves to a different residence.
Status: Passed the House 94-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB1832 Special license plate; Navy and Marine Corps Medal. (Leftwich-R-78) Creates a special license plate for persons awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal or for unremarried surviving spouses of such persons.
Status: Passed the House 96-Y, 0-N. Passed by the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB2551 Commercial driver’s licenses; military service members. (Thomas-R-28) Requires the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles to waive certain knowledge and skills tests required for obtaining a commercial learner’s permit or commercial driver’s license or a commercial driver’s license endorsement for certain current or former military service members, as authorized by federal law.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed by the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by Governor.

HB2632 Veterans Services, Board of; increases membership and clarifies scope of responsibilities. (Helsel-R-91) Increases the membership of the Board of Veterans Services by adding an additional member of the House of Delegates, an additional member of the Senate of Virginia, an additional non-legislative citizen member, and an additional ex officio member, the Chairman of the Virginia War Memorial Foundation. The bill also clarifies the scope of responsibility of the Board to include policy recommendations related to the mission of the Virginia War Memorial. The bill has a delayed effective date of January 1, 2020.
Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

Better Government

Kirkland Cox

Reducing Unnecessary Government Spending

Kirk believes strongly that government should focus on the core functions of government and must live within its means. Nowhere is this more evident than when he is working on the state budget. As a member of the House Appropriations Committee and a Budget Conferee, Kirk advocates for a balanced, responsible budget that does not raise taxes or fees on hardworking Virginians. Kirk believes in leading by example, and that means cutting spending within the legislature itself. Since 2010, the legislative branch returned over $19 million in savings to the state’s general fund. By focusing on passing conservative, responsible, and balanced budgets, Kirk’s leadership has placed Virginia in a position to move forward.

2019 Session – Gov Spending

HB2653 Higher educational institutions, public, institutional partnership performance agreements. (Cox–R–66) Permits any public institution of higher education to propose in conjunction with the six-year plan process, and the General Assembly to adopt by reference in the general appropriation act, an institutional partnership performance agreement that advances the objectives of the Virginia Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2011 by aligning the strategies, activities, and investments of the institution, the Commonwealth, and any identified partners concerning (i) college access, affordability, cost predictability, and employment pathways for undergraduate Virginia students and (ii) strategic talent development and other high-priority economic initiatives of the Commonwealth. The bill contains provisions relating to mandatory and permissive contents of, the approval process for, and the legal effect of any such agreement. Status: Passed the House 94-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1920 New Economy Workforce Credential Grant Fund and Program; grant priority. (Stolle-R-83) Requires the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, in awarding grants pursuant to the New Economy Workforce Credential Grant Program, to give priority to institutions that offer noncredit workforce training programs in high-demand fields in which employer demand is currently unmet by the available workforce. Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 39-Y, 0-N.

HB1729 School counselors; nomenclature; staff time. (Landes-R-25) Changes the name of guidance counselors to school counselors and requires each school counselor employed by a school board in a public elementary or secondary school to spend at least 80 percent of his staff time during normal school hours in the direct counseling of individual students or groups of students. Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

HB2192 Public school buildings and facilities; modernization. (Rush-R-7) Provides that it is the legislative intent that public school buildings and facilities be designed, constructed, maintained, and operated to generate more electricity than consumed, and allows local school boards to enter into leases with private developers to achieve that goal. The bill also provides that private developers that contract with local school boards to modernize public school buildings and facilities may receive financing from the Virginia Small Business Financing Authority. Status: Passed the House 96-Y, 1-N. Passed Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1737 School crisis, emergency management, and medical emergency response plans; development and review.(Wright-R-61)Requires each school board to include the chief law-enforcement officer, the fire chief, the chief of the emergency medical services agency, the executive director of the relevant regional emergency medical services council, and the emergency management official of the locality, or their designees, in the development and review of school crisis, emergency management, and medical emergency response plans. Under current law, the school board is required to provide copies of such plans to the chief law-enforcement officer, the fire chief, the chief of the emergency medical services agency, and the emergency management official of the locality but is not required to include such first responders in the development and review of such plans. Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Senate 40-Y ,0-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

HB1970 Telemedicine services; payment and coverage of services. (Kilgore-R-1)Requires insurers, corporations, or health maintenance organizations to cover medically necessary remote patient monitoring services as part of their coverage of telemedicine services to the full extent that these services are available. The bill defines remote patient monitoring services as the delivery of home health services using telecommunications technology to enhance the delivery of home health care, including monitoring of clinical patient data such as weight, blood pressure, pulse, pulse oximetry, blood glucose, and other condition-specific data; medication adherence monitoring; and interactive video conferencing with or without digital image upload. The bill requires the Board of Medical Assistance Services to include in the state plan for medical assistance services a provision for the payment of medical assistance for medically necessary health care services provided through telemedicine services.Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB1611 Virginia College Savings Plan; prepaid tuition contracts; pricing reserves. (Landes-R-25)Provides that in the event that the ratio of the assets of the Virginia College Savings Plan (the Plan) to the obligations of the Plan exceeds 105 percent, the pricing reserve, which the bill defines as the percentage by which the sum of advanced payments to be made pursuant to each prepaid tuition contract of the Plan exceeds the amount estimated to be required to provide tuition at the fixed, guaranteed level that is specified in such prepaid tuition contract, shall not exceed five percent. The bill provides that in the event that the ratio of the assets of the Plan to the obligations of the Plan does not meet or exceed 105 percent, the pricing reserve may exceed five percent but shall not exceed 10 percent.Status: Passed the House 94-Y, 5-N. Passed the Senate with substitute 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2538 Balance billing; emergency and elective services. (Ware-R-65)Requires a facility where a covered person receives scheduled elective services to post the required notice or inform the covered person of the required notice at the time of pre-admission or pre-registration. The bill also requires such a facility to inform the covered person or his legal representative of the names of all provider groups providing health care services at the facility, that consultation with the covered person’s managed care plan is recommended to determine if the provider groups providing health care services at the facility are in-network providers, and that the covered person may be financially responsible for health care services performed by a provider that is not an in-network provider, in addition to any cost-sharing requirements.Status: Passed the House 99-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2577 Health Insurance; coverage for autism spectrum disorder. (Thomas-R-28)Requires health insurers, health care subscription plans, and health maintenance organizations to provide coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder in individuals of any age. Currently, such coverage is required to be provided for individuals from age two through age 10. Status: Passed the House 97-Y, 1-N 1-A. Passed the Senate 39-Y, 0-N.

HB1655 Real property tax exemption for disabled veterans; surviving spouse’s ability to change residence. (Miyares-R-82)Enacts as statutory law an amendment to subdivision (a) of Section 6-A of Article X of the Constitution of Virginia that was adopted by the voters on November 6, 2018, which applies the real property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a disabled veteran to such spouse’s principal place of residence regardless of whether such spouse moves to a different residence. The provisions of the bill would apply to taxable years beginning on and after January 1, 2019. The bill makes technical corrections related to the real property tax exemptions for surviving spouses of members of the armed forces killed in action and surviving spouses of certain persons killed in the line of duty.Status: Passed the House 94-Y, 0-N. Passed the Senate 40-Y 0-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

HB2528 Felony homicide; certain drug offenses, penalty. (Hugo-R-40)Provides that a person is guilty of felony homicide, which constitutes second degree murder and is punishable by confinement of not less than five nor more than 40 years, if the underlying felonious act that resulted in the killing of another involved the manufacture, sale, gift, or distribution of a Schedule I or II controlled substance to another and (i) such other person’s death results from his use of the controlled substance and (ii) the controlled substance is the proximate cause of his death. Status: Passed the House 69-Y, 30-N. Passed Senate 40-Y, 0-N.

HB2719 Health insurance; small employers. (Pillion-R-4)Revises the definition of “small employer” for purposes of group health insurance policies to provide that an individual who performs any service for remuneration under a contract of hire for (i) a corporation in which he is a shareholder or an immediate family member of a shareholder, or (ii) a limited liability company in which he is a member, regardless of the number of members of the limited liability company, shall be deemed to be an employee of the corporation or the limited liability company. The measure provides that a health insurance issuer shall not be required to issue more than one group health plan for each employer identification number issued by the Internal Revenue Service for a business entity, without regard to the number of shareholders or members of such business entity.Status: Passed the House (99-Y 0-N). Passed the Senate 40-Y, 0-N.HB2529 Income tax, state; conformity of taxation system. (Hugo-R-40)Advances conformity of the Commonwealth’s tax code with the federal tax code to December 31, 2018, effective starting in taxable year 2018. Starting in taxable year 2019, the bill deconforms from the provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that limit the deduction for state and local taxes and that suspend the overall limit on itemized deductions. The bill establishes income tax subtractions starting in taxable year 2018 for Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) and for one-fifth of the amount of business interest that is disallowed as a deduction from federal income tax. The bill increases the standard deduction to $4,500 for single individuals and $9,000 for married persons filing jointly for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, the standard deduction is $3,000 for single individuals and $6,000 for married couples filing jointly. The bill provides for a refund, not to exceed a taxpayer’s tax liability of up to $110 for individuals and $220 for married persons filing a joint return. The refund will be issued in October 2019 and will be available only for a taxpayer filing a final return by July 2019. The refunds will be reduced and prorated if the additional revenues generated by the TCJA are insufficient to fully fund the refunds. The bill establishes the Taxpayer Relief Fund (the Fund). For fiscal years 2019 through 2025, any additional revenues attributable to the TCJA, beyond those necessary to fund the provisions of the bill, would accrue to the Fund. The bill directs the General Assembly to appropriate money from the Fund to enact permanent or temporary tax reform measures. Status: Passed the House 95-Y, 4-N. Passed Senate with substitute 35-Y, 5-N. Signed into law by the Governor.

Safety

Sheila Bynum-Coleman

Gun Violence

We need common sense gun laws, including universal background checks, and surveys confirm that most voters support such legislation. Sheila’s daughter was shot while attending a house party. Fortunately, her daughter survived, but this experience has made Sheila a vocal champion for gun safety laws in the commonwealth

Criminal Justice Reform

The criminal justice system is inherently unjust and is not doing the job for which it was intended. The system leads to the incarceration of far too many, particularly for drug crimes. People of every race use illegal drugs at similar rates, yet African-Americans are far more likely to be imprisoned than whites. African-Americans are 3-4 times more likely to be arrested for drug crimes and six to ten times more likely to be imprisoned. Additionally, our legislature has shown no interest in helping inmates successfully reintegrate into our communities and productively contribute to society. Nor are they interested in restoring the constitutional right to vote to felons who have done their time.

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VA House 68 - 2109VA House 68 – 2109

District Description: Counties of Chesterfield (part) and Henrico (part); City of Richmond (part)
Current Delegate: Dawn Adams since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Adams beat longtime delegate Manoli Loupassi in 2017. This year she faces Coward, a political consultant and the second of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year. Republicans say they doubt Adams, a nurse practitioner, has been helped by an unusual lawsuit filed by her former legislative aide alleging hacking.”

Summary

District Description: Counties of Chesterfield (part) and Henrico (part); City of Richmond (part)
Current Delegate: Dawn Adams since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Adams beat longtime delegate Manoli Loupassi in 2017. This year she faces Coward, a political consultant and the second of two African-American candidates the party has recruited this year. Republicans say they doubt Adams, a nurse practitioner, has been helped by an unusual lawsuit filed by her former legislative aide alleging hacking.”

VA House District 68

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #68

Dawn Adams

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 68 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 68

For more information, see Dawn Adams’s post.

Dawn AdamsDr. Dawn M. Adams has been an advocate for healthy communities for over 30 years. After receiving her Bachelors of Nursing degree from James Madison University, Dawn positioned herself in the center of Virginia’s healthcare system as a Critical Care Registered Nurse (RN). As an RN, Dawn saw first-hand how our state’s most vulnerable citizens continually fell through the cracks as a result of limited healthcare access and coverage.

In 1989, Dawn returned to school to earn her Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Virginia, and soon became a Nurse Practitioner. From there, she went on to earn her Doctorate in Nursing from Old Dominion University, where she now serves as an adjunct professor. Dawn’s research focused on identifying barriers to healthcare access for all people across the economic spectrum. For her research, she won the ODU Nursing Scholar award. As she studied and worked intimately in medicine, it became abundantly clear to her that the right to affordable public education and access to adequate healthcare are inextricably linked—both are necessary as well as critical to building a healthy, successful community.

Prior to beginning her career in education, Dawn worked alongside a nurse lobbyist. This afforded her the opportunity to engage in community stakeholder meetings concerning Medicaid expansion, lobby as an advocate for healthcare access, and attend the 2014 General Assembly (GA) session. This experience led Dawn to author a proposal for a Health Policy Fellowship for nurses. This fellowship is currently available to nurses who attend graduate programs within Virginia.

While at the GA, Dawn was approached by the Assistant Commissioner for Virginia Department for Behavioral Health & Developmental Services. He prompted Dawn to utilize her education and experience to solve the problem of inadequate community-based care. Due to Dawn’s success in this field, she served as the Director of the Office of Integrated Health. In this role, she managed a multi-million-dollar state budget and built strong relationships with state and local agencies to implement local community programs and construct public policy for individuals with developmental disabilities. She has also began work to partner primary care service providers with mental health services.

Dawn’s effort to help our community extends beyond her continuous work in healthcare. Her numerous experiences, which include being the first participant in the Virginia Nurse Advocate Health Policy Fellowship, creating beneficial relationships with Virginia’s elected representatives, and developing public policy in her work as a civil servant, have helped her to identify the troubling disconnect between political maneuvering and our government’s obligation to serve the people. This is what fueled her desire to run for office.

Despite all odds, being outspent 5 to 1, on November, 7, 2017, nearly 20,000 voters in the 68th District cast their vote to bring Dawn into the General Assembly, giving her the highest voter turnout of any Democratic Candidate running against an incumbent.

Dawn is honored to take the lessons she’s learned as a nurse practitioner, administrator, educator, and community leader to represent her community as Delegate of Virginia’s House District 68 and is proud to represent the people of the city of Richmond, Chesterfield and Henrico counties.

Garrison Coward

Current Position: Chief Operating Officer of BizCents
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 68

For more information, see Garrison Coward’s post.

Garrison Coward 1Garrison R. Coward, is a native of Richmond, Virginia (born at St. Mary’s Hospital), and a proud product of Henrico County’s Short Pump Middle School and J.R. Tucker High School.  He graduated from Hampden-Sydney College ‘12, with a degree in Economics; The George Washington University ‘17, with a Master’s degree in Political Management; and is currently seeking his MBA from The George Washington University’s School of Business.

Garrison is the Chief Operating Officer of BizCents, a local data analytics firm.  He served as a political advisor to Congressman Rob Wittman, and as Campaign Manager from 2015-2018.  He is the Executive Director of the Conservative Professionals Network, which aims to engage a new generation of center-right thinkers on public-policy matters.  Prior to joining Congressman Wittman, Garrison served as Political Director and Deputy Director of Minority Engagement for the Republican Party of Virginia.

In 2016, he was elected a Delegate to the RNC Convention from Virginia’s 7th Congressional District.

Garrison enjoys reading, travelling, and playing basketball.  He serves on the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors at the Southside Community Development and Housing Corporation, the YMCA of Greater Richmond Millennial Initiative, and on the Board of Directors of the Richmond-based company BizCents. Garrison is a member of the Advisory Board of Directors of the Richmond Heritage Federal Credit Union.

Issues

Economy

Dawn Adams

In Virginia, we are fortunate to have a relatively low unemployment rate. Yet,there is still work to be done to create more jobs that enrich individuals, families, and communities.  The growth, incentivization, and development of small business are a few ways to create more jobs. We need Dawn’s demonstrated ability to work across the aisle to develop other workforce solutions that will also reduce the demands for more healthcare workers, rebuild our crumbling transportation and educational infrastructure, install state-wide broadband, and operationalize energy alternatives to meet our persistent dependence on carbon fuel through solar and wind power installation.

Garrison Coward

The Greater-Richmond Area is home to many small and medium-sized businesses that are the backbone of our local, state, and national economies.

Virginia needs economic policies that:

  • Protect our businesses from higher and unnecessary taxes and regulations. Mandates such as repealing right-to-work laws, plastic bag taxes, and burdensome food and beverage regulations simply don’t work
  • Protect families by ensuring their take-home pay is protected from taxes that hinder their ability to save or invest in their futures
  • Encourage growth by incentivizing businesses to come, stay, and grow within our communities

Health Care

Dawn Adams

Affordable healthcare coverage for all just makes sense. We can provide lower cost care to ensure all citizens receive the preventative medical, dental, and eye care that will keep them healthy, while addressing the opioid crisis, provide more comprehensive mental healthcare, and reducing the costs associated with chronic illness. At the same time, we must be prepared to take on the challenges of the epidemic of dementia, escalating needs of our aging population, the high cost of prescription drugs, and respond nimbly to the ever-changing policy demands from the federal government. We need Dawn’s three decades of diverse healthcare experience and ideas to develop affordable solutions to issues.

Garrison Coward

Virginia should focus on providing better and more affordable healthcare for everyone.
We should make it easier for:

  • Doctors and patients to be in control of their own healthcare decisions based on their needs, budgets, and wants
  • Examine prescription drug pricing policies
  • People with preexisting conditions to obtain and maintain coverage
  • Young people to stay on parent’s plans
  • More access to care through new technologies such as telemedicine
  • Recovery programs to seek and obtain funding to treat addiction

Education

Dawn Adams

All kids deserve a good education. Education is the foundation from which children can dream and young people can aspire to be the person they were meant to become. Strong public school education creates strong adults. Teachers and the supportive infrastructure to address the increasing demands and pressures impacting our youth today are critical to their success or failure as students. Additionally high school graduates deserve affordable options for post-secondary school and when qualified, guaranteed admission to Virginia State schools. We need Dawn’s academic insight and ideas to make this a reality. Dawn will continue to fight for the cost-effective solutions that will maximize every opportunity for our children.

Garrison Coward

Good quality of life starts with a good education. Children deserve the right to a quality education regardless of their zip code, period.

In Virginia we need to:

  • Protect our teachers by ensuring competitive pay
  • Empower parents by giving them additional viable options for their children’s education like public charters
  • Allow students to explore career fields in middle school to pique career interest earlier in order to prepare for future career and educational choices
  • Remove politics from our schools and focus on our children’s  education

Better Government

Dawn Adams

Virginia is a Balanced Budget state. This means that it is required by law that we balance the budget, and not because any one party has decided to be more financially responsible. The real question regarding the budget is how are we spending the money and collecting the revenue to prepare for the Commonwealths priorities? Dawn gets it, and her peers within the General Assembly know it. She is well aware of the General Assembly’s responsibility to be good stewards of our State’s funds and has submitted several pieces of legislation toward that end.

Garrison Coward

Government Accountability
Virginia should be run like a business.  Voters should be seen as the Board of Directors and politicians our employees.

As such:

  • Politicians should be held accountable and to the same standards as everyone else
  • The government should operate as efficiently and effectively as possible
  • We should examine ways to control conflicts of interest

Environment

Dawn Adams

Virginia is home to the pristine splendor of our mountains, green forests, expansive ocean, and beautiful array of lakes, streams, and rivers. In our District (68th), the James River runs right through our backyards. We can do more to keep this scenic resource clean and open for recreation and ensure that the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways are safe and protected for generations to come.  As a member of the Virginia House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources Committee, Dawn understands thatprotecting these resources makes sense for our children, families, and Virginia.

Safety

Garrison Coward

We need to make sure that our communities stay safe. Henrico, Richmond, and Chesterfield have law enforcement and first responders that are second to none.

We need to do our part by:

  • Addressing road safety by ensuring that resources are being used to help with roads, sidewalks, and other infrastructure issues that have caused tragedies especially in places like Midlothian, the West End, Fan and Monument District(s)
  • Providing law enforcement officers with the resources to curb street crime
  • Encourage a meaningful community dialogue surrounding criminal justice reform

 

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VA House 72 – 2019VA House 72 – 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“VanValkenburg, a teacher, was the first Democrat to even run for this seat in 10 years when he won in 2017 with just under 53 percent of the vote. Though the district has gotten consistently bluer each year, Republicans say they see an opening for Vandergriff, who unsuccessfully ran for school board and serves on a variety of community boards. For now, the money is on VanValkenburg’s side, who had raised $205,000 at last report, nearly twice as much as Vandergriff.”

Summary

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“VanValkenburg, a teacher, was the first Democrat to even run for this seat in 10 years when he won in 2017 with just under 53 percent of the vote. Though the district has gotten consistently bluer each year, Republicans say they see an opening for Vandergriff, who unsuccessfully ran for school board and serves on a variety of community boards. For now, the money is on VanValkenburg’s side, who had raised $205,000 at last report, nearly twice as much as Vandergriff.”

VA House District 72

District Map (PDF) 

VA State House District #72

GayDonna Vandergriff

Current Position: Business and nonprofits
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 72

For more information, see GayDonna Vandergriff’s post.

GayDonna Vandergriff 1GayDonna is an educator, community leader, and mother who will take common sense Henrico values to the General Assembly.

Born and raised in Virginia, GayDonna Vandergriff is a first-generation college graduate and learned early on the power of public education to change someone’s life. GayDonna has been married to John, her sweetheart since 4th grade, for 27 years. Their two daughters, Abby and Shelby, are both graduates of Glen Allen High School and are Virginia Tech Hokies.

Keeping Henrico Strong
GayDonna has invested over twenty years encouraging knowledge and strong education through her service promoting literacy as Chairman of the Henrico Library Advisory Board and President of the Friends of the Glen Allen Library. She currently serves the broader community as the Brookland District Representative on the Henrico Area Mental Health and Development Services Board. GayDonna has further invested in Henrico’s next generation of leaders by serving as a substitute teacher at Glen Allen Elementary School, teaching university classes, and serving on multiple PTA boards in Henrico County Public Schools. Now, GayDonna wants to continue her service to the citizens of Henrico as your Delegate for State House District 72.

Smart Solutions for Henrico
GayDonna’s MBA and experience in business and nonprofits has equipped her with the necessary skills to negotiate competing needs in a way that will provide for the common good of Henrico citizens.  Her commitment to the needs of the people of Henrico ensures she will prioritize common sense solutions within our means, demanding the best use of our tax dollars, and leading with smarter, more efficient solutions to our challenges.

Schuyler VanValkenburg

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 72 since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 72

For more information, see Schuyler VanValkenburg’s post.

Schuyler VanValkenburgAs A Legislator
Since Schuyer won election in 2017, he has been hard at work creating legislation to help Virginia and Henrico County.  For example, in his first session, he sponsored and passed a bill to prevent people from losing their state professional licensure due to student debt problems – a cruel policy which Virginia had allowed for too long.  After all, if you take someone’s license to work, how will they pay the debt for which you took the license? In the wake of the Parkland shootings, he was one of a few delegates chosen to serve on a select committee for school safety, so he held community input sessions and met with parent activists and school safety experts to work on a set of recommendations to the General Assembly.  He made sure the final recommendations were not just about physical infrastructure but also student mental and emotional health, and about school-community relations, to address not just tragic shootings but school violence more generally. He helped to pass Medicaid expansion, which enabled more 9,500 people in Henrico county access to affordable, quality healthcare coverage in its first few months of operation alone.  In his second session, Delegate VanValkenburg led the charge to get a higher standard for school counseling in the state budget, ensuring that schools will have the resources to reach a ratio of one counselor for every two hundred and fifty students. Delegate VanValkenburg has been proud to fight for equality of opportunity, quality education, and inclusiveness – and his record speaks to his commitment to those ideas.

Personal Story and Background

Schuyler VanValkenburg grew up thirty minutes north of Albany, NY, in the small city of Johnstown, nicknamed the “Glove City” for its leather tanning mills in the 19th century. He watched as the city’s economy continually suffered when factory jobs left for overseas factories. Early on, his family impressed on him the importance education would have in this changing world and he fell in love with history thanks to some very talented educators.

After high school, he enrolled at the University of Richmond in 2001. His family’s insistence on bettering himself through education pushed him to excel in the history department and complete teacher licensure programs while he was there. During his undergraduate studies, he also met his wife. After college, they started a family and he began his teaching career in Henrico County Public Schools. He has been a teacher for twelve years, first at Short Pump Middle School, and now at Glen Allen High School.

During his teaching career, Schuyler went back to school to earn his Masters degree in American History at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2008, with a focus on women’s history. He also won National Board Certification and became the We the People constitutional competition coach at Glen Allen High School.

Schuyler VanValkenburg’s experience growing up in small industrial town, attending the University of Richmond, and teaching in Henrico County, have all invigorated him in the fight to make Virginia a national leader in education in order to expand opportunity for all Virginians. He knows firsthand the immeasurable impact a high quality education can have, and is committed to ensuring that for every child across the commonwealth. He also knows how important it is provide equitable access and opportunities for every citizen – both by ensuring a democracy where every voice is heard and every vote counted and by increasing job growth and access to economic opportunity.  Finally, Schuyler believes in an inclusive society, and believes that Virginia has no place for discriminatory laws and policies which and that threaten the constitutional right to equal protection.

Issues

Civil Rights

Schuyler VanValkenburg

Equality
Virginia should be a bold symbol of the American value of egalitarianism.  Every person, regardless of religion, sexuality, gender, or race should have the same rights, opportunities, and social status as everyone else.  Period. I have and will push back against anti-LGBTQ legislation from bathroom bills to protections for conversion therapy. I also stand with criminal justice reformers – for example, I was part of the effort to raise the cap on felony crimes in Virginia and reduce the number of minor crimes (like stealing an iPod) being prosecuted as felonies. Virginia has a long way to go one women’s rights, too – I voted for the Equal Rights Amendment and spoke in its defense in one of the speeches I was most proud to make on the floor all year in 2019. I was also a vote against gender-discriminatory products like imposing taxes on necessities like femine hygenie products. Virginia still needs to make progress to close the wage gap and fight against gender discrimination in the workplace.

GayDonna Vandergriff

Religious Freedom Matters
Religious liberty is one of the cornerstones of our founding and our laws dictate a separation of church and state. My faith is extremely important to me and I believe in openness and tolerance for others to worship as they choose.

Economy

Schuyler VanValkenburg

I believe in creating an economic environment that creates opportunity for all. In the past two years, I have sponsored and worked on legislation that would give Virginians more opportunities to engage in apprenticeship programs and job training, eliminate the use of non-compete clauses to restrict the opportunities of low-income workers, and prevent people from losing professional licenses for unpaid student debt.  Virginia’s prosperity is remarkable – we have some of the lowest unemployment and highest income to cost of living rates in the nation – but we must make sure it is accessible to everyone. The more people participate in our commonwealth’s economy, the better off we are.

GayDonna Vandergriff

My roots are humble. My father left school after seventh grade because his parents literally couldn’t afford to buy him shoes. Still, he persevered with pride and hard work. He had a blue-collar job to deliver bread to the grocery stores. Everyone knew my dad as the Rainbo bread man. His name is Charles and he wore it proudly on a patch sewn to his work shirts which my mom stood and ironed every Sunday for 40 years. His job taught my sisters and I the value of hard work and it kept the importance of community as a daily part of our lives. Sadly, though, those jobs and others started disappearing and families like mine were out of work and eventually out of options. Businesses closed and my generation had to leave to find work.

A priority of the state government must be to create an environment that supports business growth in the Commonwealth. We should start with limiting regulations and supporting policies that create the best possible economic environment for Virginia. My MBA and business experience will be a true asset. I have taught business courses at the college level at Strayer University, I have 6 years of retail experience, and I have advised small businesses for over a decade. This knowledge is truly needed at the General Assembly.

Education

Schuyler VanValkenburg

I am one of the few teachers in the General Assembly, and my thirteen year career in teaching has shown me first hand the need for adequate support for our school systems from the state.  This is particularly true when it comes to student safety, and I served on a special commission for student safety in the wake of the Parkland shootings which made significant bipartisan progress.  One such area that was particularly valueable was an increase in the budget for school counseling staff and the implementation of a 1:250 counselor:student ratio, which I was proud to fight specifically for in the 2019 session of the legislature.  I also was part of a bipartisan move to give schools more control over their own calendars and remove the influence of special interest tourism industry lobbies from our school calendars.

But there is still so much more to do to improve our state’s education system.  Virginia remains one of the worst states in the nation for college affordability, our schools are funded almost 10% less per student by the state now than they were in 2008, leaving localities holding the bag, and our SOL testing system is a burden on schools, students, and parents.  As an educator and parent, improving Virginian’s access to educational opportunity from pre-school to trade school as the basis for prosperity and equality is my greatest passion.

GayDonna Vandergrif

Public Education Matters
My education is 100% public education kindergarten through MBA. My daughters are both 100% public educated at Henrico County Public Schools and Virginia Tech. My husband’s education is also 100% public. If not for public education, my family would have no education.

Personally, I have experienced Virginia’s public education system as a student, parent, classroom volunteer, PTA President, and substitute teacher. I am proud to have served the Henrico County Public Schools community through numerous positions for 15 years. As a parent advocate and PTA leader, I am most proud of my efforts to have Henrico invest in its older school facilities. My work led to the renovation of Brookland Middle School and much needed repairs and improvements at Henrico’s other older schools. The benefits of this work are still being seen today with the decision to build new schools to replace Tucker High School and Highland Springs High Schools.

I am also a tireless advocate for reducing classroom sizes and replacing trailers with permanent classrooms. Twice recognized as an HCPS PTA volunteer of the year, Brookland Middle School and Hungary Creek Middle School, I also served on the Parent Advisory Committee at Glen Allen High School. I understand what support our Henrico schools need from the Commonwealth.

Thankfully, more discussions are being had about public education funding. Our K-12 teachers absolutely need a raise. Our schools absolutely need increased funding. However, money alone isn’t enough to address the problems inside our classrooms. We have to focus on teaching not testing. We have to focus on the greater needs of the classroom as a whole for all of our students, teachers, and parents. We can and we must do this.

Higher Education Matters

I worked my way through school. First, starting at Mountain Empire Community College, then UVA-Wise and finally graduating from an Historically Black College and University—West Virginia State. After my husband and I moved to Henrico for his job, I went back to school at night while raising our daughters and earned my MBA from VCU. In one generation, through hard work and determination, my family made it from a seventh-grade education to an MBA and now to a candidate for the House of Delegates.

In total, it took me 15 years to earn my college degrees and I am still paying my students loans 17 years later. One of the things I worry about the most is that a young person of very modest means, like I was, can no longer do what I did. It gets harder and harder to work to put oneself through college. This reality is one which Virginia must face. Thankfully, conversations have begun in Virginia. Actions are needed to restore state funding to pre-recession levels. Still, we must also act to ensure these dollars are spent wisely. As your delegate, I will support approaches of affordability for Virginia residents with a return to core academics rather than expensive non-academic services.

Technical Education Matters

One of the issues contributing to the student loan crisis is the belief that all of our children need a college education to be successful. This is simply not true. There are many paths forward. My father-in-law is a master electrician who provided well for his family without a college degree. Educating students early about alternatives to college and working with local businesses to modify curriculums will better prepare our students to make better fitting career choices. The quickest way to reduce the student loan debt burden is to help students understand that not all paths forward require a college degree.

Literacy and Libraries Matter

One of the key ways I closed the economic gap in my own journey was through the free resources available at my local library. As a child, I was an avid reader and learned so much about other people and opportunities. As an adult, I have given back to the library community and literacy by serving as an appointee to the Henrico County Library Advisory Board.

I am proud to have advocated for the expansion of Henrico’s library system. During my tenure on the Library Advisory Board and while serving as Chair, I advocated for the construction of the Tuckahoe, Twin Hickory, Varina, Libbie Mill and Fairfield Libraries along with the renovation of the Gayton Library and the expansion of the Glen Allen Library. As the President of the Friends of the Glen Allen Library, I have worked tirelessly to raise funds through book sales to support the Summer Reading program and the All Henrico Reads initiative, both of which provide for the greater public benefit of literacy.

Health Care

Schuyler VanValkenburg

Virginia has achieved one of the most important goals I fought for in my first campaign for office: an expansion of our Medicaid program, with federal subsidy, to more than 200,000 additional low-income Virginians.  Health is the basis of everything – without affordable healthcare, a good job and educational opportunities are often out of reach – and so expanding Medicaid was a crucial milestone.

There are new challenges, though.  Virginia continues to wrestle with its opioid epidemic, and I am a strong advocate of adopting a public-health approach to our drug problems rather than a primarily criminal one.  Virginia has one of the highest concentrations of veterans in the nation, and their health needs are special – we must make sure Virginia can pick up some of the care and attention our state’s veterans need and which the national V.A. doesn’t always provide.  Finally, the gap in healthcare between the rural and poor parts of our community and the wealthier ones is still staggering, and health infrastructure investment and concentrated programs must supplement Medicaid expansion in those areas of the state.

GayDonna Vandergrif

The debate about healthcare in this country has focused too much on who supplies what type of health insurance and not enough on the well-being of the patient. The well-being for all Virginians should always be our top priority. This starts with addressing rising costs of treatment and prescriptions while maintaining coverage for pre-existing conditions. We must also protect our system of quality care which provides the latest and best treatments in the world.

We need to continue to find free market solutions to our challenges that keep patients in control of their healthcare decisions. Medical spending accounts, buying insurance based on needs, lowering the barriers to introduce new drugs, safety nets for pre-existing conditions and minimizing the frivolous lawsuits that drive costs up for medical treatments are among the things I would support.

Infrastructure

Schuyler VanValkenburg

Virginia’s state government can do more to help its counties and cities build infrastructure, fund crucial projects, and strengthen local programs on the ground.  I’ll work to ensure that the Richmond metropolitan region has the funding and communication necessary to promote our economy. From revitalizing Lakeside Avenue to fixing Sadler Road traffic by working with local planning authorities to mass transit planning like the GRTC pulse, shared growth and prosperity is key to Henrico and the region’s future

Democracy and Civic Engagement

Schuyler VanValkenburg

As a teacher, I have seen the transformative power of knowledge and democratic engagement.  But Virginia’s laws as they currently stand don’t give our citizens enough ways to engage their government effectively.   I was proud to help start the process of gerrymandering reform by voting for the first stage of an independent redistricting commission amendment in 2019, but that commission will need additional stages and implementing legislation which we must follow through on by doing thing s like banning the use of partisan data in the commission process, for example.

We need to make voter registration more accessible, reform and extend voting times and precinct efficiency, and make absentee and early voting easier.  Many populations with burdens on their time and ability to get to physical polling places, from college students to the elderly to those with high-travel jobs, are badly punished by Virginia’s current inflexible systems of voting.

Better Government

GayDonna Vandergrif

Smart Financial Decisions Matter
State government should be a good steward of your tax dollars and not take a single dollar out of your paycheck that isn’t absolutely necessary. Just as with your own family budget, decisions about state spending need to be analyzed using a cost to benefit ratio. As our delegate, I will question if your dollars are being wisely spent. I know how hard you work to earn them. I will work just as hard to make sure you get to keep them.

My husband and I started our family with a household budget at the poverty level. We learned how to stretch a dollar and how to do without. By law, Virginia is required to have a balanced budget. There are no credit cards and no loans. We must accept that government cannot and should not provide all things. Choices must be made to yield the greatest good from the dollars spent. The ability to prioritize and spend efficiently is a must. Those are skills my personal journey has sharpened.

 

Environment

GayDonna Vandergrif

Being from the mountains of Virginia, I never had to look far to see the natural beauty this state enjoys. My childhood was spent outdoors enjoying the mountains and rivers. We were taught that each of us has a personal obligation to protect the environment. My grandfather was a farmer and the family grew much of what we ate. I truly understand the need for sound environmental policies. As your delegate, I will advocate for Virginia’s land, water, and air.

Veterans

GayDonna Vandergrif

The men and women of our military deserve our deepest gratitude. We should thank them for their service and always support them and their families. Without these great men and women, we would not be able to enjoy the benefits that come from living in a free and independent country. This is a very personal issue for me as my father is a disabled Army veteran and he lives with me. Being my father’s caregiver, I take him to the VA frequently for his healthcare. I understand the challenges. I want to ensure all veterans and their families have easy access to the benefits they have earned. I will always advocate for our service families.

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VA House 73 - 2019VA House 73 – 2019

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Debra Rodman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats flipped in 2017 where the winner, in this case Debra Rodman, opted to run for Senate rather than reelection. Willett, an attorney, and Kastleberg, an investment banker, are both making their first runs for office. Of the seats Republican’s hope to win back from Democrats this year, Northam’s margins in 2017 were thinnest here, with 53 percent of the vote. Combined with the fact that Democrats won’t have the advantage of running an incumbent,that has Republicans sounding confident.”

Summary

District Description: County of Henrico (part)
Current Delegate: Debra Rodman since 2018 (D)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Another district Democrats flipped in 2017 where the winner, in this case Debra Rodman, opted to run for Senate rather than reelection. Willett, an attorney, and Kastleberg, an investment banker, are both making their first runs for office. Of the seats Republican’s hope to win back from Democrats this year, Northam’s margins in 2017 were thinnest here, with 53 percent of the vote. Combined with the fact that Democrats won’t have the advantage of running an incumbent,that has Republicans sounding confident.”

VA House District 73

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #73

Rodney Willett

Current Position: Vice President, Impact Makers
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 73

For more information, see Rodney Willett’s post.

Rodney Willett 1RODNEY’S VIRGINIA ROOTS
A Virginia native who grew up in a family of teachers, Rodney has dedicated his career to public service. Rodney attended Virginia’s oldest university – The College of William and Mary – where he earned both his undergraduate and law degrees, and where he was instrumental in founding the Pulley Family Endowment, which supports public service work by students.

As an attorney, Rodney represented local governments in Virginia, where he learned firsthand what good governance can look like and the positive impact it can bring to working families. He was also instrumental in establishing and expanding free legal assistance programs while running his practice.

CREATING CHANGE
In the late 90’s, Rodney saw the potential for technology to transform government, and created Virginia Interactive, where he led a public/private partnership with the Commonwealth to move information and citizen/business services online, helping put Virginia at the forefront of the online revolution.

Rodney has continued this work with his current company, Impact Makers. Impact Makers’ “all profits to charity” model has led the company to contribute nearly $3 million in financial and pro bono support to nonprofits that help families facing health care, education and housing issues.

Rodney is running for the House of Delegates because he wants to put his exceptional experience to work advocating for the interests of everyone in his home district, the 73rd.

LEADING WITH EXPERIENCE
Rodney lives in Henrico with his wife, Lydia, an attorney and fellow W&M graduate. They have three children – a middle school teacher, a college student at UVA, and a high school student.

Rodney chairs the Richmond Performing Arts Alliance and champions its early learning through arts program for kids. He also serves on the board of Rx Partnership, which provides free or low-cost prescription medication fulfillment to uninsured Virginians. As a member of Virginia’s Children’s Health Insurance Advisory Board, Rodney has fought to endure the continuation of life-saving healthcare coverage for kids.

Rodney’s work has had a positive impact on all Virginians. It’s time to put that experience to work for Henrico.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg

Current Position: Retired, Business Executive
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 73

For more information, see Mary Margaret Kastelberg’s post.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg was born on the Fourth of July in 1963, in Richmond, Virginia to Bill and Dorothy Smithers, an attorney and former school teacher. As the third of four children, she grew up in an active household in Henrico. Her family was involved in St. Mary’s parish, often volunteering at bingo nights, spaghetti suppers and basketball games.

Mary Margaret graduated as valedictorian from St. Catherine’s School in Richmond in 1981, and headed to Princeton University that fall.

While at Princeton, Mary Margaret had a full schedule of studies, sports, work and interest groups. Having never before “rowed”, with grit and sheer determination she worked her way into the “first boat” of the Freshman Crew. She later joined the rugby team where she finished her senior year as captain. In addition to making time for sports, Mary Margaret worked in food services and the Alumni Council all four years before graduating in 1985.

After college, Mary Margaret headed directly to the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business where she graduated in 1987, with an MBA concentrating in Finance.

Following UVA, she accepted a position at Ryland Acceptance Corporation as a financial analyst in Richmond. She worked in various roles during her tenure and eventually left the company as a Senior Vice President. Her financial experience led her to accept a position at a small and growing investment banking firm in Richmond, Ewing Monroe & Co., where she expanded her knowledge of finance and capital structures as well as business management.

Though she had always been active in alumni activities, in 1989 Mary Margaret began what would become an expanding list of community outreach by first partnering with Richmond’s Big Brother Big Sister Program.

Mary Margaret (Smithers) married Eugene Kastelberg at Richmond’s Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in 1995. In four years, the family doubled with the arrival of Bridget in 1997 and of Gene III 1999.

Mary Margaret stepped back from the corporate world and balanced working part-time and the demands of caring for family, both young and old.​

Like many moms, she could be found volunteering at her children’s school, coaching soccer games and volunteering at St. Bridget Church.

Mary Margaret joined the board of Commonwealth Catholic Charities in 2006, serving as the chair from November 2015-March 2018. She was drawn to the mission of the organization to serve the most vulnerable in our community, regardless of faith. The entire family has supported the Little Sisters of the Poor over many decades and especially looks forward to prepping for and working at the annual French Food Festival.

After years of car-pool, football and softball games, and many recitals, Mary Margaret and Gene are excited to have two Hokies in the house. They continue to work in their respective fields (business and medicine), but look forward to visits to Blacksburg.

Issues

Economy

Rodney Willett

Henrico and the Greater Richmond area are engines for economic development.  Rodney wants to preserve and grow that engine by applying smart policies that help eliminate red tape and minimize bureaucracy for businesses. His expertise in using technology to help streamline government will be put to work creating good jobs in Henrico and developing retraining programs for workers who need new job skills. Rodney also believes in equal pay for equal work, and will work to raise the minimum wage so Virginia workers can support their families.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg

Improve Quality of Life
Henrico is one of the best places to live in Virginia, and Mary Margaret believes there are opportunities to continue improving the quality of life for our citizens. To accomplish this, Mary Margaret believes:

1. Henrico must remain “open for business” and sustain an environment that is welcoming to entrepreneurs and businesses of all sizes. This business-friendly environment will spur job opportunities across all fields.

2. State and local leaders must work together to manage growth and ensure proper planning continues in Henrico. Mary Margaret will work with leaders across the aisle to manage growth and ensure common concerns such as school overcrowding and transportation safety are addressed as we continue to grow.

3. Our children should never feel unsafe in our community whether on the playground or online. As a mother of two, Mary Margaret is committed to ensuring our law enforcement agencies are given all of the tools that they need to protect families.

Education

Rodney Willett

Rodney believes strongly in public education and will advocate for more and better funding for schools, including support for sufficient counseling resources, and hiring the best and brightest teachers by paying them fair wages. Studies have shown that children who receive early childhood education are more likely to succeed later in life. Early investments result in the biggest impact. Rodney supports universal Pre-K enrollment for all Virginia kids. Investing in education isn’t just the smart thing to do, it’s the right thing to do.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg

Improve Henrico Schools
Henrico County schools are one of our region’s greatest resources, and our state universities are consistently ranked among the best in the nation.  Mary Margaret is committed to working with local schools, colleges and businesses so students graduate from high school and either enter the workforce skills-ready or continue their education without accumulating crippling student debt.

To keep our schools strong, we need to invest in recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers. Our assessments of students, teachers, and schools should be relevant and measure progress against appropriate benchmarks. Mary Margaret will look at opportunities for schools to partner with non-profit organizations to support students in a variety of areas including mentoring and reading.

A cookie-cutter approach to education does not work. Mary Margaret recognizes that different students have different needs and having an array of educational options enhances our ability to meet those needs.

In addition, Mary Margaret feels we must avoid adding more burdensome mandates, which often result in unintended and undesirable consequences. Trusting local school districts with greater discretion in scheduling and staffing, with appropriate oversight, can relieve budget pressures while maintaining adherence to approved and uniform standards.

Mary Margaret believes that by bringing educators, families, businesses and community groups together, we can create the best outcomes for students.

Health Care

Rodney Willett

AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE
Nothing hurts a family more than a loved one experiencing a healthcare nightmare – and not being able to pay the bill. Rodney believes every Virginian deserves access to affordable, quality healthcare that covers pre-existing and chronic conditions. Medicaid expansion was a good start, but still too many Virginians lack reliable health care at reasonable costs. Prescription drugs must be affordable: No one should ever have to choose between a meal and medication. But that’s not all – Rodney is also advocating that Virginia put more funding into mental health care and addiction treatment, to help keep the most disadvantaged Virginians from falling through the cracks.

PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICES
Rodney is proud to be on the board of Rx Partnership, which has helped more than 12,000 uninsured Virginians obtain 60,000 needed prescriptions in the past 12 months alone. Rodney believes that no one should ever have to choose between a meal and medicine. His own experiences with his aging parents and their steep monthly medication costs have led him to be active on this issue. Public/private partnerships hold the key to solving this pervasive problem, and Rodney is an expert at establishing those initiatives.

WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE
Rodney trusts women. He believes they must have the ability to make their own decisions, in consultation with their doctors, about their bodies. He supports a woman’s right to choose and access to affordable contraception. He will fight to ensure that Republicans do not roll back these vital protections and make it harder for women to get the healthcare they need.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg

Increase Access to Quality Healthcare
For many Henrico families, having access to affordable and top-quality healthcare is difficult or unattainable. Other Henrico families may have coverage, but they face rising costs each year.

Mary Margaret believes we need to preserve what is working in our healthcare system, while also pushing for policies that expand access and reduce costs without requiring a complete government takeover of our health insurance system.

We can do this, and Mary Margaret’s guiding principles on healthcare are:

1. Protect patients with preexisting conditions.

2. Support measures to increase access to care, while working to reduce costs to patients and taxpayers. Medicaid is the fastest growing item in the Virginia Budget, and for individuals, the cost of prescription drugs is skyrocketing. Mary Margaret is focused on finding innovative ways to address these and other cost issues.

3. Oppose “Single Payer,” “Medicare for All,” or any other complete government takeover of healthcare proposals for Virginia as it will result in the inevitable elimination of private insurance coverage, restrict access to the doctor of your choice, and weaken the top-quality healthcare available in Henrico.

Safety

Rodney Willett

Guns
Almost all of us remember where we were when we heard about the Virginia Tech shooting. Too many preventable gun-related tragedies have unfolded in our Commonwealth. Common sense gun safety measures are not a political issue, they’re a public health issue. Establishing universal background checks is a proven way to keep guns away from violent criminals and potential terrorists. Rodney will advocate for legislation that keeps guns from domestic abusers, protecting our families. Rodney will support red flag laws so that those who present an immediate danger to themselves or others can have firearms temporarily removed. Rodney will fight for bipartisan gun safety laws in the House of Delegates. He will not settle for continued inaction.

Mary Margaret Kastelberg

Our children should never feel unsafe in our community whether on the playground or online. As a mother of two, Mary Margaret is committed to ensuring our law enforcement agencies are given all of the tools that they need to protect families.

Civil Rights

Rodney Willett

Businesses around the country know they can invest in Virginia because we have successfully fought back efforts to codify discrimination. If we want to continue attracting companies that bring good-paying jobs and good corporate partnerships, we need laws that protect the rights of all our citizens. Rodney’s core principle is that ALL Virginians deserve equal opportunity, justice and fairness, no matter their skin color, ethnicity, faith, country of origin, sexual orientation or gender identity. He will actively fight prejudice, bigotry and discrimination, which includes advocating for passing the ERA to give women long overdue constitutional protections.

Environment

Rodney Willett

Rodney believes climate change is real. As a coastal state, Virginia is threatened by rising sea levels, which will ruin communities, homes and livelihoods while menacing our military installations. Severe and dangerous weather events are becoming more common and more dangerous. Rodney will work in the General Assembly to take concrete steps to move to renewable energy sources.  As an outdoorsman and hiker, Rodney also values our unique public lands and iconic waterways, such as Shenandoah National Park, and he will ensure they are protected from harmful development.

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VA House 76 – 2019 ElectionVA House 76 – 2019 Election

District Description: Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Suffolk (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Jones since 1998 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Once basically invincible, Jones, the Republican chair of the House money committee, was hardest hit by a court ordered-redistricting plan, which turned his reliable red district distinctly blue. Democrats there now hold a theoretical 15-point advantage, a figure calculated as part of the redistricting process based on 2012 presidential election results. Democrats are already spending money there on digital ads to boost Jenkins, a real estate agent. Neither Jones nor his party, however, are writing off the district. Republicans say their candidate is well known and well liked in the area, the result of years of hard campaigning.”

Summary

District Description: Cities of Chesapeake (part) and Suffolk (part)
Current Delegate: Chris Jones since 1998 (R)

According to Ned Oliver of Virginia Mercury:

“Once basically invincible, Jones, the Republican chair of the House money committee, was hardest hit by a court ordered-redistricting plan, which turned his reliable red district distinctly blue. Democrats there now hold a theoretical 15-point advantage, a figure calculated as part of the redistricting process based on 2012 presidential election results. Democrats are already spending money there on digital ads to boost Jenkins, a real estate agent. Neither Jones nor his party, however, are writing off the district. Republicans say their candidate is well known and well liked in the area, the result of years of hard campaigning.”

VA House District 76

District Map (PDF)

VA State House District #76

Chris Jones

Current Position: State Delegate for VA House District 76 since 1998
Former: Suffolk City Council (1986-98; Vice Mayor 1986-90; Mayor 1992-96)
Affiliation: Republican

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 76

For more information, see Chris Jones’s post.

Chris JonesChris Jones was born and raised here in the 76th District. Born in 1958, he grew up in a family of three children with parents Bobby and Barbara Jones, who were active in their community.  Growing up in Chuckatuck, Chris was involved with Little League Baseball, a member of the Chuckatuck Volunteer Fire Department and spent time working for his father, a pharmacist who owned Village Drugs in Chuckatuck. Chris graduated from John Yeates High school in 1976 and attended Randolph-Macon College where he was a member of the Ashland Volunteer Fire Department and the Ashland Volunteer Rescue Squad. Following in his dad’s footsteps, Chris attended the Medical College of Virginia to become a pharmacist graduating in 1982. In 1985, Chris opened Bennett’s Creek Pharmacy. In 1986, Chris began his first term on the Suffolk City Council where he represented the Chuckatuck Borough until 1998. While on council he served two terms as Vice Mayor, from 1986-1990 and served two terms as mayor from 1992-1996. In 1997, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates by the residents of the 76th District. In Richmond, Chris serves on three Standing Committees in the House of Delegates, Privileges and Elections (since 1998), Appropriations (since 2002), and Rules (since 2012).  In 2014, Chris was tapped as Chairman of the House Appropriations committee, where he provides a strong, common-sense voice for the hard-working citizens of the Commonwealth. Chris and his wife Karen have one daughter, Kaitlin, who is a graduate of the College of William and Mary.

Clinton Jenkins

Current Position: Manager real estate company
Affiliation: Democrat

Candidate: 2019 State Delegate VA House District 76

For more information, see Clinton Jenkins’s post.

Clinton Jenkins 1Clint was raised in the heart of the 76th district and graduated from John F. Kennedy High School.  After graduating, Clint enlisted in the US Army and proudly served his country. Upon returning to Suffolk, he earned his B.A. at Saint Leo University and continued his graduate studies at Southeastern Baptist Theology Seminary.

He and his future wife, Karen Hopson, met at the Oak Grove Baptist Church in Suffolk. The proud parents of three daughters, he and Karen will be celebrating their 32nd wedding anniversary this year.

After working for a time as a Subcontracts Administrator for BAE Systems Shipyard, Clint later became the Ethics Officer for the shipyard. While employed in the ship repair industries, Clint began to work part-time as a real estate agent. Today, he manages a local real estate company with his daughter, Ashlin.

Clint has been serving his community his entire adult life, staying active in local Civic Leagues, churches, and various other community organizations. He has also been a leader in the local Democratic Party, serving as the Suffolk coordinator for the 77th district House of Delegates and the DPVA’s Chair of the 3rd Congressional District.

A strong commitment to service has defined Clint’s involvement in his community. He knows the needs and concerns of the people of the 76th District because he has seen and heard them firsthand. He is committed to representing his constituents with honesty, integrity, and transparency.

Issues

Better Government

Chris Jones

Chris knows that you want the most for your hard earned tax dollars and expect the government to use your money wisely. This is why he has fought to cut out wasteful spending so that your tax dollars can be put to better use such as funding for new roads and bridges and better technology in our public schools.

Civil Rights

Chris Jones

Chris understands that gun ownership is a fundamental right of all American’s and has been a champion of protecting the Second Amendment. He believes in the value of owning firearms for home defense and sport. He rejects bills that infringe on the fundamental rights of Virginians to own and carry firearms.

Clinton Jenkins

  • Support the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment in Virginia
  • Fight for equal pay for equal work legislation
  • Protect a woman’s constitutionally-protected right to make her own healthcare decisions, and roll back existing barriers to access

Education

Chris Jones

Del. Jones has championed Education reform bills that will make standardized testing more applicable to real world situations and critical thinking skills. This will ensure that the children of Virginia are prepared and competitive in a global workforce. He understands that the children are the future of the commonwealth and deserve the very best from the public school system so that they have a fair shot at success.

Clinton Jenkins

Infrastructure

Chris Jones

Chris understands the congestion issues that a growing state faces and knows that the less time you spend sitting in traffic means more time at home with your family. He serves on the Hampton Roads Transportation Accountability Commission that decides how the money appropriated to Hampton Roads for new roads and bridges gets spent. He has been a champion of sweeping transportation reform that will improve the infrastructure of the entire state of Virginia and shorten your commute to and from work every day.

Clinton Jenkins

Safety

Chris Jones

Del. Jones was named the 2013 Delegate of the Year by the Virginia State Police Association as well as receiving numerous other awards from law enforcement agencies. He is not only committed to supporting our brave men and women in law enforcement but also supporting policy that help keep our neighborhoods safe.

Clinton Jenkins

Economy

Chris Jones

Del. Jones has a proven record of supporting legislation that makes it easier for Virginia businesses to operate and thrive. He stands behind policies that help create jobs for the Commonwealth by cutting back on government red tape that gets in the way of running a business. As a small business owner himself, Chris knows what it takes to create good-paying jobs that help Virginia’s families. He supports Virginia’s Right to Work laws that protect workers from being forced into paying union dues and helps businesses continue to run efficiently and continue to grow and hire.

Clinton Jenkins

Economy/Jobs

  • Attract better-paying jobs so no one who works full-time struggles to make ends meet
  • Invest in critical infrastructure that companies need to do business more efficiently
  • Expand job training programs to help get people back to work

Workers’ Rights

  • Increase the minimum wage
  • Repeal Virginia’s Right to Work law
  • Crack down on employers who engage in wage theft and employee misclassification
  • Protect employees’ rights to organize and collectively bargain

 

Voting Rights

Clinton Jenkins

  • Repeal Virginia’s Voter ID law
  • Institute universal voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting
  • Expand early voting periods to give people greater flexibility in casting their ballots
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