Jennifer Carroll Foy

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Jennifer Carroll Foy is fighting to:

  • Improve transportation by extending the Metro Blue Rail to Prince William County and changing the state formula to ensure Stafford county has sufficient funds for road construction and maintenance.
  • Protect the water we drink from coal ash contamination, by removing ash or recycling it to make materials like concrete.
  • Ensure that veterans have the resources they need to get an education, start a businesses, and fully participate in Virginia’s economy after returning from service.

Wendy Gooditis

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Sam Rasoul

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Sam Rasoul is the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer of a non-profit healthcare firm helping with maternal child health in East Africa. Equipped with an understanding that leadership is a bold journey for justice, he organizes community leaders through The Impact Center; his initiative to develop & empower new age leaders.

Sam committed to decline any donations from special interest Political Action Committees and lobbyists in an effort to raise awareness of the control many powerful special interests have over the political system.

Chris Hurst

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

“I’ve dedicated my life to public service and giving a voice to the people of southwest Virginia.”
“My career in news was fulfilling but instead of asking questions, I became focused on finding solutions.”

Danica Roem

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Kelly Fowler

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Kelly Fowler’s life has always been dedicated to the service of others. She’s worked as an elementary school teacher and owns her own small real estate business specializing in military family relocation and advocacy. She has been a resident of Virginia Beach since childhood and cares deeply for her community.

Delegate Fowler supports transparency and will serve with integrity, and will support legislation to ensure others do the same.

Joshua Cole

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Josh has served the state by acting as the Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler, fighting for the people by working alongside Delegate Convirs-Fowler on issues important to all Virginians, like fair housing.

Simultaneously, Josh serves on Stafford County Public Schools Superintendent’s Equity, Diversity and Opportunity Committee, the Greater Fredericksburg Area Interfaith Council, as the President of the Stafford County NAACP and participates with numerous other local and community initiatives.

Liz Guzman

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Elizabeth  Guzman has been working in the public sector for 10 years, and currently works as the Division Chief for Administrative Services for the Center for Adult Services for the City of Alexandria. Her personal and professional experience have given her strong insight into the needs of the 31st House of Delegates district, and Elizabeth cares about the many challenges residents in Prince William County and Fauquier County face. Elizabeth will fight as a strong advocate for the needs of the 31st District, whether that’s legislating for change in Richmond, or attending a community meeting in Catlett.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Liz Guzman’s office in Woodbridge, VA on Oct. 17, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

David Reid

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Kathleen Murphy

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.comDecember 13, 2019 (Short)

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.com – December 13, 2019

State Delegate Kathleen Murphy (D-McLean) introduced the legislation making the non-resident bans possible. Her bill sailed through the state Senate on a 32 to 7 vote, and the measure cleared the House of Delegates without opposition.

“A county operating under the urban county executive form of government may by ordinance develop a program to issue resident permits or stickers to residents of a designated area that will allow such residents to make turns into or out of the designated area during certain times of the day when such turns would otherwise be restricted,” Virginia Code Section 15.2-2022.1 states.

On Saturday, the Virginia House Democratic Caucus announced their remaining elected leadership positions. The election results are as follows:

Vice Chair of Operations: Jeion Ward
Vice Chair of Outreach: Kathleen Murphy
Secretary: Marcus Simon
Treasurer: Betsy Carr
Sergeant-at-Arms: Delores McQuinn

“I am pleased to congratulate Dels. Jeion Ward, Kathleen Murphy, Betsy Carr, and Delores McQuinn on their re-election to caucus leadership positions and to welcome Del. Marcus Simon to his new role as Secretary,” said Caucus Chair Rip Sullivan.

Democrats walk away with Fairfax election, gain legislative majorities
Inside Nova , Brian TrompterNovember 7, 2019 (Short)

It would be tough to imagine a better night than Nov. 5 was for local Democrats.

Candidates backed by the Fairfax County Democratic Committee secured all but one of the 10 seats on the county’s Board of Supervisors, had a strong showing in the School Board race and beat back an independent challenger for commonwealth’s attorney.

Del. Kathleen Murphy (D-34th) received 10,004 votes (56.7 percent) to defeat Republican challenger Gary Pan, who earned 7,630 votes (43.2 percent).

Kathleen Murphy For Delegate - "Good Things"
Murphy for DelegateJune 28, 2015 (00:30)

Current Position: State Delegate for 34th House District since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Mark Keam

This year, Dominion is looking for an explicit legislative green light to build, on its own, what would be the nation’s largest offshore wind project off the coast of Virginia Beach, and recoup the estimated $8 billion cost from ratepayers.

On a 5-4 tally, the bill advanced, but unease from Democratic Dels. Mark Keam of Fairfax and Alfonso Lopez of Arlington showed not everyone is sold on the idea that such a project would be in the public interest.

Virginia onAir interviews Mark Keam
Kerrie Thompson, CuratorJanuary 15, 2020 (10:37)

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

In 2009, Mark became the first Asian-born immigrant and the first Korean American elected to any state-level office in Virginia. Since then, voters in the 35th District have returned Mark to Richmond for additional two-year terms.

Over the past decade, Mark has authored dozens of state laws that impact the quality of life for Virginians, such as improving public education and healthcare, creating innovative tech sector and environmental jobs, supporting military veterans and public safety, reforming tax codes and business regulations, and providing more government transparency, accountability, and efficiency.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Kerrie Thompson in the Fairfax Regional Library in the Fall of 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Ken Plum

Current Position: State Delegate since 1978
Affiliation: Democrat

I am in my thirty-ninth year of service representing the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. I am a retired teacher and school administrator, having been employed by the Fairfax County Public Schools for nearly 30 years. Serving as your delegate is now my full-time focus.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Ken Plum’s Pocahontas Building office in Richmond, VA on Jan. 17, 2020. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

David Bulova

Current Position: State Delegate since 2007
Affiliation: Democrat

David Bulova was first elected to the General Assembly in November 2005.  He currently serves on the General Laws, Education, and Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural Resources committees.

David is passionate about community service. He is currently on the Board of Trustees of Brain Injury Services, which provides support to survivors of brain injuries and their families, the Board of the City of Fairfax Band, and the Board of Advisors for the William and Mary Public Policy Program.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Tim O’Shea in David Bulova’s Fairfax City office in July, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Kaye Kory

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Kaye and her husband Ross have lived in Fairfax County for over 35 years. Kaye has her B.A. degree in English from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University.

Kaye has represented District 38 since 2010. Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

Vivian Watts

Current Position: State Delegate since 1982
Affiliation: Democrat

As your Delegate in the state legislature, I face the challenge of acting on your behalf on a great many items from taxes to health care to school funding to crime to the environment. I value your opinions and constantly learn from your experiences to help me serve more effectivel

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Dan Helmer is a combat veteran, business strategist, Rhodes Scholar, husband, and father.  His wife, Karen, is a public school teacher, and their two young sons, Harris and Aaron, attend class in Fairfax County Public Schools.

Dan is a leader who is ready to bring out-of-the-box thinking to deliver better transportation solutions to Northern Virginia, protect our children in school while ensuring they have a high quality education, and protecting Virginians’ access to quality, affordable healthcare.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Shuaib Ahmed in Dan Helmer’s office in Arlington, VA on Dec. 11, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Eileen Filler-Corn

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Eileen Filler-Corn has served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 41st District, since 2010. The 41st District, located in Fairfax County, includes Burke and parts of Fairfax, Fairfax Station and West Springfield. Eileen has over two decades of experience in both the public and private sectors, working across party lines to make a difference in the lives of all Virginians. She currently is the 56th Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates.

Previously, Eileen served in the Administrations of Governor Mark Warner and Governor Tim Kaine, advising on state and federal relations. For over 25 years, Eileen and her husband Bob have lived in Fairfax County, Virginia, along with their children, Jeremy and Alana.

Kathy Tran

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Mark Sickles

Current Position: State Delegate since 2004
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Paul Krizek

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Mark Levine

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat

Mark Levine was elected in 2015 to represent the 45th Delegate District of Virginia (Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax).

Mark has a record of crafting progressive legislation at the local, state, and federal level that spans three decades. Mark is dedicated to turning the progressive ideals of our community into laws that help people and advance justice for all Americans. Mark co-founded the bi-partisan, bi-cameral Virginia Transparency Caucus, to make committee and subcommittee meetings in the General Assembly accessible to the public.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Kerrie Thompson at the Sherwood Community Center in Fairfax City during the LWV-Fairfax Redistricting Forum on Nov. 17, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Charniele Herring

Current Position: State Delegate since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat

Charniele has lived in Northern Virginia area for over 30 years, most of them in the West End of Alexandria.  Charniele has a rich history of community involvement as a volunteer, a member of Rotary, and a past Chair of the West End Business Association. She has served on the Alexandria Commission for Women, including Chairing the organization.

She was also appointed by Governor Tim Kaine to the state’s Council on the Status of Women. She presently serves on the Board of the Parent Teacher Leadership Institute of Alexandria and as a Trustee of Hopkins House—advocating for strong pre-k education.

Patrick Hope

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Rip Sullivan

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Alfonso Lopez

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Lee Carter

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Hala Ayala

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Luke Torian

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Marcus Simon

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Karrie Delaney

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

As a local community leader and a mom,  Karrie Delaney is dedicated to bringing innovative economic growth, world-class education, and healthcare for all to Northern Virginia.”

Karrie Delaney has always been committed to strengthening the community for everyone.

The daughter of a U.S. Army veteran, Karrie saw firsthand the importance of supporting our returning heroes. Her dad came home from Korea in the late 1950’s to get his GED and a good-paying job in a VA Hospital.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Kerrie Thompson at the Sherwood Community Center in Fairfax City during the LWV-Fairfax Redistricting Forum on Nov. 17, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

David Toscano

Current Position: State Delegate since 2006
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Mayor Charlottesville ; Charlottesville City Council from 1994 – 1996

David Toscano’s priorities are education, energy, and the environment. He fights for education funding, against teacher pay freezes, and to protect VRS and retirement benefits. He pushes the cause of renewable energy, and stood against those who deny the reality of climate change.

He opposes predatory lending in its various forms. He argues for multifaceted transportation programs that include roads, rail, and public transit. He opposes cuts to services for the poor and disabled, defends a woman’s right to choose, and advances reforms in foster care and adoption, so that all children will have the opportunity to live productive lives in family settings free from abuse and neglect.

Sally Hudson

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Sally Hudson understands that so many challenges we face are economic at their core, from the rising cost of housing and health care to the red tape holding back clean power production. She’s running for Delegate to deliver innovative reforms that secure genuine opportunity for all.

Sally also knows that real progress on policy requires fixing our democracy itself. That’s why she’s been a dedicated election reform advocate. Sally founded FairVote VA, a cross-partisan coalition working to advance ranked choice voting in Virginia. She is also an active volunteer with OneVirginia2021, the statewide anti-gerrymandering campaign, and a grassroots leader in Indivisible and Women of the Fifth.

Lashrecse Aird

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Dawn Adams

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Dr. Dawn M. Adams has been an advocate for healthy communities for over 30 years. After receiving her Bachelors of Nursing degree from James Madison University, Dawn positioned herself in the center of Virginia’s healthcare system as a Critical Care Registered Nurse (RN). As an RN, Dawn saw first-hand how our state’s most vulnerable citizens continually fell through the cracks as a result of limited healthcare access and coverage.

Dawn is honored to take the lessons she’s learned as a nurse practitioner, administrator, educator, and community leader to represent her community as Delegate of Virginia’s House District 68 and is proud to represent the people of the city of Richmond, Chesterfield and Henrico counties.

Betsy Carr

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Betsy Carr was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 2009 representing parts of the City of Richmond and the County of Chesterfield on both sides of the James River.

In the House of Delegates she serves on the Appropriations, Transportation, General Laws, and Rules Committees. She also serves on the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, the Commission on Employee Retirement Security and Pension Reform, the Joint Commission on Administrative Rules, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Commission, and the Virginia Housing Commission. She is Treasurer of the House Democratic Caucus.

Delores McQuinn

Current Position: State Delegate since 2009
Affiliation: Democrat

From wikipedia

McQuinn was a member of the Richmond School Board 1992–96, serving as vice chair.

McQuinn was elected to the Richmond City Council in a special election on April 6, 1999, replacing Leonidas B. Young, II, who resigned in February, and Sherwood T. White, an interim appointment. She served as Vice-Mayor 2003–2004 and Vice-President of the Council 2007–2008.

When Delegate Dwight Clinton Jones was elected Mayor of Richmond in November 2008, McQuinn ran for the Democratic nomination for his 70th district House seat. She defeated lawyer Carlos Brown for the nomination, and was unopposed in the general election on January 6, 2009.

Jeffrey Bourne

Current Position: State Delegate since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): City of Richmond School Board from 2013 – 2017

Jeff Bourne has spent much of his professional career serving Virginia and the people of Richmond.

Prior to winning elected office, Jeff was appointed by Attorney General Mark Herring to serve as the Deputy Attorney General for transportation, real estate and construction litigation for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Prior to that appointment, Jeff was head of Government Relations at the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority. Jeff also served as Deputy Chief of Staff for the Mayor of Richmond.

Schuyler VanValkenburg

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Schuyler VanValkenburg knows firsthand the immeasurable impact a high quality education can have, and is committed to ensuring that for every child across the commonwealth.

He also knows how important it is provide equitable access and opportunities for every citizen – both by ensuring a democracy where every voice is heard and every vote counted and by increasing job growth and access to economic opportunity.

Finally, Schuyler believes in an inclusive society, and believes that Virginia has no place for discriminatory laws and policies which and that threaten the constitutional right to equal protection.

Rodney Willett

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

As an attorney, Rodney Willett represented local governments in Virginia, where he learned firsthand what good governance can look like and the positive impact it can bring to working families. He was also instrumental in establishing and expanding free legal assistance programs while running his practice.

In the late 90’s, Rodney saw the potential for technology to transform government, and created Virginia Interactive, where he led a public/private partnership with the Commonwealth to move information and citizen/business services online, helping put Virginia at the forefront of the online revolution.

Lamont Bagby

Current Position: State Delegate since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Henrico County School Board (Chair) from 2008 – 2015

Lamont Bagby (born December 21, 1976) is an American politician of the Democratic Party. On November 3, 2015, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 74th district, which includes Charles City County, parts of Henrico County and the City of Richmond. He is a former member of the Henrico County School Board.

Roslyn Tyler

Current Position: State Delegate since 2006
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Sussex County Board of Supervisors from 1984 – 1995

Delegate Roslyn Cain “Roz” Tyler, House of Delegates Representative of the 75thDistrict, was elected to the Virginia General Assembly in 2005. The 75th District includes all of the City of Emporia, all of Brunswick County, all of Greensville County and parts of Dinwiddie County, Lunenberg County, Southampton County, Sussex County, Surry County, Isle of Wight County, and the City of Franklin

Clinton Jenkins

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

After working for a time as a Subcontracts Administrator for BAE Systems Shipyard, Clint Jenkins later became the Ethics Officer for the shipyard. While employed in the ship repair industries, Clint began to work part-time as a real estate agent. Today, he manages a local real estate company with his daughter, Ashlin.

A strong commitment to service has defined Clint’s involvement in his community. He knows the needs and concerns of the people of the 76th District because he has seen and heard them firsthand. He is committed to representing his constituents with honesty, integrity, and transparency.

Cliff Hayes

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Chesapeake City Council (2004-12) from 2004 – 2012

Cliff” Hayes was sworn in as a member of House of Delegates, representing the 77th District of the Virginia General Assembly on November 22, 2016. Delegate Hayes is a life-long resident of the Chesapeake area.

Today, he serves as the CIO/Technology Director for the Norfolk Sheriff’s Office. Prior to being elected to the Virginia General Assembly, Delegate Hayes served as a member of the Chesapeake City Council from 2004 – 2012.  He is an ardent supporter of senior citizens rights, healthy alternatives for youth, public safety, technology, job creation/retention, and the city’s school system.

Stephen Heretick

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Portsmouth City Council from 2004 – 2012

Politicians are often on the wrong side of history; whether it be a failure to protect us against predatory tolls on our tunnels, cuts in state funding for our local schools, blocking working-class families from accessing healthcare, or eroding the voting rights of our elderly and disabled…enough

Don Scott

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Attorney Don Scott is a former United States Naval Officer. He understands integrity, service and sacrifice.

Don graduated from Texas A&M University, where he pledged Pi Omicron Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. He obtained his law degree from LSU.

Don sits on several boards and commissions, including Future of Hampton Roads, the 1st Vice President of the Southeastern Employment and Training Association, and as a Chair of the Portsmouth Economic Development Authority.

Nancy Guy

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Nancy Guy grew up in a Navy family in the 83rd District and attended Thoroughgood Elementary and Cox High School. She graduated from The College of William and Mary with a B.A. in Government ( where she was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa), and got her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

As a proud product of Virginia’s public education programs, supporting public education has long been her passion.  Nancy believes that a quality public education system is the very backbone of democracy and will do everything in her power to channel proper resources to it.

Alex Askew

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Alan Askew has served as a legislative aide for the Virginia House of Delegates, guiding elected officials towards tangible solutions. He’s helped craft groundbreaking legislation such as the nationwide Ashanti Alert (a public alert system for missing and endangered adults), Medicaid expansion, affordable housing expansion, and school safety initiatives.

Outside of work, he has remained engaged in this community. I am an active member of New Jerusalem Ministries, where I mentor and tutor local youth. I am a founding board member of the New Leaders Council Virginia, as well as a board member for the Democratic Business Alliance of South Hampton Roads and a 2018 graduate of UVA’s Political Leaders Program.

Ibraheem Samirah

Current Position: State Delegate since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Ibraheem Samirah won a special election on Feb. 19, 2019 against Republican Gregg Nelsen and other candidates. On November 5, 2019  was unopposed in the Delegate race for District 86 – see Recent Election results below.

Ibraheem says “I worked hard in school so I could one day return to the country I loved. I attended American University and went on to Boston University for dental school. Today, I run a community based dental practice serving patients throughout metro DC.

Now, I am running for Virginia’s House of Delegates to give back—by helping families stay healthy, with more opportunities to succeed, and more time to spend together.”

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Ibraheem Samirah’s office in Herndon, VA on Oct. 2, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Suhas Subramanyam

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Jay Jones

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Jay Jones completed his undergraduate studies at the College of William and Mary, where he was a double major in Government and History, and obtained his law degree from the University of Virginia.  Upon graduation from law school, Jay began practicing law in Norfolk.  Prior to attending law school, he was an associate with Goldman Sachs where he focused on risk management and rating advisory.

Jay was raised in a family that believes deeply in public service and devotion to our city and its people. Currently, Jay serves as a member of the board of the Boys and Girls Club of Southeastern Virginia.

Joseph Lindsey

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Joseph (Joe) C. Lindsey is a lifelong resident of Norfolk, Virginia, successful attorney and community leader who has spent his life as a public servant.

Joe understands well how policies affect people and small businesses in our community. As the representative for the 90th District, Joe works to create a strong, self-sufficient, successful community with greater opportunities for Virginia. This spirit of servant leadership is at the core of everything he does, and something he strives to promote throughout the house.

Martha Mugler

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Martha Mugler has lived, worked, and raised a family in the 91st District. She’s a native of Hampton.

Martha was elected to the Hampton School Board in 2008, and is currently serving her third term. She served as Chairman of the Board for four years from 2012 – 2016. Martha received her BA in Communications from Radford University and is an Executive Assistant for Business Development at Old Point National Bank. She previously worked in university admissions, public, community and media relations.

Jeion Ward

Current Position: State Delegate since 2004
Affiliation: Democrat

Delegate Jeion Ward began serving as a member of the Virginia General Assembly, representing the 92nd District of the House of Delegates, in 2004.  As a member of the House of Delegates, she serves on the commerce and labor, transportation and general laws committees.

As a lifelong resident of the Hampton Roads area, Jeion and her family have remained active in the community for over thirty years.

In 1998, after serving four years as Vice President, Jeion was elected President of the Hampton Federation of Teachers, AFT Local 4260, a position she currently holds.  Jeion is a member of the Executive Council of the Virginia AFL-CIO. She has coordinated both partisan and non-partisan “Get-Out-The Vote” campaigns in targeted areas of Hampton and Newport News since 1997. In addition, she has organized voter registration drives and restoration of rights campaigns.

Michael Mullin

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat

Mike Mullin is passionate about a lot of things, and it’s one reason he is such a good Delegate for the 93rd District of Virginia. In Mike’s first year as a legislator, he passed four bills — more than any other freshman legislator in the House of Delegates that year.

He served on the Counties, Cities and Towns Committee and the Courts of Justice Committee. In his first year, he was most proud of his bill to ensure that people who commit domestic violence aren’t eligible for “first offender status” if they have committed other violent felonies. “This bill could help stop the cycle of violence and protect women and children,” he says. “It just might save the life of somebody you love.”

Shelly Simonds

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

My husband, Paul, and I moved to Newport News in 2000, when he was hired as a NASA engineer. We soon realized that Newport News was the perfect place to raise our two daughters, Georgia and Tessa. And after my second daughter turned two, I returned to the workforce as a Spanish teacher at their school, Hilton Elementary, and discovered a new passion for teaching. I had never had a workplace where I felt like I was part of a team with such purpose. We spent our lunch breaks talking about our students and how we could encourage them.

I’ve also been a longtime environmental activist. I got my start in Virginia politics as a member of the Legislative Contact Team with the League of Conservation Voters. This work is also incredibly important to me, and something that I want to fight for in the General Assembly, if elected.

Marcia Price

Current Position: State Delegate since 2016
Affiliation: Democrat

Marcia Price, affectionately known as “Cia”, was born and raised on the Peninsula.

Price worked as a special assistant in the Virginia Liaison Office under then Governor Mark Warner and as a state coordinator for the NAACP This Is My Vote! Campaign for voter registration, education, and mobilization.

Price serves on the Health, Welfare, and Institutions Committee (Subcommittee #1), the Privileges and Elections Committee (Subcommittee #3), and the General Laws Committee (Subcommittee #2). She currently serves as Secretary of both the House Democratic Caucus and the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus.  Del. Price is a member of the Hampton Roads Caucus and the National Black Caucus of State Legislators.

Featured video: Original interview recording and has not been edited in any way. This interview was conducted by Katlyn Weiser in Marcia Price’s office in the fall of 2019.

Jennifer Carroll Foy 1Jennifer Carroll Foy

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Jennifer Carroll Foy is fighting to:

  • Improve transportation by extending the Metro Blue Rail to Prince William County and changing the state formula to ensure Stafford county has sufficient funds for road construction and maintenance.
  • Protect the water we drink from coal ash contamination, by removing ash or recycling it to make materials like concrete.
  • Ensure that veterans have the resources they need to get an education, start a businesses, and fully participate in Virginia’s economy after returning from service.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Jennifer Carroll Foy is fighting to:

  • Improve transportation by extending the Metro Blue Rail to Prince William County and changing the state formula to ensure Stafford county has sufficient funds for road construction and maintenance.
  • Protect the water we drink from coal ash contamination, by removing ash or recycling it to make materials like concrete.
  • Ensure that veterans have the resources they need to get an education, start a businesses, and fully participate in Virginia’s economy after returning from service.

About

Auto Draft 17

Source: Campaign page

I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you my story because I think you deserve to know more about me and what I believe.

When I was growing up, my grandmother always said, “If you have it, you have to give it.” Those words stuck with me when I was at the Virginia Military Institute; they were the reason I served as a foster parent; and they are a guiding principle I live by as a public defender and a Delegate.

Giving back has been, and must continue to be, the foundation of Virginia. That is why I’ve made it my life’s work.

When I was at Virginia Military Institute (VMI), I knew I had to defy the odds and graduate in order to have the opportunity to give back. I enrolled in the third class of female cadets to attend the historically all-male college. On my first day, they shaved my head and said, “Welcome to VMI.” My best male friend bet me a dollar that I wouldn’t last a year. Well, I won that bet.

I know the deck seems stacked against us. Sometimes it seems like politicians prefer gridlock over results. But every time I look my kids in the eyes, or walk into work as a public defender, I know we have to fight toward a fairer, stronger, and more just Virginia. Having spent four years in a military academy, I learned to address problems head-on and never back down from a fight.

As your Delegate, I have delivered the following results:

  • We passed a state budget that expanded Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians to ensure access to affordable healthcare for veterans, women, and working families.
  • We passed a budget that includes 3% salary increases for teachers and 2% salary increases for law enforcement officers.
  • I proposed and passed legislation preparing our students for the 21st Century economy by making it easier for them to take coding classes and get Career and Technical Education certifications.
  • I proposed and passed legislation that made it easier for foster parents to adopt their foster children.
  • I led the charge to include funding for the full development of Widewater State Park in Stafford in Virginia’s budget.
  • I co-patroned a bill to increase the grand larceny threshold from $200 to $500.

But, we still have work to do. As your Delegate, I am fighting to:

  • Improve transportation by extending the Metro Blue Rail to Prince William County and changing the state formula to ensure Stafford county has sufficient funds for road construction and maintenance.
  • Protect the water we drink from coal ash contamination, by removing ash or recycling it to make materials like concrete.
  • Ensure that veterans have the resources they need to get an education, start a businesses, and fully participate in Virginia’s economy after returning from service.

Together, we can achieve great things. If you have any questions, please email my office at DelJCarrollFoy@house.virginia.gov.

Experience

Education

  • BA
    Virginia Military Institute
    2019 to 2003
  • MA
    Virginia State University
    2019 to 2005
  • JD
    Thomas Jefferson School of Law
    2019 to 2010

Personal

Birth Year: 1981
Place of Birth: Petersburg, VA
Gender: Female
Race(s): African American
Religion: Baptist
Spouse: Jeffrey Foy
Children: Alex Foy and Xander Foy
Occupation/Profession: Public Defender

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Joshua Crandell
Administrative Assistant During Session: Charlotte Via

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219

District Office
P.O. Box 5113
Woodbridge, VA 22194
Phone: (571) 402-5704

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Jennifer Carroll Foy (D)11,82860.92%
Heather Mitchell (R)7,56338.95%
Write in (Write-in)24.12%
TOTAL19,415

2017 State DelegateArray

Jennifer Carroll Foy (D)13,36663.0%
Michael David Makee (R)7,80336.8%
Write in (Write-in)34.2%
TOTAL21,203

Finances

Source: Follow the Money

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Ballotpedia

Issues

Civil Rights

WOMEN’S RIGHTSAs a working mother who gave birth during my campaign, I know the struggles of simultaneously being a mother and working a full-time job. That’s why I am fighting to institute paid family medical leave policies, fair scheduling laws, and equal pay for equal work policies. I also believe that we must ensure all women have access to affordable birth control and cancer screenings. I am staunch defender against the concerted effort to roll back women’s rights and access to safe, affordable healthcare

As a working mother who gave birth during my campaign, I know the struggles of simultaneously being a mother and working a full-time job. 

That’s why I am fighting to institute paid family medical leave policies, fair scheduling laws, and equal pay for equal work policies. I also believe that we must ensure all women have access to affordable birth control and cancer screenings. I am staunch defender against the concerted effort to roll back women’s rights and access to safe, affordable healthcare

CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

As a former magistrate and a current public defender, I have witnessed first-hand the need for comprehensive criminal justice reform. We must end the school to prison pipeline and stop locking up our children for small mistakes. This starts by promoting alternatives to out of school suspension and emphasizing deterrence options for resource officers. In the 2018 session, I proposed ten criminal justice reform bills.

In my first year in office, I co-sponsored legislation to raise the grand larceny threshold from $200 to $500 and stop needlessly convicting children of felonies. Virginia had one of the lowest grand larceny thresholds in the country: If someone takes something valued at $200 or more, they can be charged with a felony. That means, if a child is cold and takes a coat in the dead of winter, they would often be charged with a felony and sent to prison. While I believe the grand larceny threshold should be raised to $1000, I am pleased we were able to raise the resold to $500. We must continue to focus on smart-on-crime initiatives that keep kids in schools and out of prisons.

Economy

GROWING OUR MIDDLE CLASSWe need to grow our economy from the middle out, by investing in our workforce, preparing every Virginian for the 21st Century economy, and ensuring that everyone can earn a living wage and be treated with dignity on the job. In my first year, I passed a bill that allows English language learners to take a coding class instead of a foreign language for the purposes of their graduation requirements to help give them the skills they need to be successful in today’s economy. Furthermore, I passed a bill that makes it easier for our children to receive Career and Technical Education certifications in our public schools. I will continue to sponsor and support legislation to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour, create paid family medical leave in Virginia, and end the gender pay gap. Nobody deserves to work 40 hours a week and live in poverty

We need to grow our economy from the middle out, by investing in our workforce, preparing every Virginian for the 21st Century economy, and ensuring that everyone can earn a living wage and be treated with dignity on the job. 

In my first year, I passed a bill that allows English language learners to take a coding class instead of a foreign language for the purposes of their graduation requirements to help give them the skills they need to be successful in today’s economy. Furthermore, I passed a bill that makes it easier for our children to receive Career and Technical Education certifications in our public schools. I will continue to sponsor and support legislation to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour, create paid family medical leave in Virginia, and end the gender pay gap. Nobody deserves to work 40 hours a week and live in poverty

Education

During my campaign, I promised to go to Richmond and increase teacher pay. I am proud to say that the new state budget includes 3% salary increases from all teachers and support workers. As your delegate, I will continue to fight to strengthen our schools by working to reduce classroom size and combat the teacher shortage crisis in Prince William and Stafford. 

Public education has a direct impact on the economy and raises families out of poverty. In order to attract and retain quality teachers, we must find creative ways to attract the best and brightest educators. We also must reinvest in our schools to remain competitive and prepare the future generation.

Environment

COAL ASH, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND OUR STATE PARKS

In Woodbridge, I live just a few miles from Possum Point, where coal ash waste from a power plant was stored in ponds that seeped toxic chemicals into our water. We must protect the water we drink from coal ash contamination and ensure this pollution never happens again. This starts by removing the coal ash or recycling it to make materials like concrete.

As your Delegate, I support laws that will support the boom in renewable energy and create green jobs. I will also support entrepreneurial innovation and challenge businesses to engineer ways to reduce our carbon emissions.

Finally, with explosive population growth in Stafford and Prince William counties, we need a place where people can relax and enjoy the outdoors. That’s why I introduced a budget amendment to fully fund Widewater State Park’s operations and development in Stafford county. I am proud that the General Assembly allocated these funds, allowing Stafford residents to finally have public access to the Potomac River.

Health Care

In 2018, we passed a state budget that includes Medicaid expansion. 

Thanks to your advocacy, we expanded Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians – veterans, women, and working families. Here in the 2nd District, 2,400 of our neighbors now have access to healthcare through Medicaid expansion.

Infrastructure

TRANSPORTATION

Our neighbors lose far too much family time to traffic. As a daily commuter, I understand first-hand the effect traffic has on our businesses and our quality of life. As delegate, I proposed legislation to begin the process of extending the Metro Blue Line into Prince William County. While my efforts were blocked, I will continue to fight for transportation solutions. We must also change the Virginia Department of Transportation funding formula to ensure that Stafford county has adequate road funding

Veterans

As a VMI graduate, I know the sacrifice that our veterans, their spaces, and their families make for our country. One in every ten Virginian is a veteran – and we have more women veterans than any other state. I pledge to fight as hard for our veterans as they did for us. I have proposed legislation that helps fund extra programs in the Department of Veteran Services to help returning women veterans.

Twitter

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Wendy Gooditis 1Wendy Gooditis

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

About

Wendy Gooditis

Source: Campaign page

Wendy was raised to work hard and serve others. She grew up in Cranbury, New Jersey with two older brothers. Her father spent his childhood in rural Alabama during the Great Depression, where his family had scraped and saved to buy milk for him as an infant. As an adult, he rode in a commuter van over two hours each day to work, but still found time to teach Wendy how to play the piano and work hard for what she believed in.

Her mother and grandmother were public school teachers. In the 1930s, Wendy’s grandmother pushed social limits to earn her graduate degree, and Wendy’s mother followed suit. From them, Wendy learned early the importance of education, perseverance, and working women.

In college, Wendy applied her equestrian background to service. She worked as a student mounted marshal for the Rutgers Police, logging 30 hours a week with a full course load. After graduation, following in her family’s tradition of strong, working women, Wendy went on to lead a team of mid-career men at Bell Laboratories when she was 26 years old.

After she met Chris, her husband of 25 years, Wendy made the move to Virginia. Following the birth of her children in the mid-1990s, Wendy became enamored with education. She received her Masters in Education from Shenandoah University. During her career in education she taught in the Clarke County public school system, at an area private school, and partially homeschooled her children. As her kids entered college, Wendy knew that she would need to help pay the tuition bills. She joined RE/MAX as a realtor in 2013, and has been there since.

Like millions of other Americans in 2017, Wendy decided that she had to get off the sidelines. She co-founded an Indivisible chapter in the predominantly red Clarke County. However, she knew that was not enough. After deciding to run for the 10th district seat in the spring, she stormed to victory on November 7th 2017 beating 3 term incumbent Randy Minchew.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Real Estate Agent
    RE/MAX
    2013 to present
  • Educator
    Clarke County public school system
    2019 to present

Education

  • M.S., Education
    Shenandoah University
    2019 to 2012
  • B.S., Communications
    Rutgers University
    2019 to 1982

Personal

Birth Year: 1960
Place of Birth: New Brunswick, NJ
Gender: Female
Race(s): American Indian, Caucasian
Religion: Quaker
Spouse: Christopher Joseph Gooditis (Chris)
Children: Chloe and Locke Gooditis
Membership & Affiliation: Goose Creek Society of Friends

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Truman S. Braslaw
Administrative Assistant During Session: Mary Woodley

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1010

District Office
District Office
P.O. Box 180
Boyce, VA 22620
Phone: (540) 300-3857

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Gooditis grew up in Cranbury, New Jersey; she lived in Virginia for 20 years before running for office. Formerly an employee for Bell Laboratories, Gooditis became a teacher in the 1990s, teaching in the Clarke County, Virginia public schools and at a private school. Gooditis then became a real estate agent.

After Donald Trump’s rise, Gooditis became a co-founder of the anti-Trump Indivisibles chapter in Clarke County.

Gooditis’s successful 2017 run for the 10th district seat in the Virginia House of Delegates was her first run for elected office.  She defeated incumbent Republican Randy Minchew, who had held the seat since 2011.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Wendy Gooditis (D)15,92852.31%
John Randall Minchew (R)14,50047.62%
Write In (Write-in)190.06%
TOTAL30,447

2017 State DelegateArray

Wendy Gooditis (D)15,16151.9%
John Randall Minchew (R)14,02548.0%
Write In (Write-in)260.1%
TOTAL29,212

Finances

GOODITIS, WENDY  has run in 1 race for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$480,257.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Science and Technology
Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources

Subcommittees

Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources – Subcommittee #3

Appointments

House Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
House Science & Technology

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Source: Campaign page

Suicide rates are on the rise in Virginia, especially among women.Lawmakers are trying to figure out ways to reverse the trend. Since 2010, the suicide rate among women in Virginia has increased 24 percent.

Freddy Mejia at the Commonwealth Institute says a number of factors may have contributed. “Making sure that mental health is accessible to this population is crucial. We also know that increased access to lethal means, such as illicit and prescription drugs as well as firearms, may have contributed to this rise.”

Earlier this year, Delegate Wendy Gooditis, a Democrat from Northern Virginia, introduced a bill that requires the state to issue an annual report to lawmakers about suicide prevention. “My family was horrifically affected by the loss of my brother this year following a couple of years of suicide attempts, so in my personal and professional opinion anything we can do to spread the word and help these people is really important.”

Legislative Priority – What is your top priority if elected to the General Assembly?
(answer from Virginia21 2019 General Assembly Candidate Survey)

My top priority is protecting the health and safety of my constituents through improved access to medical care, common sense gun safety reforms, and environmental protections.

Democracy

REDISTRICTING & VOTING RIGHTS

Gerrymandering is the issue that first got Wendy out of her chair at a town hall back in February 2017. As a 19-year resident of the district, she has watched its lines be contorted and redrawn.

Wendy believes that free and fair elections are tenets of our democracy. Voters should be choosing their politicians instead of politicians choosing their voters. She has supported a constitutional amendment in Virginia to ensure that district lines are not drawn to favor any individual or political party. Furthermore, she firmly opposes any effort to make voting harder — and is appalled by Virginia House Republicans efforts to require photo identification for absentee ballots and multiple forms of state ID at the voting booth.

Economy

Wendy believes that the economy should work for everyone, giving each Virginian a fair shot. That means competitive public and technical education systems, a living minimum wage and jobs for our veterans. It also means the protection of worker rights and labor unions as well as equal economic opportunity for all Virginians. It means government investment in public infrastructure so that we can can build better roads, bike lanes and transit systems. Virginia’s economy is developing quickly, and we must take steps to ensure that our workforce is well trained and paid so that it can grow, compete and prosper.

Virginia21 2019 General Assembly Candidate Survey

A Prosperous Virginia – In your view, how can we ensure that Virginia has the high employment rates and good job opportunities that will encourage students to remain in the Commonwealth after graduating from postsecondary institutions? What policies are needed to close employment equity gaps and offer socioeconomic mobility for young Virginians?

I believe greater state public education funding can even the playing field in K-12 schools between wealthy and poor localities. This would, in turn, produce more equitaby distributed college-readiness among students. I believe good education is the cornerstone of a healthy and meaningful life for individuals, families, and our society as a whole.

Education

As a career educator and mom of two, Wendy understands that our communities are only as strong as our schools. In Richmond, she fights for competitive public schools so that each child in Virginia can learn and succeed.

The wage for Virginia public school teachers is about $7,000 under the national average. Because Wendy’s mom and grandmother were public school teachers, she understands firsthand the impact of underpaid educators. This life experience makes her a staunch supporter of a living wage and benefits for public educators, so that Virginia can recruit and retain the nation’s top talent. She knows that investing in Virginia’s families means investing in Virginia’s teachers.

Virginia21 2019 General Assembly Candidate Survey

Higher Education Attainment – Please share your platform on higher education funding and college affordability. Do you support increasing state financing of student aid in the biennial budget? Do you support increasing the amount awarded to students enrolled in private colleges and universities through the Tuition Assistance Grant? How can Virginia ensure equity in access and attainment for all students, particularly those from underserved groups?

Answer:
I support funding for our public colleges and universities, as I understand that education is a critical area of investment for our economic future. I also support Tuition Assistance Grants for students attending institutions that demonstrate financial responsibility and provide quality education. I believe financial aid assistance, especially at our public colleges and universities, should be increased to provide greater access to underserved communities.

Student Debt – Student loan debt has surpassed auto loans and credit cards to become the second highest form of consumer debt. The average Virginia college graduate now owes over $30,000 in student debt. How should Virginia address the mounting burden of student debt and its economic impact? Do you support strengthening oversight of student loan servicers?

Answer:
I support strengthened oversight of student loan services and believe they should be held to a high standard of ethical conduct. I also believe the state can do more to provide financial aid in order to lessen the average student debt burden. Lastly, I think increased investments in our public higher education institutions will increase the value of a degree earned in Virginia, giving graduates better ability to pay back their loans.

Campus SafetyIn your opinion, how should the General Assembly address issues of student safety on college campuses? What addtional action (if any) should Virginia take to combat campus sexual assault and safeguard the rights of survivors beyond current Title IX protections? Student safety is a top priority for me. I believe we need to institute just and transparent processes at all colleges and universities that receive state money for adjudicating claims of sexual assault. Survivors must be heard

Answer:
I support strengthened oversight of student loan services and believe they should be held to a high standard of ethical conduct. I also believe the state can do more to provide financial aid in order to lessen the average student debt burden. Lastly, I think increased investments in our public higher education institutions will increase the value of a degree earned in Virginia, giving graduates better ability to pay back their loans.

Environment

Wendy believes that strong communities start with a healthy planet. Raising her children on the banks of the Shenandoah River, Wendy chose to live in District 10 because of its beautiful green spaces, clean water, and clear air.

In office, Wendy defends and expands existing environmental protections. To ensure that she can legislate without bias, Wendy has pledged never to take campaign contributions from Dominion Power or Appalachian Power.

Wendy supports Virginia’s investment in renewable energy, making alternative energy options like solar panels and wind energy more accessible and affordable. She pushes for cleanup efforts and the preservation of District 10’s best green spaces. Development must be responsible, and cannot come at the cost of our land, water, and air.

Health Care

Wendy believes that everyone should receive the health care they need and deserve. She knows how critical state support can be – until recently, Wendy and her family purchased their healthcare through the Affordable Care Act.

Wendy voted to expand Medicaid. As a result an estimated 400,000 Virginians don’t have to keep making the impossible choices between paying healthcare bills or paying the mortgage. She also understands that Medicaid expansion is good for Virginia’s economy – through a healthy workforce and the creation of about 30,000 new jobs.

About a week into her candidacy, Wendy lost her brother, Brian, to mental illness. He had been denied Medicaid in Virginia for years. She’s fighting so that Virginia families don’t have to experience what hers did. In the United States we don’t abandon the most vulnerable among us, we help and care for them.

Safety

Twitter

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Sam Rasoul 1Sam Rasoul

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Sam Rasoul is the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer of a non-profit healthcare firm helping with maternal child health in East Africa. Equipped with an understanding that leadership is a bold journey for justice, he organizes community leaders through The Impact Center; his initiative to develop & empower new age leaders.

Sam committed to decline any donations from special interest Political Action Committees and lobbyists in an effort to raise awareness of the control many powerful special interests have over the political system.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2014
Affiliation: Democrat

Sam Rasoul is the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer of a non-profit healthcare firm helping with maternal child health in East Africa. Equipped with an understanding that leadership is a bold journey for justice, he organizes community leaders through The Impact Center; his initiative to develop & empower new age leaders.

Sam committed to decline any donations from special interest Political Action Committees and lobbyists in an effort to raise awareness of the control many powerful special interests have over the political system.

About

Sam Rasoul

Source: Campaign page

Sam Rasoul represents the Eleventh District in the Virginia House of Delegates. It is the honor of his lifetime to represent the Valley that raised him. Growing up he learned and worked at his parent’s corner store, a community hub. Through his experiences, he realized the value in listening, and neighbors helping neighbors. 

Sam lives in Roanoke with his wife Layaly and their three beautiful children. He is continually inspired by the innocence and wisdom of his children. After completing his Master’s Degree, he became a small business owner, and later the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer of a non-profit healthcare firm helping with maternal child health in East Africa. Equipped with an understanding that leadership is a bold journey for justice, he organizes community leaders through The Impact Center; his initiative to develop & empower new age leaders. Sam committed to decline any donations from special interest Political Action Committees and lobbyists in an effort to raise awareness of the control many powerful special interests have over the political system.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Healthcare consultant
  • Virginia Defense Force
    2007 to 2008

Education

  • MBA
    Hawaii Pacific University, HI
    2003
  • BA
    Roanoke College
    2002

Awards

The Roanoker Magazine, Platinum Award for “Government Person Who Gets It”
Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Martin Luther King, Jr., Drum Major for Justice Award
Virginia Education Association, Solid as a Rock Award

Personal

  • Birth Year: 1981
  • Place of Birth: Warren, OH
  • Gender: Male
  • Race(s): Other
  • Religion: Muslim
  • Spouse: Layaly
  • Children: Jennah, Amirah, Issa

Membership & Affiliation

Kiwanis of Roanoke
Williamson Road Business Association
Goodwill (board member)
Science Museum of Western Virginia (board member)
NAACP (lifetime member)
Junior Achievement
American National University (adjunct business professor)
Meals on Wheels
Education: Roanoke College (B.B.A., 2002)
Hawaii Pacific University, HI (M.B.A., 2003)

Occupation/Profession: Healthcare consultant
House Leadership: Minority Caucus Secretary (2015-)
Military Service: Virginia Defense Force (2007-08)
Awards: The Roanoker Magazine, Platinum Award for “Government Person Who Gets It”
Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Martin Luther King, Jr., Drum Major for Justice Award
Virginia Education Association, Solid as a Rock Award

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Lillian Franklin
Administrative Assistant During Session: Polly Wall

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219

District Office
1417 Peters Creek Road NW
Roanoke, Virginia 24017

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Rasoul first ran for elected office in 2008 when he challenged incumbent Republican Bob Goodlatte for Virginia’s 6th Congressional seat. Rasoul earned 36% to Goodlatte’s 61%.

Rasoul was elected in a special election held on January 7, 2014. The special election was held to fill the vacancy created by the resignation, in November 2013, of Delegate Onzlee Ware. After winning the Democratic primary by 44 votes, Rasoul received nearly 70% of the vote over his Republican opponent Octavia Johnson in the general election. He was inducted into office on January 8, 2014.

In September 2016 he initiated House Joint Resolution 541 to the Virginia House of Delegates, a proposed amendment to the Virginia Constitution for “top two open primaries” for various Virginia elections, in which candidates from opposing parties would run on one ballot.The top two candidates in the proposed public primaries would subsequently compete in traditional one-on-one runoffs in Virginia’s general elections.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Sam Rasoul (D)10,26994.38%
Write In (Write-in)6115.62%
TOTAL10,880

2017 State DelegateArray

Sam Rasoul (D)15,66796.93%
Write In (Write-in)4963.07%
TOTAL16,163

Finances

RASOUL, SAM has run in 4 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $478,335.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Delegation

Minority Caucus Secretary (2015-)

Committees

Privileges and Elections
Militia, Police and Public Safety
Health, Welfare and Institutions

Subcommittees

Health, Welfare and Institutions – Subcommittee #2
Militia, Police and Public Safety – Subcommittee #2
Privileges and Elections – Subcommittee #4

Appointments

Block Grants
House Health Welfare and Institutions
House Militia Police and Public Safety
House Privileges and Elections
Recreational Facilities Authority, Virginia
Roanoke River Basin Advisory Committee, Virginia
Roanoke River Bi-State Commission, Virginia Delegation of the
Southwest Virginia Cultural Heritage Foundation
Western Virginia Public Education Consortium

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Source: Campaign page

SYSTEMIC ISSUES

No single issue happens in a vacuum. So often, we think in our silos to solve problems, but this only puts a bandaid on the issue. We must push ourselves to think about systemic issues as an intricate puzzle, with each problem a single piece interconnecting with another issue. It’s only when we look at the whole puzzle that we’ll be able to confront each individual problem.

Civil Rights

Women’s Rights

Women are crucial to driving innovation, growth, & prosperity in our country. Too many people face discrimination and we must take every opportunity to stand up and fight for equality. I support women’s right to choose, any measure to close the gender pay gap, & the Equal Rights Amendment.

Most Recent Bills > Equal Rights Amendment

LGBTQ & Minority Rights

We have made great gains recently, but the fight is not over. We must continue to make progress toward equal rights for all. I will advocate to preserve and expand protections and end harmful practices that disproportionately affect the LGBTQ & Minority communities.

Most Recent Bills > Fair Housing LawGrocery Fund

Democracy

Campaign Reform

I made a pledge to campaign free from special interest donations so that I can support, uplift, and show how powerful our grassroot networks are. While I was the first elected to take this pledge, VA is now covered in elected officials who have taken similar pledges.

Voter Access

It should not be difficult to exercise your right to vote. In order for your voice to be heard, I believe it is my duty to expand and make it easier to vote. This includes longer voting hours, and no – absentee voting.

Most Recent Bills > Vote By MailEarly Voting

Economy

Economic Development

To improve the economic well-being & quality of life for our VA communities we have to lay the groundwork for multilateral policies. We must recognize the role of early childhood education, criminal justice reform, neighborhood desegregation, and economic diversification has on our overall success.

Most Recent Bills > Green New Deal, Blockchain Tech.

Education

A quality education is the key to uplifting any person, or group. It is essential that we continue to improve our public school system from the bottom up, starting with pre-k and working up to higher education.

Most Recent Bills >Socio-Emot. Learning,Comm. Schools

Environment

Every person, community, and neighborhood deserves a healthy environment to raise a family. While pushing policies like the Green New Deal, we can also provide thousands of good paying jobs in clean energy.

Health Care

We must increase coverage, support small businesses, expand primary care, and lower premiums. Medicare for All is the next step toward addressing inequalities. In 2018, Medicaid Expansion passed allowing over 230,000 people to gain coverage here in Virginia.

Most Recent Bills >Medicaid Expansion

Safety

Gun Violence Prevention

There are nearly 13,000 gun homicides a year in the US. Marginalized and minority groups are regularly inflicted by this systemic issue and have been left powerless. To protect our vulnerable communities, VA must implement a comprehensive gun violence prevention plan

Most Recent Bills > Public Entities Protection
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Chris Hurst 1Chris Hurst

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

“I’ve dedicated my life to public service and giving a voice to the people of southwest Virginia.”
“My career in news was fulfilling but instead of asking questions, I became focused on finding solutions.”

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

“I’ve dedicated my life to public service and giving a voice to the people of southwest Virginia.”
“My career in news was fulfilling but instead of asking questions, I became focused on finding solutions.”

About

Chris Hurst

Source: Campaign page

I’ve dedicated my life to public service and giving a voice to the people of southwest Virginia. When I came here almost a decade ago as a reporter, I quickly identified with our shared values of strong families, strong faith and personal integrity. I fell in love with the Blue Ridge Mountains and the people living in small towns with big hearts.

As a journalist, I’ve been a fierce advocate for families struggling for access to mental health care and equality in education for students with special needs. I’ve investigated the reasons why our workforce must adapt for the careers of the future, documented the dramatic rise of child abuse and opioid addiction, and held government leaders accountable while showing how our first responders are left without vital resources.

However, I decided to leave journalism and run for office after recovering from a profound tragedy. In 2015, I was just beginning a new life with my late girlfriend, Alison Parker. Yet I found myself on a different path after Alison and Adam Ward’s murder on television shocked me and the country. My career in news was fulfilling but instead of asking questions, I became focused on finding solutions. Your continued prayers and support gave me the strength to move forward and be a courageous fighter for all Virginians.

As your delegate, I have continued to fight tirelessly to increase access to and resources for mental health care, voted to ensure gun safety laws are put in place, and have been an advocate for quality and affordable schools with adequately paid teachers. I have fought to bring jobs to the 12th District and protect our land and water from outside industries and pollution. Join me as I continue to courageously fight for all Virginians.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Journalist

Education

  • B.A., Broadcast Journalism
    Emerson College, MA
    2009

Awards

Chris Hurst 2
Photograph by: Virginia League of Conservation Voters

National Alliance on Mental Illness, Media Person of the Year (2014)
NAACP, Roanoke Branch, Media Person of the Year (2015)
Edward R. Murrow Award (2016)
Legislative Leadership Award (2018)

  • (None)

Personal

  • Birth Year: 1987
  • Place of Birth: Philadelphia, PA
  • Gender: Male
  • Race(s): Caucasian
  • Religion: Presbyterian

Membership & Affiliation

Kiwanis of Montgomery County-Blacksburg

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Sadie Gary
Administrative Assistant During Session: Connie Mason

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1012

District Office
P.O. Box 11389
Blacksburg, VA 24062
Phone: (540) 739-2553

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Chris Hurst (born July 9, 1987) is an American journalist, former news anchor and politician of the Democratic Party serving as a Delegatein the Virginia House of Delegates for the state’s 12th district. He defeated Republican incumbent Joseph R. Yost in the November 2017 election,receiving 54.3% of the vote.

Hurst was formerly a journalist for Roanoke’s WDBJ; he became an anchor at 22, which the station said made him the youngest anchor in the country.He entered politics in the aftermath of the 2015 on-air murder of his girlfriend, Alison Parker. In February 2017 he left his job and lived on his savings in order to run for the House of Delegates in the 12th district. In the race, Hurst was endorsed by Everytown for Gun Safety (the only House of Delegates candidate to receive the endorsement), while his opponent Yost had an A rating from the NRA. Hurst also ran on LGBT rights, education, mental health, and Medicaid expansion.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Chris Hurst (D)11,13553.56%
T. Forrest Hite (R)9,64346.39%
Write In (Write-in)110.05%
TOTAL20,789

2017 State DelegateArray

Chris Hurst (D)12,49554.4%
Joseph Ryan Yost (R)10,45845.5%
Write In (Write-in)360.2%
TOTAL22,989

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Finances

HURST, CHRIS L has run in 1 race for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $1,252,791

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Science and Technology
Education

Subcommittees

Education – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

House Education
House Science & Technology
Interstate 81 Commission
Western Virginia Public Education Consortium

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Economy

Attracting Jobs to the NRV

With Southwest Virginia’s largest economic engine and one of the world’s leaders in innovation sitting in our backyard, we are in a very unique position to attract more good-paying jobs to the 12th District. As we continue to attract the nation’s brightest minds, our local and state governments need to do all they can to keep that talent right here in the New River Valley. That means creating opportunities for small businesses and innovations while evaluating regulations that can deter growth. As your Delegate, this is my number one priority.

Access to Broadband

There are many parts of the district where access to broadband internet is limited or nonexistent. In our digital world, the Commonwealth is doing all of us a disservice by not investing in the infrastructure and technology to bring broadband access to rural communities. By partnering with new businesses who are doing this great work day in and day out, I hope we can finally solve this problem for Southwest Virginia.

Education

Overhaul Outdated Funding Formulas

For years, legislators in Richmond have tweaked the funding formulas for our public schools with disastrous results. Students across the Commonwealth lose out on $800 million every year. I am working towards restoring pre K-12 funding to at least pre-recession levels. I have been able to partially restore At-Risk Add-On funding, which will help schools better serve at-risk students in our community.  Virginia must also change the funding formula so that school divisions with declining enrollment like Giles and Pulaski won’t lose out on needed resources from the state.

Attract The Best Teachers To Our Schools

Virginia is ranked 29th in the country in average teacher pay. That’s unacceptable. Teachers in Virginia earn, on average, about $7,000 less than other educators around the country. But it’s worse in the 12th District; teachers in Giles County make about $10,000 less than just the state average. I’ve consistently voted to increase teacher salaries each year I’ve been in the General Assembly.

Reduce the Burden of Standardized Testing

Virginia has improved the way our teachers, schools, and students are evaluated but there is still more work to be done. Study after study has shown that Virginia’s method of testing our students is inadequate. As your Delegate, I am fighting to give freedom back to school divisions while still ensuring success for all students.

College Affordability

The costs students face to attend college is constantly rising.  From tuition to room and board, to course supplies, I am fighting to keep college affordable. Which is why I introduced HB 2380, which requires that institutions of higher education include in the online course catalogue or online registration system information about which courses use exclusively low­ or no-­cost educational materials. In addition, I have helped ensure state funds will be used to freeze tuition rates for the next year, providing an average savings of 45% to students and families.

Environment

Protecting Our Natural Resources

For generations, families in the New River Valley have respected and protected their land. From the pristine waters of Wolf Creek to the untouched natural beauty of Pearis Mountain, our land is our most valuable resource. We must resist any threat to our rivers, streams, and forests. I introduced HB 2112, which curtails the ability of natural gas companies to enter private property to conduct surveys without landowner consent. I stand proudly with landowners in their fight against the Mountain Valley Pipeline and, as your delegate, have championed these efforts by supporting stop-work orders when our water and soil is in danger of contamination.

Transforming Our Energy Sources

For too long, our representatives in Richmond have stalled the transformation of how we power our homes and businesses. By removing restrictions on how Virginians get our energy, we can bring more investments in renewable sources like wind, solar and geothermal. We must increase diversity and competition in our energy mix to reduce our consumption of fossil fuels and lower utility bills.

Health Care

Expand Medicaid

I said I would fight to expand Medicaid because it made moral and economic sense, and we did. In 2018, Virginia finally passed Medicaid expansion which is bringing $12.2 million in new spending and over 2000 jobs to the 12th district. Most importantly, thousands of our neighbors have access to healthcare for the first time.

Women’s Healthcare

I am a journalist, not a doctor. Any decisions regarding women and their health care need to be made by the woman, in consultation with her family if she chooses, and her doctor. These decisions shouldn’t be made by lawmakers in Richmond.

Fight the Opioid Crisis

The opioid crisis is a battle that’s become all too familiar for our District, with too many lives already lost. We must expand access to life-saving treatment options and medications. We have to change the stigma around substance-use disorders and address the crisis as an illness, not just a series of poor choices.

Mental Health

Expanding Medicaid would directly impact and increase access to mental healthcare in Virginia. In addition, we need to give our police officers, sheriff’s deputies, fire departments and rescue squads the training and resources they need to handle mental health crises. Rural communities like ours face especially tough circumstances. Individuals in crisis are often transferred to treatment centers on the opposite side of the Commonwealth on their own dime. We must fundamentally change the way we view and treat mental illness. Virginia has to address the lack of rural mental health care providers and reinvest in support for our state hospitals.

Reduce Gun Violence

We must change the way we address the thousands of Virginians who die each year by bullets from guns. I think we do that by realizing this is a public health crisis: more people in the commonwealth die from gun violence than in car crashes. My focus remains on those most susceptible to homicide and suicide from firearms. I will work to protect men and women of color in cities from dying on the streets, to help women find safety after taking the courageous move to leave a dangerous relationship and to encourage parents to make sure children don’t have unsupervised access to a gun. As someone who has been personally touched by this issue, I will take the same objective, pragmatic approach to investigate solutions as I had when I worked as a journalist.

Infrastructure

Access to Broadband

There are many parts of the district where access to broadband internet is limited or nonexistent. In our digital world, the Commonwealth is doing all of us a disservice by not investing in the infrastructure and technology to bring broadband access to rural communities. By partnering with new businesses who are doing this great work day in and day out, I hope we can finally solve this problem for Southwest Virginia.

Twitter

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Danica Roem 2Danica Roem

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

About

Danica Roem

Source: Wikipedia

Danica Roem (/ˈroʊm/ ROHM; born September 30, 1984) is an American journalist and politician of the Democratic Party. In the 2017 Virginia elections she was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, winning the Democratic primary for the 13th district on June 13, and the general election on November 7. She is the first openly transgender person to be elected to the Virginia General Assembly, and in January 2018 became the first to both be elected and serve while openly transgender in any U.S. state legislature. In December 2017 The Advocate named her as a finalist for its “Person of the Year”. In January 2018, Delegate Roem was included on the cover of Time Magazine in their “The Avengers” feature, highlighting new female candidates and elected officials from around the country.

Early life and education

Roem was born at Prince William Hospital and raised in Manassas, Virginia, the child of Marian and John Paul Roem. Her father committed suicide when she was three years old, and her maternal grandfather, Anthony Oliveto, acted as a father figure. Living in Manassas, Virginia for her whole life, she attended the majority of her schooling there. She went to Loch Lomond Elementary School for grades K-3, and then All Saints School for grades 4-8. She then attended Paul VI Catholic High School in Fairfax, Virginia and then went to her aunt and uncle’s alma mater, St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, New York to pursue journalism.[10] As a student at St. Bonaventure University, she had a 1.1 GPA her first semester and was more focused on music than homework. During her second semester, she made a comeback and raised her GPA to a 3.48 and made the Dean’s List. Her professors described her as tenacious, persistent, and one who worked for those who voices were often ignored. She moved back to Virginia after graduation.

Roem has stated that her role models growing up were Senator Chuck Colgan (D-29) and Delegate Harry Parrish (R-50) because, although they were affiliated with a party, they had more independent ideologies.

Journalism career

When Roem was a child, her grandfather would tell her, “the basis of my knowledge comes from reading the newspaper every day.” This influenced her to become a journalist. She was a journalist for ten and a half years. Her first job out of college, in 2006, was at the Gainesville Times in Gainesville, Virginia. Roem worked for nine years as the lead reporter for the Gainesville Times and Prince William Times. She then went to work as a news editor in August 2015 at the Montgomery County Sentinel in Rockville, Maryland, where she was employed there until December 2016. She then decided to run for public office. She said she has a wide knowledge of policy issues due to her journalism career. She won awards from the Virginia Press Association seven times.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Journalist
    Montgomery County Sentinel
    2019 to present
  • Journalist
    Gainesville Times
    2006 to 2015

Education

  • BA, Journalism
    St. Bonaventure University
    2019 to present

Awards

Named ‘Best Politician’ by readers of the Prince William Times and Gainesville Times from 2006-2015.

The Gertrude Stein Democratic Club “Justice Award” Winner.

 

Personal

Birth Year: 1984
Place of Birth: Manassas, VA
Gender: Female
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Roman Catholic

Membership & Affiliation

  • Virginia Press Association 7 awards
  • Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia Press Association 4 Awards

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Gabrielle Slais
Administrative Assistant During Session: Eliza Weathers District

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219

District Office
P.O. Box 726
Manassas, VA 20113

Phone: (571) 393-0242

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Campaign

Roem first got interested in politics in 2004 following President George W. Bush’s proposal to add a constitutional amendment to ban same sex marriage. After that, she was interested in looking into how the government operates and how she could change it.

Roem was recruited to run for state delegate by her local Democratic Party, more specifically, by State Delegate Rip Sullivan, the recruiting chair for the Virginia House Democratic Caucus. She states that she had never considered running, but it did not take a lot of convincing.

Roem ran against Bob Marshall, who was a 13-term incumbent representative. Marshall is a self described “chief homophobe” and was a sponsor on Virginia’s bill to end same sex marriage and Virginia’s bathroom bill.

She was endorsed by the Victory Fund, EMILY’s List, Run for Something, Virginia’s List, and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee.

She was able to raise $500,000 in donations, much of it coming from LGBTQ+ supporters and other national allies, out raising her opponent 3-to-1. Her campaign knocked on more than 75,000 doors in a district with only 52,471 voters. Her campaign was notable for the transphobic discrimination she faced. Marshall consistently attacked Roem’s gender identity through his advertisements. She was also attacked by a conversion therapy advocate, who stated that Roem was trans because her father committed suicide and her grandfather failed to serve as an adequate role model for her.[Roem stated she never wanted the focus to be about her gender identity, and instead focused mainly on traffic issues in the district that she had faced.

2017 election

Roem ran as a Democrat in the 2017 election for the 13th District of the Virginia House of Delegates against Republican incumbent Bob Marshall, who has held the office for the past 25 years. In January 2017, Marshall introduced the “Physical Privacy Act” (HB 1612), a bathroom bill which died in committee two weeks later in January. Marshall has referred to himself as Virginia’s “chief homophobe”.

Roem declared her candidacy in January 2017. She received endorsements from the Victory Fund[ and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. Between April 1 and June 1, Roem received 1,064 donations of under $100, the highest of any delegate candidate in the state other than Chris Hurst. Roem’s platform was based on economic and transportation issues, centered on a promise to fix Virginia State Route 28.

In July 2017, following President Donald Trump’s announcement of a ban on transgender people serving in the U.S. military, Roem received a $50,000 donation from Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele.

In August 2017, Roem received an endorsement from the Human Rights Campaign (HRC). In October 2017, she was endorsed by former Vice President Joe Biden.

In September 2017, Roem posted a web video entitled “Inspire”, criticizing her opponent’s refusal to debate her or to refer to her as a woman. In the video, she says “There are millions of transgender people in the country, and we all deserve representation in government.”

In October 2017, Roem’s campaign received reports that residents of her district were receiving anti-transgender robocalls. Roem said the calls were being made by the American Principles Project, which has circulated a petition to “Stop Transgender Medical Experimentation on Children”. Also in October 2017, the Republican Party of Virginia mailed campaign fliers attacking comments Roem made during a September radio interview. Although the fliers, approved by Roem’s opponent, used male pronouns to refer to Roem, the party’s executive director dismissed the idea that they were attacking Roem’s gender identity.

Over the course of the campaign, she out-raised Marshall by a 5 to 1 margin, collecting over $370,000, including over 4,100 small-dollar donations from Progressive Change Campaign Committee members.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Danica Roem (D)12,06655.92%
Kelly S. McGinn (R)9,46843.88%
Write In (Write-in)420.19%
TOTAL21,576

2017 State DelegateArray

Danica Roem (D)12,07753.7%
Robert Gerard Marshall (R)10,31845.9%
Write In (Write-in)900.4%
TOTAL22,485

Finances

ROEM, DANICA  has run in 1 race for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$978,782.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Counties Cities and Towns
Science and Technology

Subcommittees

Counties Cities and Towns – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

House Counties Cities and Towns
House Science & Technology

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Governance

Increase Accessibility

Through the first half of 2019, I hosted or participated in 20 local town hall meetings in the greater Prince William County area since January 2018, including events in each of the four communities I represent: Manassas, Manassas Park, Gainesville and Haymarket. Being present and available in the community is the same work ethic I showed for more than nine years as your local reporter. As your local elected official, I remain accessible and accountable to you. 

On many nights during the 2019 session, I posted two-minute videos recapping my day in Richmond so my constituents would know what I was doing on their behalf. I take my commitment to open government seriously and will continue to do so on behalf of the people of the Thirteenth District.

Create a Publicly Searchable Cold Case Database

In 2018, I introduced HB 938 to create a publicly searchable cold-case database to involve the public in assisting law enforcement officials with solving homicide, missing person, and unidentified person cases. As more cases are entered into the system, more people in every area—law enforcement, victim advocacy and the general public—can become a part of the conversation that will resolve cases. Manassas remains home to the only unsolved murder of a state trooper in Virginia history, now more than 40 years old. Since the bill advanced out of committee in 2018, I have worked across the aisle to secure funding for the legislation and I am ready to pass it into law in 2020.

Increase Citizen Review

House Bill 2375, one of my three bills that passed during the 2019 session, increases transparency in local government by requiring governing bodies to hold a public hearing before fast-tracking a zoning ordinance change through a planning commission. They will also have to advertise that public hearing in the print edition of a newspaper and on the governing body’s website so it is in the public record at least two weeks ahead of the vote. 

 When budget amendments arrived late this year in Richmond, I voted against cutting the amount of public review time from 48 hours to 24 hours before the General Assembly voted on them and adjourned. The rule change passed anyway, so I logged into Facebook that night and early the next morning and read page after page of the budget amendments live on camera so the public would know what we were voting on that Sunday.

I will keep fighting for citizens to have more access to information and continue my work to increase government transparency so you know exactly what your elected officials are doing with your time and your dime.

Strengthen the Freedom of Information Act

There’s no reason why Maryland’s government should be more open and accessible than Virginia’s government, yet that’s exactly where we find ourselves. I authored HB 940 (2018) HB 2507 (2019) to establish a state-level Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) ombudsman through the Office of the Attorney General. The Ombudsman would be a dedicated, independent, neutral position to streamline and mediate FOIA requests, and ensure that they are being addressed effectively and more efficiently between FOIA requestors and state agencies. I’ll bring this legislation back in 2020 so we can create this important position to help everyday citizens navigate the complex and confusing world of state agencies and public information. 

I also filed HB 1603 (2018) to eliminate fees for the first two hours it takes an agency or governing body to fulfill a FOIA request. In many cases, these fees are designed to limit the public’s access to information, not strengthen it. I’ll continue working to make FOIA more accessible to the public and stand up to unnecessary exemptions that harm open government.

Prevent Child Warfare Fraud

One of my other government accountability bills that was signed into law is HB 2339 (2019), which allows the Department of Social Services to work with the Department of Taxation to modify existing child support orders and prevent child welfare fraud. I had to wage an epic fight for this bill on the floor of the House of Delegates and prevailed as a freshman member of the minority party because I learned the rules and procedures and built a reputation as a bipartisan consensus seeker who always works in good faith.

The relationships I built across the aisle during my time in office so far allowed this bill to pass out of the House of Delegates and Senate. I’m committed to maintaining those relationships so I can make a good law even better in 2020 by allowing the Department of Social Services to notify Virginians that they are eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other benefits.

Enact Real Campaign Finance Reform

Not only have I refused to accept any money from for-profit corporations, their PACs, their trade associations and their lobbyists, I introduced HB 562 (2018) to ban public service corporations from donating to elected officials because the regulated should not be to have undue influence over their regulators. 

Through my advocacy to reform our campaign finance system and eliminate conflicts of interest, I’ve led by example both on the campaign trail and in the General Assembly through my actions. 

I pledged not to take any money from Dominion Energy before the Activate Virginia pledge even existed in 2017. I continue to rely on people power to fund my campaigns and on my constituents to help me craft our legislation, not on corporations.

Civil Rights

Creating a Fairer Tax System

When the majority caucus this year proposed disproportionately extending federal tax cuts to people making more than $50,000 a year while providing barely anything for those who earned less, I fought for all of my constituents to be included until half of the tax cuts went to people making less than $50,000.
I’ll continue supporting a fair, equitable tax system that takes care of all of my constituents, including making the Earned Income Tax Credit fully refundable, without playing political games. That’s why I voted for conformity of the tax code this year and last year so my CPA constituents could do their work in a timely manner without the uncertainty of waiting for the Virginia General Assembly to do its job. I’ll continue legislating in a fiscally responsible manner to make sure Virginia pays its bills and maintains its AAA bond rating.

Ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment

On Feb. 21, 2019, a 50-50 vote in the House of Delegates ended our chance this year for Virginia to become the 38th and final state needed to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The ERA text states the following:

Section 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

Section 3: This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.

I wore my mother’s 43-year-old “Women’s Bicentennial” ERA medallion necklace almost daily during session in 2019. Ratification of the ERA has an 81 percent favorability rating in Virginia. Its support goes across party lines and ideologies. I’ll continue advocating for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment so we are all considered equal under the Constitution.

Championing Your Rights

The Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the Bill Rights ensures your right to privacy so you can have the autonomy to make your own reproductive health care choices and marry the consenting adult you love. That’s why we need to update the Code of Virginia to remove discriminatory language and ensure equal rights of all Virginians.

My legislative record is solidly on the side of justice and inclusion so we provide equity and equality for women, people of color, LGBTQ people, immigrants, workers, the disabled, seniors, students, people experiencing homelessness, survivors of sexual assault and human trafficking and all of my constitutions who need a hand up.

I’m proud to stand up for my constituents no matter what they look like, where they come from, how they worship if they do or who they love because of who they are, not despite it.

Economy

Tax Policy: Creating a Fairer Tax System

During the 2019 General Assembly Session, a majority of the House of Delegates proposed disproportionately extending federal tax cuts to Virginians making more than $50,000 a year while providing barely anything for those who earned less. In response, I fought for all my constituents to be included until half of the tax cuts went to Virginians making less than $50,000.
I’ll continue supporting a fair, equitable tax system that takes care of all of my constituents, including making the Earned Income Tax Credit fully refundable, without playing political games. As a regular practice, the General Assembly has historically voted to conform the state tax code to the federal tax code upon Congress’ passage of new federal tax legislation. Following my CPA constituents’ advice and to ensure my constituents could file their taxes without a delay for the 2018 tax year, I voted for conformity every step of the legislative process during the 2019 General Assembly session.
I’ll continue legislating in an inclusive and fiscally responsible manner to make sure Virginia pays its bills and maintains its AAA bond rating.

Education

Raising Teacher Pay

When I voted to fulfill my campaign promise to expand Medicaid to 400,000 uninsured constituents, the state government was able to bring home $371 million from the federal government, which freed up enough money in the state budget to tackle major education funding issues. By casting this vote, I also fulfilled another campaign promise to raise teacher pay. By voting for the approved FY 2019-2020 budget and related amendments in 2019, I voted to raise salaries for public school instructional staff by 5 percent. This is a great start but not the end of this important issue as we work to make sure Prince William County teachers do not have the lowest salaries in Northern Virginia while also bringing Virginia above the national average for teacher salaries. The budget also included the In-State Undergraduate Tuition Moderation Fund to prevent tuition hikes in higher education. I’ll continue to work across the aisle to fully fund K-12 and higher education while taking care of our students, instructional staff and administrators.

Feeding Hungry Kids

For the 2018 and 2019 General Assembly sessions, I have worked with one of my Gainesville constituents to author legislation to ensure Virginia students do not go hungry at school. During the 2019 session, I introduced and passed into law HB 2400 to require all public school districts throughout Virginia to post prominently on their websites an online portal for parents to apply for free and reduced meals for their children. There are thousands of children throughout Virginia, including Prince William County and Manassas Park who are eligible for free and reduced school meals but are not enrolled because completed paper applications never made it back to school. Having an online system that’s easy to find on the school division website will allow parents to apply on their own time and without the social stigma of having to turn in a paper form declaring that their income allows them to be qualified for the program in the first place. The law goes into effect July 1, 2019, so I will monitor our local school divisions to make sure they are compliant.

Leading By Example

When Google offered me $2,500 in exchange of using two seconds of a video of me for their International Women’s Day 2018 ad, I declined taking the money for myself. Instead, I asked Google to pay off $2,500 worth of school meal debts in the 13th District. This money was used to pay off all school meal debt at Loch Lomond Elementary School in Manassas, PACE West in Gainesville and took care of almost all the debt at Sinclair Elementary School in Manassas.

Meanwhile, I contributed hundreds of dollars to the “Settle the Debt” campaign to pay off school meal debts in Prince William County as my Gainesville constituent Adelle Settle raised more than $40,000 to pay off school meal debts across Prince William County Schools.

While it’s important to pay down existing debts, it’s even more important to address the systemic problems that cause debt in the first place. I will continue to advocate for maximizing enrollment in the federal Community Eligibility Program so more schools can provide meals without charge to students while I continue to advocate for the reduction and elimination of school meal debts at the state level.

Eliminating School Meal Shaming

No student should be shamed for their parents’ income situation. In addition to introducing anti-school meal shaming legislation in 2018 as a constituent service request, I signed on as the chief-co-patron of Del. Patrick Hope’s HB 50 (2018) and worked with him to pass this legislation to prevent students from being forced to wear a wristband or do chores as a result of having school meal debt. HB 50 also requires all communication concerning school meal debt to be addressed to the parent, not the student because children should just be able to focus on learning instead of being shamed for debt that their parents/guardians owe. In fact, parents often don’t know what happens when their kids carry school meal debts. I authored HB 2462 (2019) to require school districts inform parents of the policies, procedures and consequences for students carrying school meal debt. I also introduced HB 2376 (2019) to ban school officials from forcing students to throw away meals after they’ve been served to them because the student carries school meal debt or their parents/guardians cannot afford their meals. Thankfully, this shaming practice does not apply in Prince William or Manassas Park but it exists in other parts of Virginia. While HB 2462 and HB 2376 had bipartisan support of more than 50 co-patrons each – a majority of the House of Delegates – the Chairman of the House Education Committee recommended for them to instead be considered for administrative implementation through the Code of Virginia. I’ve followed up with Education Secretary Atif Qarni since then to make sure that happens. I believe forcing a student to throw away a meal should be explicitly banned in the Code of Virginia instead of at the will of the agency, so I will reintroduce that legislation to prohibit that form of school meal shaming.

Being Accessible to Student Constituents

It’s one thing for a legislator to make time for adults when the adults can vote for them. It’s another to make time for students who are too young to vote. I serve all of my constituents, regardless of their eligibility to vote and the best place to interact with students is to meet them where they’re at: school. In 2017, I heard from Manassas Park residents that they felt invisible to their elected officials so I told them that would stop with me and started engaging with my student constituents at school. Two weeks after I won the 2017 campaign, I toured every public school in Manassas Park. 

In May of 2018, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine and I hosted a student-led gun prevention roundtable at Manassas Park High School where we answered questions and heard public policy ideas from Manassas Park, Stonewall Jackson, Patriot and Hylton high school students. When Stonewall Jackson High School students asked me to attend a public hearing about the proposed boundary lines for the 13th high school in Prince William County, I went and listened to the students express their frustration that the proposed lines packed students of color at one school while diluting the presence of students of color at Patriot and Battlefield High Schools.

I have conducted student town halls at Stonewall Jackson High School and the George Mason University Science and Technology campus in Manassas. By writing and passing commending resolutions in the House of Delegates, my team and I have honored educators and students alike from Prince William and Manassas Park, and twice joined the Battlefield BEST Club as they, in partnership with the Virginia Student Training and Refurbishment (STAR) Program, gave away refurbished laptops to families who needed them at Sinclair and Tyler Elementary Schools.

I attended the Manassas Park High School senior awards ceremony and sat on stage at each of the graduation ceremonies for every public high school in western Prince William County as well as the eighth grade promotion ceremony at Manassas Park Middle School, the fifth grade promotion ceremonies at Piney Branch, Sinclair, Sudley, Manassas Park Elementary Schools and even the second grade promotion ceremonies at Cougar Elementary School.

Whether it’s an outdoor festival at Osbourn Park High School to raise money for hurricane survivors in Puerto Rico, joining the advisory board for the George Mason University Science and Technology campus or testifying in front of our local school boards in favor of including LGBTQ students and staff in their non-discrimination policies (which are now implemented both in Prince William and Manassas Park), I’ve been present in our community, accessible and accountable as I’ve advocated for our community. I’ll continue to do so as your delegate.

Creating Equitable, Safe and Fun Learning Environments

During the 2019 session, I signed onto Del. Jeff Bourne’s HB 1600, to address the statewide of problem of black students and disabled students being disproportionately more likely to be given long-term suspensions from schools than other students. The bill, now signed into law, reduces the length of long-term suspensions from 364 days – the highest in the nation – to 45 days except in the most severe circumstances. Simply put, a child cannot learn while rehabilitating their behavior if they are being taken out of school for months at a time without education. This legislation marks the first major crack we took in the House of Delegates at addressing the school-to-prison pipeline, one of the policy promises I made during my 2017 campaign. 

In Northern Virginia, we heard parents raise awareness about how denying elementary school students 15-minutes of recess in a day is actually detrimental to children as they need that unstructured time to reset and unwind before continuing their education. In 2018, I signed on as a co-patron to Del. Karrie Delaney’s HB 1419, to allow school divisions to count recess as instructional time in elementary schools. After the bill was signed into law, the Prince William County School Board was the first in the commonwealth to adopt it, so students in kindergarten through fifth grade now have an additional 15 minutes of recess per day. I’ll continue working with my colleagues who advocate on behalf of students to improve their learning environment inside and outside of the classroom.

Environment

Ban Above-Ground Transmission Lines Near I-66

As the lead reporter of the Gainesville Times, I was at Silver Lake in 2006 when activists floated balloons 155-feet-high in the air so we could see how a proposal from Dominion Energy to build transmission lines along the Interstate 66 corridor would affect the environment.

Eight years later, I identified Amazon as the owner of the controversial data center in Haymarket on Sept. 10, 2014 when Dominion Energy officials refused to name their corporate client when they proposed building 110-foot-high transmission lines along the I-66 corridor again.

Simply put, the people of Haymarket and Gainesville have had enough of these drawn out fights against corporate giants spanning the last 13 years.

When legislators proposed to include the hybrid route for the Haymarket Transmission Line in a large bill (SB 966/HB 1558) favored by Dominion Energy in 2018, I actually read the text and found out that the bill would actually allow above-ground transmission lines:

“§ 8. Approval of a proposed transmission line for inclusion in this program shall not preclude the placing of existing or future overhead facilities in the same area or corridor by other transmission projects.”

In Catholic school we would call this “sin by omission” as the bill simply does not mention above-ground transmission lines rather than including provisions to ban them. I called this out on the House floor (video) and voted against the bill. After the legislation passed the House, that line was stripped from the bill. 

I take constituent requests very seriously. When my Haymarket and Gainesville constituents contacted my office by an overwhelming majority in opposition to the Haymarket Transmission Line project, I filed HB 2469 (2019) to ban above-ground transmission lines in perpetuity along the Interstate 66 corridor between Gainesville and Haymarket. With many of my constituents in Richmond to testify for the bill, we challenged Dominion head-on in the House Commerce and Labor Committee. I earned bipartisan support for my bill this time around and plan to build upon that in 2020 to finally pass the legislation.

I also carried HB 556 (2018) to allow citizen groups like the Coalition to Protect Prince William County to recover some of their legal fees from the State Corporation Commission to level the playing field between small constituent advocacy organizations and public service corporations like Dominion Energy.

Meanwhile, I filed HB 562 (2018) to ban public service corporations like Dominion from being able to donate to political campaigns so regulated monopolies don’t have undue influence over their regulators.

I don’t take Dominion’s money or money from any for-profit corporation, their PACs, their lobbyists or trade associations. 

Controlled Development

As a member of the House Counties, Cities and Towns Committee, I sit on Subcommittee 2, which deals with legislation regarding residential developments. My legislative philosophy in most circumstances is that I generally try to empower localities to make their own land-use decisions as the people closest to the area know the most about their environment and property.

When those issues relate to Prince William County, the first question I ask if how will this bill affect residential development: will it make it easier for the Board of County Supervisors to bring development under control and will it be a tool the Board of County Supervisors can be counted on to use responsibly?

While other local governing bodies in Virginia are likely to use the proffer bill (HB 2342, 2019) that passed this year responsibly, I had severe concerns about whether Prince William County  would fall into the same old habits that created the county’s over-development problem in the first place. We need to have adequate, existing infrastructure for roads, schools, water and first responders in place before approving new developments. We need public policy that prioritizes infrastructure development before residential development.

That’s why I’ve attended a number of MIDCO and Planning Commission meetings regarding the Kline Farm and The Reserve at Long Forest in Manassas as those developments directly affect my Signal Hill and Yates Ford constituents. As a state delegate, I only speak in front of local elected governing bodies upon invitation, so I do not try to use the heavy hand of the state government to tell local elected officials how to do their jobs. At the same time, I do speak in front of appointed bodies, citizen organizations and listen to constituent feedback so I can take their ideas and make the best, most informed decisions I can for the people of the Thirteenth District in Richmond.

Health Care

Expanding Health Care Insurance Coverage

Expanding Medicaid to 400,000 uninsured Virginians – including 3,800 of my constituents – was the single most consequential and important vote I cast during my first term because I know what it’s like to be uninsured. More than 279,000 Virginia adults enrolled in Medicaid in less than five months – far surpassing enrollment timeline expectations. Passing Medicaid expansion through the budget also included historic investments in mental and behavioral programs across the state as well as much needed funding to combat the opioid crisis. 

At the same time, hundreds of thousands of Virginians who earn more than $17,256 per year remain uninsured or underinsured with $5,000 deductible plans that leave many people functionally uninsured. Meanwhile, even more Virginians have health insurance premiums that keep rising.

That means we need to stay vigilant. Here’s what we can do:

1) Maximize Medicaid expansion enrollment: I’ll continue working with the Department of Social Services in Prince William County and the City of Manassas Park to make sure than each and every one of the 3,800 constituents I represent, who are eligible for Medicaid expansion, have all the information they need to enroll if they so choose. My office has assisted many constituents in applying for coverage under Medicaid expansion and is happy to continue doing so in the future. Please visit www.coverva.org for eligibility and enrollment information. 

2) Create a public option: I’ll keep encouraging our federal delegation to pass U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine’s Medicare-X Choice Act, which would create a public option that could drastically reduce the uninsured and underinsured populations in Virginia. This would build on Medicare to create a public plan offered on the individual and small business health exchanges, giving Americans the option to choose between existing private insurance plans or a public option. The Medicare-X legislation is currently under consideration in Congress. If there is no action on it at the federal level by 2021, I’ll work with my colleagues in the House of Delegates to re-examine how we can use the framework from the Marketplace Virginia proposed compromise from five years ago as a means of establishing a state-level public option while preserving Medicaid expansion.

3) Fight “junk” plans: I have voted against “buyer-beware” proposals lacking even some of the most basic protections that would dilute the health insurance market pool and raise insurance premiums on people with pre-existing conditions. I’ll continue working to make sure our legislature strengthens the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in Virginia and does not undermine it.

Covering Your Health Care Needs

Far too often, doctors prescribe their patients treatments that health insurers simply won’t cover because they’re not required to do so. I worked hard to close some of these health insurance coverage gaps for my constituents during my first term in office and I remain dedicated to making sure your health care needs are not excluded from coverage.

1) Mental Health: While I support fully implementing the recommendations of the Deeds Commission, I’m continuing my work to emphasize suicide prevention in the commonwealth. I was honored to earn the 2018 Virginia Counselors Association’s “Legislator of the Year” award for my advocacy on behalf of mental health care causes, including my resolution HJ 138 that would have ensured all employees in a school district are trained to identify the signs of suicidal ideation in students. I also voted for HB 2053 (2019) and the budget amendments this past session that allocated $12.2 million to improve the student-to-counselor ratio to start making progress on this issue. I’ll continue supporting our counselors, school psychologists and social workers to make sure our most vulnerable students receive the care they need.

2) Autism Spectrum-Related Healthcare: In 2018, I introduced HB 1113 to eliminate the age cap for autism-related health insurance coverage on behalf of one of my Manassas Park constituents and a group of moms in Prince William County. In 2019, I signed on as a co-patron of HB 2577 to eliminate (2019) all age requirements for autism-related health insurance coverage. This year, we got it done. I’ll continue to advocate for my autistic and Aspie constituents, especially students who are at risk of being misunderstood and mistreated by peers or staff due to a lack of awareness and training.

3) Mechanical Prosthetic Devices: For my amputee constituents, I introduced HB1478 (2018) and HB 2669 (2019) to require health insurers to cover doctor-prescribed mechanical prosthetic devices, such as myoelectric, biomechanical or microprocessor-controlled devices. HB 2669 requires doctor prescribed mechanical prosthetic devices with a Medicare code to be covered under all health plans regulated by the commonwealth. This is an opportunity to give members of the limb loss community, such as one of my constituents, access to the care they need, when they need it. HB 2669 was referred to the Health Insurance Reform Commission for further consideration. I’ll continue advocating for the limb loss community as a means of improving the mental and physical quality-of-life of my constituents.

4) LGBTQ Healthcare: Whether it’s access to PrEP, IVF treatments or transition-related health care, LGBTQ health care is health care. I signed on as the chief co-patron to HB 1466 (2018) and HB 1864 (2019) to ensure health insurance coverage for transition-related healthcare in Virginia. None of my constituents should have their health care needs rejected when they are following their doctors’ orders and this is a key issue as I champion non-discrimination in general for my LGBTQ constituents.

Infrastructure

Fix Route 28 Now!

During the 2017 campaign, you may have seen my “Fix Route 28 Now!” yard signs and if you ever heard me speak, I’m sure it was one of the first things I mentioned. It’s my #1 issue because I know how it affects my constituents’ lives.

As a lifelong resident of the Manassas part of Prince William County, I covered our transportation issues for over nine years as the lead reporter of the Gainesville and Prince William Times. Prior to my journalism career it was a problem my family dealt with every single workday as my mother commuted up and down Route 28 for 40 years. I’m proud of the significant progress we’ve made since 2017. However, the people of the Thirteenth District elected me to fix the problem, not just improve it.  Fixing Route 28 remains my top legislative priority along with alleviating traffic congestion along Interstate 66.

Expand Mass Transit

Shortly after I was elected in November 2017, I met with Bob Schneider, Executive Director of the Potomac and Rappahannock Transportation Commission, and discussed the need to expand OmniRide bus service to Gainesville and Haymarket.

In 2018, I fulfilled my 2017 campaign promise to work across the aisle in favor of putting a floor on the Northern Virginia regional motor fuels tax and we got it done with HB 768/SB 896. Because of that vote, I was able to fulfill another campaign promise to expand mass transit in western Prince William County because the revenue from the motor fuels tax allocated $7.86 million more to the PRTC, allowing the PRTC board to launch the first ever OmniRide commuter bus linking Haymarket and northern Gainesville to Arlington on December 17, 2018.

As of now, four buses make six stops each along the westbound side of Heathcote Boulevard corridor and five locations near Metro stations in Arlington. This Sept. 9, two eastbound stops are due to be added at Carterwood and Sheringham.

The more mass transit options we provide for commuters, the more passenger vehicles we can remove each day from Interstate 66. I’ll continue advocating and legislating to make this happen.

Improve Dangerous Intersections

During the last two years, two fatal traffic accidents have shook Gainesville as we’ve mourned those who died at intersections Rollins Ford Road and Estate Manor Drive and Heathcote Boulevard and U.S. 29.

It shouldn’t take a fatality for us to improve road safety. That’s why I worked for months with VDOT to improve the Heathcote/29 intersection, which happened on June 29, 2019 with the additional lane paving for commuters along northbound U.S. 29 turning left onto Heathcote Boulevard.

I also worked for months with VDOT on coming up with alternative intersection designs at three intersections along Rollins Ford Road and held three bipartisan town halls dedicated to gathering feedback from my constituents so VDOT would know what options the people who live in the area prefer. VDOT has since presented us with alternative intersection designs for the area. I’ll continue to listen to what my constituents want for the area and work to secure funding to implement them.

Fully Fund the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority

In 2018, we had the opportunity in the General Assembly to both provide dedicated funding for the Metro and simultaneously preserve enough money with the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) to keep funding more fixes for Route 28, such as the 6-7-8 lane hybrid widening in Centreville. Before the Reconvene Session in April, where the General Assembly considers the Governor’s proposed amendments and vetoes, I wrote a letter to the Governor urging him to amend HB 1539 (2018) to keep the NVTA from losing $35.1 million per year to fix our roads and multi-modal projects. Given that HB 1539 called for transferring money from the NVTA to fund Metro, I asked the Governor to offer amendments to safeguard NVTA funding that only applied to the six Metro compact jurisdictions – Alexandria, Arlington, Falls Church, Loudoun, Fairfax County and Fairfax City – not Prince William County, Manassas or Manassas Park. The Governor did exactly that in Recommendation #16 to HB 1539, which the majority caucus killed on a party-line vote of 51-48. As an immediate consequence of that vote that left crucial transportation funding on the table, Fairfax County decided to proceed only with the six-lane widening of Route 28 in Centreville instead of the 6-7-8 lane hybrid widening option that would widen the road to six lanes in the south near Compton Road and eight lanes by Route 29. 

However, I would not accept defeat when that transportation funding was lost. I spoke out on floor of the House of Delegates and called for NVTA funding to be restored by inserting a provision in the Interstate 81 bill (HB 2718, 2019) that included bringing back $20 million per year to the NVTA without raising taxes in Northern Virginia. This time, when the funding amendment arrived, I worked hard behind the scenes to whip support and helped deliver 48 Democratic votes for the amendment while 12 of 51 Republicans crossed the aisle to vote along with us. This allowed us to deliver and approve the largest transportation funding bill in six years.

In addition, I will continue to advocate for Del. Vivian Watts’ legislation, HB 2085 (2019), to restore another $30 million of funding for the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority. Combined with the $20 million I helped bring back this year, that will restore $50 million annually — and that does not even include the money that would come from the localities.

Northern Virginia candidates and politicians routinely talk about bringing back transportation funding from Richmond. In under two years in office, I helped secure $20 million a year for Route 28 improvements and other Northern Virginia regional transportation projects. I’m not afraid to take tough votes, fulfill my campaign promises and deliver the results I’ve promised for the people of the Thirteenth District.

Safety

Gun Violence Prevention

As of May 26, 2019, 73 of the 110 homicides committed in greater Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area have come from people being shot to death, including in Prince William County, according to the Washington Post. Gun violence also makes up an untold number of suicides and assaults in the region. It is possible to prevent people from killing other people or themselves without infringing upon someone’s Second Amendment rights for lawful self-defense and recreation.
This is why I signed onto legislation to require universal background checks (HB 140, 2018), prohibit bump stocks (HB 41, 2018) and allow localities to regulate firearms in government buildings (HB 261, 2018). I also support enacting “red flag” laws to allow a judge to issue an emergency substantial risk order to prohibit someone who is in imminent danger of hurting themselves or others from purchasing, possessing or transportation a firearm (HB 198 (2018) and HB 1763 (2019).
As we work across the aisle on this issue, we must involve our student constituents in the discussion. In May 2018, I hosted a student-led roundtable discussion with U.S. Senator Tim Kaine on gun-violence prevention at Manassas Park High School. Student participants from Manassas Park, Stonewall Jackson, Patriot and Hylton High School shared their stories, offered innovative policy solutions and stressed the critical need for gun violence prevention legislation as they feared for their safety in school and the local community. Our students and community deserve to live free from the threat of gun violence.
I’ll continue to support gun violence prevention bills where there is existing precedent in Virginia or other states for bipartisanship so we can get something done that is effective and data-driven. 

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Kelly Convirs-Fowler 1Kelly Fowler

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Kelly Fowler’s life has always been dedicated to the service of others. She’s worked as an elementary school teacher and owns her own small real estate business specializing in military family relocation and advocacy. She has been a resident of Virginia Beach since childhood and cares deeply for her community.

Delegate Fowler supports transparency and will serve with integrity, and will support legislation to ensure others do the same.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Kelly Fowler’s life has always been dedicated to the service of others. She’s worked as an elementary school teacher and owns her own small real estate business specializing in military family relocation and advocacy. She has been a resident of Virginia Beach since childhood and cares deeply for her community.

Delegate Fowler supports transparency and will serve with integrity, and will support legislation to ensure others do the same.

About

Kelly Convirs-Fowler

Source: Campaign page

Kelly Fowler’s life has always been dedicated to the service of others. She’s worked as an elementary school teacher and owns her own small real estate business specializing in military family relocation and advocacy. She has been a resident of Virginia Beach since childhood and cares deeply for her community.

As a daughter to a military family, Kelly moved to Virginia Beach at a young age. She attended public school right here in Virginia Beach and received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees just up the road from her district at Virginia Wesleyan and Old Dominion.

In 2016, Kelly was fed up with the state of American politics. Donald Trump had just been elected president and her local representative was more beholden to his campaign contributors than his constituents. So she decided to take action. She organized marches, she ran for office, and on November 7th, 2017, she won.

Since being sworn in, Delegate Fowler has dedicated her public service career to creating a better future for her two young daughters, Tessa and Sophie. She was a key vote to expand Medicaid, raise teacher pay, and provide tax breaks to small businesses across Virginia. Once she is reelected with a Democratic Majority, she looks forward to passing the Equal Rights Amendment, taking steps to fight flooding and climate change, and taking bold action to curb gun violence in Virginia.

Delegate Fowler supports transparency and will serve with integrity, and will support legislation to ensure others do the same.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Real Estate Broker

Education

  • M.A., Elementary Education
    Old Dominion University
    2012
  • BA
    Virginia Wesleyan College
    2003

Personal

  • Place of Birth: Groton, CT
  • Gender: Female
  • Race(s): None Given
  • Religion: Non-denominational
  • Spouse: William Fowler (David)
  • Children: Tessa Fowler and Sophie Fowler

Membership & Affiliation

Hillcrest Farms Homeowners Association (board member)

Contact

Legislative Assistant: BA Ciccolella
Administrative Assistant During Session: Mary Woodley

Email:

  • Government –

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1021

District Office
1980 Salem Road, Suite 2
Virginia Beach, VA 23456
Phone: (757) 364-8428

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Kelly Fowler was born and raised in Virginia Beach. She is of Filipino and Mexican descent. She graduated from Virginia Wesleyan College, where she majored in Psychology and Criminal Justice. After earning her Master’s degree in Education at the Old Dominion University, she began teaching at Lynnhaven Elementary. She left her job to begin a home renovation business with her husband. They specialize in serving military families.

She is married to David Fowler, and they have two daughters. Her older daughter’s name is Tessa and her younger daughter’s name is Sophie.

Fowler ran to be a delegate in Virginia’s 2017 election against Ron Villanueva. She won the election with 52.3% of the vote, and will take office in January 2018. Fowler is of Filipina and Mexican heritage. She and Kathy Tran are the first Asian-American women to be elected to Virginia’s House of Delegates. At the same time, Fowler, Elizabeth Guzman, and Hala Ayala are the first Latina American women to be elected to the House of Delegates.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Kelly Convirs-Fowler (D)12,40254.54%
Shannon D. S. Kane (R)10,30045.30%
Write In (Write-in)370.16%
TOTAL22,739

2017 State DelegateArray

Kelly Convirs-Fowler (D)12,54052.46%
Ronald John Asuncion Villanueva (R)11,30947.31%
Write In (Write-in)580.23%
TOTAL23,907

Finances

CONVIRS-FOWLER, KELLY K has run in 2 races for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $661,295.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Science and Technology
Privileges and Elections

Subcommittees

Privileges and Elections – Subcommittee #3

Appointments

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Source: Campaign page

Civil Rights

Women’s Issues

As a mother to two young girls, Tessa and Sophie, I am obligated to improve the lives of my daughters however I can. They were my inspiration to first run for office, and they are my inspiration to fight every day for women and girls all over the country. Since being elected, I have advocated for policies that protect the rights of women and expand their social, economic, and healthcare opportunities. Once I’m re-elected, I will fight to finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment and bring Virginia into the 21st century on women’s issues. And I will fight to make sure that when they are adults, Tessa and Sophie can make their own healthcare choices alongside their doctors without government interference.

Education

Teacher Pay

As a former elementary school teacher, I know that paying educators a fair wage makes it easier to keep and recruit the best teachers. It matters because we look to teachers to give our children the best education possible. That’s my hope for the children in our district—including my two daughters—and the reason why I fought so hard to push through a 5% pay raise for Virginia’s teachers.

Environment

Flooding

We need to be proactive about flooding and sea-level rise. It all starts with acknowledging the problem—climate change—which is why I co-patroned a bill that brings awareness to flood zones when buying or renting properties. Further, I was proud to fight for a resolution to have Virginia Beach join the American Flood Coalition so we can tackle this problem together.

Health Care

In May of 2018, I was proud to provide a crucial vote to pass Medicaid Expansion in Virginia. After a more than four-year battle in the General Assembly, we finally overcame Republican obstruction to provide healthcare access to 400,000 Virginians. We could not have done this without you, and we could not have done this without the Blue Wave. When I won in 2017, the voters sent me to Richmond to get the job done, and I did. I will continue to fight for access to quality and affordable healthcare for all Virginians. Without affordable care, families in my district will not be able to go to work, send their kids to school, or aspire to reach the American Dream. I will always defend my constituents from Republican attacks on their healthcare.

 

Safety

Gun Violence

Gun violence has become a public health crisis in our country. Every single day, lives are needlessly taken by criminals who should not have access to firearms. Let me be clear – I am a gun owner. My husband, Dave, is a law enforcement officer. I support the 2nd Amendment and believe that law-abiding citizens should not have their rights infringed. However, it is imperative that we take steps to address gun violence by expanding background checks, limiting modifications like silencers and extended magazines, and ensuring domestic abusers and violent criminals aren’t able to have access to deadly weapons. So many elected officials have failed to address gun violence beyond “thoughts and prayers.” We need to take action. We need votes and laws.

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Joshua ColeJoshua Cole

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Josh has served the state by acting as the Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler, fighting for the people by working alongside Delegate Convirs-Fowler on issues important to all Virginians, like fair housing.

Simultaneously, Josh serves on Stafford County Public Schools Superintendent’s Equity, Diversity and Opportunity Committee, the Greater Fredericksburg Area Interfaith Council, as the President of the Stafford County NAACP and participates with numerous other local and community initiatives.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Josh has served the state by acting as the Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler, fighting for the people by working alongside Delegate Convirs-Fowler on issues important to all Virginians, like fair housing.

Simultaneously, Josh serves on Stafford County Public Schools Superintendent’s Equity, Diversity and Opportunity Committee, the Greater Fredericksburg Area Interfaith Council, as the President of the Stafford County NAACP and participates with numerous other local and community initiatives.

About

Joshua Cole 1

In 2017, Joshua Cole proudly ran for the Virginia House of Delegates to represent Virginia’s 28th District, becoming the first American-American, and youngest person to receive any party’s nomination, along the way. In an underfunded, hard-fought race, Josh finished less than 100 votes shy of having the honor of representing the 28th District.

Since then, Josh has served the state by acting as the Chief of Staff for Delegate Kelly Convirs-Fowler, fighting for the people by working alongside Delegate Convirs-Fowler on issues important to all Virginians, like fair housing. Simultaneously, Josh serves on Stafford County Public Schools Superintendent’s Equity, Diversity and Opportunity Committee, the Greater Fredericksburg Area Interfaith Council, as the President of the Stafford County NAACP and participates with numerous other local and community initiatives.

Clear in all of this work is Josh’s commitment to the communities of the 28th District. Raised in the 28th, Josh knows not only what it takes to live here, but what it means to build a home in Fredericksburg and Stafford County. He understands the excruciating drive along I-95 that is the bedrock of so many constituent commutes. He’s seen first-hand the ever-increasing cost of living in this community, and has sat with hardworking friends and neighbors, proud Virginians, who simply want to find a way to raise their family in the same town in which they grew up. Josh seeks to be your Delegate to he can fight to make this so, for all of them, and for you.

A product of the Stafford County Public School system, Joshua’s background in Virginia’s political affairs is rich, dating back to 2005, when he was appointed by the then-speaker, the Honorable William J. Howell, as a Page for the Virginia House of Delegates. That same year he was chosen as the Governor’s Page by Governor Mark R. Warner. He returned to the General Assembly again in 2016 as a Staff Assistant to the Clerk of the Virginia State Senate. As your Delegate, Josh will bring this experience to the fore to fight for a Virginia that serves all Virginians.

Contact

Email:

Web

Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram

Politics

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Joshua G. Cole (D)13,33451.82%
Paul V. Milde III (R)12,29447.78%
Write-in (Write-in)101.39%
TOTAL25,729

Issues

Civil Rights

Ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment

Until we pass the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), it is still remains legal to discriminate against Virginians on the basis of one’s gender. I refuse to stand idle while women and members of the LGBTQ+ community continue to be treated as second class citizens across the Commonwealth.  I believe that all people are created equal, regardless of their sex or gender identity. Virginia must become the 38th state to pass the ERA to meet the threshold for ratification in the United States Constitution, and I intend to make it happen.

Protecting Reproductive Freedom

Every year, conservatives in Richmond work tirelessly to deny citizens across the Commonwealth their reproductive liberty and body autonomy. I will work to block any attempt to criminalize abortion, silence victims of assault, and restrict access to contraceptives in Virginia.

Economy

Economic Justice

A living wage is about more than a paycheck, it’s about investing in our communities and our people. Yet our leaders in the General Assembly can’t be bothered to pass legislation that raises Virginia’s minimum wage from $7.25/hour. And, as I hear from my neighbors each and every week, this just isn’t cutting it anymore. Not when you need $65,000 a year to maintain a one bedroom apartment in Fredericksburg, not when the top 1% of Virginians make 17.7 times more than the bottom 99% (according to the Economic Policy Institute), and not when Stafford County is the #6 wealthiest county in America. We can do better, and as your delegate, I will do better.

As the son of a single mother, I saw firsthand what it takes to hold down a job in our state, and the hardworking spirit of Virginians. In the Capitol, I’ll fight for the men and women of the 28th District putting in an honest day’s work, day in and day out.

Education

In takes someone who understands our problems to fix our problems. A product of the Stafford County Public School System and now serving on Superintendent Kinzer’s Equity, Diversity, and Opportunity Committee, I know the problems our schools face not only from a student’s perspective but from that of a community member as well.

Solving our problems starts early, with early childhood education, and universal pre-school for all Virginia’s sons and daughters. As these children rise up through the public education system, they should be meet by facilities that receive a fair and equal distribution of state and local funding, to eliminate the inequalities that we see going on statewide.

Guiding these men and women through the halls of our institutions should be teachers who don’t just hear our praise, but feel it in their pocketbooks and wallets. An across-the-board pay raise for our teachers and paraprofessionals is not only required, but mandatory if we intend to keep the best and the brightest in Virginia educating our children.

Beyond this, ending the playground-to-prison pipeline is one of my top legislative priorities. Too many children are subject to overpunishment that puts them on a path curtailing their education and increasing the risk they engage in criminal activity. By simply practicing restorative justice within our schools, eliminating or reducing out of school suspensions for minor behavioral episodes, and reclassifying incidents away from criminal occurrences and back towards childhood outbursts, we can keep our children in the classroom and on a path to success.

Environment

Environmental Action

We have a lot to be thankful for in our district, but one of our greatest resources, one of the things we take most for granted, is the natural environment we’re blessed with in Stafford County and Fredericksburg. It can be a place we go for picnics and playgrounds, or, for the many farmers who populate our district, the means for income and employment. That’s why protecting our environment is a charge I take seriously.

This is about more than keeping our grass green. It’s about reducing the number of days with extreme heat, so we can keep our infrastructure from buckling. It’s about preserving green spaces so that we have a place to bring our children. It’s about holding bad actors who continue to pollute our beautiful Virginian environment accountable for their actions. I will work with, and for, the communities of our district so that we can leave behind a Virginia that is greener and greater than it is today.

Health Care

Passing Medicaid expansion was a huge win for Virginians, and long overdue. But with Republicans tacking on work requirements, the access to healthcare we should all have is being curtailed by those looking to play politics with our lives. Now, we’ve got a job to finish: repeal the requirements and pass Medicaid-for-All so every Virginian can see a doctor. No one should ever have to choose between spending money on medication or spending it on groceries. Virginia can, and must, do better.

But improving our healthcare system should not end there. In a state with such a large active and retired military population, especially here in the 28th district, it’s essential that we dedicate more time and resources to improving the systems we have in place to care for our veterans. Long wait times, uncovered care, and unkempt facilities are not how we show our respect for those who have given so much for all of us.

Infrastructure

Transportation

If you’re a Virginian with a driver’s license, then I don’t have to tell you about how our infrastructure can’t handle the Virginia of today, let alone the Virginia of tomorrow.

One of the worst commutes in America, in terms of traffic, is along the I-95 corridor from Fredericksburg to Washington, DC. But you already knew that. With so many of our residents heading up and down 95 each and every week, we need a delegate who will actually put forward the legislation to end this traffic nightmare, not just talk about the issue. We need solutions that will rebuild our roads and improve our public transportation options, not rhetoric that leaves us stuck in the same old gridlock. As your delegate, I’ll get gridlock out of the House of Delegates, and off of our streets and roads.

Safety

Criminal Justice Reform

It is now common cause, uniting Virginias of all political stripes, to champion the idea that our criminal justice system is in desperate need of reform. But the folks in Richmond continue to fail to act to right the wrongs of our penal codes. The effects of this misapplication of justice on our diverse community have been far and wide, and it’s time for them to come to an end.

It begins with a return to community policing. Our communities are built on strong ties between neighbors, and those should extend to relationships between our citizens and the police. Enabling that trust should be accelerated by the passing of a statewide requirement for force-wide use of body and dash cameras.

And rebuilding our communities also means creating sensible drug rehabilitation policies. Too many communities have been decimated by burdensome arrests and jail sentences caused by infractions related to issues of mental health and addiction. We see this happening more and more in the face of our opioid and heroin epidemic. But we’ve substituted incarceration for care. I’ll fight to make sure our government provides mental health and addiction care to those who have and will end up in legal trouble due to addiction, and that we help with their re-entry into society. Our system should not be one of just punishment, but progress too.

Housing

For over two decades, I’ve been fortunate enough to call the 28th District my home. But as I look around today, I see more and more families expressing difficulty finding an affordable place to live in Fredericksburg and Stafford County. It’s no surprise.

We know why this happens. With many in the district shuttling up I-95 for work every day, six-figure salaries from the NoVA area end up here in our area. Developers see these opportunities and our housing stock is proof of that. Those dollars and dealers inflate home values, pricing out the hardworking residents who work to keep our district moving forward. Shouldn’t the residents who work to make this community feel like home be able to afford a home of their own?

Our government can take meaningful steps to ensure that rent-controlled, workforce housing is available to all Virginians. I was proud to stand with Del. Convirs-Fowler as she introduced a bill to further restrict discrimination in housing practices. This is just the beginning though, and we’ve got a lot of work to do. We’ll make the 28th a place for everyone to live and work.

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Liz Guzman

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Elizabeth  Guzman has been working in the public sector for 10 years, and currently works as the Division Chief for Administrative Services for the Center for Adult Services for the City of Alexandria. Her personal and professional experience have given her strong insight into the needs of the 31st House of Delegates district, and Elizabeth cares about the many challenges residents in Prince William County and Fauquier County face. Elizabeth will fight as a strong advocate for the needs of the 31st District, whether that’s legislating for change in Richmond, or attending a community meeting in Catlett.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Liz Guzman’s office in Woodbridge, VA on Oct. 17, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Elizabeth  Guzman has been working in the public sector for 10 years, and currently works as the Division Chief for Administrative Services for the Center for Adult Services for the City of Alexandria. Her personal and professional experience have given her strong insight into the needs of the 31st House of Delegates district, and Elizabeth cares about the many challenges residents in Prince William County and Fauquier County face. Elizabeth will fight as a strong advocate for the needs of the 31st District, whether that’s legislating for change in Richmond, or attending a community meeting in Catlett.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Liz Guzman’s office in Woodbridge, VA on Oct. 17, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

About

Liz Guzman 1

Source: Campaign page

Elizabeth Guzman is a public administrator and a social worker who resides in Dale City. Elizabeth and her husband Carlos have four children and live in Ridgefield Estates. In between ballet and tap lessons, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts activities, judo practices, and swimming lessons at the Dale City Recreation Center, Elizabeth works tirelessly as a Court Appointed Service Advocate for CASA CIS to prevent child abuse, a PTO representative for Penn Elementary School, and as a “Cookie Mom” for her youngest daughter’s Girl Scout troop. The Guzman family are active and long-time members of Harvest Life Changers Church in Woodbridge. The Guzmans also attend Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

Elizabeth came to the United States from Peru as a single mom, looking for a better future for her oldest daughter. Sheremembers those early years; working three jobs in order to afford a one-bedroom apartment for her and her daughter. Despite graduating with honors from high school in Peru, Elizabeth’s parents could not afford to send her to college. With her love of learning Elizabeth persevered, and enrolled at Northern Virginia Community College, obtaining her degree in Office Administration and Management. Elizabeth also holds a Bachelor’s in Public Safety from Capella University, a Master’s in Public Administration from American University, and a Master’s in Social Work from the University of Southern California.

Elizabeth is a long time resident of Prince William County, living in the community for more than 15-years – in spite of elected officials like Chairman Corey Stewart, who worked to divide the community and threaten the Hispanic community, which Elizabeth is a proud member of. She fell in love with Prince William County because of all of the opportunity the area offered to her as a community leader and homeowner, and her desire to raise her children in a diverse, engaging environment.

Elizabeth was elected in 2017 to become the first Hispanic female immigrant to join the 400 year old Virginia General Assembly. She now proudly represents Virginia’s 31st House District that covers Fauquier and Prince William County.

Elizabeth has been working in the public sector for 10 years, and currently works as the Division Chief for Administrative Services for the Center for Adult Services for the City of Alexandria. Her personal and professional experience have given her strong insight into the needs of the 31st House of Delegates district, and Elizabeth cares about the many challenges residents in Prince William County and Fauquier County face. Elizabeth will fight as a strong advocate for the needs of the 31st District, whether that’s legislating for change in Richmond, or attending a community meeting in Catlett.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Public Administrator and Social Worker
    2019 to present

Education

  • M.S.W.
    University of Southern California
    2019 to present
  • M.P.A
    American University
    2019 to present
  • B.A., Public Safety
    Capella University
    2019 to present
  • A.D., Office Administration and Management
    Northern Virginia Community College
    2019 to present

Personal

Place of Birth: Jesus Maria, Lima, Peru
Gender: Female
Race(s): Hispanic, Latino
Religion: Catholic/Christian
Spouse: Carlos Alberto Guzman (Cali)
Children: Pamela Tavares-Romero, Ivanna Guzman, Carlos Guzman, and Hannah Guzman

Membership & Affiliation

  • Sacred Heart Catholic Church H
  • Harvest Life Changers Church
  • American University Diversity & Inclusion (board member)
  • Girl Scouts of America (former member)
  • CASA CIS – Child Advocate

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Christopher D. Fleury
Administrative Assistant During Session: Charlotte Via

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1031

District Office
P.O. Box 1818
Woodbridge, VA 22195
Phone: (571) 403-1213

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Facebook, Government Page

Politics

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Elizabeth R. Guzman (D)14,63052.63%
Darrell H. “D.J.” Jordan, Jr. (R)13,12547.22%
Write-In (Write-in)420.15%
TOTAL27,797

2017 State DelegateArray

Liz Guzman (D)15,46654.0%
Lee Scott Lingamfelter (R)12,65844.2%
Nathan Daniel Larson ()4811.7%
Write In (Write-in)400.1%
TOTAL28,645

Committees

Committees

Privileges and Elections
Counties Cities and Towns

Subcommittees

Counties Cities and Towns – Subcommittee #3
Privileges and Elections – Subcommittee #4

Appointments

House Counties Cities and Towns
House Privileges and Elections
Rappahannock River Basin Commission

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Economy

Elizabeth believes that no hard-working Virginian should struggle with putting food on the table for their families due to low wages or a lack of economic opportunity. Elizabeth is a strong believer in raising the minimum wage, so that families in the 31st district and across the Commonwealth aren’t working 50-60 hour weeks and still having to choose between paying their bills and feeding their families. For Elizabeth establishing a living wage and promoting economic development is a family issue, because if individuals are making higher wages this will allow them the opportunity to spend more time with their families.

Elizabeth will work to promote economic development opportunities in Prince William and Fauquier County, so that more residents will be able to work rewarding, high-paying jobs closer to home.Each day Elizabeth commutes more than 45 miles to work, due to the lack of high-paying jobs in Prince William and Fauquier that are competitive with the wages and opportunities of surrounding localities

Education

As a mother of four, two of which face mental health challenges, Elizabeth knows the struggle parents face when ensuring that their children are getting a quality education – particularly for those what need additional mental health or disability services. As Delegate for the 31st District, Elizabeth has fought to expand funding and opportunities for early childhood education to ensure that all children in Virginia have adequate access.

Elizabeth is also committed to working to restore funding for public schools, and to find funding and innovative solutions to deal with the challenge of growing class sizes, high teacher turnover rates, and teacher pay. In Richmond she will continue to advocate for a better student to counselor ratio in our schools, and is dedicated to closing the education gap that is present in diverse communities across the state.

Environment

Elizabeth understands that climate change is real and we need to act now. She wants to ensure that the Virginia we enjoy today will be available for her children and the next generation 20 years from now. One of Elizabeth’s top priorities is protecting Virginia’s many beautiful landmarks, natural spaces, and farmland areas. Elizabeth’s grandparents were farmers, which gives her strong insight on the growing importance of protecting area farmland. She will continue to ensure that it will be there for generations to come by promoting agribusiness and agricultural opportunities in the 31st district, and supporting small family farms.

Health Care

Delegate Guzman was one of the very first champions for Medicaid Expansion in Virginia when she started to run, and true to her word she provided results her first legislative session. Elizabeth believes that healthcare is a human right and that we must do better to take care of our neighbours. She believes that workers deserve time off to go see the doctor or visit loved ones when they are ill without using vacation time to do as much. Now that we have expanded healthcare access across Virginia it is time that people are able to use it for preventative care before their situations get worse.

Immigration

As an immigrant to this country Elizabeth wants to ensure that diversity is something that is never disrespected in our Commonwealth. She knows the struggles of adjusting to a new place and will fight for a more inclusive Virginia where all communities are welcome. Elizabeth believes that immigrants make america great and that we must do everything we can to protect our Dreamers.

Providing licenses to all those eligible to drive in the 31st District would open up driver’s ability to get insurance on their vehicles and require individuals to take driver’s tests and properly register with the state’s motor vehicle agency. Making licenses available to all residents would bring much-needed revenue back into Virginia– revenue we are losing to Washington DC and Maryland, where they do allow for undocumented residents to get a license.

By allowing undocumented residents to get a license, we strengthen families– with the permission to drive safely and legally to work, school, and elsewhere, undocumented families can participate more fully in society without the constant fear of being. Unlicensed, uninsured drivers cause damage claims that cost other policyholders. More licensed and insured drivers will reduce the number of accidents and lower insurance rates for all.

Safety

Gun Control

Elizabeth respects the 2nd Amendment and would never do anything to impact the lives of law-abiding gun owners, but we need reasonable gun safety reforms. Violent criminals and domestic abusers should not have the means to do greater harm again. She believes that it is time for comprehensive background checks not only at gun shows but also for all private sales. She is in support of the Safe Virginia Initiative that aims to help keep our schools safe by examining the root cause of gun violence.

Veterans

The 31st District is home to many veterans and their families. Elizabeth wants to ensure that we take care of them by ensuring they have access to all the services that Virginia offers. According to the National Coalition of Homeless Veterans, one million veterans currently face homelessness due to shortage of affordable housing in Northern Virginia and lack of support to transfer the skills they learned during their service. When veterans are not able to transfer their skills they are pushed into low-paying jobs that do not provide them with enough support for their families

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David Reid 1David Reid

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2018
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

About

David Reid

Source: Campaign page

Growing up in Virginia

In 1972, my family moved from Rockbridge County, Virginia — where we lived in a four-room house without an indoor bathroom — to the United Methodist Children’s Home in Richmond, Virginia. My three siblings and I were each placed into a “cottage” based upon our age and gender. I lived at the Children’s Home for six years, before moving to Tahlequah, Oklahoma with foster parents.

My first paying job was at the Children’s Home, where I helped maintain the 40-acre campus for 35 cents per hour. The children would cut the grass with tractors and push mowers, pick up trash, trim bushes, edge sidewalks, and maintain all the equipment.

The lessons I learned at an early age prepared me for the hard work that would be necessary for me to become the first person in my family to graduate from college.
The Call to Service

Out of a deep desire to give something back to the country that has given me so much, in 1988 I joined the US Navy Reserve. I served our country as a Naval Intelligence Officer for 23 years until 2011, when I honorably retired as Commander.
Commander Reid

While in the Navy, I made two deployments to South Korea and one to Iceland, and a field deployment with the US Army. I participated in a NATO exercise onboard the USS Mount Whitney. I was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal on three occasions.​

My experience in the Navy gave me the tools needed to become a business professional in strategic management, banking, global telecommunications, and the defense industry. In 2014, I founded my own small business, Rockbridge Consulting, which specializes in studies and analysis.
My Life in Loudoun County

My wife, Barbara, and I have been married for 25 years and have lived in Ashburn since 2000. My family and I have been involved in our community. I have been a recreational and travel soccer coach and a certified soccer referee. My wife and daughters have volunteered at the Loudoun Interfaith Relief food pantry. We attend the Arcola United Methodist Church.​
My Family

​Our two daughters, Elizabeth and Rebecca, attended Loudoun County Public Schools; they received an outstanding education at Mill Run Elementary School, Eagle Ridge Middle School, and Briar Woods High School. Our eldest daughter is now a Senior at UVA and our youngest is a sophomore at Lynchburg College.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Naval Intelligence Officer
    US Navy Reserve
    1988 to 2011

    Honorably retired as Commander

  • Small business owner
    Rockbridge Consulting
    2014 to present

    Rockbridge Consulting LLC focuses on providing integrated analytical, process, and technology support for the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC). Rockbridge Consulting combines our expert domain knowledge of the worldwide threat environment with process improvements and technology enhancements to provide operationally focused, cost-effective solutions.

    Our personnel are available for long-term staff support, special projects, and ad hoc consulting. Additionally, we offer an open source, web risk assessment (WRA) capability that provides agencies with an objective assessment on the potential threat from their web presence.

Personal

Birth Year: 1962
Place of Birth: Lexington, VA
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Methodist
Spouse: Barbara Elizabeth Delpire
Children: Elizabeth and Rebecca
Membership & Affiliation: Arcola United Methodist Church
NAACP Loudoun County
Loudoun County Democratic Committee

Membership & Affiliation

  • Arcola United Methodist Church

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Benjamin Ernst, John McAuliff
Administrative Assistant During Session: Cathy Eagles

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1032

District Office
P.O. Box 4132
Ashburn, VA 20148

Phone: (703) 662-1395

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site

Politics

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

David A. Reid (D)20,46292.62%
Write-In (Write-in)1,6307.38%
TOTAL22,092

2017 State DelegateArray

David Reid (D)17,86558.47%
Thomas Alexander Greason (R)12,65341.41%
Write In (Write-in)340.11%
TOTAL30,552

Finances

DAVID REID CAMPAIGN CMTE has received $54,191 in contributions spanning 2 years.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Counties Cities and Towns
Transportation

Subcommittees

Counties Cities and Towns – Subcommittee #1
Transportation – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

House Counties Cities and Towns
House Transportation

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Civil Rights

Women’s Rights and Women’s Health

Only a woman and her doctor should be making decisions about a woman’s health and her body. I fully support a woman’s right to make personal decisions about her health and her body without interference from the state, either in limiting her options or trying to shame her.

Economy

Growing Our Regional Economy

We need to focus on bringing more quality, high-paying jobs to Loudoun County. Northern Virginia is quickly becoming the East Coast hub for technological innovation. We are at the center of core population areas. We have great universities and a well-educated population. Let’s take advantage of these resources to fully achieve our potential in space technology, alternative energy, advanced transportation solutions, biomedical research, and federal contracting.

For every $1 Loudoun County sends to Richmond, we get less than 30 cents back, with some estimates putting the amount as low as 18 cents on the dollar. We need to reassess the funding formulas and bring more of our money back to Loudoun County so that we can address our real needs in transportation, education, and public safety.

Education

Investing in K-12 Education

Implementing full-day kindergarten for all children in Loudoun County and making an investment in early childhood development will provide the foundation for children to become positive contributors to our community. While Loudoun is one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, it is still one of only three jurisdictions in Virginia without full-day kindergarten. The state budget is about priorities. Clearly the politicians in Richmond have not acted with urgency regarding K-12 education in Loudoun County.

College Affordability

As the first person in my family to earn a college degree, I know how important a college education is to breaking the cycle of poverty and providing a pathway to achieving the American Dream. In Richmond, I will fight against tuition increases, ensure we are investing in higher education because it is unacceptable that Virginia is now 6th in the nation for having the highest in-state tuition rates. We must break the cycle of saddling our young adults with excessive student loan debt. Since 2009, in-state tuition and fees have increased by approximately 7% annually; increases have been as high as 10% and 13% annually, which is a hidden tax on every parent with a child in college.

Environment

Energy Independence & Protecting our Environment

As a 23-year Navy veteran, I recognize that energy independence and protecting the environment are intertwined and each has been identified as a national security concern. Dependence on fossil fuels decreases our national options on where and when we must deploy the U.S. military and put service members in harm’s way. Virginia must do its part in addressing these issues and generate new, high-tech energy jobs by creating a business environment in which renewable energy can flourish.

I will hold oil and gas companies accountable when they pollute our air and water and put our health at risk. I will put the interests of our communities above those of corporate polluters.

Health Care

Expanding Access to Healthcare

For the first ten years of my life, my family and I lived without healthcare, so this issue is deeply personal to me. When my siblings and I moved to the Children’s Home, the healthcare professionals there wanted to remove my 16-year old sister’s teeth and give her dentures because her teeth were in such bad condition. I’m grateful for the healthcare I received at the Children’s Home and from my foster parents and know how important it is to improving quality of life. That is why you can count on me to fight for expanding access to healthcare to all Virginians. I will vote to expand Medicaid here in Virginia to ensure that more Virginians will receive access to life-saving medical treatment and preventative healthcare. In blocking Medicaid Expansion, the Republican majority in Virginia’s General Assembly has denied 400,000 eligible Virginians access to health insurance, blocked the infusion of $2.2 billion in federal dollars per year into our economy, and prevented the creation of over 30,000 healthcare jobs. This is unacceptable and, as your delegate, I will fight to make sure Virginians can afford to see a doctor when they are sick.​

Infrastructure

Invest In and Improve Transportation

If you drive anywhere in Loudoun County or Northern Virginia, you are aware that your commute has gotten worse over the last seven years. This situation represents a failure among the politicians of Richmond to proactively represent and deliver on the transportation needs of Loudoun County. Northern Virginia is the economic engine for the state. We need to ensure that the engine is not crippled by gridlock.

I oppose increasing the economic burden of tolls here in Loudoun County as well as on commuter roads Eastern Loudoun families utilize to get to and from work. Since 2000, the cost for an end-to-end trip on the Dulles Greenway has gone from $2 to $6.50. That’s a “road tax” increase of more than 320% for the residents of Ashburn, most of whom travel to only one or two exits. We need to either implement “distance-based pricing,” which would prorate routes between exits, or purchase the Greenway from the developer and add it to the VDOT system. I will never put special interest money above the interests of you and your family.

Reducing Gun Violence

Law-abiding citizens have the right to own firearms. However, our state government must do more to prevent gun violence and keep our children and communities safe. I support gun safety measures to include: universal background checks, mental health checks, and restrictions on convicted domestic abusers.

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Kathleen Murphy 1Kathleen Murphy

Current Position: State Delegate for 34th House District since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.comDecember 13, 2019 (Short)

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.com – December 13, 2019

State Delegate Kathleen Murphy (D-McLean) introduced the legislation making the non-resident bans possible. Her bill sailed through the state Senate on a 32 to 7 vote, and the measure cleared the House of Delegates without opposition.

“A county operating under the urban county executive form of government may by ordinance develop a program to issue resident permits or stickers to residents of a designated area that will allow such residents to make turns into or out of the designated area during certain times of the day when such turns would otherwise be restricted,” Virginia Code Section 15.2-2022.1 states.

On Saturday, the Virginia House Democratic Caucus announced their remaining elected leadership positions. The election results are as follows:

Vice Chair of Operations: Jeion Ward
Vice Chair of Outreach: Kathleen Murphy
Secretary: Marcus Simon
Treasurer: Betsy Carr
Sergeant-at-Arms: Delores McQuinn

“I am pleased to congratulate Dels. Jeion Ward, Kathleen Murphy, Betsy Carr, and Delores McQuinn on their re-election to caucus leadership positions and to welcome Del. Marcus Simon to his new role as Secretary,” said Caucus Chair Rip Sullivan.

Democrats walk away with Fairfax election, gain legislative majorities
Inside Nova , Brian TrompterNovember 7, 2019 (Short)

It would be tough to imagine a better night than Nov. 5 was for local Democrats.

Candidates backed by the Fairfax County Democratic Committee secured all but one of the 10 seats on the county’s Board of Supervisors, had a strong showing in the School Board race and beat back an independent challenger for commonwealth’s attorney.

Del. Kathleen Murphy (D-34th) received 10,004 votes (56.7 percent) to defeat Republican challenger Gary Pan, who earned 7,630 votes (43.2 percent).

Kathleen Murphy For Delegate - "Good Things"
Murphy for DelegateJune 28, 2015 (00:30)

Top News

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.comDecember 13, 2019 (Short)

Virginia Restricts Use Of Public Roads In Neighborhoods
thenewspaper.com – December 13, 2019

State Delegate Kathleen Murphy (D-McLean) introduced the legislation making the non-resident bans possible. Her bill sailed through the state Senate on a 32 to 7 vote, and the measure cleared the House of Delegates without opposition.

“A county operating under the urban county executive form of government may by ordinance develop a program to issue resident permits or stickers to residents of a designated area that will allow such residents to make turns into or out of the designated area during certain times of the day when such turns would otherwise be restricted,” Virginia Code Section 15.2-2022.1 states.

On Saturday, the Virginia House Democratic Caucus announced their remaining elected leadership positions. The election results are as follows:

Vice Chair of Operations: Jeion Ward
Vice Chair of Outreach: Kathleen Murphy
Secretary: Marcus Simon
Treasurer: Betsy Carr
Sergeant-at-Arms: Delores McQuinn

“I am pleased to congratulate Dels. Jeion Ward, Kathleen Murphy, Betsy Carr, and Delores McQuinn on their re-election to caucus leadership positions and to welcome Del. Marcus Simon to his new role as Secretary,” said Caucus Chair Rip Sullivan.

Democrats walk away with Fairfax election, gain legislative majorities
Inside Nova , Brian TrompterNovember 7, 2019 (Short)

It would be tough to imagine a better night than Nov. 5 was for local Democrats.

Candidates backed by the Fairfax County Democratic Committee secured all but one of the 10 seats on the county’s Board of Supervisors, had a strong showing in the School Board race and beat back an independent challenger for commonwealth’s attorney.

Del. Kathleen Murphy (D-34th) received 10,004 votes (56.7 percent) to defeat Republican challenger Gary Pan, who earned 7,630 votes (43.2 percent).

Kathleen Murphy For Delegate – “Good Things”
Murphy for DelegateJune 28, 2015 (00:30)

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate for 34th House District since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat

Overview: N/A

About

Kathleen Murphy

Source: Campaign page

Prior to her service in the General Assembly, Kathleen was President of Johnson Murphy & Associates – a McLean consulting firm providing strategic counseling and legislative strategies for companies and non-profit organizations. During the Clinton Administration, she worked as a Senior Advisor for International Trade issues at the Department of Commerce and handled Congressional Affairs at USAID. Previously, she was senior staff for Congressman Charlie Wilson (D-TX), where she handled Defense and Foreign Operations appropriations. Throughout her career, Kathleen has held a Top Secret Security clearance.

Kathleen helped found Salute Our Services, which was created to connect deployed service members to their families. She also helped found Kids Serve Too, an organization to honor and support children in military families. Kathleen played a critical role in Women’s Campaign International, an organization dedicated to teaching women in developing countries how to become political leaders, and was a founding member of the Congressional Wives Task Force, an advocacy group that focused on ensuring accurate nutrition labeling on food products and decreasing violence in children’s television.

Kathleen is a member of the McLean Community Foundation. She served on the Human Services Council for Fairfax County and the Fairfax County Health Care Task Force. She serves on a fundraising board for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. She graduated from American University magna cum laude. Kathleen is the mother of four children. She and her husband, Bill Sudow, are long time McLean residents.

Experience

Work Experience

  • President
    Johnson Murphy & Associates
    2019 to present

    a McLean consulting firm providing strategic counseling and legislative strategies for companies and non-profit organizations.

Education

  • B.A.
    American University
    2019 to present

    Magna cum laude

Personal

Birth Year: 1948
Gender: Female
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Catholic
Spouse: William E. Sudow
Children: Mark, Emily Hynes, Elizabeth, Amanda, Elyse Howard, and Alyson Bailey
Membership & Affiliation: McLean Community Foundation
Fairfax County Human Services Council
Fairfax County Health Care Task Force
Cystic Fibrosis Committee
McLean Chamber of Commerce
McLean Community Association
Dranesville District Democratic Committee/Fairfax County Democratic Committee

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Adrienne Tetreault
Administrative Assistant During Session: Susan Bain

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1034

District Office
P.O. Box 146
McLean, VA 22101
Office:
Phone: (804) 698-1034

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Murphy is President of Johnson Murphy & Associates (2000-present), a consulting firm based in McLean that provides strategic counseling and builds legislative strategies for companies and non-profit organizations. Previously she worked as a Senior Advisor for International Trade issues at the Department of Commerce (2000-20001) and handled Congressional Affairs at USAID (1996-2000) during the Clinton administration. She worked for Congressman Charlie Wilson (D-TX)(1993-1996) where she held a Top Secret security clearance and handled Defense and Foreign Operations appropriations. She was a writer and producer at Nickelodeon and deputy director of women’s outreach at the Democratic National Committee. Murphy helped found Salute Our Services, which helped connect service members deployed overseas with their families and Kids Serve Too, an organization to honor and support children in military families. Kathleen has played a critical role in Women’s Campaign International, an organization dedicated to teaching women in developing countries how to become political leaders, and now serves on their advisory board. She was a founding member of the Congressional Wives Task Force, an advocacy group that focused on nutrition labeling and violence in children’s television.

Murphy is currently a member of the Human Services Council for Fairfax County, the McLean Community Foundation, the Fairfax County Health Care Task Force and serves on a fundraising board for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. She is an active member of the Fairfax County Democratic Party and has worked as a Precinct leader for over 15 years. She graduated from American University, magna cum laude. Murphy is the mother of 4 children and 2 step children. She and her husband, attorney Bill Sudow, are long time McLean residents.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Kathleen J. Murphy (D)17,14358.35%
Gary G. Pan (R)12,21341.57%
Write-In (Write-in)230.08%
TOTAL29,379

2017 State Delegate

Kathleen Murphy (D)20,52260.9%
Cheryl Anne Buford (R)13,14639.0%
Write In (Write-in)200.1%
TOTAL33,688

2015 State Delegate

Kathleen Murphy (D)6,41951.2%
Craig Alan Parisot (R)6,09348.6%
Write In (Write-in)170.1%
TOTAL12,529

2013 State Delegate

Kathleen Murphy (D)10,82050.4%
Craig Alan Parisot (R)10,63249.5%
Write In (Write-in)160.1%
TOTAL21,468

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Finances

MURPHY, KATHLEEN JOHNSON has run in 5 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $2,735,896.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Transportation
General Laws
Counties Cities and Towns

Subcommittees

Counties Cities and Towns – Subcommittee #3
General Laws – Subcommittee #4
Transportation – Subcommittee #3

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Civil Rights

Protecting Women’s Rights

Women’s rights are human rights. It has been almost 50 years since the US Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment and sent it to the States for ratification. The only right explicitly granted to women by the Constitution is the right to vote. The ERA ensures equal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex. It ensures equality in the workplace, in education, and in pay.

On average, women earn only 81 cents for every dollar earned by men. The number is even lower for women of color. It has been more than 50 years since President Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law making it illegal to pay unequal wages to men and women who do the same or equal work. It is time to end the wage gap.

I believe we must protect a woman’s right to make her own health care decisions, including choices about contraception. I am a strong voice against the passage of bills that attempt to limit a woman’s access to health care or that attempt to close clinics that provide life-saving cancer screenings. Women should make their health care decisions with their doctors, not their legislators.

Protecting our Communities and our Children

Gun violence has become all too common in our society.  In the wake of recent tragedies it is clear that we need sensible gun solutions that will keep our children and communities safe from gun violence.  I support enhanced background checks and closing the gun show loophole, which allows people to purchase guns without a background check.  The NRA supported background checks after the tragedy at Columbine High School.  It is stunning that they have turned their backs on such sensible regulations.

I lost my brother to gun violence.  Two gunmen robbed and murdered him.  He was the father of five young children, a loving husband, a thoughtful son and a really fun brother.

I work with local groups, police, and concerned citizens to find reasonable regulations to help prevent these terrible tragedies. We must do our best to stop criminals and the mentally ill from obtaining dangerous weapons. And we must fund programs and services for the dangerously mentally ill.

Economy

Economic Development & Growth

Virginia has many assets that make it attractive to do business and raise families. We have excellent schools, a great quality of life, and a competitive corporate tax rate that make Virginia one of the best places to live, work, and raise a family.

In order to grow our economy we must support our schools, ensure access to affordable health care and deal with our growing transportation challenges. We also must make sure that Virginia is a welcoming community for all workers and their families.

As your Delegate I have been recognized by the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce, and the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for my work to promote and support a healthy and welcoming climate for business.

Education

Education

Education is an investment in our future. It is key to ensuring that our children will have opportunities to succeed and for building and strengthening a healthy economy. Virginia has consistently been rated as a leader in providing a world-class education for students in our public schools and universities.

We must take measures to ensure that our public schools remain competitive in a changing 21st century economy and promote innovative opportunities and practical solutions to improve education in Virginia.

Unfortunately, our schools are underfunded, and our teachers are underpaid. As your Delegate, I am committed to making responsible budget decisions that protect funding streams that our communities depend on to support our local schools.

Our Universities and Community Colleges are among the best in the country. An educated workforce is key to our region’s economic growth. In order to ensure that they remain among the best we need to support them financially. As financial support from the Commonwealth has decreased for our universities, tuition has gone up for our students. We need to continue working with our Universities and Community Colleges to keep higher education affordable. Our Community Colleges are a pathway to an affordable college education and a great resource for providing workforce training.

Health Care

Health Care

Affordable health care is a core necessity for all Virginians. The passage of Medicaid Expansion meant that over 300 thousand Virginians now have access to affordable healthcare. There is still work to be done to protect healthcare as a right and make prescription drugs affordable. It is essential that we tackle the problems associated with opioid abuse, including over-prescription. There should be treatment options available for these addictions to help with recovery.

I started the Rare Disease Caucus to help families who deal with the challenges of a child or family member who has a rare disease. I have offered legislation to expand coverage for several rare diseases.

Infrastructure

Transportation & Infrastructure

Northern Virginia has a transportation problem. We know that transportation, infrastructure and education together are key investments that fuel future economic growth and impact our quality of life. We waste hours sitting in traffic. We want real transportation solutions.

I opposed adding tolls to I-66 inside the Beltway. The plan adding tolls to I-66 has not adequately addressed the problems commuters are seeing, and has pushed more traffic into our neighborhoods, and acted as a tax on already stressed commuters.

I am working for efficient use of transportation funds and for Northern Virginia to get its fair share. We need to make sure these funds are allocated to the critical projects that will relieve congestion, improve intersections, and ensure pedestrian and bike safety.

For too many years we have deferred investments in our infrastructure. This has not only impacted our economic growth, it is a safety issue. Our roads, highways, and bridges are our lifeline. Rebuilding, repairing, and improving aging roads and bridges must be a priority.

Safety

Gun Violence

I lost my brother to gun violence. Two gunmen robbed and murdered him. He was the father of five young children, a loving husband, a thoughtful son and a really fun brother.

Gun violence has become all too common in our society. In the wake of recent tragedies it is clear that we need sensible gun safety solutions that will keep our children and communities safe from gun violence. I support enhanced background checks and closing the gun show loophole, which allows people to purchase guns without a background check. I support banning bump stocks and semi automatic firearms with high capacity magazines that are designed and configured for rapid fire and combat use.

I started the Gun Violence Prevention Caucus with Senator Adam Ebbin to ensure our efforts would be bi-cameral. I co-chaired the Safe Virginia Initiative and after speaking with people across the Commonwealth we authored a report on gun violence prevention and our responsibility to our communities. I continue to work with local groups, police, and concerned citizens to find reasonable regulations to help prevent these terrible tragedies. We must do our best to stop criminals and the mentally ill from obtaining dangerous weapons.This should be a bipartisan issue.

Twitter

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Mark Keam 1Mark Keam

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

In 2009, Mark became the first Asian-born immigrant and the first Korean American elected to any state-level office in Virginia. Since then, voters in the 35th District have returned Mark to Richmond for additional two-year terms.

Over the past decade, Mark has authored dozens of state laws that impact the quality of life for Virginians, such as improving public education and healthcare, creating innovative tech sector and environmental jobs, supporting military veterans and public safety, reforming tax codes and business regulations, and providing more government transparency, accountability, and efficiency.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Kerrie Thompson in the Fairfax Regional Library in the Fall of 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

This year, Dominion is looking for an explicit legislative green light to build, on its own, what would be the nation’s largest offshore wind project off the coast of Virginia Beach, and recoup the estimated $8 billion cost from ratepayers.

On a 5-4 tally, the bill advanced, but unease from Democratic Dels. Mark Keam of Fairfax and Alfonso Lopez of Arlington showed not everyone is sold on the idea that such a project would be in the public interest.

Virginia onAir interviews Mark Keam
Kerrie Thompson, CuratorJanuary 15, 2020 (10:37)

Top News

This year, Dominion is looking for an explicit legislative green light to build, on its own, what would be the nation’s largest offshore wind project off the coast of Virginia Beach, and recoup the estimated $8 billion cost from ratepayers.

On a 5-4 tally, the bill advanced, but unease from Democratic Dels. Mark Keam of Fairfax and Alfonso Lopez of Arlington showed not everyone is sold on the idea that such a project would be in the public interest.

Virginia onAir interviews Mark Keam
Kerrie Thompson, CuratorJanuary 15, 2020 (10:37)

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

In 2009, Mark became the first Asian-born immigrant and the first Korean American elected to any state-level office in Virginia. Since then, voters in the 35th District have returned Mark to Richmond for additional two-year terms.

Over the past decade, Mark has authored dozens of state laws that impact the quality of life for Virginians, such as improving public education and healthcare, creating innovative tech sector and environmental jobs, supporting military veterans and public safety, reforming tax codes and business regulations, and providing more government transparency, accountability, and efficiency.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Kerrie Thompson in the Fairfax Regional Library in the Fall of 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

About

Mark Keam

Source: Campaign page

Delegate Mark L. Keam is a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, which is considered the oldest law-making body in the New World, meeting continuously since 1619.

His legislative district is entirely within Fairfax County, and includes 85,000 residents living in the neighborhoods of McLean, Tysons, Dunn Loring, Town of Vienna, Oakton, Penderbrook, and Fair Oaks.

In 2009, Mark became the first Asian-born immigrant and the first Korean American elected to any state-level office in Virginia. Since then, voters in the 35th District have returned Mark to Richmond for additional two-year terms.

Over the past decade, Mark has authored dozens of state laws that impact the quality of life for Virginians, such as improving public education and healthcare, creating innovative tech sector and environmental jobs, supporting military veterans and public safety, reforming tax codes and business regulations, and providing more government transparency, accountability, and efficiency.

A recognized leader on technology and innovation issues in the General Assembly, Mark serves on the House Commerce & Labor Committee, Finance Committee, Education Committee, and Agriculture, Chesapeake & Natural Resources Committee.

He is a member of the special Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding and the Joint Subcommittee to Evaluate Tax Preferences. As a co-chair of the Virginia Legislative Tourism Caucus, Mark also works with the Fairfax County Sports Tourism Task Force.

Mark maintains a reputation as an effective bipartisan policymaker and has received awards and recognitions from a wide spectrum of organizations, including Virginia Chamber of Commerce, Tysons Regional Chamber of Commerce, Virginia Education Association, League of Conservation Voters, The Sierra Club, Humane Society, and Commissioners of the Revenue Association of Virginia.

Professionally, Mark has three decades of experiences in both the private and public sectors. On the commercial side, Mark has been an entrepreneur, an in-house counsel with a Fortune 15 technology company, the head of a national Asian American chamber of commerce, and an independent business consultant.

As a member of the bar in two states, he has practiced law in the executive and legislative branches of federal and local governments, including serving as chief counsel to a United States Senate Assistant Leader.

Active in the community, Mark has helped start or worked with dozens of nonprofit organizations that focus on his passions, including civic engagement, serving immigrants and minorities, developing youth leadership, and promoting literacy and lifelong learning.

He currently serves on the boards of Virginia Literacy Foundation, University of Virginia’s Thomas C. Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership, George Mason University’s Virginia Serious Game Institute, Northern Virginia Community College Educational Foundation, New American Leaders, Asian Pacific Islander American Health Forum, and Asian Americans Advancing Justice AAJC.

Mark is a member of Rotary Club of Vienna, Optimist Club of Greater Vienna, Tysons Regional Chamber of Commerce, Vienna Business Association, McLean Citizens Association, Leadership Greater Washington, Vienna Arts Society, Historic Vienna, Inc., and Vienna Presbyterian Church.

He is also active with the NewDEAL Leaders and BMW Foundation World Responsible Leaders programs.

Mark was born in Korea and lived in Vietnam and Australia before moving to America as a teenager. He received a political science degree from the University of California at Irvine and a law degree from U.C. Hastings College of the Law.

Mark and his wife Alex reside in Vienna and have two children in public schools.

Experience

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1966
Place of Birth: Seoul, Republic of Korea
Gender: Male
Race(s): Asian American
Religion: Presbyterian
Spouse: Alex Seong Keam
Children: Tyler and Brenna
Membership & Affiliation: Vienna Presbyterian Church
Asian/Pacific Islander American Chamber of Commerce and Entrepreneurship
Fairfax County Democratic Committee
Fairfax Law Foundation, Society of Fellows program
Historic Vienna, Inc.
Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies
Leadership Greater Washington
McLean Citizens Association
National Asian Pacific American Caucus of State Legislators
National Conference of State Legislatures
NewDEAL (Developing Exceptional American Leaders)
Optimists of Greater Vienna
Rotary of Vienna
Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership
Tysons Regional Chamber of Commerce
Vienna Arts Society
Vienna Business Association
Virginia Literacy Foundation
Occupation/Profession: Attorney

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Janine Gaspari
Administrative Assistant During Session: Teddi Reynolds

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1035

District Office
P.O. Box 1134
Vienna, VA 22183-1134
Phone: (703) 350-3911

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Government Page

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

In 2009, Delegate Steve Shannon, the Democratic incumbent, did not seek reelection in the 35th district in order to run (unsuccessfully) for Attorney General of Virginia. Keam declared his intention to run for the seat. On Election day Mark Keam defeated Republican challenger James E. Hyland. He was sworn into office on January 13, 2010 at the State Capitol in Richmond, Virginia.

In February 2010, Keam and fellow freshman delegate James LeMunyon, a Republican, authored an op-ed in The Washington Post about their introduction of a bill to the General Assembly, which would attempt to make the voting records of General Assembly members more accessible to the public. The bill passed the House of Delegates 86 to 13 later that month. A State Senate committee carried the bill over for a year, and it has not yet been voted on.

He told a local newspaper in his district in January 2010 that he can legislate from an immigrant’s point of view; saying that “I want to be able to speak on issues where people say, ‘I’ve never met an immigrant in my life; I don’t know what you guys think about it,’… I want to be able to say, ‘Well, let me tell you what they think about it.’” He has also sponsored another bill which would raise the number of ESL, or “English as a second language” teachers in Virginia’s schools from 17 full-time positions to 30 full-time positions for every 1,000 students.

Keam said in 2010 that he would abstain from voting on any bill which would pose a conflict of interest due to him being on an unpaid leave of absence from Verizon Communications, and he would not introduce any telecommunications legislation to the House of Delegates.

Keam was re-elected to his seat in Virginia’s House of Delegates on November 7, 2017.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Mark L. Keam (D)17,19892.75%
Write-In (Write-in)1,3447.25%
TOTAL18,542

2017 State Delegate

Mark Keam (D)22,59692.9%
Write In (Write-in)1,7187.1%
TOTAL24,314

2015 State Delegate

Mark Keam (D)9,20394.7%
Write In (Write-in)5205.3%
TOTAL9,723

2013 State Delegate

Mark Keam (D)14,63264.6%
Leiann Kirkland Leppin (R)7,96135.1%
Write In (Write-in)610.3%
TOTAL22,654

2011 State Delegate

Mark Keam (D)9,63696.2%
Write In (Write-in)3833.8%
TOTAL10,019

2009 State Delegate

Mark Keam (D)12,60650.7%
James Jim E. Hyland (R)12,25249.2%
Write In (Write-in)220.1%
TOTAL24,880

Finances

KEAM, MARK has run in 6 races for public office, winning 5 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$1,055,840.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Commerce and Labor
Finance
Education
Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources

Subcommittees

Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources – Subcommittee #1
Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources – Subcommittee #4
Education – Subcommittee #3
Commerce and Labor – Subcommittee #3
Finance – Subcommittee #3

Appointments

Flooding, Joint Subcommittee on Coastal
House Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
House Commerce and Labor
House Education
House Finance
Tax Preferences, Joint Subcommittee to Evaluate
Youth, Commission on

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Twitter

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Ken Plum

Current Position: State Delegate since 1978
Affiliation: Democrat

I am in my thirty-ninth year of service representing the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. I am a retired teacher and school administrator, having been employed by the Fairfax County Public Schools for nearly 30 years. Serving as your delegate is now my full-time focus.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Ken Plum’s Pocahontas Building office in Richmond, VA on Jan. 17, 2020. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 1978
Affiliation: Democrat

I am in my thirty-ninth year of service representing the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. I am a retired teacher and school administrator, having been employed by the Fairfax County Public Schools for nearly 30 years. Serving as your delegate is now my full-time focus.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Nader Momtaz in Ken Plum’s Pocahontas Building office in Richmond, VA on Jan. 17, 2020. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

About

Ken Plum

Source: Campaign page

Recognitions
Transportation
  • Distinguished Transportation Leadership Award, Northern Virginia Transportation Alliance 2013
  • Tower of Dulles Award from Committee for Dulles 2010
  • Dulles Area Transportation Association Founder’s Award for Transportation Leadership, 2007
  • Outstanding Contribution by a Public Official for New Services Along the Dulles Corridor, Virginia Transportation Association, 2000
Conservation
  • Conservation Hero, League of Conservation Voters, 2007-2013
  • Legislator of the Year, Virginia Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, 1996
  • Eco-Hero Award, Sierra Club, 1996
  • Legislator of the Year Award, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, 1993
Education
  • Plum Center for Lifelong Learning named in honor of Delegate Ken Plum, 2009
  • Virginia Education Association Legislative Achievement Award, 2009
  • Infant/Toddler Family Day Care – Achievement Award, 2007
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Cultural Foundation “2005 Outstanding Educator Award” honoring significant contributions in helping Fairfax County students attain their educational goals
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Cultural Foundation – Community Service Award for extraordinary commitment and leadership in improving public education for youth and adults in the Reston community and in the Commonwealth of Virginia, both as a professional educator and as a legislator, 2003
  • Legislator Appreciation Recognition, Education for Independence Programs in Virginia, 2000
  • Establishment of the Kenneth R. Plum Scholarship to the outstanding graduating senior, Fairfax County Public Schools, enrolled in “Project Opportunity.”
  • Legislative Leadership Award, Virginia Literacy Council, for leadership in and support of basic education and high school completion programs and private literacy provider organizations, 1996
  • Outstanding Service to Young Children Award, Northern Virginia Association for the Education of Young Children, 1995
Civic and Economic Leadership
  • Community Partner Award, Giving Circle of HOPE, 2014
  • Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce – Pinnacle Award, 2007
  • John Sturdivant Memorial Award for outstanding leadership and service to the state, county, and community from the 11th Congressional District Democratic Committee, 2001
  • Internet Leadership Award, U.S. Internet Council, for advancing sound public policies for the Internet, 1999
  • Virginia Economic Bridge – Leadership Award for promoting jobs throughout Virginia, 1999
  • “Tech Tenure” Award for innovative and positive efforts to strengthen technology businesses, further technology investments and broaden technology education and job training on behalf of the technology industry by the Northern Virginia Technology Council, 1999
  • “Tech Ten” Legislator for legislative leadership on behalf of the technology industry by the Northern Virginia Technology Council, three-time recipient, 1996, 1997, and 1998
  • U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s President’s Legislative Council, a select group of opinion leaders strengthening the visibility of business issues on the national level, 1998 and 1999
  • Chosen by the Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates to represent the General Assembly at the National Leadership Institute hosted by the National Conference of State Legislatures, Aspen, Colorado, 1997
  • Public Citizen of the Year Award, National Association of Social Workers-Virginia Chapter, 1995-96
  • Outstanding Service Award, Virginia Network for Victims and Witnesses of Crime, Inc., 1994
  • Good Guy Award, National Women’s Political Caucus, 1992
Healthcare
  • Coalition for Northern Virginians with Mental Disabilities – Distinguished Leadership Award, 2007
  • Virginia Association of Health Plans – Distinguished Public Service Award, 2007
  • ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia – Appreciation Award, 2007
  • Recognition from the March of Dimes for the Expansion of the Newborn
    Screening Program, 2005
  • Mental Health Community Contributor Award by the Fairfax-Falls Church Mental Health Advocacy Community at the Mental Health awareness Week Conference, 2005
  • Co-Legislator of the Year, Alzheimer’s Association of Virginia, 2000
  • Military Order of the Purple Heart Citation for outstanding legislative support to Virginia’s combat-wounded Purple Heart Veterans and their families, 1996
  • Legislative Leadership Award, Virginia Center on Aging, for leadership in and support of aging-related issues in the General Assembly, 1996
  • Drug Abuse Prevention “Warrior of the Year,” 1990

Experience

Work Experience

  • Director of Adult and Community Education
    Fairfax County Public Schools
    2019 to present

    Retired teacher and school administrator after nearly 30 years.

Education

  • BA
    Old Dominion University
    2019 to present
  • M.Ed
    University of Virginia
    2019 to present

Awards

  • For awards, see campaign web site (2019)

Personal

Birth Year: 1941
Place of Birth: Shenandoah, VA
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Ecumenical Christian
Spouse: Jane Meacham
Children: Timothy R., David W., Helen Kilinski, and Augusta Niday
Membership & Affiliation: United Christian Parish of Reston
Virginia Literacy Foundation (charter board member)
Retired Teachers’ Association
Dulles Corridor Rail Association (chairman)

Membership & Affiliation

Source

House Democratic Caucus, Chairman Emeritus
Democratic Party of Virginia – Former State Chair
Dulles Corridor Rail Association – Founder and Chair
Virginia Literacy Foundation – Charter Member of the Board of Directors
Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation – Board of Trustees
American Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia – Board of Trustees
Greater Reston Arts Center – Advisory Board
Reston Chorale – Honorary Board Member
Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty – Board of Advisors
United Christian Parish of Reston – Trustee, former Moderator of Board

  • United Christian Parish of Reston
  • Virginia Literacy Foundation (charter board member)
  • Retired Teachers’ Association
  • Dulles Corridor Rail Association (chairman)

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Kristy Pullen
Administrative Assistant During Session: Alexandra O’Brien

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1036

District Office
2073 Cobblestone Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Phone: (703) 758-9733

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Facebook, LinkedIn

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

Kenneth Ray Plum (born November 3, 1941) is a Democratic member of the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 36th District since 1982. He earlier served from 1978 through 1980. His district includes a large part of Fairfax County, including the entirety of the town of Reston.

Plum was selected as chair of the House Democratic caucus on January 14, 2009. He was previously a chair of the Democratic Party of Virginia. He currently serves as Caucus Chair Emeritus.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Kenneth R. “Ken” Plum (D)19,55892.94%
Write-In (Write-in)1,4857.06%
TOTAL21,043

2017 State DelegateArray

Ken Plum (D)24,14992.9%
Write In (Write-in)1,8417.1%
TOTAL25,990

2015 State DelegateArray

Ken Plum (D)10,34493.9%
Write In (Write-in)6716.1%
TOTAL11,015

2013 State DelegateArray

Ken Plum (D)18,42693.2%
Write In (Write-in)1,3416.8%
TOTAL19,767

2011 State DelegateArray

Ken Plum (D)9,52264.1%
Hugh McAteer Cannon (R)5,32735.9%
Write In (Write-in)100.1%
TOTAL14,859

2009 State DelegateArray

Ken Plum (D)12,89359.9%
Hugh Mac M. Cannon (R)8,58139.9%
Write In (Write-in)330.2%
TOTAL21,507

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Finances

PLUM, KENNETH R (KEN) has run in 11 races for public office, winning 10 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $1,321,407.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Rules
Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
Science and Technology
Transportation

Subcommittees

Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources – Subcommittee #2
Transportation – Subcommittee #1
Rules – Subcommittee #1
Rules – Subcommittee #1

Appointments

Autism Advisory Council
Electric Utility Regulation, Commission on
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia, Board of Trustees
House Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
House Rules
House Science & Technology
House Transportation
Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation Board of Trustees
Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission
Technology and Science, Joint Commission on

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Source: Wikipedia

Kenneth Ray Plum (born November 3, 1941) is a Democratic member of the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 36th District since 1982. He earlier served from 1978 through 1980. His district includes a large part of Fairfax County, including the entirety of the town of Reston.Plum was selected as chair of the House Democratic caucus on January 14, 2009. He was previously a chair of the Democratic Party of Virginia. He currently serves as Caucus Chair Emeritus.

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David Bulova

Current Position: State Delegate since 2007
Affiliation: Democrat

David Bulova was first elected to the General Assembly in November 2005.  He currently serves on the General Laws, Education, and Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural Resources committees.

David is passionate about community service. He is currently on the Board of Trustees of Brain Injury Services, which provides support to survivors of brain injuries and their families, the Board of the City of Fairfax Band, and the Board of Advisors for the William and Mary Public Policy Program.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Tim O’Shea in David Bulova’s Fairfax City office in July, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2007
Affiliation: Democrat

David Bulova was first elected to the General Assembly in November 2005.  He currently serves on the General Laws, Education, and Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural Resources committees.

David is passionate about community service. He is currently on the Board of Trustees of Brain Injury Services, which provides support to survivors of brain injuries and their families, the Board of the City of Fairfax Band, and the Board of Advisors for the William and Mary Public Policy Program.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Tim O’Shea in David Bulova’s Fairfax City office in July, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

About

David Bulova 3

Source: Campaign page

David Bulova and his family live in the Middleridge community of Fairfax.  David and his wife Gretchen met while attending Robinson Secondary and have been married for 23 years.  They have three wonderful children, Alex, Josette, and Grayson.  David and Gretchen are proud of their hometown.  They want to raise their children to have the same opportunities and with the same community-focused values they had growing up here.

Both David and Gretchen grew up in Fairfax. David received a BA from the College of William and Mary, a Master’s in Public Administration and Policy from Virginia Tech, and is a graduate of the Sorensen Institute of Political Leadership at the University of Virginia.

Professionally, David is a Project Manager at Amec Foster Wheeler Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. and works to help governments and industry comply with state and federal environmental regulations.

David was first elected to the General Assembly in November 2005.  He currently serves on the General Laws, Education, and Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural Resources committees.  He is a member of the State Water Commission, Chesapeake Bay Commission, Housing Commission, the Joint Commission on Health Care, and the Virginia War Memorial Board.  He serves as Governor McAuliffe’s appointee to the Legislative Advisory Council to the Southern Region Education Board and the Legislative Advisory Board to the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, and was Governor Kaine’s appointee to the Commission on Climate Change.  From 2003 to 2005, David was an elected representative on the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District Board.

David is passionate about community service. He is currently on the Board of Trustees of Brain Injury Services, which provides support to survivors of brain injuries and their families, the Board of the City of Fairfax Band, and the Board of Advisors for the William and Mary Public Policy Program. His is also an honorary member of the Rotary Club of Centreville-Chantilly. Other community service includes: former coach with Fairfax Little League and Burke Athletic Club soccer; former member and treasurer of the Rotary Club of Annandale (1999-2002); former member of the Fairfax County Tree Commission (2004-2005); and, former Governor’s appointee to the Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance Board.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Project Manager/Environmental Planner
    Amec Foster Wheeler Environment & Infrastructure, Inc.
    2004 to present
  • Board of Directors
    Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District
    2006 to present

Education

  • B.A., Government
    The College of William and Mary
    1991 to present
  • M.P.A.
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    1996 to present

Awards

  • Citation of Merit for Outstanding Citizen Service, Fairfax Federation of Citizen Associations (2002)
  • Watershed Connections Award and Legislator of the Year (2005)
  • Friends of Trees Award, Fairfax County Tree Commission (2008)
  • Legislator of the Year, Virginia Professional Firefighters (2009)
  • Legislative Achievement Award, Virginia Emergency Management Association (2010)
  • Legislator of the Year, American Council of Engineering Companies of Virginia (2011)
  • Brownson Award, Virginia Association of Museums (2014)
  • Legislator of the Year, Commissioners of the Revenue Association of Virginia (2015)
  • Michael S. Harris Award, American Association of University Professors (2015)
  • Industrial Strength Leadership Award, Virginia Manufacturing Association (2017)
  • Excellence in Workforce Development Award, Virginia Chamber of Commerce (2017)

Personal

Birth Year: 1969
Place of Birth: Fairfax, VA
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Roman Catholic
Spouse: Gretchen Marie Reimer
Children: Alex, Josette, and Grayson

Membership & Affiliation

  • St. Mary’s of Sorrows Catholic Church
  • Brain Injury Services (board of trustees)
  • Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance Board (former member)
  • Rotary of Centreville (honorary member)
  • City of Fairfax Band (board member)
  • William and Mary Public Policy Program (board of advisors)
  • Sorensen Institute Political Leaders Program

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Rama Van Pelt
Administrative Assistant During Session: Mary Ann Christian

Email:

Offices

Richmond Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1037

District Office
9900 Main St. Plaza 102
Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: (703) 310-6752

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube

Politics

Source: Government

Elected State/Local Office: Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District (board of directors, 2004-06)

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)14,27991.89%
Write-In (Write-in)1,2608.11%
TOTAL15,539

2017 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)18,87793.53%
Write In (Write-in)1,3056.47%
TOTAL20,182

2015 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)7,06557.3%
Sang Hyun Yi (R)5,24942.6%
Write In (Write-in)9.1%
TOTAL12,323

2013 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)11,52660.9%
Patrice Marie Winter (R)7,35338.9%
Write In (Write-in)39.2%
TOTAL18,918

2011 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)7,02159.5%
Brian William Schoeneman (R)4,75240.3%
Write In (Write-in)19.2%
TOTAL11,792

2009 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)12,20967.6%
Christopher Francis DeCarlo ()4,47124.7%
Anna M. Choi ()1,2456.9%
Write In (Write-in)1470.8%
TOTAL18,072

2007 State DelegateArray

David L. Bulova (D)13,64798.1%
Write In (Write-in)2691.9%
TOTAL13,916

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Finances

David Bulova has run in 7 races for public office, winning 7 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $1,537,598.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
General Laws
Education

Subcommittees

Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources – Subcommittee #3
Education – Subcommittee #1
General Laws – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

Agricultural Best Management Practices
Chesapeake Bay Commission
Health Care, Joint Commission on
House Agriculture Chesapeake and Natural Resources
House Education
House General Laws
Standards of Learning Innovation Committee
Virginia Housing Commission
War Memorial Board, Virginia
Water Commission, State

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

As your voice in the Virginia House of Delegates, I believe it is important for you to know where I stand on the issues affecting our community.  Even more, I believe that action speaks louder than words.  Please see below for my priorities and the legislation that I have introduced or supported to turn these priorities into reality.

Governance

Ethics Reform/Open and Accountable Government

In 2015, I introduced aggressive legislation (HB1667) on ethics reform, including a hard cap of $100 per year on all gifts.  My bill was rolled into HB2070, which was signed by the Governor.  While I will continue to press for stronger legislation, this effort moves Virginia in the right direction.

As your voice in Richmond, I am accountable to you for my votes and strive to make government more open and accessible.  Open and accountable government starts right here at home.  Each year I hold a town hall meeting during session, mail constituents a Report from Richmond to summarize issues tackled by the General Assembly, conduct a Constituent Survey, and host a series of “informal office hours” where residents can stop by to chat and provide feedback on community issues.  Each spring I also send a letter to all community/civic association presidents offering to speak at meetings and attend community events.

Finally, I believe that voters should choose their representatives – not the other way around.  Our current system of redistricting results in too many non-competitive districts that are drawn for political purposes.  I have supported numerous efforts to establish a non-partisan Virginia Advisory Redistricting Commission.  While these measures failed, I will continue to be a strong advocate for this very important electoral reform.

Fiscal Responsibility

The General Assembly has an obligation to use your tax dollars wisely and efficiently.  Virginia has a AAA bond rating because of our reputation for fiscal responsibility.  It is critical for Virginia to continue this tradition.  I am proud that Virginia’s Constitution requires a balanced budget and that the General Assembly has worked together in a bi-partisan manner to do this in a fiscally responsible manner.

As a member of the House of Delegates, I have supported several initiatives to streamline the delivery of services.  In 2010, I spearheaded successful legislation (HB208) that eliminated a half-dozen outdated or redundant school reporting requirements to ensure that funding goes where it belongs — in our classrooms.  In 2011, I voted for successful legislation that established the state-wide Office of the Inspector General (HB2076) to investigate allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse.  In 2012, I supported and was appointed to the conference committee for HB1295, which eliminated several outdated mandates on local government and regional government entities.  Also in 2012, I sponsored successful legislation (HB1164) that eliminated redundant review of many local road projects — a practice that had resulted in significant delays of much needed local improvements.

Civil Rights

Identity Theft

As our community relies more and more on electronically stored data, the opportunity for personal information to reach the wrong hands also increases.  Identity theft can have a devastating impact on both individuals and families, and Virginia must vigorously pursue and prosecute anyone who steals or misuses personal information.

That is why I spearheaded amendments to the Personal Information Privacy Act to curtail the practice of drivers license swiping by retailers (HB1072).  I also worked with the Secretary of Technology to introduce HB390 the “Compromised Data Disclosure Act” during the 2008 General Assembly Session.  My bill was ultimately rolled into HB1469, which was signed by the Governor.  As a result, any time personal information is accessed by an unauthorized person, the keeper of the information, whether business or government, must notify the individual and the Office of the Attorney General that a breach has occurred.  I was also proud to support legislation to allow any consumer to freeze access to his or her credit report (HB 1311) to ensure that the information cannot be accessed without the consumer’s explicit authorization.

Finally, I introduced successful legislation in 2010 (HB 210) to strengthen Virginia’s extortion statute and to close a dangerous loop-hole that would have allowed someone to threaten to sell personal information for financial gain.

While I am pleased with the progress we have made to protect our citizens from identity theft, much work remains to be done.  Sensitive personal information can still be obtained all too easily, including from publicly available land records and legal proceedings.  Protecting our citizens from identity theft will continue to be one of my top priorities.

Consumer Protection

We are all consumers and deserve to be protected from unscrupulous and predatory business practices.  Bad businesses also make it harder for good businesses to compete.  As former chairman of the Fairfax County Consumer Protection Commission, I have introduced a number of bills aimed at enhancing consumer protection in Virginia.  In 2012, I introduced legislation (HB429) to provide consumers with more tools to prevent the practice of “cramming” on telephone bills.  Cramming is the practice of placing misleading or deceptive charges on your telephone bill without authorization. Often, these are small charges with generic names in the hope that they won’t be noticed.  Since introduction, federal regulations were passed that achieved the goals of my proposed legislation.  In 2014, I introduced successful legislation (HB1072, the Personal Information Privacy Act) to make it illegal for a business to scan a driver’s license and to keep the information for marketing or other purposes not related to the immediate transaction.  Currently, I am working to better regulate predatory car title lenders and introduced HB1620 at the request of the Governor.

Economy

While there are signs of improvement, much more needs to be done to reduce unemployment and spark economic growth.  This requires investing in our transportation infrastructure and education, fostering an environment that rewards creativity and innovation, and reducing regulatory burdens to starting and running a business.  In particular, Virginia needs to increase investments in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and our community college system.  We also need to reform and streamline our tax system while ensuring that sufficient revenue is generated at the state and local levels to provide needed services.  I was a co-patron of the Virginia Growth and Opportunity Act (HB834) and supported the formation of the Virginia International Trade Corporation (HB858).  In 2017, I was proud to receive the Excellence in Education and Workforce Development Award from the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for my efforts in career and technical education.

Education

As the proud parent of three children who attend Fairfax County Public Schools, I know first hand the importance of quality public education.  As a member of the Education Reform Subcommittee, I have worked closely on efforts to reform our Standards of Learning and was a co-patron of legislation creating the Standards of Learning Reform Committee.  I was proud to accept the Virginia Education Association’s “Solid as a Rock for Public Education Award” for my efforts on the House Education Committee in 2017.  Over the years, I have introduced successful legislation to promote career and technical education opportunities (HB1552) and strengthen the process for dealing with teachers accused of sexually assaulting a student.  I have also co-sponsored legislation (HB 1871) to enhance efforts to fight bullying in our schools.

As your delegate, my priorities include:

  • Keep class size low in order to maximize the ability of teachers to provide individualized attention to students.
  • Retain and recruit highly qualified teachers and support staff.
  • Provide students with modern educational facilities that maximize the use of technology.
  • Promote parental involvement in our schools as a key component to learning.
  • Continually look for opportunities to streamline operations and assess the effectiveness of existing programs.
  • Revise the State’s Composite Index so that our schools get a fair share of funding.  Fairfax County currently received only 32% of its base-funding from the State, while the City of Fairfax only receives 20%.

Environment

Energy

Whether you are concerned about the impacts of climate change or the threat to national security posed by our dependence on foreign energy sources, sustainable energy is one of our nation’s greatest challenges.  In 2015, I introduced legislation to create a Virginia Solar Energy Development Authority (HB1725) and was chief co-patron of the final adopted legislation (HB2267).  This initiative will ensure that Virginia can take advantage of growth in this industry by unleashing the power of small businesses that are on the forefront of this technology.  In 2011, I introduced successful legislation that will position Virginia to be a leader in the area of electric plug-in vehicles by eliminating regulatory hurdles that would stifle entrepreneurialism (HB2105).  In 2009, I also successfully passed HB1994 to increase Virginia’s renewable energy goal to 15% by the year 2025.

I will continue to work hard to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels while keeping energy affordable.  My priorities include:

  • Invest in clean, renewable sources of energy.  Virginia has enormous potential to be a leader in renewable energy.  This is good for the environment and our economy.  I support: harnessing our tremendous off-shore wind resources; providing incentives for the production of biofuels that do not compete with our food supply; increasing our investment in research at our universities; and, other innovative approaches, such as harvesting methane from landfills and agricultural operations.
  • Empower residents to conserve energy.  This is win-win for the environment and the consumer.  I support: expanding smart meters so that consumers have better information about their energy consumption; exploring public-private partnerships to retrofit existing buildings; assisting low income families with weatherization; and, providing tax incentives to encourage investment in solar and wind power.
  • Encourage more efficient cars and reduce our reliance on the automobile.  Automobiles account for more than a third of our greenhouse gas emissions.  Nationally, we must continue to increase fuel efficiency standards.  Here in Virginia, we need to encourage land use patterns that promote walking and biking and take advantage of public transit.

Environment

Virginia is blessed with an abundance of natural resources.  As an environmental planner by profession, I consider it a special responsibility to fight for the environment in the General Assembly.  I am proud to have been designated as a Legislative “Hero” or “Leader” by the Virginia League of Conservation Voters for the past ten years.

As your delegate, I have successfully spearheaded legislation to:

  • better coordinate drinking water supply planning and permitting (HB1158);
  • require the leak-plagues Pickett Road Tank Farm in the City of Fairfax to bring their above ground storage tanks into conformance with modern industry standards (HB2103);
  • strengthen solid waste planning in Virginia (HB421);
  • better protect our Potomac River water supply during drought conditions (HB2487); and,
  • increase the penalties that local governments can use against developers that violate our water quality regulations (HB 392).

I also successfully fought for new legislation to help local governments in Northern Virginia preserve mature trees during development (HB1437).  Mature trees not only increase property values and beautify our neighborhoods, they also help to clean the air.  In recognition of this achievement, I was proud to accept the 2008 Fairfax County Friends of Trees Award.

Land Use and Growth

No amount of transportation funding can overcome poor land use planning and growth that exceeds our capacity to serve it with public infrastructure.  My priorities are to strengthen the ability of our local governments to manage growth responsibility and to strengthen regional coordination of land use planning.  In 2013, I introduced successful legislation (HB 2326) that provides our regional planning agency, the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, with the authority to develop a regional strategic plan to help better coordinate growth and regional service delivery.

Health Care

Today, approximately one million Virginians lack health insurance, which means that our emergency rooms provide the primary source of health care for many of these individuals. As a result, the financial burden of this care is shifted mainly to those with private insurance in the form of higher premiums.  Under the federal health care law, Virginia has the option of expanding Medicaid coverage to those with income under 133% of the federal poverty level, which represents more than 300,000 people. For the first three years of the program, the federal government will pay 100% of the cost. The federal share will then be slowly reduced to 90%. This is expected to save Virginia significant money by making the system more efficient and ensuring that more people get preventative health care.  This is one of the reasons why expansion is supported by the Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce.  In 2014, I supported a bi-partisan plan to put Virginia on a path for Medicaid expansion and make sure that Virginia doesn’t leave $5 million per day on the table that could go to the improving the health of our citizens.

As a member of the General Assembly’s Joint Commission on Health Care, I have worked closely with Secretary of Health and Human Resources Bill Hazel on a wide range of health care and mental health issues.  These include:

  • Mental health reform.  In the wake of the Virginia Tech tragedy, the General Assembly made important reforms to our mental health laws and increased the resources available to courts and case managers.  We need to continue to refine these reforms and ensure that funding is not cut to these critical services.
  • Autism spectrum disorder.  I co-patroned the successful effort to require health insurers to provide coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder.  The benefits of early intervention are enormous, not only to the child, but also in terms of the long-term cost savings to the state.  No family should be put in the position of having to decide if they can afford appropriate treatment.
  • Smoking in restaurants ban.  As a member of the General Laws Committee, I helped to pass the landmark legislation in 2009 that protects both the health of customers and workers by significantly limiting smoking in restaurants.

Infrastructure

Transportation

Traffic congestion threatens our economy and our quality of life.  As the parent of three children, I know the frustration of being late for that important recital or evening sports practice.  I have consistently supported common-sense measures to provide much needed transportation funding for the Northern Virginia region.  In 2013, I supported the comprehensive transportation package that passed the General Assembly on a bi-partisan basis.  This package resulted in substantial new revenue that is going toward our region’s most pressing and aggravating problems.  In 2016, I introduced several pieces of legislation regarding the Governor’s plan to toll I-66 inside and outside of the Beltway. I successfully passed HB407 to ensure that HOV-2 could not be converted to HOV-3 for the purpose of tolling. I was also part of a group of legislators that brokered a deal to widen I-66 inside the Beltway from the Dulles Connector to Ballston.

In addition, I will continue to advocate for changes in the way that transportation funding is distributed to make it more equitable for Northern Virginia.  I spearheaded efforts to change the transportation maintenance formula  (HBs 389, 6011, 1993, 1491, and 477) and in 2013 co-patroned legislation to provide Northern Virginia with more representation on the Commonwealth Transportation Board (HB864).  Getting our fair share will continue to be one of my top priorities.

Additional priorities include:

  • Increase our investment in transportation technology, including telework, “smart highways,” and better synchronization of our traffic lights.
  • Help get people out of their cars by making strategic investments in bike paths and walking trails.
  • Expand Metro to Centreville and beyond and adequately fund both Metro and the Virginia Railway Express.

Social Security

Veterans

Supporting Veterans

As the son and grandson of veterans, I am thankful for the sacrifices our veterans make to protect our freedoms.  In 2015, I was a proud co-patron of successful legislation authorizing a Northern Virginia Veterans Care Center (HB1276).  I have been proud to support Virginia’s Wounded Warriors Program as both a member of the House of Delegates and as a Board Member of Brain Injury Services, Inc.  During the 2011 session, I had the honor to serve as chief co-patron of successful legislation (HB1691) designed to help veterans who have fallen on tough times.  Based on successful programs in New York and Pennsylvania, the legislation allows local courts to establish special dockets for veterans and active military service members who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury and run into trouble with the law.  According to a 2008 RAND Corporation study, nearly 20 percent of our service men and women returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.  Many more suffer from traumatic brain injury – both diagnosed and undiagnosed.  Fewer than half of these individuals actually seek treatment for PTSD or depression.  Unfortunately, while trying to recover, some of these veterans fall into drug and alcohol abuse or commit minor crimes and end up in the criminal justice system.  It is during these trying times that our veterans need our assistance the most.  The premise behind HB1691 is to provide alternatives to incarceration when possible and to ensure that judges are aware of the rehabilitative programs offered by state and federal agencies as well as local veterans organizations.  I was proud to work with the Joint Leadership Council of Veterans Service Organizations, which represents over two dozen veteran service organizations in Virginia, on this effort.

Affordable Housing

All Virginians deserve safe, decent, affordable housing. To achieve that goal, I have supported increased funding for the Virginia Housing Trust Fund, a flexible loan and grant resource that addresses a range of local housing needs from homelessness to homeownership.  I also passed legislation to provide the City of Fairfax additional authority to negotiate with developers to provide affordable housing (HB1471).  Finally, I support ensuring adequate funding to provide permanent and supportive homes for individuals with serious mental illness and other disabilities.

Twitter

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Kaye Kory 2Kaye Kory

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Kaye and her husband Ross have lived in Fairfax County for over 35 years. Kaye has her B.A. degree in English from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University.

Kaye has represented District 38 since 2010. Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 2010
Affiliation: Democrat

Kaye and her husband Ross have lived in Fairfax County for over 35 years. Kaye has her B.A. degree in English from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University.

Kaye has represented District 38 since 2010. Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep. Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County.

About

Kaye Kory

Source: Campaign page

Kaye and her husband Ross have lived in Fairfax County for over 35 years.  Kaye has her B.A. degree in English from the Miami University of Ohio and has done graduate work in public policy at the University of Iowa and George Mason University.  She gravitated to the educational arena when seeking pre-K options when her three children were young.  Kaye was a frequent and vocal critic of many Fairfax County School Board and school administration policies.  She won a special election for the Mason District seat on the School Board in June of 1999.  After that first special election, Kaye won three regular elections by some of the largest margins for Democrats in the Mason District and across the County.  Kaye routinely turned out crowds to observe and testify at School Board meetings and work sessions.  Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her activist roots run broad and deep.

Kaye served as a counselor for troubled youth at “Runaway House” in our 38th District. She also worked with the Grey Panthers in Woonsocket Rhode Island, under the auspices of the activist Catholic Diocese there.  As well, Kaye was the Program Manager for a Community Agency on Aging and the Executive Director for Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax.  As Program Analyst for the Fairfax County Department of Community Action, Kaye did program assessment and grant writing for such programs as Head Start and the Medical Care for Children Program (nationally recognized by the Kennedy School at Harvard for public sector innovation). Kaye has been an active leader in a diverse range of community organizations including: the Annandale Chamber of Commerce; the Virginia League of Conservation Voters; and, the NAACP.   She has been a sustaining member of the Fairfax County Democratic Committee since 2001.  She has served on numerous Fairfax boards and committees including the Fairfax County Community Action Advisory Board, the Board (member and President) of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Partnership for Youth, the Fairfax County Association for the Gifted; the J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding President; renamed Justice High School Fund); the Fairfax County Boys and Girls club; and, the Hampton Court Homeowner’s Association.

Kaye gravitated to the educational arena when seeking pre-K options when her children were young. She soon emerged as a leader of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia (MSNV), one of the oldest in the region. She transitioned into PTA leadership positions following her children’s transition to the public schools.

Kaye won a special election for the Mason District seat on the Fairfax County School Board in June of 1999, following the resignation for health reasons of former member Fred Ward.   Fred supported Kaye in that election, even though Kaye was a frequent and vocal critic of many School Board and school administration policies.  Fred knew Kaye as a PTA activist at Sleepy Hollow Elementary, Glasgow Middle School and J.E.B. Stuart High School, a mother of three and a passionate and effective community builder. Kaye routinely turned out crowds to observe and testify at School Board meetings and work sessions.

Following that first special election, Kaye won three regular elections by some of the largest margins for Democrats in Mason District and across the County.

Professional

Though Kaye has achieved prominence in Education, her “activist” roots run broad and deep:

She served as a counselor for troubled youth at “Runaway House” in the District. Kaye worked with the Grey Panthers in Woonsocket Rhode Island, under the auspices of the activist Catholic Diocese there.

As Program Manager for a Community Agency on Aging and Executive Director for Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax County, Kaye developed expertise in a wide range of programs affecting the elderly. She established a free transportation program for the elderly and handicapped in the Mount Vernon District of the County that was a predecessor to the County’s FastTran program.

As Program Analyst for the Fairfax County Department of Community Action, Kaye did program assessment and grant writing for such programs as Head Start and the Medical Care for Children Program (nationally recognized by the Kennedy School at Harvard for public sector innovation);

Community

Kaye has served on numerous boards and committees in her 30 years in Fairfax County including the Fairfax County Community Action Advisory Board, the Board (member and President) of the Montessori School of Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Partnership for Youth, the Fairfax County Association for the Gifted; the J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding President); the Fairfax County Boys and Girls club; and the Hampton Court Homeowner’s Association.

Kaye and Ross served two years as VISTA volunteers (predecessor to AmeriCorps), working on housing and anti-poverty issues;
As a volunteer, while she had young children at home, Kaye developed and led a “Great Books” program for seniors working through Fairfax County Adult and Community Education and secured funding for Fairfax County Association for the Gifted Literary Magazine

Experience

Work Experience

  • Project Manager
    2019 to present

    (retired)

Education

  • B.A
    Miami University, OH
    2019 to 1969

Awards

  • The Montessori School of Northern Virginia, Woman of the Year (2019)
  • Fairfax County Police, Certificate of Appreciation (2019)
  • J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation, Kaye Kory Scholarship (2019)
  • Virginia League of Conservation Voters, 100% Legislative Hero Award (2019)
  • Virginia Education Association, Rookie Award, Solid as a Rock Award (2019)
  • Interfaith Council on Public Policy, Legislator of the Year (2019)
  • Sierra Club, Leadership Award (2019)
  • Drive Smart Virginia (2019)
  • Association for College Admission Counseling, Leadership Award (2019)

Personal

Birth Year: 1947
Place of Birth: Chicago, IL
Gender: Female
Race(s): Caucasian
Spouse: Ross C. Kory, Jr.
Children: Matthew, Alexander, and Caroline
Membership & Affiliation: NAACP League of Women Voters
Virginia League of Conservation Voters
EMILY’s List
Sleepy Hollow Elementary School PTA
Glasgow Middle School PTA
J.E.B. Stuart High School PTA (president, treasurer)
The Montessori School of Northern Virginia (president)
J.E.B. Stuart Educational Foundation (founding president)
Fairfax County Boys & Girls Club (board member)
Annandale Chamber of Commerce
Virginia Democratic Women’s Caucus
ProgressVA

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Holly Hazard
Administrative Assistant During Session: Jeanne Oostdyk

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1038

District Office
6505 Waterway Drive
Falls Church, VA 22044
Phone: (703) 354-6024

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook

Politics

Source: Wikipedia

For two years, Kory was a VISTA volunteer working on housing and anti-poverty issues. As a program adviser to a Community Agency on Aging and Executive Director at the Saunders B. Moon Senior Citizens Center in the Gum Springs neighborhood of Fairfax County, Kory established a free transportation for the elderly.

Kory became involved with the parent-teacher associations at her children’s schools, and was elected president and treasurer of the J.E.B. Stuart High School PTA.

Recent Elections

2019 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)13,93493.26%
Write in (Write-in)1,0076.74%
TOTAL14,941

2017 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)16,02373.5%
Paul Byrne Haring (R)5,72326.3%
Write In (Write-in)510.2%
TOTAL21,797

2015 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)7,81973.8%
James Lewis Leslie (G)2,65525.1%
Write In (Write-in)1151.1%
TOTAL10,589

2013 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)12,53474.7%
James Lewis Leslie (G)4,08724.3%
Write In (Write-in)1664%
TOTAL16,787

2011 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)8,10676.4%
James Lewis Leslie (G)2,40222.6%
Write In (Write-in)970.9%
TOTAL10,605

2009 State Delegate

Kaye Kory (D)9,62159.5%
Danny R. Smith (R)6,50540.2%
Write In (Write-in)420.3%
TOTAL16,168

Finances

KORY, L KAYE has run in 6 races for public office, winning 6 of them. The candidate has raised a total of$396,913.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Militia, Police and Public Safety
Commerce and Labor
Finance

Subcommittees

Finance – Subcommittee #3
Commerce and Labor – Subcommittee #3
Militia, Police and Public Safety – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

Civic Education, Commission on
Health Care, Joint Commission on
House Commerce and Labor
House Finance
House Militia Police and Public Safety
Wireless Communications Infrastructure Group – Joint Subcommittees of House Commerce & Labor, Senate Commerce & Labor, and Senate General Laws & Technology

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Civil Rights

Advocating for Women

Fighting for women’s rights is at the forefront of my career. 

​As a legislator and a community activist, I have worked to establish women’s reproductive rights and reproductive justice, as well as to bring a high profile to these issues.  Whether a patron of a reproductive rights bill, an anti-discrimination bill or a menstrual equity bill and an advocate for  passage, and working to ensure implementation, I actively seek broader social justice goals in our education system and in our criminal justice system.  I have organized community action in Iowa, Rhode Island and Virginia to support these goals.  I became an elected School Board Member and Delegate to pursue equity and create leadership opportunities for women and girls, and strengthen our pro-choice support.​

Through founding and chairing the Women’s Reproductive Health Care Caucus in the Virginia General Assembly, I have built a strong base to support reproductive justice and push for change.  I have attended and spoken at rallies and marches at the Capitol and traveled with the ERA bus.  My successful bill, HB83 (2018), requiring prisons and jails to provide menstrual supplies at no charge and upon request — instead of an allotted amount — for incarcerated women was the first in the nation.  I have gone into jails and prisons to learn firsthand the specifics of health care offered to women.  I have also organized a public panel of formerly incarcerated women to publicize the travesties and inequities in our criminal justice system and hope to schedule more in the future.

Establishing civil equality and the right to choose reproductive health care should not be the century-long fight that it has become.  Unfortunately, equality looks like a threat to the privileged.  This has been borne out again and again.  Not one more generation of women should have to fight this fight.  Our Constitution must establish legal equality for women.  Until that time, I will fight against gender inequity everywhere I find it.

Education

Standing Strong for our Families

I am fighting for our fair share of state funds for education and transportation; I am also protecting teachers’ salaries and retirement plans. I refuse to support cuts in programs for children with special needs and in core community services.

increase in public education funds and a 5% raise for teachers and instructors during the 2019 reconvened legislative session.  Moreover, these significant achievements for public education were agreed to in a Republican-controlled General Assembly.  Imagine what we could do with a Democratic majority in 2020 and beyond!

Educators endorse my re-election! ​

I am excited and honored that our teachers have endorsed my re-election in recognition of my push for state investment in pre-K-12 education.  The FEA and VEA join me in striving to offer our children the excellent education they deserve.

Equitable education access for students of diverse backgrounds. ​

One important issue facing our public schools that is not discussed often enough is Virginia’s outdated funding formula identifying ratios for full-time instructional positions to students with limited English proficiency — also called ESL (English as Second Language) students and ELLs (English Language Learners).  Our ESL students deserve the same quality education as their peers.  That’s why we need to update the current ratio so our ESL students are able to spend more time with specialized instructors to have greater opportunities to catch up.  I patroned HB362 and HB694 in previous legislative sessions at the General Assembly.  I unfortunately received no support from the GOP-controlled House of Delegates and both bills were tabled on party-line votes in Subcommittee.  I look forward to having a Democratic majority in 2020 so we can finally address this issue.

Virginia’s public schools: the foundation of our Commonwealth’s future. ​

Anyone who knows me knows my longstanding career spanning over 20 years supporting Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS).  I have stood with partner organizations like the Fairfax Education Association (FEA) and Virginia Education Association (VEA) to help lead the charge in our push for investment in pre-K-12 education.  Investing in public education in our Commonwealth shows our students that we are working hard to support their learning and growth, as they are the foundation all of our futures.  That’s why I am pleased to announce that after working hard and advocating for public education in Richmond at the General Assembly, we were able to pass a $378 million

Environment

Working to Protect our Environment

I am fighting for our right to clean air and water. I will always vote to prevent pollution and bring green energy business to Virginia. This includes utilizing my membership of the Special Energy Subcommittee of the House Committee on Commerce and Labor, where all energy-related legislation in the House must go before we determine whether a bill can advance to full Committee. I have also been appointed the Virginia State Lead for the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators since 2017.

Electric power restructuring, modernization, and consumer rate reform.

​Over-charging directly resulted from a rate freeze enacted in 2015 to provide funding for the mandatory greenhouse gas reduction proposed for Virginia as part of the federal Clean Power Act. Due to steps Virginia had already taken to reduce emissions, the percentage reduction requirements we faced was going to be more costly to achieve than our neighboring states who had yet to put in place some of the lower cost measures that we had. However, with the election of President Trump, the proposed regulations were reversed and we no longer faced a mandate. The accumulated money, therefore, became an over-charge on consumer electric rates since the stated need for it did not materialize. Under the legislation passed in the General Assembly in 2018, there was a $200 million rebate through a reduction in consumer bills in spring 2018 and another $150 million rebate in summer 2018 after a full determination was made of the effect of the December federal tax reduction act.​

Although the Clean Power Act was reversed, it spoke to the serious crisis of climate change accelerated by over-dependence on fossil fuels. With or without federal mandates, I have a long-standing commitment to developing green energy and reducing consumption. I do not believe that Dominion has done enough. As such, I fully supported provisions in the legislation to:

  • Bring on-line 5,000 megawatts of wind and solar, which is 10 times the current commitment and is enough to serve 1.25 million homes;
  • Spend $1 billion for energy efficiency in the next decade, which includes $13 million per year from the company-funded Energy Share Weatherization program that is not in the rate base and is focused on low income households; and
  • Carry out State Corporation Commission (SCC) approved grid transformation to promote non-peak energy use and provide for net metering to allow relatively small-scale solar generation to be sold back and used throughout the grid.

I not only advocated provisions directing the SCC to consider funding robust investments in green energy, I also supported provisions for modernizing the grid to promote conservation, guard against cyber-security breaches, and improve dependability —- particularly by undergrounding wires in neighborhoods with a high rate of power outages. As we saw in the March 2018 Nor’easter, strategic undergrounding in the most vulnerable areas needs to be systematically carried out. Not only is it important to have the ability to centrally pinpoint outages, but sophisticated equipment is affected by peak power demand brown-outs and the grid needs to be able to respond.

These considerations depend on robust professional financial review by the SCC in assuring that rates properly cover:

  • the service currently provided;
  • expenditures to maintain, improve, and maximize service; and
  • investments to achieve the most cost-effective, reliable service into the future.​

Success in the 2018 General Assembly Legislative Session.

  • The General Assembly ended rate freezes as of January 1, 2018.
  • The General Assembly returned to regular rate reviews every 3 years.
  • The SCC can order refunds and rate cuts after just one — not two — consecutive periods of over-earnings and can do so in between aforementioned triennial reviews.
  • The General Assembly put an end to “double-dipping” that had included the value of investments already paid for in full by ratepayers in calculating a rate of return on those investments that was to be covered in setting future rates.
  • The General Assembly required the SCC to report back after each triennial review regarding solar, wind, and grid transformation, as a way to underscore the SCC’s responsibility to hold energy utilities accountable for achieving the goals that have been set and to establish an historic base for the SCC to enforce the provision that requires $50 million dollars a year in base rate reductions if investments in renewable energy and grid transformation are not made.

Health Care

Fighting to Keep Medicaid Expansion

I will continue to fight against threats to cut funding to Medicaid expansion and work to ensure that all Virginians can receive affordable and quality health care.

An historic moment: Medicaid expansion in Virginia. 

I fought alongside my Democratic colleagues for nearly a decade to expand Medicaid in Virginia.  When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, they included money for states to expand Medicaid coverage.  But General Assembly Republicans refused that money and stranded 400,000 working Virginians without healthcare.

With the help of grassroots advocates, and my colleagues in both the House of Delegates and Senate, we were finally able to pass Medicaid Expansion for those 400,000 uninsured working Virginians.

The passage of Medicaid expansion in the 2018 Legislative Session freed up hundreds of thousands of dollars in our state budget, which allowed us to fund additional critical needs such as education, mental health, and transportation across the Commonwealth.  Governor Northam’s Medicaid Expansion bill-signing ceremony on the Capitol steps in Richmond in summer 2018 was an historic moment and I was proud to be a part of it.  The passage of Medicaid expansion in Virginia was made possible by the pressure exerted by the unprecedented number of Democratic office holders elected in the 2018 Blue Wave.   There is strength in numbers, which enabled us to finally pass Medicaid expansion legislation and offer healthcare to for some 400,000 working, yet uninsured, Virginians.

Infrastructure

Budget and Transportation

Too many Republicans and Democrats in Richmond believe that a “one size fits all” model can apply to creating the budget and fixing transportation. These advocates of the Dillon rule could not be farther from the truth. The fact of the matter is a decision made without concern over a specific locality is a decision doomed for failure. As your delegate, I promise to conduct my work on the budget and transportation issue in a way that reflects the needs of the 38th District.Working along side with local officials and community leaders Short-term Fixes and Long-term Solutions for Our Transportation Problems

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Vivian Watts

Current Position: State Delegate since 1982
Affiliation: Democrat

As your Delegate in the state legislature, I face the challenge of acting on your behalf on a great many items from taxes to health care to school funding to crime to the environment. I value your opinions and constantly learn from your experiences to help me serve more effectivel

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate since 1982
Affiliation: Democrat

As your Delegate in the state legislature, I face the challenge of acting on your behalf on a great many items from taxes to health care to school funding to crime to the environment. I value your opinions and constantly learn from your experiences to help me serve more effectivel

About

Vivian Watts

Experience

Work Experience

  • Secretary of Transportation
    1986 to 1990

    State Agencies under Secretariat:

    Transportation, Corrections, State Police, Motor Vehicles, Alcoholic Beverage Control, Correctional Education, Military Affairs, Emergency Services, Criminal Justice Services, Parole Board, Aviation, Fire Programs, Alcohol Safety Action Program, Commonwealth’s Attorneys Services, (Virginia Port Authority prior to 7/88).

    Exercised budgetary and legislative oversight for

    29,395 employees, $2.77 billion in annual operating funds, and $100 million annually in building construction, and addition to highway and transit construction.

    Major Secretarial initiatives

    Gained legislative approval of 1/2 billion dollar annual state transportation revenue increase;
    Initiated and carried out prison construction on 13 sites resulting in a 45% capacity increase;
    Chaired Northern Virginia sub-regional transportation plan adoption;
    Chaired negotiations for 80% private funding of $140 million public road improvement;
    Additional highlights

    Private toll Road Corporation authorized and granted a franchise.
    Commuter Rail agreement reached involving 4 railroads, 6 localities, Virginia, and Congress.
    Congressional approval to establish the Washington Area Airport Authority. Dulles selected as site for the National Air and Space Museum expansion.
    Average highway construction project time cut 20%. Anti-fraud contract monitoring unit established.
    Annual $10 million aviation safety improvement and service expansion program developed.
    Statewide emergency hazardous material response and training program established.
    Computerized fingerprint identification instituted.
    Prison escape rate and use of overtime brought to unprecedented low levels.
    Prison literacy program established. Prison mental health program achieved accreditation.
    Statistical model tracking 122 separate trends instituted to predict prison population growth. 10-year Prison Construction Master Plan developed.

  • Consultant
    1990 to 1993

    TRANSPORTATION AND FINANCE – Clients included National Institute of Corrections, National League of Cities, Arthur Anderson Consulting, Ernst & Young, and National Association of Public Administration.

  • Author
    U.S. ADVISORY COMMISSION ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
    1990 to 1994

    Author of two books on Criminal Justice through U.S. Department of Justice grant.

  • Executive Director
    FAIRFAX CASA
    1993 to 2000

Education

  • B.A
    University of Michigan
    2019 to present

    English major with minors in Mathematics and Psychology, cum laude

Personal

Birth Year: 1940
Place of Birth: Detroit, MI
Gender: Female
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Unitarian
Spouse: David A. Watts
Children: Cynthia Simpson and Jeffery E.
Membership & Affiliation: Arlington Unitarian Church
Fairfax Area League of Women Voters (former president)
Salvation Army (board member)
Annandale Rotary
Arts Council of Fairfax County

Contact

Legislative Assistant: Aaron Yohai
Administrative Assistant During Session: Cindy Burkholder and B. Kelley

Email:

Offices

Capitol Office
Pocahontas Building
900 E. Main St,
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-1039

District Office
8717 Mary Lee Lane
Annandale, VA 22003

Phone: (703) 978-2989

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site

Politics

Source: Campaign

Summary of bills introduced by Delegate Vivian Watts.

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Vivian E. Watts (D)15,76968.35%
Nick O. Bell (R)7,24831.42%
Write-In (Write-in)530.23%
TOTAL23,070

2017 State DelegateArray

Vivian Watts (D)21,40792.6%
Write-in (Write-in)1,7057.4%
TOTAL23,112

Source: Department of Elections

Finances

WATTS, VIVIAN E has run in 11 races for public office, winning 11 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $958,003.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Courts of Justice
Finance
Science and Technology

Subcommittees

Courts of Justice – Subcommittee #1
Courts of Justice – Subcommittee #4
Finance – Subcommittee #2

Appointments

Child Support Guidelines Review Panel
Criminal Justice Diversion
Criminal Law Subcommittee
House Courts of Justice
House Finance
House Science & Technology
Joint Commission on Transportation Accountability
Mental Health Services in the Twenty-First Century, Joint Subcommittee to Study

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Virginia Legislative Information System

Issues

Economy

Fiscal integrity.  Maintain Virginia’s AAA bond rating.  Don’t raid education, Medicaid funding, environmental clean-up, funds for transportation.  Create jobs.

HOW NATIONAL NEWS PLAYS OUT IN VIRGINIA

The continuing threat of federal budget cuts plagues Virginia’s economy.   We benefit more than any other state with 30% of our economy driven by federal contracts and jobs.   Therefore, we could lose more and the looming uncertainty of whether we will plays out in a number of ways:

  • Unemployment:  National unemployment dropped from 7.3% to 5.5% in the last 2 years (through 2014), while Virginia’s barely changed, hovering at 4.9%.   Businesses in Northern Virginia and around the military presence in Hampton Roads are very cautious about expanding.
  • Economic growth: Virginia’s economy is flat compared to 2.2% growth nationwide in 2014.
  • National rankings: Virginia’s slipped from the #1 best state to do business 5 years ago to #12 today, largely because of our economy and lack of transportation investment.  We may be further down-graded because of public policy instability, which boiled over in the refusal to confirm a governor’s Supreme Court appointment for the first time in 114 years.

Virginia’s challenges are very different from the federal government’s. Our budget must be balanced. We can’t run up a deficit …we can’t print money.

Therefore, every time we pass a budget, we must project what state tax revenues will be more than 2 years out. Typically, we underestimate income rather than over-commit spending …Virginia is not California. In fact, Virginia consistently is ranked at the top of all states for the quality of our economic management.

State revenue reports finally turned around in mid-March 2015, giving us a $538.5 million budget surplus, instead of the $2 billion shortfall we faced if we hadn’t made hard cuts in September 2014 to education, nursing homes, law enforcement, and state agencies across the board. By law, this surplus goes to replenish the Rainy Day Fund — which had fallen to less than 1/4 million from over $1 billion in 2007-08 — and 10% for infrastructure to improve water quality. Almost 60% of the increased revenue that produced the year end surplus came from non-payroll individual income tax payments.  We don’t know at this time whether those payments reflect robust stock market capital gains prior to July 2015 or whether they reflect the recovery of small business entrepreneurs and consultants.  The tax gain from increased payrolls was much more modest.

CREATING NEW JOBS

Continuing to diversify our economy is critical.   Governor McAuliffe has been a dynamo bringing in new jobs.   In his first year, he brought twice as much business investment into Virginia than any Governor ever has. The pace continues with over $7.5 billion brought in to date!

Virginia has great potential to expand high-paying jobs: strong universities, community college workforce development, low taxes (44th per $1000 of personal income and the 2nd lowest employer unemployment tax in the nation), and access to world markets.

Congestion is the greatest impediment to expanding Northern Virginia high-paying jobs, while broad-band internet access is the greatest infrastructure need for areas of the state where there is widespread double-digit unemployment.  If we can avoid extremely restrictive stem cell restraints, bio-tech research potential is extremely strong and large pay-offs can come from start-up grants, wet lab construction, and business/academic partnerships.

Finally, Virginia is well-situated to expand green energy related employment from off-shore wind energy to alternative biofuel research centered in Blacksburg and fossil fuel rich Appalachia. We must actively compete to be part of an east coast highspeed rail corridor.

PRESERVING EXISTING JOBS

We need to help small businesses through increased access to business loans, reducing government paperwork, increasing state and local outreach to bid on government contracts, and dealing with health insurance.

Some believe job stimulus programs should just target public construction projects. As critical as transportation needs are, a nursing home job, a state police position, a teacher, etc., etc. are just as important as a construction job.   If state or local governments do not have funds, these jobs will be cut.

THE CHALLENGE OF POVERTY

Virginia has one of the greatest spreads between wealth and poverty of any state.  Despite long-standing poverty, welfare reform in 1996 cut by half the number of Virginians qualifying for TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families). The amount families receive has only been increased once in 23 years.

The most crucial need is to expand Medicaid to cover 400,000 Virginians – 70% of whom work but earn less than $32,000 for a family of four or $15,302 for one person.  Beyond the humanity of expanding healthcare, here are the dollars and cents facts:

  • Adults whose only source of health care is the emergency room drive up hospital costs and insurance rates for all.
  • Expansion would use managed care to prevent problems from getting worse and more costly to treat, as well as under-cutting a wage-earner’s ability to support his or her family.
  • Virginians have already paid the federal taxes to fund expansion and are getting nothing in return. In fact, we are losing between $4 and $5 million a day.
  • Expansion would create over 30,000 jobs.
  • We cannot attract employers into rural areas where hospitals are closing.

HOW BAD HAS VIRGINIA BEEN HIT SINCE 2007?

When we began cutting state spending in 2007, well-before most states faced reality, Virginia was 37th in state spending per person.  Therefore, ultimately, we had to cut basic programs, including local public schools which still receive less per pupil in 2015 than in 2009.  Even though Virginia spends less than almost every other state on Medicaid, 15% of state taxes go to match the federal Medicaid dollars we receive.   Indeed, public safety is the only area of state spending where we exceed national averages.   Of great importance, about 50% of the state budget goes to local governments for schools, jails, mental health, emergency services, police, and car tax relief.   Cutting such state support to localities puts severe pressure on local real estate taxes.

MY COMMITMENT

Fiscal integrity must be maintained which has earned Virginia our long-standing AAA bond rating and rank of best-managed state.   Open processes with full discussion of alternative economic viewpoints and actuarial projections are essential – no blue smoke and mirrors.

Maintaining adequate transportation funding through fees on all users is essential.  Beneficiaries of transportation improvements should bear the cost and it is wrong to raid the General Fund at the expense of public education, mental health, nursing home care, environmental protection, or job creation initiatives.

Cuts in state funding for local governments must be equitably applied and not single-out Northern Virginia. I’m a “numbers person” and know the devil is in the details.  I will use my tenacity and knowledge of funding formulas to make sure that Fairfax County is not unfairly impacted by population caps or cost-of-living manipulation in proposals to change state funding for K-12 education, court functions, mental health, or social service delivery.

HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE

BUDGET STRUCTURE

Our $52 billion FY15 annual approved budget is split between 2 funds. The General Fund is $19 billion and used to pay for basic state government operations. 35% goes to pay for K-12 education, followed by state expenditures for Medicaid (14%); police, courts, and prisons; higher education (6%); mental health and other human services; and car tax relief (3%). Money to fund these programs comes from sources everyone pays: individual income taxes (65%), the sales tax (20%), business taxes, lottery and ABC store profits, liquor and cigarette taxes, and court fees).

Most of the rest of the budget – $33 billion in the Non-General Fund – comes from and goes to specific areas. Federal dollars must be used for programs such as Medicaid (41%). College tuition payments and hospital charges go to the institutions (23%). The gas tax and vehicle fees are designated for transportation.

Since 2007, Non-General Fund revenue has increased substantially more than General Fund as we dealt with the economic downturn by increasing fees (especially tuition) not raising taxes as many state did.  In addition, the 2013 transportation funding increases are all Non-Ggeneral Fund.

TAX REFORM

  • Eliminated the estate tax  (2007)
  • Cut the food tax 2½ cents (as of July 2005)
  • Increased state income tax personal deduction to $900 instead of $800. (2006 Tax Year)
  • Increased the 2.5¢ per pack cigarette tax to 30¢ (March 2005)
  • Closed major corporate tax loopholes regarding holding companies. (July 2004)

SPENDING

In the decade from July 1999 to July 2008, the general fund budget grew 80%. However, taking inflation (29%) and population (12%) growth into account, the actual growth was 23%.

The three largest State spending initiatives were:

  • setting aside money for a Rainy Day Fund
  • growth in Car Tax Relief from $220 million to $950 million where it’s been capped
  • use of general tax funds for transportation which grew from $44 million to $150 million

These three areas of increased spending totaled $1.2 billion or about 7% of the total General Fund budget.

Other areas that grew more than inflation and population:

  • The Medicaid inflation-adjusted increase was 53%.
    • This was slightly more than the 48% inflationary growth in medical care because Virginia significantly increased the number of children of the working poor covered by insurance. Matching funds for Medicare Part D also increased state spending.
  • Federal mandates including
    • No Child Left Behind Act and special education funding requirements,
    • environmental programs such as the Clean Water Act,
    • enforcement of court-ordered child support payments, and
    • the Real ID Act
  • The Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement brought in more that $581 million since the program began in FY2000 to be used for replacement job creation and health.
  • Debt service fund grew 134% to $244 million reflecting the State’s increased issuance of bonds used mainly for construction-related expenses for toll roads and universities.

We also increased state funding to reduce waiting lists for mental health and mental disability services. In addition, we increased the state share of funding for local schools to better reflect what localities actually pay.

The higher education fund increased 108% to $5.15 billion (14.3% of FY08 budget) is explained by a combination of enrollment growth, increased tuition and fees, and increased revenues at university hospitals. For example GMU general fund appropriate grew from $86 million to $151 million.

I believe it is important to balance the budget but still be able to wisely spend the state’s money to improve transportation, keep class sizes low in our schools, provide the resources that our law enforcement officials need to keep our communities safe, protect our natural resources, make sure everyone has access to the higher education and health care they need, and keep taxes low for its citizens

Education

Higher Education

Virginia has some of the best colleges and universities in the nation.   We must make sure that this excellence continues and that there is room for all qualified students coming from Northern Virginia.   All post-high school education must be available based on the student’s skill and academic ability — not on ability to pay — through financial aid and alternatives to residential universities.  Relevant certification and licensure programs need to be expanded.

Over the years, Virginia’s excellent higher education system has defined Virginia as not just a sleepy southern state.  It is a key element of economic development, for example, biotechnology is a major area of research where Virginia is well-situated, whether in medicine, agriculture, communications, marine science, green energy, or basic science.  Indeed, many residents coming to this area chose to live in Virginia because of our superior higher education opportunities and know the economic value of a degree drops if the reputation of the university is allowed to drop.  With enlightened stewardship, higher education can continue to move Virginia into eminence.

LACK OF FUNDING

However, support for higher education has been seriously eroded.  By the academic year ending in 2015, in-state undergrad tuition and fees at Virginia institutions ranked

  •  6th highest in the nation for non-doctoral institutions,
  • 13th highest for doctoral/research institutions, and
  • 17th highest for community college.

After years of trying to make community college an affordable option, Virginia’s tuition and fees are now back to being as expensive compared to other states as they were 20 years ago.

Traditionally, General Assembly policy had been that state funds should cover 75% of the cost for in-state undergrads and 80% for community college students.  In 2004, that policy officially changed to in-state, 4-year undergrad students paying not 1/4 but 1/3.  (Out-of-state students pay at least 100%.)

Unfortunately, state funding for 4-year schools dropped sharply (in constant dollars) from $10,675 per student in 2000 to just $7,303 in 2009.  The harsh reality for families and students throughout the Commonwealth is that, while the official policy that in-state students will pay no more than 1/3 hasn’t been changed, in fact, in-state undergraduate students had to pay more than 1/2 the cost of their education in 2014-15.  For many this means life-changing debt.

TUITION

In 2001-02, total charges for an undergraduate living on campus was 32% of an average Virginian’s after tax income.  That measure of the cost that must be bourne by students and their families has climbed sharply.   For 2014-15, it was 47%!  I must emphasize it is cuts in state funding that are the major cause of this ever-increasing lack of affordability and, therefore, limited access.

We must restore public funding to Virginia’s public colleges and universities.  In addition, I believe a portion of any tuition increase that is enacted must always go into increasing the financial assistance available to students.

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

I applaud the cost-savings of an integrated path for students to complete their first two years in qualified subjects at a community college and, then, be able to complete their degree at a 4-year institution.  I also was a strong supporter in 2015 of Virginia (belatedly) joining other states in determining credit for relevant community college courses that should be given for specific military experience.  This will enable veterans to earn a degree or certification at less cost and get into skilled jobs faster.  Finally, while the need for post-high school education has become ever-more important in gaining meaningful employment, 4-year academic degrees are not the right path for everyone.  We must expand licensure and certification programs that are most relevant to employers.

Environment

I still enjoy back country camping with my grandsons.  I love the beauty and thrills of Virginia’s whitewater.  I smile when trillium re-appear behind our house each spring.  Especially in times of great change, many of us reach to nature to regain our sense of stability.

But even as Virginia’s lush vegetation, stream valleys, and open waters can be a source of peace, they cannot endure like the ancient Appalachians without our help.

We need to make critical land purchases now to buffer the Chesapeake Bay from run-off. The phenomenal increase in transit use revealed capacity restraints and the need to expand the system. Reducing global warming is critical.   Laws to control land use, protect ground water, prevent air and water pollution can’t be effective without sound environmental impact research and the will to enforce them.

ENERGY AND CLEAN AIR

It is past time to adopt significant initiatives including but not limited to: off-shore wind energy; bio-energy research focused on non-food stocks; demand metering that provides readily visible, real time information; green construction; re-cycled product development; safe nuclear generation; and a significant gas tax and/or electronic tolling that reflects the true cost of providing a transportation system that cuts greenhouse gas generation through reduced vehicle usage.

Energy Conservation –Virginia’s voluntary renewable portfolio standard goal of 15% (of 2007 base year) by 2025 should be increased and be made mandatory.

New Energy – Wind turbines in the relatively shallow waters at least 12 miles off Virginia’s coast would capture significantly more steady wind power than the mid-west, avoid migratory birds, not interfere with Navy training, and allow efficient power transmission to population centers. I support a Renewable Portfolio Standard that would require that a certain percentage of the state’s electricity come from renewable resources with preference to zero-emission resources. I oppose drilling for natural gas off Virginia’s coastline … proposals to limit drilling to 30 miles out involves depths at which there are only a handful of wells in the Gulf of Mexico.

Coal-fired power plants – most built in the 1940’s and 50’s – are the greatest source of air pollution in Virginia. Unfortunately, recent federal Clear Skies rules allow these plants to continue to pollute even when they’re upgraded. Other east coast states are reacting by passing state regulations and I believe that Virginia should join these initiatives. Technology could remove 95% of pollutants, equivalent to taking 4 million cars off Virginia roads.

TRANSIT

The capacity of the existing Metro system must be increased by fully utilizing the multi-billion dollar track infrastructure through purchasing significantly more cars and making technological and platform modifications to accommodate 8-car trains; maintenance of the 40-year old Metro system is critical; and circumferential expansion of Metro as recommended in the 2020 Plan must commence with identification and purchase of future Metro station sites to be used initially as HOV / SLUG and express bus service (BRT) lots.  It is also critical that such collector lots be established as a condition of I-95 HOT lanes construction – if the HOT lanes are constructed before the collector lots, they will significantly increase sprawl at the terminal access points.

Both as a legislative leader in changing the transportation formula and as Secretary, I increased Metro funding 4-fold.  I currently co-chair a Senate House Joint Committee on Enhanced Priority Bus Service.  I will continue to work for more transit funding.  I was shocked in 2005 that the Family Foundation labeled additional money for Metro as anti-family and caused the Senate bill to be killed by a party-line vote in House Finance Committee. I believe users of Virginia roads should pay a larger share of the cost of the transportation system, rather than currently less than half of what they did in 1990.

SMARTER GROWTH

As Secretary, I chaired a year-long, unprecedented regional effort of top local officials, staff, and citizens that brought land use and transportation plans together for the first time to create a coordinated Northern Virginia Transportation Plan. As chair, I prevailed over VDOT’s objections and insisted that citizen participation be equal to technical staff input. I fully support the update of that plan, which includes a transit corridor between Springfield and Tysons Corner and rail out I-66.

The key to preserving the integrity of designated growth areas and keeping the designation from being undercut by a court challenge is to establish the area upon defensible planning premises that can be and are documented using measurable factors. In addition, an inclusive public processes will help establish broad community acceptance of the principles and hopefully prevent electoral swings in philosophy.

OPEN SPACE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

As a conferee, I helped preserve the Land Conservation Tax Credit from the Senate attempt to severely weaken it.  It is highly successful in preserving land and is serving as a national model.  I believe that we closed developer abuses. It was also important to preserve the ability to sell the credit because of the important incentive this represents to some of the lower income people I represent who back onto streams that are part of the Chesapeake water shed.  The Tax Credit can play an important role in helping Virginia meet its commitments under the Chesapeake Bay Interstate Preservation Agreement.

I support transferable development rights, but want to be sure that the sale of the development right is in perpetuity and cannot be reversed by a Master Plan change.  Based on my work on the Land Preservation Tax Credit Study, I look forward to taking an active role in assuring that Virginia’s Historic Preservation Tax Credits also are fully implemented.

CLEAN WATER

7,000 miles of Virginia rivers and streams, including our portion of the Chesapeake Bay, are on the national “dirty water” list.  We have yet to identify a source of ongoing funding to carry-out our commitment under the Chesapeake 2000 Agreement to remove the Chesapeake Bay from the federal list of impaired waters.

Our efforts have focused on upgrading wastewater treatment plants and working with farmers to reduce agricultural runoff.  However, to meet the nitrogen reduction goal, we must improve our efforts to curb nitrogen pollution which involves controlling urban runoff.

In 2000, I supported crucial protection of Virginia’s rivers, marshes, and, of course, the Chesapeake Bay through passage of Non-Tidal Wetlands Protection legislation. Its significance for controlling land use was underscored by how hard it was fought. At one point, a “compromise” proposal would have permitted development of 90% of the Great Dismal Swamp!

A number of poor counties accepted large private trash “dumps” to increase local tax revenue and create jobs. Between 1993 and 1998, the annual increase would fill a line of trash trucks stretching bumper-to-bumper from the Atlantic to the Pacific.  By 1999, Virginia had become second in the nation in the amount of out-of-state trash coming into the state, causing concerns about ground water contamination and transport spills. Unfortunately, Congress failed to grant state’s the power to limit trash under interstate commerce and ground water pollution remains a serious concern.

STATE PARKS

Virginia is dead last in funding for parks and natural areas, which limits their use and proper care.

Infrastructure

Transportation

No solution can be off the table in tackling this major problem; including enhanced transit, increased road capacity, Department of Transportation accountability and management, coordinated land use, private/public financing, user fees that track inflation, increased state and federal funding to Northern Virginia, greater control over Fairfax County roads, intersection improvements, telecommuting, etc.

You know and I know road congestion and maintenance in Northern Virginia has gotten worse and worse!  Everyone else knows, too.  For two years running, this region has been ranked the MOST congested in the nation.  NV rush “hour” is 7 hours long.   We spend 67 hours a year tied up in traffic at a cost of $1398 in time and fuel.

It got this bad in large part because the last time Virginia increased state funding was 1987.  Every other state increased their gas tax (except the wide-open states of Alaska and Oklahoma.)   Revenue from the per gallon gas tax used to fund over half the state’s construction budget – by 2013 it was less than 1/6.

THE FUNDING BREAKTHROUGH

It will take a long time to make up for this refusal to act, which is why I started on such a highly negative note — instead of crowing about the amazing funding breakthrough of 2013 which I spent so many years trying to achieve.

The 2013 General Assembly passed a package of new transportation funding that will raise $1.3 billion a year by 2017. The major driving forces behind this long overdue break-through were:

  • Everything else had been tried, including using 80% of transportation borrowing capacity for the next 25 years.
  • By 2017, there would be no state money to get 80-90% federal funding for major projects. Federal gas taxes Virginians had paid would go to other states.
  • Seriously deteriorating maintenance finally got rural legislators to the table.
  • Virginia lost its rank as the best place to do business solely because of congestion in the urban crescent.

The compromise wasn’t simple. The bottom line is:

  • What passed provides the sustained annual funding that study after study underscored we must have to address the backlog of basic needs.
  • Northern Virginia gets control and serious funding.
  • All road users will continue to pay through the gas tax (despite Gov McDonnell’s proposal to eliminate it.)

WHERE IT WILL BE SPENT

Over $300 million a year will be raised in Northern Virginia and constitutionally it must be spent on transportation in Northern Virginia. If it is not, the NV taxes are repealed.   Funds must be used for road or transit improvements that reduce congestion.  70% or over $200 million will go to regionwide projects and Northern Virginia – not Richmond – will control what these projects are.

The rest goes back to the NV locality where it was raised. This local 30% also must be spent to address congestion.  However, in addition, each local government also must commit funds (equal to a 12.5¢ real estate tax on business properties); however, this locally raised funding can be spent more broadly for any non-maintenance purpose.   Fairfax County will control approximately $100 million a year for transportation – half from the bill we passed and half from the required local funding.

For the last 4 years, the State has spent zero on local road improvements.   By 2016, state local road construction funds finally will start flowing again. The delay is due to the state taxes being phased-in and an initial $300 million in state funds that went to fund rail to Dulles.

Indeed, transit funding was significantly increased across the board.   State transit support will more than double from the current $130 million.

WHERE IT COMES FROM

The 17.5¢ per gallon gas tax that’s been in place since 1987 wasn’t increased.  But it will be replaced (starting January 2015) with a tax on the wholesale price so that revenue grows with inflation. (The new tax rate on diesel fuel will increase taxes on trucking, but diesel cars can get a rebate on the difference.) The bulk of the new state revenue comes from the tax on car sales going from the current 3% to 4.15% by July 2016 and from raising the sales tax on non-food items across Virginia from 5% to 5.3%.

In Northern Virginia and in Hampton Roads, the sales tax increases to a full 6%, with the additional amount going to fund transportation in the region where it is raised.   Northern Virginia also will use an additional 2% hotel tax and a 15¢ per $100 tax on real estate sales.  The total tax package of these three taxes along with the real estate tax on business properties, the value of car purchases, and the gas tax are an attempt to spread the burden of over all road users and factors that increase congestion.

GET INVOLVED

From where I sit, the result of all these changes should support better coordination locally to remove bottlenecks, increase transit use, and deal with the impact of land use decisions. I look forward to working with you and our local officials to reach these goals.

ON-GOING CHALLENGES

What Northern Virginia Gets From The State

First, the position we gained in 2013 must be constitutionally protected.  The reason we stopped getting state construction funds was because in 2002, annual budgets began diverting more and more local construction money to maintenance statewide.  By 2008, no local construction money was left.

Unfortunately, constitutional amendments I’ve patroned and co-patroned to protect transportation funds are always killed in the Senate by those who want to divert General Fund tax dollars to fund transportation.  Besides the harm to public education and other critical services, using General Funds would be even more unfair to Northern Virginia.   Because 65% of the General Fund comes from the income tax, Northern Virginians contribute over 43% of the General Fund , while we only pay about 30% of the transportation fund.  In addition, General Fund taxes come only from Virginia taxpayers…the 20% to 30% drivers who aren’t residents get off the hook.

Here is a technical discussion of Maintenance Funding that lays out why we must have a State Constitutional Amendment.  See also 2004 House Floor Speech and 2004 budget amendment.

If we keep the current road allocation formula from being over-ridden, the 1985 formula I played a key role in passing automatically increases funding for local secondary roads with annual population growth.  NV has approximately 27% of the state population and under the formula gets approximately 25% of the money spent on state construction and transit.   About 30% of state transportation revenues are raised in NV.

I continue to try to further close the gap through changing the formula for how primary roads are funded, which I introduced repeatedly from 2002 – 2009.  (Primary roads are those numbered under 600 — ie, Rt 123, Rt 236, and Rt 50 — and secondary roads are roads with higher numbers.)  My bill would double funding for Northern Virginia primary roads by tying the funding to the number of vehicles miles traveled per lane mile.  I refer to this as the “congestion factor.”

My 2007 Newsletter discusses Northern Virginia getting our fair share for transportation.  See also floor remarks on Fair Share for Northern Virginia.  Also, I did get a bill passed in 2002 (HB771) to ensure that Northern Virginia’s needs are fairly considered on an even playing field.  It requires that transportation priorities be established using the same criteria statewide and that transit and road needs be considered side by side.

COORDINATING TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE

In 2007, we passed measures to tie land use more closely with owners paying for the transportation impact of new development. The effect of these new tools will depend on local governments having the discipline and sophistication to avoid court challenges if they divert funds or make inconsistent zoning decisions.

Equally important, as Secretary, I chaired an unprecedented regional effort that brought land use and transportation plans together for the first time to create a coordinated Northern Virginia Transportation Plan.  The NV Transportation Authority’s updates of this regional plan provide an essential foundation to focus the new NV funding we passed in 2013.

PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE PRIVATE SECTOR

I believe in finding win/win opportunities for businesses to be full partners in funding congestion solutions. 80% of improving 16 miles of Rt 28 from 2 lanes to expressway capacity was paid for by a tax on business property that I negotiated as Virginia Secretary of Transportation.   This is the finance model that is constructing rail to Dulles — supplemented by federal funding and by Dulles Toll Road revenue.

However, I have a love/hate relationship with the Express Lanes.  While the immediate benefit has been reduced Beltway congestion, the real potiential is to significantly strengthen regional transit.  Extending Metrorail is prohibitively expensive and doesn’t have the flexibility to serve the pattern of development from Springfield to Tysons and from Springfield south.  My concern is that the transit potential will only be realized if local governments make the hard decisions to create park and ride lots with convenient access to I-95 and to fund local bus service that meet commuting needs to the major NV employment centers of Tysons, Springfield Mall / EPG / Ft Belvoir, and Mark Center.  Otherwise, improving traffic flow only entices sprawl and only temporarily reduces congestion.

Financing is also a concern. The private operator has complete control in setting tolls for 70 years. Tolls have to be high enough to pay-off construction debt, but if they’re too high, drivers won’t pay the price. If there are too few toll-paying vehicles, the State must pay the private operator for HOV vehicles if they make up more than 25% of the traffic in any 15-minute period.*

Finally, over 30% of the Beltway construction impacted my Delegate District.  While neighborhoods have been helped with Transurban landscaping grants and limited soundwall additions, cut-through traffic remains a concern.  With re-districting, I now represent the greatest neighborhood impacts of the 1-95 / I-395 Express Lane construction and completely share the deep frustration of impacted residents that the new lanes were stopped short of Mark Center when they should have been extended across the Potomac.

These and other concerns about the public accountability of projects that are owned privately led me to introduce a bill in 2008 calling for a study of competitive bidding under Virginia’s Public Private Transportation Act (PPTA).

(*The State funded 21.5% of the $1.9 billion Beltway project cost, which was largely used to pay for replacing 50 aging bridges and overpasses, 3 new interchanges, and pedestrian/bicycle crossings. Private investors, looking for a 13% return on investment, put in $350 million. The remaining $1.2 billion came from 40-year bonds that will be repaid by tolls. Tolls also must cover all maintenance and operation costs.  For I-395/I-95, the State is paying directly for 8% of the project cost of the express toll lanes.)

BACKGROUND

For more detail, the links below take you to charts, commentaries, and testimony I’ve prepared* over the years –unless otherwise credited.   Unfortunately, they are as important today as when I first developed them.  I’ve put them in order of relevance to your understanding the problem rather than by date.

  1. The gap between transportation needs and funding is much worse since I developed this Basic Gas Tax Revenue Chart in 2001 to answer legislators’ objections to passing my bill (HB1984) to raise the gas tax. It’d look the same today, only the gap would be much wider.   It is a graphic representation of how far behind we are and how long it will take for the 2013 funding to address the need.  Note: The representation of NEED does not include growth in transit use.
  2. Since Virginia last increased transportation funding in 1986, Demand Up Supply Down since 1986 shows the growth through 2004 in traffic (71%), transit riders (58%), car ownership (53%), licensed drivers (34%), population (28%), and expanded road capacity (7%). (Chart reflects statewide growth and was prepared by Fairfax County.)
  3. The cost of highway and street construction rose 89.1% between 1986 and 2006. (Source: U.S. Department of Labor’s Producer Price Index for Highway and Street Construction. The 40% in Fairfax County’s chart above is the general Consumer Price Index) Click here for a discussion of essential investments that must be made for an effective, safe transit system.
  4. If transportation had continued to be funded at the level established when I was Secretary under Governor Baliles, Virginia would have spent over $3.5 billion more from 1995 to 2005 on transit and road improvements, making congestion substantially less than it is today.
  5. Although, as Secretary, I had cut construction time by 20% and increased employee efficiency by over 30%, by 2002, Governor Warner discovered fully 1/3 of the projects that had been promised by the previous Governor had to be cut because funds never had existed to fund them.  Reforms build on 9 separate audits from 1999-2010.  We now have accurate reporting of on-time and on-budget performance rather than politically convenient promises.

Part of this financial management reform can be found by going to dashboard.virginiadot.org.  These reforms have produced over 80% on-time, on-budget performance year after year. Finally, here is a one page Audit Fact Sheet about what a 2010 audit really said about VDOT not spending all available funds — mostly out of un-certainty about the economy which led to a 6-month reserve rather than 3-month.

As a delegate in 1985, my work was key to changing the highway funding formula to more than double Fairfax’s share of state funds. As Secretary, among other achievements, I increased Metro funding 4-fold, freed toll revenue for use to make cooridor improvements, forged 80% private funding to improve 16 miles of Rt 28, negotiated VRE use of railroad right of way, crafted the private toll road legislation for the Greenway, and chaired development of the first Northern Virginia unified land use and transportation plan. These landmark initiatives continue to be models for most of the current “new” ideas to solve transportation problems.

Crime

As the only non-lawyer on the House Criminal Law subcommittee, I play a key role as a victim advocate.  I will continue to use my tenacity and respect for the Law to work with attorneys and law enforcement in crafting enforceable laws that keep a focus on real world impacts.  As a former Secretary of Public Safety overseeing prisons, I also have dealt with the high cost of putting all our efforts on punishment and not also working to prevent crime.

GANGS

According to the head of the Fairfax County Police anti-gang unit, Virginia now has the toughest laws in the country. I will continue to work to strengthen our laws wherever needed, such as my bill to make it a criminal offense to brandish a machete following attacks involving my District. Law enforcement needs your help, too. Please report any suspicious activity or gang graffiti by using the police non-emergency number: 703 – 691 – 2131. Your eyes and ears in the community may give police an important link in their investigative and prevention efforts.

Most proposals to combat gang activity are taken seriously by the General Assembly. We’ve created “gang free zones” around schools, created a witness protection program, and allow police and prosecutors to close down houses that harbor gang activity in the same way they can close down houses of prostitution.  We added prosecutors to work across county and city lines in Northern Virginia to effectively build cases against gang organizers; made bail harder to get; directed that schools be informed if any student is arrested for gang activity; and made it a crime to recruit or intimidate someone into joining a gang.

Earlier bills of mine are also relevant to gang activity. In 1996, I increased the penalties for conspiracy and solicitation to commit a crime when minors and handguns are involved. In 1997, my bill to treat the aggravated malicious wounding of a pregnant woman with the intent to kill the fetus the same as murder became law. This is a particularly heinous form of gang vengeance.

However, the more I work with the issue of gangs, the more convinced I’ve become that the #1 thing we can do to prevent gangs is reduce class sizes, especially in elementary schools.  A child who feels they are part of society, doesn’t have to join a gang to “belong.”

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

The national Polaris Project named Virginia law as one of the most improved in their 2011 rankings.  I was please to receive this email: “Thank you for everything you did and for being one of our champions on this important issue.  If it weren’t for you efforts on HB 1893/1898 the law would not be nearly as strong as it is today.”

Changes in the law are fully discussed in this link.  In brief, human trafficking was brought fully under Virginia’s abduction and kidnapping laws.  Anyone who participates in any way to bring about an abduction is as guilty as the person who actually holds the person and – as it relates to most human trafficking – the penalty is 20 years to life. Abduction of any one under 18 for the purpose of manufacturing child pornography was added to Virginia law. In addition, where a connection to an abduction can’t be proven, anyone who benefits from making anyone engage in forced labor or services, concubinage, prostitution, or the manufacture of any obscene material or child pornography can be sentenced to 2 to 10 years in prison

CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN

Working with a frustrated Fairfax police investigator — whom I’d gotten to know as Director of CASA (program to help abused children) — I crafted HB1731 (1999) to allow police to step-in and make an arrest before a child is physically contacted by a sexual predator who is cultivating him/her through the Internet. I was delighted when the Fairfax County Police Child Services Unit made me their first “Honorary Member” for this work.

In 2006, my bill (HB1066) expanded the definition of child abuse/neglect to cover any parent or custodian who allows a child to be alone with someone who is required to register as a sexual offender.

In 2005 (HB2564), I was able to get long-overdue reform to provide consistently greater criminal penalties against parents or grandparents who sexually abuse their child or use the child in the commission of any sexual crime, such as pornography.

In 2003 and 2004, I was shocked that bills to require that, if it did not breach the tenets of their church structure, clergy must report suspected child abuse – as doctors and teachers must – were defeated despite strong support from all but one member of the clergy who expressed the view that the clergy’s first duty was to minister to the adult.  That view prevailed.

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

In 2008, successful bills from the Criminal Law subcommittee, which I chaired, of the Governor’s Sexual Violence Commission included not making victims pay for medical services following rape, not requiring an initial victim polygraph, and removing subsequent marriage to a 14-year-old as a defense against prosecution for rape.

Working closely with prosecutors, in the 1999 Session, I was able to re-define the level of injury or force that must be proven in marital rape and largely ended the great discrepancies in prosecution and sentencing throughout the state (HB1732). In 2004, the separate offense of marital rape was done away with completely.

I also carried successful legislation – HB2017 (1997) and HB583 (1998) – to ensure that police can respond rapidly to domestic violence calls with accurate information about past incidents and have the power to make arrests upon evidence of probable harm.

In 1999 (HB1874), my bill made it clear that protective orders require stalkers to stay out of visual and voice contact as well as physical contact.

In 1997 (HB1044), my bill prevents persons charged with specified felony sex offenses who have been previously convicted of one of those offenses from being released on bail.

In 2003, I worked with House Majority Leader Griffith (R) to established a civil process to review violent sexual offenders being released from prison.   As of 2008, 20-25 per year are being committed to a secure mental institution upon a determination that they are a danger to society.

DATE RAPE AND DRUG TRAFFICKING

In 1997 (HB1926), I worked with police to come down hard on the “date rape drug,” which is widely available largely because drug traffickers push this cheap drug among young users as a way to enhance the effect of cocaine, heroine, and alcohol. Seizures of “roofies”, “roach”, “row-shay” (to list just some of the street names) nationwide exceed most other illicit drugs. It is small; it is cheap; and an overdose can kill. When I learned that police weren’t going after it because the penalties were too low, I got legislation passed to make the penalties for giving, distributing, or possessing Rohypnol (flunitrazepam) the same as cocaine, marijuana, and other Schedule I drugs. In addition, just as rape can be prosecuted under Virginia law if the victim was too drunk to resist, use of a “date rape drug” is punishable by 5 years to life. As an accessory, a person who gives the victim the drug can draw the same sentence.

VICTIM’S RIGHTS

Two playmates witnessed the random, brutal stabbing of an 8-year-old Alexandria boy, Kevin Shifflett, in the spring of 2000.   My legislative study and subsequent changes in the law allow child witnesses to such violence to testify via closed-circuit television. HB 2014 (2001); HB2058 and HB 2059 (1999); and HJ 280 (1998).

Crime victims feel helpless when prosecutors believe the evidence is not strong enough to file charges. An alternative is to sue the suspect for damages, which requires less proof. In 2001 (HB2189), I removed a major hurdle to this means of pursuing some measure of justice by extending the 2-year statute of limitations on civil suits related to a crime.

Also in 2001, my bill (HB1661) prevents insurance companies from discriminating against victims of domestic violence in providing insurance including health, accident, life and property damage.

When I was Secretary of Transportation and Public Safety, Virginia became the first state to process and use DNA evidence. We are a leader in the development of a criminal DNA records bank to assist in solving violent crime. Virginia became the 6th state to use computerized finger-print identification which cleared a huge backlog of unsolved burglaries and other property crimes.

DRUNK DRIVING

I am proud of my long involvement combating drunk driving. One of the most significant bills I got passed was HB924 (2001) aimed at hardcore drunk drivers. Virginia finally joined 45 other states that allow prosecutors to tell the judge/jury if a defendant unreasonably refused to take a breath test. “Experienced” drunk drivers previously took a chance that they might escape conviction on a technicality if there was no breath test evidence.

In 2004, we spent many hours on the Criminal Laws Subcommittee significantly strengthened drunk driving laws in reaction to the steady increase in alcohol-related traffic deaths nationally and in Virginia since 1999 after almost two decades of decline. There were more drunk driving fatalities than murders in 2002. Most of the tough new laws are directed at hard core drunk drivers, who make up more than 1/3 of arrests, and often are driving with BAC’s over .20.

UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS

Local and state police do not have the authority to deport. Unless the person we detain has a criminal record, federal authorities release them back into the community pending a hearing — for which they may not show-up. If federal authorities are given the resources to quickly determine legal status and the resources to return undocumented immigrants to their country, then cooperative efforts with local and state law enforcement could be productive. Of course, the ultimate measure of the success of deportation is border security and the ease with which a deportee can re-enter.

In addition, specifically related to day laborers, law enforcement would be greatly enhanced by federal reform that realistically sets the number of work visas. Police could then more readily deal with those who have a legitimate reason to be in this country and those who don’t. Finally, federal enforcement of the duty of an employer to check the legal status of any employee is not being evenly applied. Law-abiding employers are being undercut by competitors who are hiring undocumented immigrants because they can use their status to pay them less.

GUNS

In 2000, my bill (HB309) made it illegal for a person to sell a gun if they can’t legally own a gun. Closing this loophole creates an even playing field between small licensed dealers who go through criminal and mental health background checks to get a license and large chain stores, like K-Mart, that have only one corporate license covering all their stores. This legislation also lays the groundwork to cover people who go from gun show to gun show, acting like dealers, but who are un-licensed because they don’t have a place of business.

In 2004, I voted against a bill that passed which overturns all local gun laws.  Because the bill passed, Fairfax County must have General Assembly approval to ban guns in county offices, recreation centers, or parks.

THE DEATH PENALTY IN VIRGINIA

In recent years, Virginia has been second only to Texas in the number of executions. One reason is that 21 days after a person has been convicted in Virginia, new evidence cannot be considered. While I have voted for the death penalty, I vowed during my service as Virginia Secretary of Transportation & Public Safety (yes, prisons as well as pavement!) that I would do all I could to erase the 21-Day Rule.

With the active involvement of many religious organizations and the credibility of DNA analysis, in 2001, we moved a long way towards this goal. Appeals can now be granted based on new biological evidence.  However, we couldn’t get enough votes for a one-year moratorium on executions while the Virginia Supreme Court completes its study of other kinds of evidence, such as another person’s confession.

In 2004, the 21-Day rule was carefully lifted for non-biological evidence. A person gets only one appeal and court review must find the evidence meets the highest standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt” before the appeal can proceed. The new law excludes anyone who pled guilty. Unfortunately, this also includes plea bargains or “Alfred plea” even if the new evidence includes another person’s confession.

RECORD AS VIRGINIA’S SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION & PUBLIC SAFETY:
(THE FOLLOWING IS MY RECORD AS SECRETARY AS COMPILED AT THE END OF MY TERM)

As Secretary of Transportation and Public Safety for the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1986-90, Vivian Watts was responsible for a 5,350 bed construction program carried out on 13 sites, two of which were new prison locations. Use of prototype pre-cast components for cellblock construction and pre-engineered buildings for dormitories produced cost savings and significantly reduced construction time. From the date of legislative authorization, facility openings ranged from 10 months to 3 and 1/2 years for a new 2100-bed cellblock facility. Equally important, while lifetime staffing costs were reduced through modification of existing designs, basic similarities in layout will facilitate systemwide management and training, as well as, appropriate crisis response.

Mrs. Watts played a key role in the timely identification of changes in growth trends in inmate population. From initially questioning the validity of time series forecasting techniques to weekly tracking of year-to-date comparisons, she provided strong direction for projection modeling changes and the need for additional expedited construction. A sophisticated simulation model which tracks 122 variables was developed for population forecasting. (Note: The 2001 Joint Legislative and Review Commission Report on Forecasting recommended that this simulation methodology and consultative model be used by other major state agencies and noted that the prison over-building which occurred in the mid-nineties was a direct result of its not being used.)

As an outgrowth of this construction and forecasting experience, Mrs. Watts directed the development of a 10-Year Master Plan for construction. The Plan included time lines for site identification, environmental review and permitting, budget authorization and the letting of construction contracts. In addition, the Plan contained regional location recommendations by type of facility, appropriate use of inmate labor, assumptions about effects of sentencing alternatives and a recommended balance between dormitory and cellblock construction based on translating simulated population forecasts to security level requirements.

In prison operations, due to improved training and central management direction, the Virginia Department of Corrections achieved the lowest escape record in its history and one of the lowest in the nation. Management direction also led to the reduction of overtime by 50 percent.

Correctional program initiatives included the institution of the Literacy Incentive Program (LIP or “No Read/No Release”) which has become a national model. In addition, an integrated prison mental health program was established which included licensure of a 180-bed intensive care facility. Separation of Youth Services as an independent agency from the Department of Corrections was achieved. Secretary Watts’ personal interest in the expansion of prison industries, led to acceptance by industry and labor representatives of the concept of competitive bidding for private sector running of prison shops and establishment of a Prison Industries Authority.

Secretary Watts also had oversight for the State Police, Criminal Justice Services, Commonwealth Attorney Services, and served on the Supreme Court’s Commission on the Future of the Judiciary. During her tenure, the number of state police officers were increased 16 percent and all officers were issued body armor and semi-automatic weapons to replace .38 caliber revolvers. Computerized fingerprint identification capability was established with a statewide network of remote terminals for local law enforcement access. Sentencing guidelines, developed by her secretariat in cooperation with the judiciary, are now in use throughout the Commonwealth. Secretary Watts also headed a delegation of law enforcement and corrections officials in an on-site exchange program with Israel.

Finally, as Secretary, Mrs. Watts was directly involved in the development of efforts to increase legislative, media and public understanding of the magnitude of the corrections challenge. Her development of a variety of charts and concise presentations of the current factual status of commonly held perceptions helped expedite decision making. She initiated improved communications with sheriffs and local jails which led to identification of more efficient procedures for the movement of inmates and improved data base development. She actively served on the steering committee of Commission on Prison and Jail Overcrowding, which was formed in her last year as Secretary. The 55 recommendations made by this Commission represent a blueprint of the governmental, administrative and program changes and continuing commitments which are necessary to deal with increased incarceration rates.

Seniors

My favorite definition of seniors is “65 and better!” That’s the goal for most, but it’s not always the reality.

Going door to door over the years, I’ve had an 83-year-old call down to me from her perch on a second story window sill where she was washing windows. I’ve also talked to a bone-tired 76-year-old man whose been nursing his wife for the last 5 years. I represent the dynamic, stimulating continuing care community of Greenspring Village. I also represent distressed people with loved ones in under-staffed nursing homes.

I’m determined that where government must step-in, it will be with the flexibility and adequate funding that fosters human dignity. I am equally determined that our tax policies allow seniors to manage their resources in order to maintain their financial independence.

NURSING HOMES

Virginia is one of the few states with no minimum staffing standards for nursing homes. The seriousness of this issue is underscored by the fact that Christopher Reeve – even with all the care he received – died from bedsore complications. With the high number of frail elderly in nursing homes on Medicaid and the acuity required to be placed in a nursing home under Virginia’s minimally-financed Medicaid program, it is especially critical that we join the 37 other states who have minimum staffing requirements.

Virginia’s lack of standards is directly related to the fact that reimbursement rates for Medicaid patients in nursing homes run $500 below actual monthly costs on average. Nursing homes who do have adequate staffing do so by charging private pay patients significantly more. I see this as a hidden tax to make-up for what Virginia’s low Medicaid rates don’t cover. It would cost the state $24.5 million (matched by another $24.5 million in federal Medicaid funds) to require that patients in every nursing home throughout Virginia have at least 3.5 hours of direct care services per 24 hours. 2005 marks my 5th year fighting for this issue and I will not give up.

In 2008, my bill HB 1051 provided that the cap on medical malpractice suits applies only to healthcare services provided in nursing homes and not to injury or death caused by business decisions such as staffing, security, maintenance, or food preparation.

In 2007, I carried a bill to establish a Nursing Facility Quality Improvement Program that will provide on-site training and quality improvement assistance at nursing homes that are not in compliance with state regulations that is funded from fines paid for violations.  Another one of my bills (HB 2636) helped establish a pilot program to provide geriatric mental health services to people over age 65 with serious mental illness and to provide psychiatric consultation and training to the staff of long-term care facilities.

ASSISTED LIVING

In 2004, the Washington Post’s investigative series on shocking conditions in Assisted Living Facilities put a face on bills I carried since 2000. In 2005, I worked with key legislators and responsible assisted living operators to create much-needed protection for over 30,000 people who cannot live on their own and are in assisted living throughout Virginia. Our 2005 legislation creates

  • oversight for dispensing medications,
  • better mental health screening,
  • licensure of operators so that the bad apples can’t just close one home and open another, and
  • emergency help for residents in unsafe homes.

Fines were substantially increased from just $500 to up to $10,000 (the maximum fine currently possible for veterinarians), but we also provided that fines could be used to remedy conditions. We also increased the number of inspectors and their training. Finally, we modestly increased state funding for needy residents by $50 per month, but the total is still far below actual costs.

CRIME PREVENTION

In 2011 , I introduced HB1633 to make it a crime punishable by 1 to 10 years to take the property or financial resources of a vulnerable older person. If the exploitation is by a caregiver or someone with legal authority to manage the person’s assets, the penalty increases to 5 to 20 years. The greatest challenge to getting the strongest possible bill is defining “vulnerable” and to get prosecutors to agree on what has to be proven so they will aggressively prosecute “exploitation.” I’m working hard with Fairfax County law enforcement and County Attorney on language to get it passed in 2012. In addition, I will pursue civil prosecution – as I did in bringing un-licensed contractors under the Consumer Protect Act to try them for multiple acts under whatever company name they used and award consumers triple damages.

HB1848 (1999) corrected a potentially serious problem when the 1998 Session, in trying to stop scofflaws from abusing handicapped parking privileges, passed a law requiring date-of-birth, sex, and name (!) to be displayed on the mirror placard. My bill allows people to cover up the name so that disabled persons don’t become targets for con artists or burglars.

Domestic violence bills I got passed in 1998 and 1997 (HB583 and HB2071) both expanded the response of law enforcement to domestic violence to include elder abuse.

TAXES

To support home health care providers, every session since 2006, I have introduced bills to give a tax credit for unreimbursed Home Health Care expenses and to provide a tax deduction for nursing assistants and home health aides who provide Medicare-authorized home health or long-term care services to individuals in their homes.

See Real Estate Tax Relief under Community Concerns

I opposed total repeal of the estate tax. We cannot afford it.  I do support partial repeal and, in 2004, I introduced a bill (HB5004) to removed the tax on estates under $10 million and on all estates where the majority of the assets are in a closely held business or a working farm.  This would cost Virginia about $50 million annually. Total repeal is costing 3 times that amount.  I firmly believe that funding minimum staffing standards for nursing homes is far more important to seniors than repealing the estate tax on mega-millionaires.

VETERANS

I was successful in 2005 in getting two state Services Officers located in Northern Virginia for the first time to help veterans and their spouses.  Regrettably, every time we get a service officer trained, they move to the federal VA where the salary is considerably higher.  I have received commitments that this issue will be addressed in the 2012 budget amendments.  I also will have 2012 legislation to deal with the Attorney General’s opinion that 100% disable veterans who have put their home in a revocable trust are not eligible for real estate tax relief.

ESTATES

In 2010, working with the Virginia Bar, I was able to get comprehensive reform of the Small Estates Act, saving many from the cost and hassle of probate.  Among its provisions an heir can get immediate access to an account un $2,400 in addition to being able to pay funeral expenses of up to $3,500.   After 60 days, an heir can gain access to assets of up to $15,000 and no financial institution can deny access to assets of up to $50,000 if all heirs agree in writing.

In 1998, my bill (HB334) waived the need for an inventory or payment of settlement fees when an estate is under $10,000.  And in 1997, I moved the age-old prohibition against naming someone who is not a resident of Virginia to be named as the sole executor of an estate. (HB347)

END OF LIFE DECISIONS

One commentator observed, “Most people have a lot more confidence in their loved ones than they do in some legislator.” Here are some good web sites to help you take control of your life:

www.aarp.com takes you to “Care and Family” where you need to click on “End of Life.”
www.caringinfo.org is the National Hospice site, which has Virginia’s advance directive form.
www.abanet.org/aging has a “Consumer Tool Kit for Health Care Decisionmaking” put together by the American Bar Association.
www.uslivingwillregistry.com is a national registry for living wills.

In addition, my bill (HB861 – 1998) allows a person to designate someone other than a family member to make end-of-life decisions on his or her behalf. Prior to this, hospitals and others would only deal with next of kin.

HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE

In 2001, I got a bill passed (HB2704) to require insurance and HMO coverage when pharmacists provide services, such as diabetes training, which otherwise would be performed in a doctor’s office.

In 2000, my bill (HB923) passed to require a pro-rata refund of premiums when long-term care insurance policies are cancelled or adjusted.

QUALITY OF LIFE

Under the Senior Citizens Higher Education Act, seniors have been able to enroll tuition-free in college courses on a space available basis if their federal tax income was less than $10,000. Due to the way a federal retiree’s income is taxed, this has never been equitable and the cap hadn’t been raised since 1989. My bill in 1999 (HB2274) changed the taxable income used from the federal to the state. Because of the Age Tax Credit, this effectively increases the income cap to $22,000 and treats federal retirees more equitably.

In 2000, I was please to sponsor the legislation (HB195) that gives a sales tax exemption for the Lifetime Learning Institute of Northern Virginia.

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Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Dan Helmer is a combat veteran, business strategist, Rhodes Scholar, husband, and father.  His wife, Karen, is a public school teacher, and their two young sons, Harris and Aaron, attend class in Fairfax County Public Schools.

Dan is a leader who is ready to bring out-of-the-box thinking to deliver better transportation solutions to Northern Virginia, protect our children in school while ensuring they have a high quality education, and protecting Virginians’ access to quality, affordable healthcare.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Shuaib Ahmed in Dan Helmer’s office in Arlington, VA on Dec. 11, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

Summary

Current Position: State Delegate
Affiliation: Democrat

Dan Helmer is a combat veteran, business strategist, Rhodes Scholar, husband, and father.  His wife, Karen, is a public school teacher, and their two young sons, Harris and Aaron, attend class in Fairfax County Public Schools.

Dan is a leader who is ready to bring out-of-the-box thinking to deliver better transportation solutions to Northern Virginia, protect our children in school while ensuring they have a high quality education, and protecting Virginians’ access to quality, affordable healthcare.

Featured video: This interview was conducted by Shuaib Ahmed in Dan Helmer’s office in Arlington, VA on Dec. 11, 2019. Original interview recording has not been edited in any way.

About

Dan Helmer 1

Source: Campaign page

Dan Helmer is a West Point graduate, Rhodes Scholar, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, and a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. Today he helps run a small business where he works to protect veterans’ healthcare. He lives in Northern Virginia with his wife Karen, a public school teacher, and their sons, Aaron and Harris, who attend Fairfax County Public Schools.

Dan is the son of an immigrant and the grandson of refugees. His grandparents came to America as Holocaust survivors. He has always wanted to serve the country that welcomed his family. His passion for service led him to West Point, took him on tours in Iraq, Afghanistan, and South Korea, and now motivates his campaign for Delegate here in Fairfax and Prince William Counties.

In Richmond, Dan will take on the special interests that are making healthcare unaffordable for seniors and those with pre-existing conditions. He will advocate for universal background checks and other common-sense gun safety measures to reduce gun violence. He will fight to ensure that no politician gets between a woman and her doctor. He will stop predatory lenders from ripping off active duty military families and students.

Contact

Email:

Web

Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube

Politics

Recent Elections

2019 State DelegateArray

Dan I. Helmer (D)15,91352.34%
Timothy D. “Tim” Hugo (R)14,45747.55%
Write-In (Write-in)340.11%
TOTAL30,404

Issues

Governance

CLEAN GOVERNMENT

It’s time to end corrupt, pay-to-play politics in Richmond. My opponent took a quarter million dollars from the predatory lending industry and then voted to allow them to rip off our troops, students, and the poor — voting to raise caps on interest rates to 300%. He took tens of thousands of dollars from the insurance industry and voted to allow them to deny coverage for those with pre-existing conditions. And he took thousands from the NRA and voted away every single reasonable gun safety measure in Virginia in the wake of tragedies in Virginia Beach and Virginia Tech. That’s just wrong.

I’ll stand up to the current, corrupt campaign finance system in Virginia, ending the ability of corporate polluters like Dominion to influence their regulators through unlimited donations. I’ll demand that campaign funds only be used for legitimate campaign purposes, not personal expenses. I’ll put meaningful contribution limits in place.

I will also end the practice of partisan political gerrymandering in Virginia by supporting non-partisan redistricting. We need a system where voters choose their politicians. Instead, we have one where special interests buy them. It’s time for a change.

Civil Rights

Economy

Education

EDUCATION

My wife Karen is a public school teacher, our kids go to Fairfax County public schools, and I graduated from a public high school. My education gave me incredible opportunities, including the chance to attend and graduate from West Point and become a Rhodes Scholar. I want all of our children to have the resources they need to succeed in school. That starts with adequately funding our classrooms and increasing teacher pay. Too often, students throughout Virginia are jammed into overcrowded classrooms and trailers, and quality educators are leaving the Commonwealth for more competitive salaries elsewhere.

Environment

Health Care

HEALTHCARE

I was appalled by the decision of our current Delegate to support a bill that would allow insurance companies to deny coverage in our Commonwealth to those with pre-existing conditions like my wife, Karen. I will fight to stop Delegate Tim Hugo’s age tax, which would allow insurance companies to charge more to those over 50.

I will protect healthcare for hundreds of thousands of Virginians – including tens of thousands of veterans and people with disabilities – who now have access to the care they need as a result of Medicaid expansion. I run a small business that employs over 25 people, so I understand how the surging costs of healthcare affect our families and companies. That’s why I will fight to lower the cost of private health insurance for every Virginian. My company takes on medical device makers and pharmaceutical companies that rip off the VA and prevent veterans from getting the care they’ve earned. I know how to stand up to special interests like the health insurance industry, who have given tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to our current Delegate. In Richmond, I’ll use those skills to fight to make healthcare accessible and affordable for all. This also means fighting to protect health benefits for police and firefighters who have served the Commonwealth; they should be covered if they get cancer or face PTSD as a result of their service to our community.

Infrastructure

TRANSPORTATION

My family and I face the same transportation challenges as most constituents of District 40. Every morning, I wait for over seven minutes at the intersection of Fairfax County Parkway and Popes Head Road, wondering why in 17 years, our current Delegate has done nothing to reduce this wait time. The traffic only gets worse from there.

For too long, Richmond politicians have failed to invest in our roads, mass transit system, and pedestrian infrastructure. Our current Delegate has overseen a massive transfer of our tax dollars to fund infrastructure in the rest of the Commonwealth while leaving our roads crumbling. As a result, our traffic is among the worst in the nation. Politicians in Richmond seem out of touch with the reality faced by most of us and have stopped common-sense investments in fixing Route 28, alleviating congestion on Braddock Rd and in Clifton, and fixing deadly intersections like the Fairfax County Parkway/Popes Head interchange. We need leadership that will make infrastructure a priority.

GUN SAFETY

You shouldn’t feel like you need to wear the body armor I wore in Iraq and Afghanistan just to be safe when you go shopping. Serving our country in uniform, I’ve seen the damage firearms can do in the wrong hands. As a gun owner myself, I know what responsible gun ownership looks like, and I know that it’s time for action to end gun violence in our communities.

We need universal background checks.

We need bans on high-capacity magazines & silencers.

We need to close the private sale and gun show loopholes and introduce common sense gun reform to protect our kids and our communities.

We need Extreme Risk Protective Orders that empower our police to ensure that dangerous individuals don’t have access to firearms.

Three times a year, my wife has to huddle in a corner of her classroom with her students for active shooter drills. Drills like these belong in military training, not in our schools. Enough is enough: District 40 is ready for gun safety reform.

WOMEN’S RIGHTS

Reproductive rights are under attack in our country. While our current Delegate voted to force women who need reproductive healthcare to undergo a medically unnecessary transvaginal exam, I will fight to ensure that family planning decisions are between a woman and her doctor. No Virginian should have to get permission from politicians to do what is right for themselves and their family. Families need access to reproductive healthcare that includes cancer screenings, birth control, and safe and legal abortion.

In Iraq and Afghanistan, I served side by side with women who swore an oath to defend a constitution that doesn’t recognize their equality. It’s unconscionable that our current Delegate cast the deciding vote to once again deny all American women constitutional equality in 2019. The Equal Rights Amendment has my full support during the next legislative session and I will work across the aisle to get it passed in Virginia and added to the U.S. Constitution.

Finally, I’ll remove taxes on feminine hygiene products. Feminine hygiene products are basic necessities and a lack of affordable access to these products is a barrier to dignity for thousands of women in our Commonwealth.

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